See the course catalog for complete course descriptions.

Minor in Race and Ethnicity Studies: Five courses across at least three disciplines, 12 credits of which must be upper level.

At least one Reflecting on Concepts course from:

  • Communication Studies
  • COM75-454 Race, Ethnicity, and Communication
    This course introduces critical race theory as it applies to the study of communication. In particular, it explores the intersection of race/ethnicity, communication and media as it relates to issues of social justice and identity in America. These explorations shed light on the historical formation of racial and ethnic identities and their current social and personal relevance. The course integrates questions of identity with those of justice, economics and law, and will require a strong commitment to tolerance and self-reflection. Contributes to Race and Ethnicity Studies. (H) (SJ)
  • Philosophy
  • PHI18-124 Latina/o Identities
    This course explores the formation of Latina/o identities in the intersection of race, ethnicity, gender and sexuality. Discussions will be devoted to articulating the experience of Latinas/os from these intersections, and the kinds of social, cultural, and political projects and activism that emerge from it. We will focus on works by Linda Alcoff, Gloria Anzalda, María Lugones and Junot Díaz, among others. Contributes to Feminist Studies, Latin American and Border Studies, and Race and Ethnicity Studies. (H)
  • PHI18-184 Theories of Race
    An introduction and survey of contemporary race theory, with emphases on intersections with gender, class, nationalism and imperialism. This course also focuses on the ways race has been constructed as a category of identity across various cultures, academic disciplines and historical periods, and on the relationship between race and ethnicity as categories of difference. Contributes to Feminist Studies and Race and Ethnicity Studies. (H)
  • Sociology
  • SOC34-264 Race and Ethnicity
    This course examines how race and ethnicity are constructed, maintained and challenged in the United States at the individual, interactional, and institutional levels. Some time will also be devoted to the ways that American citizenship as well as life chances are influenced by ethnic and racial group membership. Contributes to Feminist Studies, and Race and Ethnicity Studies. Prerequisite: Sociology 34-114 or 34-124. (ScS) (SJ)

At least two Thematic or Group-Focused courses from:

  • Anthropology
  • ANT35-244 Race, Class and Gender in the Caribbean
    This course critically examines how the constructs of race, class and gender shape everyday life in the Caribbean. The course will cover history and politics, language, music, sports (public fun from cricket to Carnival), families and social organization, spiritualities, development migration and tourism. Contributes to Feminist Studies, Latin American and Border Studies, and Race and Ethnicity Studies. Prerequisite: Anthropology 35-104 or Feminist Studies 04-104. (ScS) (SJ)
  • ANT35-254 Latinx Spiritualities
    This course examines Latina and Latino spiritual practices and beliefs and their historical development and cultural production in the U.S., Mexico, and other parts of Latin America. Topics include folk and organized religious practices, indigenous and feminist spiritualities, politics and religion, and their intersection with issues of gender, race, ethnicity, and class. Contributes to Environmental Studies, Feminist Studies, Latin American and Border Studies, and Race and Ethnicity Studies. Prerequisite: Anthropology 35-104 or Feminist Studies 04-104. (ScS) (SJ)
  • Communication Studies
  • COM75-654 Muslims in the Media
    This class examines the representations of Muslims in Western media. This includes exploring how popular discourse constructs Muslims, and how Muslims themselves participate in media discourse. This class also emphasizes identifying how the rhetorical strategies used to marginalize Muslims overlap with the strategies used to diminish other groups in the United States, thus establishing how power reproduces itself. Contributes to Race and Ethnicity Studies. (H) (SJ)
  • Education
  • EDU40-234 Schools, Society and Diversity
    An examination of diversity in schools and society. Emphasis is on such dimensions of diversity as culture, ethnicity, exceptionality, gender, language, sexual orientation and social class. Diversity and implications for educational policy, curriculum and methodology will be highlighted. The course provides students with an opportunity to think critically about values across cultures within the United States. Contributes to Race and Ethnicity Studies. (ScS) (SJ) (FALL and SPRING)
