See the course catalog  for complete course descriptions.

Art History

  • ARH71-024 Intro Art Hist: East Asian Art & Arch
    This course provides an introduction to the disciplinary methods and concepts of art history, presented in the context of the art and architecture of China, Korea, and Japan. Emphasis will be placed on how the distinctive styles, genres, and traditions of each region emerged in relation to one another and in the context of a shared East Asian cultural heritage. Open only to first- or second-year students, or with consent of the instructor. Contributes to International Studies. (Annually) (FAL) (WA)
  • ARH71-214 Arts of China
    This course surveys the arts of China from the Neolithic to the contemporary period. Each lecture will consist of an in-depth examination of one of twenty-three landmarks of Chinese art. A variety of works will be considered including jades, ancient bronzes, calligraphy, Buddhist murals, landscape paintings, Chinese gardens, temples, contemporary works, and more. Each work will be examined in its historical context, introducing students to China's social and political history, as well as its major religious and humanistic traditions including Confucianism, Buddhism, and Daoism. Contributes to International Studies. (Biennially) (FAL) (WA)
  • ARH71-224 Arts of Japan
    This course introduces the visual arts of Japan from the Neolithic to the late twentieth century. It will consider the development of the pictorial, sculptural and architectural traditions in light of themes such as religion, gender, cross-cultural exchange, and changes in socio-political life. Biweekly sessions will cover a range of subjects including ceramics, woodblock printing, ink painting, gardens, religious and castle architecture, calligraphy, tea ceremony, and contemporary works. Contributes to International Studies. (Biennially) (FAL) (WA)
  • ARH71-234 Ancient Chinese Art and Civilization
    This course covers China's rich and complex ancient civilization, beginning in the Neolithic and concluding with the fall of China's first long-lasting imperial administration, the Han dynasty. It considers the development and trajectory of Chinese art and architecture in relation to the formation of local states, kingdoms, and the early Chinese empires. Topics covered include painted ceramics, jades, oracle bones, bronze vessels and bells, lacquer works, mummies, gold ornaments, stone shrines, early palaces and cities, silk, and much more. Art works will be studied in the archaeological context in which they were discovered and in relation to the material culture surrounding them. Contributes to International Studies. (Biennially) (FAL) (WA)
  • ARH71-264 Art in China Since 1911
    This course presents an overview of the development of visual arts in China from the late 19th century to the present. Students will consider the ways that recent works created by Chinese artists responded to the turbulent politics of the 20th century, the global art market, and past traditions of Chinese art. Works in a range of mediums will be considered-from painting and calligraphy to architecture, film, and performance works. Contributes to Feminist Studies, International Studies, and Race and Ethnicity Studies. (Biennially) (FAL) (WA)

Chinese

  • CHI22-332 Topics in Intrm/Adv Modern Chinese
    This course facilitates active development of proficiency abilities in presentational, interpretive and interpersonal modes. Materials are primarily texts of various genres, accommodated to mixed ability levels. Topics will usually center on the cultural and functional issues in the ecology and environment as presented in Chinese language, including topics as diverse as daily interactions and business transactions, or traditional and modern literature and historical reference. The course is offered for 2 and 4 credits in any given semester and can be repeated. Contributes to Environmental Studies and International Studies Prerequisite: Chinese 22-204, or equivalent placement. Taking two 2-credit courses in Chinese can count toward one required Humanities course in General Education. (H)
  • CHI22-334 Topics Intrm/Adv Modern Chinese
    This course facilitates active development of proficiency abilities in presentational, interpretive and interpersonal modes. Materials are primarily texts of various genres, accommodated to mixed ability levels. Topics will usually center on the cultural and functional issues in the ecology and environment as presented in Chinese language, including topics as diverse as daily interactions and business transactions, or traditional and modern literature and historical reference. The course is offered for 2 and 4 credits in any given semester and can be repeated. Contributes to Environmental Studies and International Studies Prerequisite: Chinese 22-204, or equivalent placement. Taking two 2-credit courses in Chinese can count toward one required Humanities course in General Education. (H)

