Michael Cooper

Notable Achievements

Professor of Music and Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts Michael Cooper discovered and edited an unpublished choral work by Florence B. Price (1887–1953) that will be performed by Visiting Assistant Professor of Music Beth Everett and the Southwestern University Chorale at their concert on Nov. 3, 2018. The composition, titled “Night,” is based on a poem first published in 1930 in the NAACP journal The Crisis by Harlem Renaissance author Bessie Mayle. Price, generally acclaimed as the doyenne of African-American concert music of the mid-20th century, set Mayle’s poem to music in 1945. After her setting was premiered in Chicago, the autograph was filed among Price’s other manuscripts. Cooper discovered it during his research in the summer of 2018.

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Expertise

Music Literature

J. Michael Cooper joined the Sarofim School of Fine Arts faculty in 2006 as the Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts. Prior to his appointment at Southwestern he was on the faculty of the University of North Texas. His research interests include 19th- century music, source studies, historiography and political history, specializing in Mendelssohn, Schumann, Berlioz, and Richard Strauss. A Fulbright scholar, Dr. Cooper has published writings in Early Music, Nineteenth-Century Music, and elsewhere. Performances and CD recordings of his editions of unknown and little-known works by Felix Mendelssohn and Fanny Hensel have earned him a place at the forefront of the community of scholars of 19th-century music. Most important among these are a facsimile edition of the complete autograph sources of Mendelssohn’s “Italian” Symphony, the first complete edition of the revised version of that work (Wiesbaden, 1997 and 2001), the first source-critical editions of Mendelssohn’s Op. 69 and Op. 78 Motets (Kassel, 2006), and a new Urtext edition of Mendelssohn’s oratorio Paulus/St. Paul (Kassel, 2007). Dr. Cooper is also the author of Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy: A Guide to Research (New York, 2001) and Mendelssohn’s “Italian” Symphony (Oxford, 2003). His latest book, Mendelssohn, Goethe, and the Walpurgis Night: The Heathen Muse in European Culture, 1700-1850, was published by the University of Rochester Press in May 2007. He is also the recent recipient of two awards from The Florida State University College of Music: the 2007-2008 Warren D. Allen Faculty Citation for Excellence in Scholarship, and holder of the Curtis Mayes Orpheus Chair in Musicology.

Cooper received his Ph.D. from Duke University in 1994, his M.M. from Florida State University in 1988, and his B.M. from Florida State University in 1985.

  • J. Michael Cooper joined the Sarofim School of Fine Arts faculty in 2006 as the Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts. Prior to his appointment at Southwestern he was on the faculty of the University of North Texas. His research interests include 19th- century music, source studies, historiography and political history, specializing in Mendelssohn, Schumann, Berlioz, and Richard Strauss. A Fulbright scholar, Dr. Cooper has published writings in Early Music, Nineteenth-Century Music, and elsewhere. Performances and CD recordings of his editions of unknown and little-known works by Felix Mendelssohn and Fanny Hensel have earned him a place at the forefront of the community of scholars of 19th-century music. Most important among these are a facsimile edition of the complete autograph sources of Mendelssohn’s “Italian” Symphony, the first complete edition of the revised version of that work (Wiesbaden, 1997 and 2001), the first source-critical editions of Mendelssohn’s Op. 69 and Op. 78 Motets (Kassel, 2006), and a new Urtext edition of Mendelssohn’s oratorio Paulus/St. Paul (Kassel, 2007). Dr. Cooper is also the author of Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy: A Guide to Research (New York, 2001) and Mendelssohn’s “Italian” Symphony (Oxford, 2003). His latest book, Mendelssohn, Goethe, and the Walpurgis Night: The Heathen Muse in European Culture, 1700-1850, was published by the University of Rochester Press in May 2007. He is also the recent recipient of two awards from The Florida State University College of Music: the 2007-2008 Warren D. Allen Faculty Citation for Excellence in Scholarship, and holder of the Curtis Mayes Orpheus Chair in Musicology.

    Cooper received his Ph.D. from Duke University in 1994, his M.M. from Florida State University in 1988, and his B.M. from Florida State University in 1985.