  • EDU40-274 Multicultural Children's Literature
    Explores Spanish, English, or bilingual texts written specifically for children and adolescents. Books in other languages (such as Arabic, French, Mandarin) may also be considered. In addition we will discuss books that describe/illustrate issues especially relevant to marginalized communities (e.g., LGBTQ, undocumented immigration, racism). Strategies for how to explore these texts in primary and secondary classrooms will be examined. In addition to extensive reading, students are given opportunities to write for children and to present books using a variety of techniques, including storytelling, creative dramatics, role-playing, character analysis, discussion and others. Opportunities to read to children and to work in the libraries of public schools are included. Contributes to Race and Ethnicity Studies and to Latin American and Border Studies. (ScS)
  • English
  • ENG10-874 Topics in American Ethnic Literature
    A study of the literatures of American ethnic communities, analyzing the relationships between ethnicity, history, and literature. Possible subjects include, but are not limited to, African American, Asian American, Latina/o, and Native American literature. Discussion is attentive to the intersections of ethnic identity with gender, sexuality, citizenship, and class. May be repeated with change in topic. Contributes to Race and Ethnicity Studies and Feminist Studies. (H) (SJ) (WA)
  • Feminist Studies
  • FST04-244 Black Women Writers At Work
    This course takes its title from scholar Claudia Tate's ground breaking 1984 study of the same name. Featuring conversations with literary giants such as Toni Morrison, Alice Walker, Gwendolyn Brooks, Maya Angelou, and Audre Lorde, Black Women Writers at Work was the first of its kind to gather the words of black women discussing their creative process, goals, achievements, and dreams. This course draws on Tate's study to examine the basic questions of why, for whom, and in what conditions black women write. Readings will span diverse genres and time periods. Contributes to English, and Race and Ethnicity Studies. (H) (WA)
  • FST04-344 Critical Hip Hop Studies
    Existing at the intersection of consumerism, creativity, and contestation, the term 'hip-hop' captures the cultural expressions of African Americans who have come of age in post-Civil Rights America. Forty years since its birth in the Bronx, hip-hop culture is a global force. This course examines urgent theoretical and methodological debates of critical hip-hop studies including: gender and performance; race and appropriation; literacy and epistemology; politics and justice. Contributes to Communication Studies, English, and Race and Ethnicity Studies. (H) (WA) (SJ)
  • History
  • HIS16-234 History of Colonial Latin America
    A time of collisions, encounters, and rebellions, Colonial Latin America explores the individual, social, cultural, and political experiences of Africans, Europeans, and Native Americans between the apogee of the Aztecs, Incas, and Mayas and the Creole wars of independence of the 19th century. By examining pre-Colombian states, early European explorations, la conquista, the settlement of mostly Spanish but also Portuguese and other European colonies, and the responses of a diverse group of local inhabitants, this course explores the complex societies that resulted from the growth and end of global empires and that shaped the future of this diverse region. Contributes to Latin American and Border Studies, and Race and Ethnicity Studies. (Biennially) (H) (IP)
  • HIS16-244 History of Modern Latin America
    After their independence in the early 19th century, Latin American countries faced the challenge to become nations. This course surveys the many paths that these countries followed, including the rise of nationalism and its overcoming by the neocolonial order, the revolutionary option in Mexico, Cuba, and Nicaragua during the 20th century, the authoritarian responses to national discontent, and the rise of neoliberalism. It also explores how these trends transformed the society, culture, economy, and policies at the local level in response to both national and international influences. Contributes to Latin American and Border Studies, and Race and Ethnicity Studies. (Biennially) (H) (IP)
  • HIS16-404 Latin American Hist in Film & Literature
