Kim Mc Arthur

Assistant Professor of Biology Kim McArthur presented her research at the annual meeting of the Society for Developmental Biology on July 14, 2021. In her virtual poster, titled “Behavioral Analysis of Respiratory Circuit Development in Larval Zebrafish,” McArthur presented evidence that neural circuits in the brainstem that drive breathing behaviors become functional very early in development, well before they are strictly necessary for oxygen uptake. The larval zebrafish provides a unique opportunity to study the earliest stages in neural circuit development as zebrafish develop outside of their mothers where brain cells can be observed under the microscope using noninvasive methods.

—July 2021

Assistant Professor of Biology Kim McArthur was awarded the ADInstruments Educator Scholarship to attend the CrawFly neurophysiology course at the University of the Incarnate Word, January 9–12. This course provides intensive hands-on training for undergraduate educators developing laboratory courses in neuroscience to encourage integration of high-impact research experiences into the undergraduate curriculum. McArthur plans to develop a course in neurobiology that can incorporate modules from this training course.

—January 2020

Assistant Professor of Biology Kimberly McArthur coauthored a chapter in a recently released comprehensive reference book about zebrafish as a model organism in biomedical research. The chapter titled “Zebrafish as a Model for Revealing the Neuronal Basis of Behavior” appears in The Zebrafish in Biomedical Research: Biology, Husbandry, Diseases, and Research Applications(Elsevier).

—December 2019

Assistant Professor of Biology Kim McArthur presented her neuroscience research at two conferences during the fall 2019 semester. McArthur studies brain development and function at the cellular level using larval zebrafish. Zebrafish develop entirely outside of their mothers, and they are nearly transparent early in development. These unique characteristics allow McArthur and her students to study the fundamentals of early brain development in a living organism (with surprising similarities to humans) using noninvasive methods. This research combines microscopy, electrophysiology, and behavioral analysis to study the development of the cellular networks in the brainstem that generate innate survival behaviors, such as feeding and breathing. McArthur presented her poster, titled “Development and Early Organization of Respiratory Motor Circuits in Larval Zebrafish,” at the Texas Zebrafish Conference in Houston, TX, November 1–2, and the Zebrafish Neural Circuits and Behavior meeting at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, November 20–23. This poster included research completed by an undergraduate mentored by McArthur during her postdoctoral tenure at Cornell University.

—November 2019