Patrick Hajovsky

Associate Professor of Art History PatrickHajovsky published “Shifting Panoramas: Contested Visions of Cuzco’s 1650 Earthquake” in The Art Bulletin (vol. 100, no. 4, December 2018, 34–61), the premier journal in the field of art history and one that is also read widely by specialists in other disciplines. The article takes a novel approach to understanding colonial-period religious activism and modern interpretations of an icon of the city of Cuzco, Peru: a large panorama of the devastating 1650 earthquake that has been on view in the city’s cathedral since the seismic event took place. One senior colleague and expert on the painting responded in an email, “Just read your wonderful and so insightful article on the Cuzco earthquake painting in Cuzco. Congratulations. Wonderful research! You have really cracked the  puzzle surrounding the painting and put in its proper context. I learned so much. I am most grateful.”

—January 2019

Associate Professor of Art History Patrick Hajovsky will present his current research at the annual Mesoamerica Meetings (formerly Maya Meetings) at the University of Texas-Austin on Saturday, Jan. 13. This year’s theme, “Mesoamerican Philosophies: Animate Matter, Metaphysics, and the Natural Environment,” includes workshops on Maya hieroglyphs and a symposium of top scholars in Aztec studies across disciplines.

—January 2019

Associate Professor of Art History Patrick Hajovsky was the commentator for a panel titled “For Now We See through a Glass, Darkly: European Tropes through a Native Lens” at the American Society for Ethnohistory’s 2018 annual meeting in Oaxaca, Mexico, Oct. 1113.

—October 2018

Associate Professor of Art History Patrick Hajovsky was invited to a conference on “Sacrifice and Conversion,” held at Harvard University’s Villa I Tatti, outside of Florence, Italy, April 1920, 2018. He presented on Aztec concepts of blood and heart sacrifice and their conversion into Christian idioms through ideas of the body and excess. While there, he was interviewed by a reporter for Arqueología mexicanato respond on the recent theory that the central face of the Aztec Calendar Stone is a portrait of the king Moteuczoma (r. 1502-20).

—May 2018

Associate Professor of Art History Patrick Hajovsky will present his current research at the annual Mesoamerica Meetings (formerly Maya Meetings) at the University of Texas-Austin on Saturday, Jan. 13. This year’s theme, “Mesoamerican Philosophies: Animate Matter, Metaphysics, and the Natural Environment,” includes workshops on Maya hieroglyphs and a symposium of top scholars in Aztec studies across disciplines.

—January 2018