• Evan Dryden, Do you take this bride?, plastic and spray paint, life size, 2020
  • Evan Dryden, Mother Nature as a Bride, photograph and plastic props, 2019
  • Evan Dryden, ...didn’t…, oil on panel, 22.5 x 16.5in, 2019
  • Evan Dryden, 1907 to Infinity I, charcoal on paper, 18 x 18in, 2020
  • Evan Dryden, 1907 to Infinity II, charcoal on paper, 18 x 18in, 2020

My exhibit explores the permanence, overproduction/overconsumption, environmental impacts, and the disregardful use of plastic by utilizing various mediums and aims for viewers to rethink their relationship with plastic and the planet. 

The sculpture, Till Death Do Us Part, invites viewers to reflect on their eternal engagement with nature, which is polluted by humanity’s plastic obsession. In conjunction, the photographs Do You Take This Bride? utilizes bridal accessories made from plastic in an attempt to elevate, beautify, and encourage the recycling of materials. These works pose the question: are we married to nature or plastic? 

In contrast to the illusory beauty of plastic, Plastic Omens and Waste World shows the terrifying aspects of plastic and how it is taking over the environment. These digital works and charcoal drawings blur the lines between abstraction and realism while reflecting the plastic crisis occurring across the globe. The works  demand attention to viewers about an issue that can no longer be ignored.The use of gifs is intended to create conversation among the younger generations who use gifs on a daily basis. 

Nature’s Blue Period 2020, is an abstract painting of a nylon glove, inspired by plastic pollution worsened by the coronavirus pandemic. As the world is adapting to the pandemic, this painting hopes to provide a moment of reflection during our isolation to reassess our relationship with nature and the impacts humanity has on it. As the world is deteriorating, so will this painting which emphasizes the impermanence of the planet if humanity continues to neglect it.

The Ghosts of COVID-19 are cyanotypes created using gloves, masks, and soap. Pollution of gloves and masks have increased because of negligence in caring for the environment and the number of COVID deaths have increased due to negligence in taking the proper pandemic precautions. These works represent the lasting impression of the pandemic on humanity as well as nature. 

All the works in this exhibition, Broken Vows, exemplify humanity’s relationship with Mother Nature and the vows we have broken in taking care of the planet.