    Latin America is a complex territory and an idea suspended between the extremes of despair and hopefulness. Telling its history poses many challenges to the academic historian. Often the history of the land and its people is better expressed in the work of artists, writers and filmmakers. This course ventures into the magical relationships between the artist and that enigmatic territorial and spiritual landscape extending from the Rio Bravo to Tierra del Fuego. Contributes to Latin American and Border Studies, and Race and Ethnicity Studies. (Biennially) (H) (SJ)
  • HIS16-454 History of Civil Rights Movement
    This course explores the history of the Black Freedom struggle in the twentieth century United States. Moving beyond the classic Heroic Era of the civil rights (from Brown v. Board of Education to the Voting Rights Act), it examines social, cultural, and political protests from the consolidation of Jim Crow through founding of Black Lives Matter. Contributes to Race and Ethnicity Studies. (Biennially) (H) (SJ)
  • HIS16-554 The History of Europe's Muslims
    This course traces the history of Muslim presence in Europe from the early Islamic empires in Andalusia, through European imperial experiences with Muslims in Africa and Asia, to the more recent reception of Muslim migrants on European soil. The course questions the intellectual and political utility of defining populations of such cultural, linguistic, and geographical breadth solely by their religion; discusses the development of a European Islam; and debates the existence of a clash of civilizations or a shared Mediterranean culture. Contributes to Race and Ethnicity Studies. (Biennially) (H)
  • Philosophy
  • PHI18-124 Latina/o Identities
    This course explores the formation of Latina/o identities in the intersection of race, ethnicity, gender and sexuality. Discussions will be devoted to articulating the experience of Latinas/os from these intersections, and the kinds of social, cultural, and political projects and activism that emerge from it. We will focus on works by Linda Alcoff, Gloria Anzalda, María Lugones and Junot Díaz, among others. Contributes to Feminist Studies, Latin American and Border Studies, and Race and Ethnicity Studies. (H)
  • Political Science
  • PSC32-214 Governing Diversity: Race & Eth Amer Pol
    How does a government built on democratic principles of individual liberty and equality continue to support racial stratification? This course examines the many ways elections, public policy, and public opinion have shaped or perpetuated racial and ethnic inequality. Our focus will primarily be on African-Americans, but we will also consider the unique status of Native Americans and the increasing effects of immigrant communities on our political system. We will look at how citizens, politicians, and scholars talk about race, as well as how these ideas are reinforced or challenged by political systems. Contributes to Race and Ethnicity Studies. (ScS ). (American Politics)
  • Religion
  • REL19-214 Native American Traditions Americas
    A broad survey of the role and function of religion and religious activity in Native American communities. The course takes a broad, multi-disciplinary approach and focuses on religious agency in Native American communities, both past and present. Contributes to Race and Ethnicity Studies. (H) (SJ)
  • REL19-384 Rastas, Saints and Virgins Religions in the U.S. This Course Looks At the Study of Ethnic Religious Traditions in the United S
    This course looks at the study of ethnic religious traditions in the United States - religions associated with specific ethnic groups. Students will examine religious systems such as Santeria, Rastafarians and the Cult of the Virgin of Guadalupe, among others. The goal of the course is not only to understand the religions themselves, but also to see how to go about studying religious systems which are not founded in texts and which differ on a deep philosophical level from many mainstream religious systems. Contributes to Race and Ethnicity Studies. (H) (SJ) (IP)
  • REL19-394 Indigenous Myth and Narrative
    An examination of oral and written narratives in Native American cultures and communities (past and present) to show how such narratives serve as ways of encoding culture and identity, notions about world and self, and serve as a powerful means of passing those ideas on generationally. Students will have the opportunity to read collections of narratives, listen to narratives being told via audio recordings, as well as examine more contemporary methods of narrative transmission, including music, poetry and social media. Contributes to Race and Ethnicity Studies. (H)
  • Sociology
  • SOC34-334 Latina/os & Education in U.S.