History

  • HIS16-214 History of East Asia
    This course is a broad introduction to the major developments in East Asian history, society, and culture from pre-history to the present, with an emphasis on China. It examines key concepts from politics, philosophy, religion, art, and literature, paying attention to invention and reinvention. It also considers the role of communication and exchange within Asia and across the globe. Contributes to International Studies. (Biennially) (H)
  • HIS16-324 Topics in Asian History
    Thematic courses with a focus on Asian history. May be repeated with change in topic. Contributes to International Studies. (H)

Political Science

  • PSC32-284 Japanese Politics, Culture & Society
    This course explores the historical and cultural context of contemporary Japanese politics, the political institutions of the 1955 system, the policy-making process in post-war Japan, and the effects of the 1994 political reforms. This course is open only to first years and sophomores. Juniors and seniors may register with the permission of the instructor. Contributes to International Studies. (ScS) (Comparative politics)
  • PSC32-624 Germany & Japan: Losers of World War II Institutions, Economic Growth, and Political Culture in Japan and Germany in the Postw
    This course compares democratic institutions, economic growth, and political culture in Japan and Germany in the postwar era. It also examines current challenges, including women in politics, nuclear power, immigration and regional dynamics. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: Political Science 32-364 or 32-384, or permission of instructor. (ScS) (Comparative politics)
  • PSC32-644 The Chinese Cultural Revolution
    This seminar explores the causes of the Cultural Revolution, the role of Mao and Mao Zedong thought, the experiences of various groups in society during the Cultural Revolution, and the effects of the Cultural Revolution on contemporary China. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: Political Science 32-364 or 32-384, or permission of instructor. (ScS) (Comparative politics)
  • PSC32-654 Women and Politics in Europe and Asia
    A study of women and politics in Europe and Asia from a comparative perspective. Explores the role ideology, institutions, culture and social movements play in creating opportunities and constraints for women in the political realm. Contributes to Feminist Studies and International Studies. Prerequisite: Political Science 32-144. (ScS) (SJ) (Comparative Politics)

Religion

  • REL19-284 Buddhist Traditions
    A historical and thematic introduction to the central ideas and practices of Buddhism. The course takes a multi-disciplinary approach to central religious concepts and myths in classical texts and popular traditions, beginning with the historical Buddha and early developments in India, Sri Lanka and Tibet. The course surveys the spread of Buddhism throughout Asia and to other regions of the world, including North America. Ethics, gender issues, and social movements are explored. Contributes to International Studies. (H) (SJ)

See the course catalog  for complete course descriptions.