  • Politics and music history, especially 17th-20th centuries; Mendelssohn Berlioz Schumann Schubert Liszt Wagner

  • Books

    • Mendelssohn, Goethe, and the Walpurgis Night: The Heathen Muse in Western Europe, 1750-1900 (University of Rochester Press)
    • Mendelssohn’s “Italian” Symphony (Oxford University Press, 2003)
    • The Mendelssohns: Their Music in History (Oxford University Press, 2002)
    • Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy: A Guide to Research (New York: Routledge, 2001)

    Published Editions

    • Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy, Three Psalms, Op. posth. 78 (Kassel: Baorenreiter, 2006).
    • Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy, Three Choruses, Op. 69 (Kassel: Baorenreiter (2006).
    • Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy, “Die erste Walpurgisnacht”: First Edition of the 1830-33 Version. Recent Researches in the Music of the Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Centuries. Madison, Wisconsin: A-R Editions, (at press; anticipated date of publication: May 2006)
    • Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy, Symphony in A Major (“Italian”): First Edition of the Revised Version of 1833/1834. Wiesbaden: Ludwig-Reichert-Verlag, 1999.
    • Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy, Sinfonie A-dur op. 90, “Italienische”: Alle eigenhaoigen Niederschriften im Faksimile. Facsimile edition, 2 vols. with commentary. Wiesbaden: Ludwig-Reichert-Verlag, 1997.
    • Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy: Tu es Petrus, Op. 111. Stuttgart: Carus-Verlag, 1996.

    Articles and Book Chapters (selected)

    • “Knowing Mendelssohn: A Challenge from the Primary Sources.” Notes 61 (2004): 35-95
    • “Mendelssohn Received.” In The Cambridge Companion to Mendelssohn, ed. Peter Mercer-Taylor, 233-50. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004.
    • “The Realisation and Embellishment of Timpani Parts in German Baroque Music: The Schlagmanieren Revisited.” Early Music 27 (1999): 249-66.
    • “Words Without Songs: Thoughts on Texts, Titles, and Mendelssohn’s Lieder ohne Worte.” In Musik als Text: Bericht :en internationalen Kongrel2der Gesellschaft fa1/4r Musikforschung, Freiburg im Breisgau 1993, ed. Hermann Danuser and Tobias Plebuch, ii: 341-46. Kassel: Baorenreiter, 1999.
    • “Timpani and Percussion.” In A Performer’s Guide to Seventeenth-Century Music, ed. Stewart Carter, 133-52. New York: Schirmer Books, 1997.
    • “The Hero Transformed: The Relationship between Ein Heldenleben and Don Quixote Reconsidered.” Richard-Strauss-Blaotter 30 (1993): 3-21.
  • PEER-REVIEWED PUBLICATIONS

    BOOKS

    • Music and Secular Religion from Mozart to Schoenberg. In progress.
    • (with Randy Kinnett) Historical Dictionary of Romantic Music. Lanham: The Scarecrow Press, 2013.

       

    • Mendelssohn, Goethe, and the Walpurgis Night: The Heathen Muse in Western Europe, 1700-1850. Eastman Studies in Music. New York: University of Rochester Press, 2007. (Paperback edition, 2010.)

    • Mendelssohn’s ?Italian? Symphony. Oxford Studies in Musical Genesis and Structure. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2003.

    • The Mendelssohns: Their Music in History. Edited with Julie D. Prandi. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002.

    • Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy: A Guide to Research, with a Bibliographic IntroductioFelix Mendelssohn Bartholdy: A Guide to Research, with a Bibliographic Introduction to Research concerning Fanny Hensel. New York: Routledge, 2001. 2nd edition, revised and enlarged by Angela R. Mace, 2011.

    PEER-REVIEWED ARTICLES

    • (with R. Larry Todd) ??With True Esteem and Friendship?: The Correspondence of Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy and Louis Spohr.? Journal of Musicological Research 29 (2010): 171-259.
    • ?Knowing Mendelssohn: A Challenge from the Primary Sources.? Notes 61 (2004): 35-95.

       

    • ?Of Red Roofs and Hunting Horns: Mendelssohn’s Song Aesthetic, with an Unpublished Cycle (1830).? Journal of Musicological Research 21 (2002): 277-317.

    • ?The Realisation and Embellishment of Timpani Parts in German Baroque Music: The Schlagmanieren Revisited.? Early Music 27 (1999): 249-66.