    This course examines social patterns and processes in Latina/os' educational experiences and outcomes using autobiographical and sociological readings. Training in in-depth interview methods. Contributes to Race and Ethnicity Studies, and Latin American and Border Studies. Prerequisite: Sociology 34-114 or 34-124. (Every other Spring) (ScS)
  • Spanish
  • SPA15-734 Spanish in the United States
    Study of the use of the Spanish language in the United States, focusing primarily on linguistic phenomena evidenced in the various speech communities, as well as the social, historical, political, and educational forces that influence Spanish language use, maintenance, and Spanish/English bilingualism. Contributes to Race and Ethnicity Studies, and to Latin American and Border Studies. Prerequisite: One 300 level course. (WA) (H)

Allied courses from:

  • Anthropology
  • ANT35-334 Global Environmental Justice
    An exploration of global environmental issues from a perspective that foregrounds questions of social inequality (differences in socioeconomic status, race, gender, indigeneity, national identity, etc.). The course includes an overview of the U.S. environmental justice movement, a consideration of global inequality, and social theories of nature and culture. Topics addressed may include global climate change, consumerism, pollution and toxic substances, resource extraction, bio-diversity conservation, food production systems, natural disasters, and water scarcity. Students will be required to engage in environmentally oriented activism or service, and to reflect on their experiences as a part of the course. Contributes to Environmental Studies, Feminist Studies, and Race and Ethnicity Studies. Prerequisite: Anthropology 35-104, Environmental Studies 49-104 or Feminist Studies 04-104. (Fall of odd-numbered years) (ScS) (SJ)
  • Art History
  • ARH71-034 Intro to Art History: Latin American
    This course provides an introduction to the disciplinary methods and concepts of art history, presented in the context of Latin American art, from the pre-Columbian, colonial, and modern eras, including U.S. - Latino art. Open only to first- or second-year students, or with consent of instructor. Contributes to Latin American and Border Studies, and Race and Ethnicity Studies. (Annually) (FAL) (WA) (SJ) (IP)
  • ARH71-264 Art in China Since 1911
    This course, conducted in seminar format, will present an overview of the development of visual arts in China from the late 19th century to the present. Students will consider the ways that recent works created by Chinese artists responded to the turbulent politics of the 20th century, the global art market, and past traditions of Chinese art. Works in a range of mediums will be considered-from painting and calligraphy to architecture, film, and performance works. This course is open to non-majors, and there are no pre-requisites. Contributes to Feminist Studies, and Race and Ethnicity Studies. (Biennially) (FAL) (WA) (IP)
  • ARH71-364 Native Books, Images and Objects
    As the primary vehicle of communication in the 16th century, and as a model of religion, the Book was part of Spain's effort to colonize the Americas. Yet there already existed systems of recording in Mesoamerica and the Andes, which were both conflicting and commensurate with European notions of the Book. This course examines these concepts by considering books as repositories of spoken words and thought. In so doing, it questions Western hierarchies of literacy in the pursuit of truth and knowledge, and seeks to understand indigenous American voices in the process. Course topics include: space, place and time in Mexican manuscripts; indigenous cartography; ritual texts and performance; the social roles of indigenous artist-scribes; authorship and historical memory; and alternative recording practices. Students are strongly encouraged but not required to take any 300- course in Latin American art as preparation. Contributes to Latin American and Border Studies, and Race and Ethnicity Studies. (Biennially) (FAL) (WA) (SJ)
  • Communications Studies
  • COM75-234 Rhetorics of Resistance
    This course examines the ways in which rhetoric is used for social protest. It emphasizes historical and cultural contexts as it looks at how social movements use diverse rhetorical strategies to promote social justice. Contributes to Race and Ethnicity Studies. (H) (SJ)
  • COM75-284 The Rhetoric of Surveillance
    This class examines surveillance discourse and how it targets particular bodies. It will explore how security discourse emerges at the intersections of race, gender and class to maintain structures of power that sustain national and economic interests. The course also addresses and how we might resist or ethically reclaim surveillance. Contributes to Race and Ethnicity Studies. (H) (SJ)
  • COM75-434 Communication, Culture and Social Justice
    This course introduces the foundational, historical and theoretical issues for the critical study of communication as social justice, examining critical race theories, feminist theories, queer theories and postcolonial theories in order to establish a foundation for understanding the ways difference is communicated to achieve social justice. This course integrates questions of identity with those of justice, and thus requires a strong commitment to understanding self and other. Contributes to Feminist Studies and Race and Ethnicity Studies. (H) (SJ)
