New Presentations

Note: This is a list of selected seminars and not a complete list.

Invited Lectures and Talks

“Racialized Spirits: Doctors on Spiritual healing Practices in Mexico, 1920s and 30s”. Race and Ethnicity Symposium, Southwestern University, January, 2018

“Hostilidad, desorden e indisciplina: los retos del pluralismo médico en el Hospital Nacional Homeopático en la ciudad de México durante la revolución mexicana, 1895-1934”, Hispanic Symposium, Southwestern University, March, 2017

“Medicine in Revolution”: Mapping Homeopathy into the Landscape of Mexican Medical Science, 1861-1934. History and Philosophy of Science Colloquium, Luncheon Series, University of Texas, Austin, November, 2016

“Between the National and the International: Homeopathic congresses and the Consolidation of Homeopathy in Mexico, 1929-1935”, Borderlands Symposium, Southwestern University, November, 2016

“The History of the Mexican-US Border”. Mexico/US Border Lecture Series & Dinner, Southwestern University, March, 2016

“Brindando educación médica científica a la clase trabajadora. Las escuelas de medicina homeopática y la centralización de la educación médica en la ciudad de México, 1895-1940”, Departamento de Investigación Educativa, CINVESTAV, IPN; Departamento de Historia de la Medicina, UNAM, June, 2015

“Health and the Latino/a population”. Annual Cesar Chavez Dinner; Alpha Tau chapter of the Kapa Delta Chi Sorority, Inc., Southwestern University, March, 2015

Conference Presentations

“From Foreign Healers to International Doctors: Internationalism and the Consolidation of Homeopathy in Mexico, 1853-1942”, 25th International Congress of History of Science and Technology, Rio de Janerio, Brazil, July, 2017

“Hostilidad”, “Desorden”, and “Indisciplina”: The Challenges of Medical Pluralism at the National Homeopathic Hospital during the Age of Institutionalization of Biomedicine in Mexico City, 1893-1934, American Association for the History of Medicine, Nashville, TN, May, 2017

“A Revolution in Medical Training: The Making, Remaking, and Enduring of the National School of Homeopathic Medicine in Mexico, 1895-1936”, American Association for the History of Medicine, Minneapolis, MN, May, 2016

“Science, Professional Training, and Public Health: The Sanitation of the Medical Profession in Post-revolutionary Mexico, 1920-1934”; American Historical Association, Atlanta, GA, Jan, 2016

“The Sanitary Dictatorship and the Criminalization of Medical Practice in Post-Revolutionary Mexico, 1920s and 1930s”; Rocky Mountain Council for Latin American Studies, Tucson, Arizona, April, 2015 

Areas of Expertise

Professor Jethro Hernandez Berrones is interested in the history of medicine, public health, and science in Mexico and Latin America.

Education

2014 PhD History of Health Sciences
University of California, San Francisco
2008 MA Philosophy of Science
Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México
2003 BSc Biology 
Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México

Positions

Assistant Professor
Southwestern University
August 16, 2014 - present

Lecturer
Department of History and Social Medicine, University of California, San Francisco
Winter 2014
History of Medicine and Public Health in Latin America

Teaching Assistant
Department of History and Social Medicine, University of California, San Francisco
Fall, 2013
History of Medicine I: From Antiquity to the Early Modern Period

Teaching Philosophy

All of us are born with the skill of positioning ourselves in time. We can tell stories by arranging events in a timeline. We are natural storytellers and we define who we are in the world we live in by the stories we tell. But all of us need to become aware of these skills in order to refine and improve them. Only then we will be able to use them effectively in our everyday interactions.

I believe that historical thinking and writing is an unnatural act. It is a skill learned through recurrent practice. Students of history understand the skills of historians by reading, interpreting, contrasting, and criticizing primary sources and other historians’ narratives. By examining multiple historical perspectives, they come up with their own new and fresh questions and interpretations about the past. They then share these unique views through written and oral texts. Since humans are story-tellers, everyone can develop the unnatural skills of a historian, as long as they become aware of their own historical condition and exercise it in every text they read and write. My class then provides a learning environment that fosters the development of students’ critical thinking and writing through the practice of historical skills. 

