• Emilie Moeller '18
    Emilie Moeller '18

Prior to stepping foot on Southwestern’s manicured lawn, my resume could be read as follows:

  • Unicorn Handler (high school spirit group that proved exceptionally frustrating for a reserved introvert like myself)
  • Senior Tennis Captain (perks included choosing the team uniform and holding the title in name only)
  • Featured in yearbook for “Cutest Couple that Never Was” (…no comment)

However, as a graduating Southwestern senior, my accomplishments now read quite differently. Formerly an awkward contributor in a high school spirit group, I was now president of my sorority. My tennis leadership was restored in college, when I assumed the role of captain as a freshman and led my teammates all four years. And finally, I was no longer a yearbook feature. Rather, I was a pop-up book designer, with a new understanding what it actually meant to #BeSouthwestern.

Perhaps the oddest talent developed during my liberal arts education, pop-up book design had not been a personal goal in August of my freshman year. Instead, my way with paper developed as a result of my First Year Seminar, or FYS. The FYS was a required course for new students, and served as incoming freshmen’s first introduction to the Southwestern experience. My FYS, in addition to gifting me the invaluable tool of pop-up design, exposed me to the synergetic classroom characteristic of Southwestern curriculum. In high school, I had always felt most comfortable being seen and not heard, and thus avoided contribution of any sort. Within a few weeks at Southwestern, however, I leapt at opportunities to offer my opinion, and actually responded to classmates rather than simply listening to them.

This collaborative mindset soon translated to the tennis court. As a freshman, I thought I had a strong grasp on what “teamwork” was. I had won three team state championships in high school, for goodness’ sake. However, I quickly learned that leadership entailed more than acting independently as an example for my teammates. It required a voice, a voice I did not naturally possess. It was at times like these that I reflected on my classroom vocalism, and used those same experiences to act as a better teammate, and ultimately a better captain. In a similar domino-esque pattern, my term as captain provided me the confidence and ability to serve effectively as Chapter President for Tri Delta my junior year.  

Instead, I am a liberal arts student. I have confidence, and a voice to communicate with. I have an open mind, which laid the groundwork for my new and future positions and accomplishments.

Several things struck me at the realization of my new and improved resume. First and foremost, I am no longer the shy Unicorn Handler/ senior captain/ has-been yearbook feature. Instead, I am a liberal arts student. I have confidence, and a voice to communicate with. I have an open mind, which laid the groundwork for my new and future positions and accomplishments. I had done more than I could have ever imagined four years ago, and now feel ready to compete in the post-graduate business world. I am a president, captain, and pop-up book designer. And I am undeniably Southwestern.

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