  • COM75-614 Identity and Media
    This course examines the ways in which individual and collective identities are constituted, shaped, and challenged through media, including entertainment media, social media, and new media. This course examines the ways that media affect (and are affected by) race, gender, class, age, sexuality, nationality, and other dimensions of identity. Contributes to Race and Ethnicity Studies, and Feminist Studies. (H)
  • Education
  • EDU40-264 Second Language Acquisition
    Study of the development of language and literacy in linguistically and culturally diverse learners. The focus is on second language acquisition and simultaneous bilingual school-age children. Attention is given to the impact of sociocultural linguistic, psycholinguistic, and cultural factors on language development as well as teaching models for effective second language instruction and related issues. Directed observation and participation in classrooms are an integral part of the course. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing required. Contributes to Race and Ethnicity Studies, and to Latin American and Border Studies. (ScS) (SPRING)
  • English
  • ENG10-834 Postcolonial Literature
    A study of literature produced at the intersection of cultures. Consideration of ways cultural differences and legacies of colonization are negotiated. Major figures vary from year to year but will usually include Achebe, Gordimer, Head, Ngugi, Rushdie and Soyinka. Contributes to Race and Ethnicity Studies. (H) (IP) (SJ)
  • Feminist Studies
  • FST04-104 Introduction to Feminist Studies
    This course is designed to think critically about the intellectual, emotional, spiritual, and political capacities of feminist thought. We will explore the diversity of feminisms that have emerged from historical movements alongside contemporary discourses. As a class, we will explore how feminist theory is a tool used to deconstruct injustice and articulate alternatives to oppression. There will be emphasis on the body and the ways intersectional approaches reckon with difference in regard to identity (gender, sexuality, race, citizenship, class, disability). Contributes to Race and Ethnicity Studies. (H) (ScS) (SJ)
  • History
  • HIS16-034 Nations and Nationalism in World History
    This course investigates the development of national identities around the world and the nationalisms that describe or defend them. We explore how nations are defined, whether nations are natural expressions of human community, why nationalism has often led to violence, and what the future may be for the nation-state. Contributes to Race and Ethnicity Studies. (Annually) (H) (IP) (WA)
  • HIS16-474 Sport and Society in Modern America
    This course uses the social, cultural, and political history of sport to examine American history from the 1830s to the present. It considers the emergence and development of modern athletics in connection to broader questions of gender and sexuality, masculinity and femininity, labor and politics, race and ethnicity, immigration and Americanization. Contributes to Exercise Sport Studies, Race and Ethnicity Studies, and Feminist Studies. (Biennially) (H)
  • HIS16-484 The History of the U.S. West
    This course focuses on the history of the U.S. West as both frontier and region, real and imagined, from the mid-19th century onward. It considers topics such as Indian Removal, wars of conquest, immigration and migration, urban frontiers, environmental change, and the myth of the frontier. It especially highlights the intersections of race, gender, class, nationality and the environment. Course objectives include learning to interpret varied forms of historical evidence and fostering analytical, reading, discussion and synthetic skills that will help students think and communicate critically about historical and contemporary society and politics. Contributes to Environmental Studies. (Biennially) (H)
  • Music Literature
  • MUL80-134 Music in the United States
    A course exploring American musical interactions through the contextual lens of cultural history. It aims to aid in the understanding of the evolution and development of this material through music making, the examination of musical scores, recordings and films, and the consideration of various writings that express diverse views on the topic. The course explores the traditions of popular song, concert music, and indigenous styles, and in so doing, negotiates and challenges ideas around canonical great works by considering music, musicians and traditions that are generally considered to be at the center of that canon, as well as those that have been historically excluded from it. Contributes to Race and Ethnicity Studies. (FAL)
  • Philosophy
  • PHI18-134 Philosophy, Race & Revolution
    This course is oriented around the Haitian Revolution, the only successful slave revolution in history, examining the ways in which it both reflected and responded to the internal contradictions of Western philosophy's developing notion of race and the colonial mission and, on the other hand, its new universalist vision of human rights. How slave revolt exploded this contradiction from within, what its historical and theoretical effects were, and the ways in which related tensions rose again in the wave of anti-colonial revolutions in the 1960s and '70s will be the main focus. We will also consider the rise of postcolonial and decolonial theory in those revolutions' wake. Contributes to Latin American and Border Studies and Race and Ethnicity Studies. (H)