Art History

  • ARH71-044 Intro to Art Hist: Greek & Ital Renaiss.
    This course provides an introduction to the disciplinary methods and concepts of art history, presented in the context of Greek Classical and Hellenistic art and Italian Renaissance art. Open only to first- or second-year students, or with consent of the instructor. Contributes to Early Modern Studies and International Studies. (Annually) (FAL) (WA)
  • ARH71-054 Introduction to Art History: Modern Era
    This course provides an introduction to the disciplinary methods and concepts of art history, presented in the context of European and American art from the 18th to the 20th centuries. Open only to first- or second-year students, or with consent of the instructor. Contributes to International Studies. (Annually) (FAL) (WA)
  • ARH71-414 Greek & Roman Art of Hellenistic Era
    A survey of the formation of Roman art and ancient art theory within the context of the Hellenistic world, c. 400 B.C. to c. A.D. 79. It covers Greek art from the Classical and Hellenistic periods (c. 480 - 30 B.C.) and contemporary Roman art of the Mid and Late Republic and early Empire (c. 390 B.C - c. A.D. 79). The course will involve considerable study of cultural context and social structure and will examine theoretical models of cultural formation. It uses extensive readings in ancient history and original ancient texts (in translation). Contributes to Classics and International Studies. (Annually) (FAL) (WA)
  • ARH71-424 Art of Spain, 711-1700
    A survey of the art and architecture of Spain, from the Muslim conquest of Toledo to the end of the Habsburg Monarchy, with a concentration on the ideological and political shifts that occurred during Spain's emergence as a global power. Beginning with the convivencia (coexistence) between Christians, Muslims and Jews, the course examines aspects of Mozarabic and Mudejar art and identity and the production and trade of Islamic and Christian religious and courtly objects and luxury arts. After examining the complex of events that occurred in 1492, the final part of the course concentrates on Spanish Golden Age painting under the Habsburg Empire. Contributes to Early Modern Studies and International Studies. (Annually) (FAL) (WA)
  • ARH71-494 Modern Architecture
    A survey of Euro-American architecture from c. 1750 through present day. Material considers the context of intellectual history, industrial and political revolutions, mass culture and technological innovation. It is also an introduction to issues of architectural theory and the history of the modern architectural profession. Contributes to International Studies. (Biennially) (FAL) (WA)
  • ARH71-514 Rococo to Romanticism
    Encompasses the visual arts produced in Europe and the United States during the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Considers Rococo art made under the ancient régime, the influence of Enlightenment thought on the academic tradition, Salon culture, Neo-Classicism in art, Romantic painting, and native and colonial American art. Issues to be addressed include the relationship between revolution and art; the representations of gender, race and class; the tensions between Enlightenment and Romantic philosophies, and the connections between imperialism and art. Contributes to International Studies. (Biennially) (FAL) (WA)
  • ARH71-524 19th C Art In Europe & the United State
    Encompasses the visual arts produced in Europe and the United States between 1830 and 1900. Organized according to chronological developments in the history of nineteenth-century art, concentrating on the emergence of a photographic visual culture, Realism in art, painting in the academy, the Impressionists, and post-Impressionist movements such as Divisionism, Symbolism, and Art Nouveau. The course also focuses on thematic issues including the rise of mass culture; class identity and conflict; gender in artistic representation and practice; and the politicization of art. Contributes to International Studies. (Biennially) (FAL) (WA)
  • ARH71-534 Modernism and the 20th C Avant Gardes
    Encompasses the visual arts produced in Europe and the United States between 1900 and 1945. Organized according to chronological developments in the history of twentieth-century art, concentrating on fin de siècle design, Fauvism, Cubism, Expressionism, the Russian avant-garde, De Stijl, photography and painting between the wars, Surrealism, and art under totalitarian regimes. The course also focuses on thematic issues including primitivism and the colonial imaginary; gender and modern art; abstraction in theory and practice; and the politics of modernism. Contributes to International Studies. (Biennially) (FAL) (WA)

English

  • ENG10-154 Topics in British Literature I
    Beowulf to 1785. An historically organized course spanning a millennium of literary greatness, with particular emphases on social and cultural change and methods of literary analysis. May be taken independently of English 10-164. Contributes to Early Modern Studies, and International Studies. (H) (WA)
  • ENG10-164 Topics in British Literature II
    1785 to present. An historically organized course. May be taken independently of English 10-154. Contributes to International Studies. (H) (WA)
  • ENG10-604 Topics in Medieval Literature
    An advanced introduction to some of the best literature of the medieval period. Topics will vary but may include such authors as the Beowulf-poet, Chaucer, Malory and Langland. Some possible topics include quest-narratives, piety, drama, images of women, autobiography, and allegory. May be repeated with change in topic. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: One course in English or permission of instructor. (H)
  • ENG10-614 Topics in Early English Literature
    This course covers literature of the Medieval and Renaissance periods, with varying focus. Potential themes include Medieval and Renaissance Drama, Early English Lyric Poetry, the Renaissance, Narrative Form and Earlier English Religious Poetry. May be repeated with change in topic. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: One course in English or permission of instructor. (H)
  • ENG10-624 Shakespeare
    An intensive introduction to the works of William Shakespeare. The selection of works will vary from semester to semester but will address the breadth of Shakespeare's achievement. Contributes to Early Modern Studies, International Studies, and Theatre. Prerequisite: One course in English or permission of instructor. (H)
  • ENG10-654 Topics in 18th Century British Lit
    A study of British writing of the long 18th century (1660-1800), with particular attention to cultural continuity and change. Focus and authors will vary; offerings include Sexual Politics of the Restoration Age, Reason and Madness in 18th-Century Fiction, Enlightenment Self-Fashioning, Center and Periphery: the Problem of the British 18th Century. May be repeated with change in topic. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: One course in English or permission of instructor. (H)
  • ENG10-664 Topics in Romanticism
    This course will emphasize the poetry and prose of traditional Romantic writers such as Wordsworth, Keats, Coleridge, Hazlitt, Tighe and Barbauld, and will explore the Romantic-era work of novelists like Jane Austen, Mary Shelley, Charlotte Smith, Sir Walter Scott and Ann Radcliffe. Topics for this course will vary and may include Romanticism and Gender, The Byronic Hero, and Romanticism and Aesthetics. May be repeated with change in topic. Contributes to Feminist Studies and International Studies. Prerequisite: One course in English or permission of instructor. (H)
  • ENG10-674 Topics in Victorian Lit & Culture
    This course will explore the Victorian period in British culture through the dominant literary genre of that period: the novel. Authors studied may include Dickens, Eliot, Trollope, Hardy, Braddon, Wilde, Collins and the Brontë sisters. Specific topics for this course will vary and may include Austen and Brontë, Victorian Mystery, Realism and Sensationalism, and Victorian Arts. May be repeated with change in topic. Contributes to Feminist Studies and International Studies. Prerequisite: One course in English or permission of instructor. (H)
  • ENG10-684 Topics in 20th Century British Lit
    This course will focus on the development of British modernisms and postmodernisms, with particular attention to the diverse aesthetic strategies that challenged, reinforced, and reconstructed ideas about subjectivity, gender, sexuality, nation and novels. Contributes to Feminist Studies and International Studies May be repeated with change in topic. Prerequisite: One course in English or permission of instructor. (H)

