Hello to you reading this, my name is Aidan. I am a junior studying Psychology with a minor in Data Science.

Akin to many of the other writing consultants at DEWC, reading was of much importance to me as a child. For the first couple years of my life, until I turned 4, I was a relatively mute child. This concerned my parents as they couldn’t necessarily gauge how I was doing in terms of emotional and mental growth. It wasn’t until I started reading fortune cookie fortunes aloud to them seemingly out of nowhere that my parents realized I had high potential for my age in terms of reading and writing comprehension.

In later years, I enjoyed fiction novels and literature like most others, but what always held my attention and had me staying up past my bedtime were encyclopedias containing cornucopias of information. Space, trains, botany, anatomy, mythology, etc… It didn’t matter what information these encyclopedias possessed, I loved and felt the need to be “in the know” of little nuggets of wisdom across different disciplines and spreading them to my family, my friends, and even strangers if I was feeling bold enough. (What a nerd!)

My appreciation for writing, however, took more time. It wasn’t until my journalism courses in high school that I realized there was a grander purpose to writing outside of submitting my work for a grade. In this writing style, I was able to incorporate the creative and the matter-of-fact. I ultimately took control of what words I expressed on the page in a way I never felt previously. Through this experience, I also had the opportunity to assess the writing of other people by being a copy editor for the school yearbook, which in turn gifted me with better writing of my own.

Since then, I have continued to hone my written knowledge and capabilities through my coursework (particularly in Psychology) at Southwestern, and I hope to further better myself during my time as a writing consultant. Academic writing is a process that takes years of cultivation to be “successful” at. And I believe that being vulnerable and working together through the struggles it entails with fellow collegiate-level peers can be mutually beneficial for all involved!

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Consultant