  • PHI18-194 Introduction to Feminist Philosophy
    An historically informed introduction to key texts in feminist theory. Our approach to the issues and debates will be interdisciplinary and readings will be drawn from a range of disciplines such as philosophy, anthropology, sociology, psychoanalysis, and cultural studies. Contributes to Feminist Studies and Race and Ethnicity Studies. (H) (SJ)
  • PHI18-284 Philosophies of the Americas
    An introduction to the complex history of Latin American philosophy, including European and indigenous traditions of thought as well as their hybrids. Key issues will be the interpretation and criticism of notions of history and progress, race and ethnicity, colonialism and knowledge production, the philosophical status of indigenous knowledges, and the relation between philosophy and territory. Contributes to Latin American and Border Studies, and Race and Ethnicity Studies. (H)
  • Political Science
  • PSC32-174 Gender Politics
    This course analyzes the politics of gender as well as the gender of politics. Drawing from feminist political theory, masculinity studies, as well as queer theory, we rethink the subject of political science while also exploring the gendered nature of the dominant political ideologies, concepts, theories, and spaces of politics. This course is open only to first years and sophomores. Juniors and seniors may register with the permission of the instructor. Contributes to Feminist Studies, and Race and Ethnicity Studies. (ScS) (SJ) (Political theory)
  • PSC32-184 Politics of Latin America & Caribbean
    This introduction to contemporary Latin American and Caribbean politics also allows students with previous knowledge about the region to further their interests. The course is built around some of the key issues which confront Latin America and the Caribbean. Contributes to Anthropology, Latin American and Border Studies, Race and Ethnicity Studies and Sociology. (ScS) (SJ) (Comparative politics).
  • PSC32-364 Introduction to Political Theory
    This course introduces students to political theory, through critically analyzing key texts of the Western canon and practicing the methods of conceptual analysis that shape the subfield. We analyze ideologies as well as foundational yet essentially contested political concepts -- such as justice, equality, reason, sovereignty, democracy, consent, obligation, and freedom -- to learn how power shapes ideas and how politics operates within theories. We critically analyze the standpoints, assumptions, and exclusions that shape the canon, with attentiveness to identity and difference. Contributes to Race and Ethnicity Studies. Prerequisites: Political Science 32-114 and 32-144. (ScS) (WA) (SJ) (Political theory)
  • PSC32-404 Educating the Modern Political Subject
    This course analyzes educational writings of key modern political theorists who imagine and construct various modern political subjects: liberal, democratic, abolitionist, progressive, feminist, marxian, postcolonial, and postcapitalist. We analyze how power and politics work through theories of education. We use minor texts about education to better critically assess and analyze major political theories and ideologies. We study how citizens are educated to conform to existing systems as well as how they can be educated in alternative ways to resist and change conventional structures and practices. Pre-requisite: Political Science 32-364 or permission of instructor. (ScS) (SJ)
  • PSC32-564 Modern Political Theory
    This course explores experience of modernity and the concept of enlightenment, as well as disenchantment and alienation. We analyze Romantic and Modernist responses to the problems and possibilities enabled by modernity, with a focus on the practice of politics in everyday life. This course will focus on sensory perception, aesthetics, and the political implications of how we experience the world, comparing and connecting how these themes play out in 19th century American Transcendentalist versions of Romanticism and 20th century continental versions of Modernism. Contributes to Race and Ethnicity Studies. Prerequisite: Political Science 32-364 or permission of instructor. (ScS) (Political theory)
  • Religion
  • REL19-374 Sacred Space and the Environment Religion
    This course looks at the ways in which groups of peoples (the focus will be primarily on Native Americans) have shaped their spiritual identities and communities around important places within the landscape, defining themselves against these places in nature and being defined by them at the same time. Students will try to understand what it means to give spiritual value to natural places, and the varieties of ways in which religious activities (and/or environmental philosophies) are focused on such places. Contributes to Environmental Studies and Race and Ethnicity Studies. (H)
  • Sociology
  • SOC34-234 Gender and Sexuality