French

  • FRE11-304 Selected Topics
    May be repeated with change in topic. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: French 11-204 or equivalent.
  • FRE11-314 Topics in Literature and Film
    This course introduces the critical appreciation of a wide variety of texts, including but not limited to film, poetry, short stories, essays, novellas, novels, diaries, journalism and stories told through music or images. Focused topics encourage students to make interdisciplinary connections regarding current social, political and cultural issues. Students greatly refine their reading, writing, critical thinking and cultural literacy skills, including through regular group discussion of French and Francophone cultures as portrayed in literature and film. Develops intermediate and advanced oral and written proficiencies. May be repeated with change in topic. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: French 11-204, or equivalent placement. (H) (WA)

FRE 11-344 French Cinema
This course provides an introduction to French cinema. It closely analyzes films from the period 1900-present. Topics encourage students to make interdisciplinary connections regarding social, political and cultural issues. Students refine their critical thinking and cultural literacy skills, sharpen their linguistic facility and accuracy, and expand their awareness of the French and Francophone world. The course also includes practice of essay writing skills as related to contemporary film. Offerings alternate between French Cinema and Women in/on Film. Develops intermediate and advanced oral and written proficiencies. May be repeated with change in topic. Prerequisite: French 11-124 or French 11-204, or equivalent placement. (H) (WA)

  • FRE11-354 Topics in French Culture
    This course closely analyzes French and/or Francophone identities as voiced in authentic materials including text, images, video, films and music. Focused topics encourage students to make interdisciplinary connections regarding social, political and cultural issues. Develops intermediate and advanced cultural proficiencies. Offerings alternate between French Civilization 1: History of French Culture, French Civilization 2: Contemporary French Culture, and French Civilization 3: French Food Culture. May be repeated with change in topic. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: French 11-204, or equivalent placement. (H) (WA)
  • FRE11-514 Studies in French Literature
    This course studies selected texts from the modern period, as related to French social, cultural and literary history. Intensive work supports the development of advanced proficiency. May be repeated with change in topic. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: One course from French 11-314, 11-334, or 11-354. (Spring) (H) (WA)
  • FRE11-604 Topics in Literature and Culture
    This course focuses on single authors, movements or themes. Offerings include Moralist Literature/Human Condition, Eighteenth Century/Dangerous Liaisons, Paris/Cities/Parisians, and Writing/Identity/Difference, and Plural France. Intensive work supports the development of advanced proficiency regarding social, cultural and literary contexts. May be repeated with change in topic. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: One course from French 11-314, 11-334, or 11-354. (Spring) (H) (WA)