Previous Courses

At Southwestern University I teach the following courses:

  • First Year Seminar: Pseudo-medicine?
  • Disease, Medicine, and Health in World History
  • Colonial Latin America
  • Modern Latin America
  • The Mexican Revolution
  • Topics in the History of STM: Science for the People
  • Historiography (History methods course)
  • Science, Society, and the State (Capstone)

Publications

Refereed Articles

“Breaking the Boundaries of Professional Regulation: Medical Licensing, Foreign Influence, and the Consolidation of Homeopathy in Mexico” (forthcoming)

“Medicine ‘for Mexicans’: Medical Popularization, Commercial Endeavors, and Patients’ Choice in  the Mexican Medical Marketplace, 1853-1872”, Medical History, 61, 4, (October, 2017), 568-589

Book Reviews

Sloan, Kathryn A. Death in the City: Suicide and the Social Imaginary in Modern Mexico. Oakland, CA: University of California Press, 2017, 257pp. Review by Jethro Hernandez Berrones for H-LatAm (https://www.h-net.org/reviews/showpdf.php?id=50971). February, 2018

Duncan, Whitney L. The Culture of Mental Health in a Changing Oaxaca. University of California, San Diego, 2012. Doctoral Dissertation. Reviewed by Jethro Hernandez-Berrones for Dissertation Reviews (http://dissertationreviews.org/archives/7261), February 5, 2014

Digital Projects

“A visit to the Battle Creek Sanitarium (1914)” on Digital Texas Heritage Resource Center, Southwestern University Special Collections and Archives, https://texasheritage.omeka.net/exhibits/show/popularizing-science-class-exh

Seminars

Note: This is a list of selected seminars and not a complete list.

Invited Lectures and Talks

“Racialized Spirits: Doctors on Spiritual healing Practices in Mexico, 1920s and 30s”. Race and Ethnicity Symposium, Southwestern University, January, 2018

“Hostilidad, desorden e indisciplina: los retos del pluralismo médico en el Hospital Nacional Homeopático en la ciudad de México durante la revolución mexicana, 1895-1934”, Hispanic Symposium, Southwestern University, March, 2017

“Medicine in Revolution”: Mapping Homeopathy into the Landscape of Mexican Medical Science, 1861-1934. History and Philosophy of Science Colloquium, Luncheon Series, University of Texas, Austin, November, 2016

“Between the National and the International: Homeopathic congresses and the Consolidation of Homeopathy in Mexico, 1929-1935”, Borderlands Symposium, Southwestern University, November, 2016

“The History of the Mexican-US Border”. Mexico/US Border Lecture Series & Dinner, Southwestern University, March, 2016

“Brindando educación médica científica a la clase trabajadora. Las escuelas de medicina homeopática y la centralización de la educación médica en la ciudad de México, 1895-1940”, Departamento de Investigación Educativa, CINVESTAV, IPN; Departamento de Historia de la Medicina, UNAM, June, 2015

“Health and the Latino/a population”. Annual Cesar Chavez Dinner; Alpha Tau chapter of the Kapa Delta Chi Sorority, Inc., Southwestern University, March, 2015

Conference Presentations

“From Foreign Healers to International Doctors: Internationalism and the Consolidation of Homeopathy in Mexico, 1853-1942”, 25th International Congress of History of Science and Technology, Rio de Janerio, Brazil, July, 2017

“Hostilidad”, “Desorden”, and “Indisciplina”: The Challenges of Medical Pluralism at the National Homeopathic Hospital during the Age of Institutionalization of Biomedicine in Mexico City, 1893-1934, American Association for the History of Medicine, Nashville, TN, May, 2017

“A Revolution in Medical Training: The Making, Remaking, and Enduring of the National School of Homeopathic Medicine in Mexico, 1895-1936”, American Association for the History of Medicine, Minneapolis, MN, May, 2016

“Science, Professional Training, and Public Health: The Sanitation of the Medical Profession in Post-revolutionary Mexico, 1920-1934”; American Historical Association, Atlanta, GA, Jan, 2016

“The Sanitary Dictatorship and the Criminalization of Medical Practice in Post-Revolutionary Mexico, 1920s and 1930s”; Rocky Mountain Council for Latin American Studies, Tucson, Arizona, April, 2015 

Honors and Awards

Research Awards and Grants

Southwestern Faculty Competitive Funds, summer, 2016

Southwestern Faculty Competitive Funds, summer, 2015

Graduate Student Research Award, University of California San Francisco, 2012–13

UCMEXUS Small Grants for UC Students, 2010

Fellowships

Biomedical Workforce Fellowship, University of California, San Francisco, 2013–14

The University of California Institute for Mexico and the United States – Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología (UCMEXUS-CONACYT), 2009–14

CONACYT Graduate Studies Fellowship, 2004–6

UNAM’s Graduate Studies Division Fellowship, 2004–6

Honors

Jack D. Pressman-Burroughs Wellcome Fund Career Development Award American Association for the History of Medicine, 2016

Hans Walz Prize for Studies in the History of Homeopathy, Institute for the History of medicine, Robert Bosch Stiftung, 2015

Master’s Dissertation Thesis Honorific Mention (summa cum laude), UNAM, 2008

Affiliations

American Association for the History of Medicine

Latin American Studies Association

American Historical Association

Rocky Mountain Council for Latin American Studies

Conference for Latin American History