    This course examines the social construction of genders and sexualities, some as normative and others as deviant, and the consequences of these processes at the individual, interactional, and institutional levels. Particular attention is paid to the ways that race, ethnicity, and class influence these patterns. Contributes to Feminist Studies, and Race and Ethnicity Studies. Prerequisite: Sociology 34-114 or 34-124, or Feminist Studies 04-104. (ScS) (SJ)
  • SOC34-284 International Migration
    This course examines the research conducted on international migration across topics such as the labor market, gender, race, policy restrictions and the detention of immigrants. We will explore how international migration follows a historical course that takes place in the interaction between agency and social structures. This course will help you learn about different components of migration that are overlooked or ignored in public debate. You will come to understand important questions regarding immigration, such as why people migrate, how policy has historically excluded migrants, whether immigrants impact crime rates and how the labor market is affected by immigrant labor. Contributes to Latin America and Border Studies, and Race and Ethnicity Studies. (ScS)
  • SOC34-364 Sociology of Work
    This course investigates the institution of work from a sociological perspective. Topics include: a brief history of the evolution of work, work patterns prevalent in the United States, and modern day concerns with employment inequality by race, gender, class, sexual orientation and the work-life balance. Students are required to attend SPSS lab sessions (during normal class time). They will perform quantitative analyses using employment discrimination complaint data and write a paper based on the results. Contributes to Business, and Race and Ethnicity Studies. (ScS)
  • Spanish
  • SPA15-534 Cultural Memory in Latin America
    This interdisciplinary course will explore the construction of cultural memory-collective meaningful understandings of the past and present in a given socio historical context-in contemporary Latin America through the examination of symbolic systems, practices, and cultural products: written and audiovisual narratives, music, memorials, and popular traditions. Contributes to Race and Ethnicity Studies, and Latin American and Border Studies. Prerequisite: One 300 level course. (H) (WA) (SJ)
  • SPA15-644 Gender, Race and Nationalism in Spanish Cinema
    Discussion of topics such as body, performance, migration and cultural exchange through the viewing, discussing and analyzing of recent films from Spain and the Mediterranean world. Contributes to Race and Ethnicity Studies and Feminist Studies. Prerequisite: One 300 level course. (WA) (H)
  • SPA15-654 Cittzenship & Conflict Colombian Cinema
    Interpretation and analysis of contemporary Colombian films that expose the complex relation between citizenship, state practices and insurgent forces. Contributes to Race and Ethnicity Studies, and to Latin American and Border Studies. Prerequisite: One 300 level course. (SJ) (IP) (WA) (H)
  • SPA15-714 Spanish Sociolinguistics
    Study of the use of the Spanish language in its social context with analysis of variations that occurs over geographic, class, gender, racial, and educational lines. Focus on current issues in sociolinguistics as well as the field's main findings, approaches, and research methodologies. Contributes to Race and Ethnicity Studies. Prerequisite: One 300 level course. (H)
  • Theatre
  • THE72-614 Theatre for Social Chng: Prac & Perform
    This course explores theatre as a political, activist, problem solving, educational and aesthetic tool. Students will learn to develop interactive performances that can be used to effect social change in a wide variety of community settings. Contributes to Feminist Studies, and Race and Ethnicity Studies. (Spring) (SJ)(FAP)
  • THE72-234 Theatre History
    A course exploring Western theatre and drama in a variety of periods. Theatre performances and plays will be analyzed as functions of different fields of influence (economic realities of production and attendance; politics and power relations within and outside the theatre; social norms regarding gender, race, ethnicity, religion, family, etc.; aesthetic values of the time). In addition, the course is meant to introduce students to methods of critical research and issues of historiography. Contributes to Race and Ethnicities Studies. (Fall) (WA) (FAL)

Additionally, there are other courses offered less regularly in a variety of departments that contribute to this minor, some as special topics courses, some as particular content under a fixed course number that carries variable content depending on what semester it is taught. Each semester the registrar will provide a list of courses that satisfy the minor via Web Advisor.

To complete the minor, students will complete a final assessment administered by the Program Chair.
  • Race and Ethnicity Studies (RES)

 37-001, 002, 003, 004. SELECTED TOPICS. May be repeated with change in topic.
37-301, 302, 303, 304. SELECTED TOPICS. May be repeated with change in topic.
37-901, 902, 903, 904. TUTORIAL. 180 37-941, 942, 943, 944
ACADEMIC INTERNSHIP. May be repeated with change in content. Must be taken Pass/D/F.
37-951, 952, 953, 954 INDEPENDENT STUDY. May be repeated with change in content.