• Eamon Rogers, “Bottles”, Wood fired earthenware, 2016, 7” x 4”
    Eamon Rogers, “Bottles”, Wood fired earthenware, 2016, 7” x 4”

The Art and Art History Department at Southwestern University presents three senior art exhibitions for the Bachelor of Arts degree by Taylor Bailey, Eamon Rogers, and William H. Soller in the Sarofim Gallery, East Rutersville Drive, Georgetown, Texas. All three artists explore both the internal and external landscape.

Taylor Bailey, Adamant, Charcoal and ink on paper, 2016, 42” H x 45” WTaylor Bailey, Adamant, Charcoal and ink on paper, 2016, 42” H x 45” W

Taylor Bailey’s exhibition, Land: Unsettled, uses large-scale, monochromatic works on paper and canvas to explore the influences of nature and human architecture on framing the perception of landscape, questioning what constitutes the idea of landscape from a cultural and historical perspective. The dichotomy of organic form and structured geometry meet in a new dimension in her work, where a chaotic fight for dominance takes place between the natural and constructed environment.

Eamon Rogers, “Bottles”, Wood fired earthenware, 2016, 7” x 4”Eamon Rogers, “Bottles”, Wood fired earthenware, 2016, 7” x 4”

Can a pot evoke a multi sensory experience of our own natural landscapes? Eamon Rogers’ exhibition of ceramic vessels Careful Splendor asks how the landscape is experienced: visually or through immersion? The synthesis of form and finish are an expression of the artist’s personal landscape, and the work implores the user to carefully observe and explore the vessel as one navigates their own personal environment.

William H. Soller, “‘ther”, Oil on canvas, 2016, 60” x 48”William H. Soller, “‘ther”, Oil on canvas, 2016, 60” x 48”

Disjointed  ///  Memory  ///  Pieces  ///  Together is an exhibition by William H. Soller of large, colorful paintings that search for personal and communal identity through memory and shared experience. He uses abstract and representational forms to create mental landscapes where seemingly unrelated objects find connections manifold; these reflections aim to both bring together and isolate identities.

The reception is on Thursday, April 6 from 4:30 – 6:30 p.m. with artists’ talks beginning at 5p.m. The event is free and open to the public.