German

  • GER12-314 Reading German: Text in Context
    This course introduces the critical appreciation of a wide variety of texts. Personal stories (e.g. diary), public stories (e.g. journalistic writing), literary stories (e.g. poetry, novellas, short stories) and stories told in music and visual images form the textual basis for critical engagement. Intensive work supports the development of intermediate and advanced level proficiency. May be repeated with change in content. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: German 12-204, or equivalent placement. (H) (WA)
  • GER12-332 Speak German!
    This course focuses on the development of oral proficiency at all levels, organized around a framework of interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational modes of communication. It promotes autonomy in mixed-ability settings by integrating components where students collaborate as teachers and learners. Blended learning strategies support the development of multiple literacies. Students can take the course for 2 or 4 credits with assessments adjusted accordingly. Students pursuing a major or minor in German may repeat the course to reach the minimum required credits, as the topics rotate to reflect current events and advanced proficiencies. Contributes to Health Studies and International Studies. Prerequisite: German 12-144, or equivalent placement. (Spring) (H)
  • GER12-334 Speak German!
    This course focuses on the development of oral proficiency at all levels, organized around a framework of interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational modes of communication. It promotes autonomy in mixed-ability settings by integrating components where students collaborate as teachers and learners. Blended learning strategies support the development of multiple literacies. Students can take the course for 2 or 4 credits with assessments adjusted accordingly. Students pursuing a major or minor in German may repeat the course to reach the minimum required credits, as the topics rotate to reflect current events and advanced proficiencies. Contributes to Health Studies and International Studies. Prerequisite: German 12-144, or equivalent placement. (Spring) (H)
  • GER12-344 Topics in German Literature & Film Film
    This course emphasizes writing and discussions on selected literary texts and films. Students develop and implement their critical and argumentative skills at and beyond the intermediate level, crafting increasingly complex analyses both individually and in small groups. Students are encouraged to develop their own poetic voice in creative writing assignments at the intermediate and advanced proficiency levels. May be repeated with change in topic. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: German 12-204, or equivalent placement. (H) (WA)
  • GER12-354 Topics in German Culture
    Students develop intermediate and advanced proficiencies, analyzing and comparing culturally significant topics represented in authentic materials. Themes represented in texts, images, videos, films, and music connect areas of literature, history, philosophy, and politics. A focus on social justice and environmentalism invites comparisons in European and global contexts. Course may be repeated as topics rotate: 1. Identities; 2. Movements; 3. Innovations. Contributes to Environmental Studies and International Studies Prerequisite: German 12-204, or equivalent placement. (H) (WA) (SJ)
  • GER12-454 Feminist Studies in German
    Based on readings and discussions on a variety of texts addressing categories of difference including gender, race, class, nation, sexuality, age, ability and religion, students develop advanced proficiency by exploring critical approaches to literature and film. Text selections suggest connections across times and spaces from medieval visionary Hildegard von Bingen to contemporary Literature Nobel Prize winners Herta M
  • GER12-514 Studies in German Literature
    This course studies selected texts from a variety of periods as related to German social, intellectual, cultural and literary history. Text selections productively balance tradition and innovation. The course develops advanced proficiencies in critical and analytical work in the target language, including through intensive practice of academic writing for research purposes and oral expression. May be repeated with change in topic. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: One course from German 12-314, 12-334 or 12-354. (H) (WA)
  • GER12-614 Texts/Contexts
    This course provides practice in close readings of texts as they relate to multiple fields of study. Topics may include Climate Fiction Cli-Fi, Fairy Tales, Genius and Madness, the Figure of the Artist, Memory and Identity, Transnational Writing in German, or Texts of German Environmentalism. Students continue to enlarge their repertoire of strategies for processing meaning and practice increasingly sophisticated modes of expression. Intensive work develops advanced proficiency in academic writing for research purposes and oral expression. May be repeated with change in topic. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: One course from German 12-314, 12-334, or 12-354. No prerequisite if taught in English. (H) (WA)
  • GER12-714 Transnational Identity Narrative: Gender/Nature/Culture
    Taught in English to serve students beyond the German Program, with a corresponding German Tutorial to maintain or develop proficiency in German. Develops literacy in interdisciplinary theoretical frameworks, with a focus on feminist and eco-critical theories. Students practice articulating sophisticated arguments, orally and in writing, when comparing literary and filmic representations of the experience of migration captured in the themes of loss, witness, translation, identity formations, exclusion, relationships to place and cultural memory, through texts from different cultures, media, and historical periods. Further develops intercultural knowledge and competence. Contributes to Environmental Studies, Feminist Studies, Health Studies, International Studies, and Race and Ethnicity Studies. (H) (SJ)
  • GER12-734 Global Leadership and Intercultural Communication
    Taught in English to serve students beyond the German Program, with a corresponding German Tutorial to maintain or develop proficiency in German. The course supports the development of intercultural knowledge and the skills and attitudes required for communicating across cultures. Focus on research and case studies, e.g. of Germany's Mittelstand (small and mid-size enterprises), documenting increasing importance of intercultural communication for global leadership. Contributes to Business and International Studies. (H)

