Expertise

Ecosystem Ecology, Plants, Soils, Carbon Sequestration, Arctic Ecosystems, Climate Change

I am a self-identified nerdy scientist who loves geeking out on asking questions about how the natural world works and how to design experiments to answer those questions. I am often heard saying, “We can test that!” when those around me postulate a question about any topic. This passion for knowledge is what drives my teaching and research. As a scientist and teacher, I want to challenge students to think critically about the natural world around them so that they can begin to understand the complex interactions that influence the natural world. I encourage students to apply their understanding to create solutions and make decisions to promote sustainability. 

  • I am a self-identified nerdy scientist who loves geeking out on asking questions about how the natural world works and how to design experiments to answer those questions. I am often heard saying, “We can test that!” when those around me postulate a question about any topic. This passion for knowledge is what drives my teaching and research. As a scientist and teacher, I want to challenge students to think critically about the natural world around them so that they can begin to understand the complex interactions that influence the natural world. I encourage students to apply their understanding to create solutions and make decisions to promote sustainability. 

  • As an ecosystem ecologist, I incorporate concepts in both plant ecology and soil biogeochemistry to understand how climate change, land use change, and invasive species impact how carbon and nutrients are cycled in terrestrial ecosystems. In addition, I research how ecosystems are responding to climate change and how we can manage ecosystems to both mitigate climate change and make them more resilient. I use a combination of experimental and observational studies that span a diversity of terrestrial ecosystems from the desert to the arctic.

    My most recent research has taken me to the far northeast of the Siberian arctic through the brush, burned trees, and mosquitos in search for answers to a changing arctic. Like most scientists, I am passionate about finding the answers to my questions, so much so that I will endure hiking through the brush, trying not to trip over downed burned trees, all while being attacked by thousands of mosquitos to get the data to answer those questions. In addition to my research, I also work on sharing my passion for science to the general public through storytelling, education, and outreach.

    Check out my website for more information about my ongoing research projects: www.jenniedemarco.com

  • Please contact me at demarcoj@southwestern.edu for copies of any of these publications.

    Talucci, A. C., E. Forbath, H. Kropp, H. D. Alexander, J. DeMarco, A. K. Paulson, N. S. Zimov, and M. L. Loranty. 2020. Evaluating post-fire vegetation recovery in Cajander larch forests in Northeastern Siberia using UAV derived vegetation indices. Remote Sensing 12:2970 

    Christianson, C. T., M. C. Mack, J. DeMarco and P. J. Grogan. 2018. Decomposition of senesced leaf litter is faster in tall compared to low birch shrub tundra. Ecosystems 21:1564-1579.

    DeMarco, J., T. Filley, and H.T . Throop. 2016. Patterns of woody plant-derived soil carbon losses and persistence after brush management in a semi-arid grassland. Plant and Soil  406:277-293.

    DeMarco, J., M. C. Mack, M. S. Bret-Harte, M. Burton and G. R. Shaver. 2014. Long-term warming and nutrient additions increase productivity in tall deciduous shrub tundra. Ecosphere 5(6).

    DeMarco, J., M. C. Mack and M. S. Bret-Harte. 2014. Effects of arctic shrub expansion on biophysical vs. biogeochemical drivers of litter decomposition. Ecology 95(7):1861-1875.

    DeMarco, J., M. C. Mack and M. S. Bret-Harte.. 2011. The effects of snow, soil microenvironment, and soil organic matter quality on N availability in three Alaskan Arctic plant communities. Ecosystems 14:804-817.

    Cardelus, C. L., M. C. Mack, C. Woods, J. DeMarco, and K. K. Treseder. 2008. The influence of tree species on canopy soil nutrient status in a tropical lowland wet forest in Costa Rica. Plant Soil 318:47-61.

    Bret-Harte, M. S., M. C.  Mack, G. R.  Goldsmith, D. B.  Sloan, J. DeMarco, G. R.  Shaver, P. M. Ray, Z. Biesinger, and F. S. Chapin III. 2008. Plant functional types do not predict biomass responses to removal and fertilization in Alaskan tussock tundra.  Journal of Ecology 96: 713-726. 

    Classen, A. T., J. DeMarco, S. C. Hart, T. G. Whitham, N. S. Cobb, and GW Koch.  2006. Impacts of herbivorous insects on decomposer communities during the early stages of primary succession in a semi-arid woodland.  Soil Biology & Biochemistry 38: 972-982.