    • ?Felix Mendelssohn, Ferdinand David und Sebastian Bach: Mendelssohns Bach-Auffassung im Speigel der Wiederentdeckung der ?Chaconne.? ? Mendelssohn-Studien 10 (1997): 159-86.

    • ?The Hero Transformed: The Relationship between Ein Heldenleben and Don Quixote Reconsidered.? Richard-Strauss-Blatter 30 (1993): 3-21.

    • ??Aber eben dieser Zweifel?: A New Look at Mendelssohn’s ?Italian? Symphony.? Nineteenth-Century Music 15 (1992): 169-87

    • ?Towards a Reconsideration of J. S. Bach’s Writing for the Timpani.? Percussive Notes 15 (1989): 44-50.

    • ?Musical Form and Dialectic Thought in Brahms’s Schicksalslied.? Theoretically Speaking 4 (1987): 41-47.

    • ?The Baroque Timpani: Some Observations on Performance Practice and the Present State of Research.? Percussive Notes 12 (1986): 39-50.

    • ?Program and Form in Dvorak’s Othello.? Theoretically Speaking 3 (1986): 66-68.

    • ?Richard Strauss’s Vier letzte Lieder.? Theoretically Speaking 2 (1985): 39-50.

    OTHER PUBLICATIONS

    Chapters in Books and Invited Articles:

    • ??Infelice / Ah, ritorna, eta dell? ore? und ?Infelice / Ah, ritorna, eta felice,?? in Mendelssohn-Interpretationen, ed. Matthias Geuting and Wulf Konold. Laaber: Laaber-Verlag, [at press].
    • Die erste Walpurgisnacht op. 60.” In Mendelssohn-Interpretationen, ed. Matthias Geuting and Wulf Konold (Laaber: Laaber-Verlag, [2009]). [At press.]
    • “Mendelssohn and Berlioz: Selective Affinities.? In Mendelssohn Perspectives, ed. Angela Mace and Nicole Grimes (Aldershot: Ashgate, 2011). [At press.]
    • “Music History as Sermon: Style, Form, and Narrative in Mendelssohn’s ?Durer Cantata.?? In Mendelssohn and the Contrapuntal Tradition, ed. Jurgen Thym. New York: University of Rochester Press, [at press].
    • “Mendelssohn und Berlioz: Eine verdeckte Verwandtschaft.? In Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy: Kompositorisches Wirken und kunstlerisches Wesen, ed Christian Martin Schmidt. Leipzig: Breitkopf & Hartel, [2010]. [At press.]

    • “Mendelssohn’s Fugues for String Quartet (1821).? Ad Parnassum 8/14 (Fall 2010): 1-33.

    • “Mendelssohn’s Valediction.” The Choral Journal 49/4 (April 2009): 50-59.

    • “From Notation to Edition to Performance: Issues in Interpretation.” In Mendelssohn in Performance, ed. Siegwart Reichwald (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2008), 171-88.

    • “‘For You See I Am the Eternal Objector?: On Performing Mendelssohn’s Music in Translation” In Mendelssohn in Performance, ed. Siegwart Reichwald (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2008), 207-248.

    • “Impulse Bachs im Geiste der Gegenwart: Bemerkungen zu einigen wenig bekannten Satzen zu Mendelssohns Paulus.” Paper presented at ?… zu gros, zu unerreichbar … ?: Bach im Zeitalter des Romantismus, conference hosted by Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra, Sebastian-Bach-Haus, Mendelssohn-Haus, and Schumann-Haus, 11-13 November 2006.

    • ?One Aria or Two? Mendelssohn, Metastasio, and Infelice.? Philomusica Online 4 (2004-2005). See http://philomusica.unipv.it/

    • ?Mendelssohn Received.? In The Cambridge Companion to Mendelssohn, ed. Peter Mercer-Taylor, 233-50. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004.

    • ??… da ich dies Stuck gern recht correct erscheinen sahe?: Philological and Textual Issues in Mendelssohn’s Hebrides Overture, Op. 26.? Philomusica Online 3 (2003-2004). See http://philomusica.unipv.it/

    • ?Mendelssohn’s Two Infelice Arias: Problems of Sources and Musical Identity.? In The Mendelssohns: Their Music in History, 43-97. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002.

    • ?The Prodigy’s Voice: Mendelssohn and His Clarinet Sonata.? The Clarinet 29/2 (2002): 70-77.