Presented by Dr. Brenda Sendejo (Feminist Studies), Angel Cantú, SU 2022 (Feminist Studies/LABS); Corrine Ramirez, SU 2022 (Anthropology/LABS); Adriana Romero, SU 2016 (Anthropology), and Tori Vasquez SU 2016, (LABS/RES). The Latina History Project (LHP) is a faculty-student digital humanities collaborative that provides archival and educational resources on Chicana/Latina feminism and activism in Texas since the 1960s. 

Presented by Dr. Brenda Sendejo (Feminist Studies), Angel Cantú, SU 2022 (Feminist Studies/LABS); Corrine Ramirez, SU 2022 (Anthropology/LABS); Adriana Romero, SU 2016 (Anthropology), and Tori Vasquez SU 2016, (LABS/RES).

The Latina History Project (LHP) is a faculty-student digital humanities collaborative that provides archival and educational resources on Chicana/Latina feminism and activism in Texas since the 1960s. The LHP is a historical recovery project that works to facilitate inclusive learning and belonging for students, including through intergenerational knowledge transmission and student interaction with Chicana/Latina activists. The LHP includes a collection of oral histories and digitized archival documents from community activists and prominent Texas Chicana/o Movement activists such as materials from SU Special Collections on an exhibit related to pathbreaking Texas Mexican American women in education, politics, the cultural arts, spiritual activism, education, and Chicana history and feminism. Developed by Drs. Brenda Sendejo and Alison Kafer in 2013 in collaboration with Adriana Romero, Tori Vasquez, and Special Collections, the LHP is a multi-year project funded through a grant from the Summerlee Foundation. For this presentation we invite our first LHP student researchers back to SU to engage in a discussion with current researchers about how taking part in Chicana/Latinx/feminist research and engaging with activists from the movement era has impacted them. Speakers will also be invited to reflect on student activism at SU as part of the historical trajectory of feminism and activism reflecting the struggles of women and other people of color who have navigated structural inequalities in the Texas borderlands, including within higher education, that the LHP documents. Current researchers will share upcoming project activities such as creating spaces of belonging and connection, promoting mind/body/spirit healing, and remembering ourselves and our communities as forms of resistance to structural racism and other forms of exclusion. The presentation will conclude with reflections on how the activism of past generations can inform present-day social justice efforts and help us to imagine futures of liberation and healing that center the stories and experiences of various marginalized groups through connection and coalition building.

We invite attendees to participate in a discussion following the presentation. 

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