John Ross

Notable Achievements

The Department of Mathematics and Computer Science was active at the Joint Mathematics Meetings, with national meetings of the Mathematical Association of America (MAA), the American Mathematical Society (AMS), the Association for Women in Mathematics (AWM), and more. It is the largest meeting of mathematicians in the world. The meetings were held in Baltimore, MD, Jan. 16–19, 2019.

  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Therese Shelton copresented “Building Community through Systemic Initiative for Modeling Investigations and Opportunities with Differential Equations (SIMIODE)” in the MAA Poster Session on Projects Supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) Division of Undergraduate Education. The coauthors were the coprincipal investigators of their National Science Foundation (NSF) grant: Brian Winkel, SIMIODE and emeritus professor from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point; Richard C. Harwood, Newberg University; Audrey Malagon, Virginia Wesleyan University; and Patrice Tiffany, Manhattan College. The NSF grant partly funded Shelton’s attendance.
  • Shelton participated in the meeting of the MAA Committee on Sessions of Contributed Papers.
  • Shelton served on the SIMIODE Board of Contributing Advisors and participated in a meeting of her NSF grant coprincipal investigators.
  • Professor of Mathematics Fumiko Futamura presented “Factoring Homographies to Analyze Perspective Distortions” based on a recent paper coauthored with Marc Frantz of Indiana University Bloomington and Annalisa Crannell of Franklin and Marshall College in the MAA Contributed Paper Session on Mathematics and the Arts.
  • Assistant Professor of Mathematics John Ross presented “Exploring Big Ideas in Calculus 1 through Bite-Sized IBL Lessons” in the MAA Contributed Paper Session on Inquiry-Based Learning and Teaching.
  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Mathematics John Osborn presented “Peaks and Valleys of First-Time Implementation of IBL Methods in Calculus III and Intro to Statistics Classes” in the MAA Contributed Paper Session on Inquiry-Based Learning and Teaching.
  • Mercedes Gonzalez  ’21 presented “Restrictions on Homflypt and Kauffman Polynomials Arising from Local Moves” in the AMS Special Session on Not KNerds: A Community for Knot Theory. The talk was based on a 2018 NSF REU and coauthored by Sandy Ganzell, St. Mary’s College of Maryland; Chloe Marcum, Marshall University; Nina Ryalls, University of Dallas; and Mariel Santos, St. Mary’s College of Maryland. Gonzalez  received partial funding from the REU, the Fleming Student Travel Fund, and the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science.
  • Elyssa Sliheet  ’19 presented “Mathematical Models Linking within-Host to between-Host HIV Dynamics” in the AMS Contributed Paper Session on Dynamical Systems and Ergodic Theory. The talk was based on a 2018 NSF REU. Sliheet received partial funding from the REU, the Fleming Student Travel Fund, and the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science.
  • Our students each presented in a faculty session rather than a session for undergraduate presentations.
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Expertise

Differential Geometry, Riemannian Geometry, Geometric Analysis. Minimal surfaces, Mean Curvature Flow. The mathematics of bubbles and similar surfaces.

John Ross received his PhD in Mathematics from Johns Hopkins University in 2015 and his BA in Mathematics from St. Mary’s College of Maryland in 2009.

  • John Ross received his PhD in Mathematics from Johns Hopkins University in 2015 and his BA in Mathematics from St. Mary’s College of Maryland in 2009.

  • Dr. Ross’ research focuses on theory and applications of minimal surfaces and mean curvature flow. Taken together, these subjects describe how surfaces (or higher-dimensional manifolds) can evolve in time to achieve stable structures under certain constraints. The most accessible example is the creating of bubbles via soap film - a two-dimensional elastic surface that aims to minimize surface area subject to some additional structural constraint (eg. constant volume enclosure in the case of a free-floating bubble, or fixed boundary in the case of a bubble wand). The geometry of the surface with minimal surface area - or the evolution a soap film undergoes as it evolves to shrink surface area - is of broad interest to mathematicians, materials scientists, and physicists. Dr. Ross studies the differential equations that govern this process, and the connection between these equations and the underlying geometry of the surfaces.