History

  • HIS16-254 History of Early Modern Europe
    This course explores and questions the concept of the early modern period of European history, from the close of the fifteenth to the dawn of the nineteenth century. Students will examine political, cultural, and intellectual developments from the period of feudalism to the modernity ushered in by Atlantic-wide revolutions. The course will examine Renaissance art and theory, Reformation and confessional tumult, sovereignty and expansion. Contributes to Early Modern Studies and International Studies (Biennially) (H)
  • HIS16-264 History of Modern Europe
    This course surveys the history of Europe from the late eighteenth century revolutions through the creation and expansion of the European Union. We explore social, political, intellectual, and cultural developments, paying particular attention to reform movements and revolutions. The course tracks shifting ideas of gender, race, and class, as well as examining Europe's role in the world. Contributes to Data Science, Feminist Studies, and International Studies. (Biennially) (H)
  • HIS16-344 Topics in European History
    Thematic courses with a focus on European history. May be repeated with change in topic. Contributes to International Studies. (H)
  • HIS16-504 History of the British Isles Since 1688
    This course examines the British Isles since the Glorious Revolution via political, social, cultural, and intellectual lenses, integrating imperial and oceanic perspectives. It explores how British inhabitants formed, developed, and governed four distinct nations (England, Ireland, Scotland, and Wales) as part of a single kingdom, constructing one of the most powerful empires of the modern age, leaving a profound legacy in a globalized, post-colonial world. Contributes to International Studies. (Biennially) (H)
  • HIS16-514 Modern France and Empire
    This course investigates French history from 1789 to the present, charting political, social, and cultural developments within France and determining the extent to which these altered, or were influenced by, events outside the borders of the hexagon-in the Empire or in foreign relations. The course pays particular attention to attempts to define French identity within a global context. Contributes to International Studies. (Biennially) (H) (SJ)
  • HIS16-524 Real Game Thrones: Medieval Era in Hist
    This course will chart the development of European society, culture, and politics from ca. 1000 to 1500, from British, European, Atlantic and global perspectives. We will study the combination of legend and history manifest in contemporary and modern appraisals of an era when lines between reality and lore, truth and superstition, secular and spiritual were blurred. Contributes to Early Modern Studies and International Studies. (Biennially) (H)
  • HIS16-534 The Tudors: Politics & Culture
    This course examines the Tudor dynasty, an age of personal monarchy, tyranny, national consolidation, imperial expansion, patriarchy and the rule of wealthy courtiers. Students will explore how the Tudor-Stewart revolution in politics and culture fundamentally transformed Britain and Ireland, with great consequences for the world beyond its borders, between the accession of Henry VII and the death of Elizabeth I. Contributes to Early Modern Studies, Feminist Studies, and International Studies. (Biennially) (H)
  • HIS16-544 History of Human Rights
    This course places contemporary human rights debates within a long historical context, from Classical and religious traditions, through the Enlightenment, the abolition of slavery, and the growth of socialism, to the signing of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948, the movements for decolonization, and the present day. We track the gradual expansion of notions of rights, as well as changing understandings of who counts as human. The course includes discussions of political rights, social and economic rights, women's rights, minority rights, cultural rights, and environmental rights (among many others). Contributes to Data Science, Feminist Studies, and International Studies. (Biennially) (H) (SJ)
  • HIS16-554 The History of Europe's Muslims
    This course traces the history of Muslim presence in Europe from the early Islamic empires in Andalusia, through European imperial experiences with Muslims in Africa and Asia, to the more recent reception of Muslim migrants on European soil. The course questions the intellectual and political utility of defining populations of such cultural, linguistic, and geographical breadth solely by their religion; discusses the development of a European Islam; and debates the existence of a clash of civilizations or a shared Mediterranean culture. Contributes to International Studies, and Race and Ethnicity Studies. (Biennially) (H)

Music

  • MUL80-114 Music Literature I
    A survey of the principle periods of music history and the most important genres, styles, compositional techniques, and composers of each period. Prerequisites: Music Theory 76-101 and 76-103, or permission of instructor. Contributes to International Studies. (Spring) (FAL)
  • MUL80-214 Music Literature II
    A historical survey of music from Classical Antiquity through the Baroque. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: Music Literature 80-114, or permission of instructor. (Fall) (FAL)
  • MUL80-314 Music Literature III
    A historical survey of music since ca. 1750. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: Music Literature 80-214, or permission of instructor. (Spring) (FAL)
  • MUL80-414 Music Literature IV
    Special topics in Music Literature. Contributes to International Studies. (Fall) (FAL) (WA)
  • MUL80-424 Medieval and Renaissance Music
    A survey of Western European music to 1600. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: Music Literature 80-314. (FAL)
  • MUL80-434 Baroque Music
    A survey of Western European music from 1600 to 1750. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: Music Literature 80-314. (FAL) (WA)
  • MUL80-444 Classical and Romantic Music
    A survey of Western European music from 1750 to 1900. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: Music Literature 80-314. (FAL) (WA)
  • MUL80-454 20th Century Music
    A survey of music from 1900 to present day. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: Music Literature 80-314. (FAL) (WA)

Philosophy

  • PHI18-614 Ethos, Identities, Differences
    This course will focus on historical understandings of the interactions between individuals and society, especially on the ways in which a society's ethos, its overarching set of ideals, values and beliefs, relates to the ideals, values and beliefs of individuals within that society. It will examine the ways in which both individual identities and social identities are formed, the extent to which a society constructs individual identity, and vice versa. Further, the course will examine the ways in which differences emerge both within individuals and in society and the extent to which the societal ethos allows and is transformed by difference. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: One course in Philosophy. (H) (CRITICAL HISTORIES)
  • PHI18-624 Being, Structure, Change
    This course focuses upon the conceptual categories through which human beings negotiate their experience of themselves and the world and examines how those categories are formed and gain or lose currency. In every age and currently, ideas about order and structure; what kinds of things there are and how they relate; how things work, be, or become the things they are; and how we are to understand both the processes of change and the background within which change occurs, such as space and time itself, shape both how we see ourselves and the world and how we act in it. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: One course in Philosophy. (H) (CRITICAL HISTORIES).
  • PHI18-634 Experience, Language, Knowledg
    Humans are knowers: we generate truths and beliefs about the world and our place in it that guide our behavior and our work, as well as our cultural and political forms. This course asks questions such as: How is knowledge possible? What counts as knowledge? What are the limits of human knowledge? This kind of inquiry analyses the way knowledge is determined by mental, perceptual, emotional and social phenomena, particularly experience and language, and whether this determination is informed by historical processes. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: One course in Philosophy. (H) (CRITICAL HISTORIES).
  • PHI18-644 Peoples, Power, Organization
    This course focuses on historical understandings and productions of collective social and political identities and agents, the manners (political, economic, cultural, etc.) in which such collectives relate to one another, and the various ways in which such relations have been and could be organized. How might understandings different forms of power and organization assist us in redressing various forms of oppression, domination, exploitation; in furthering various forms of empowerment, equality, justice, liberation? What is the relationship between philosophy and social transformation? Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: One course in Philosophy. (H) (CRITICAL HISTORIES)

Political Science

  • PSC32-414 European Politics
    This course provides an in-depth analysis of the political cultures, structures, processes and policies of selected systems in Europe. In addition, the nature and function of the European Union is considered. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: Political Science 32-144. (ScS) (Comparative politics)
  • PSC32-624 Germany & Japan: Losers of World War II Institutions, Economic Growth, and Political Culture in Japan and Germany in the Postw
    This course compares democratic institutions, economic growth, and political culture in Japan and Germany in the postwar era. It also examines current challenges, including women in politics, nuclear power, immigration and regional dynamics. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: Political Science 32-364 or 32-384, or permission of instructor. (ScS) (Comparative politics)
  • PSC32-654 Women and Politics in Europe and Asia
    A study of women and politics in Europe and Asia from a comparative perspective. Explores the role ideology, institutions, culture and social movements play in creating opportunities and constraints for women in the political realm. Contributes to Feminist Studies and International Studies. Prerequisite: Political Science 32-144. (ScS) (SJ) (Comparative Politics)

Spanish

  • SPA15-364 Cultures of Spain
    Exploration of Peninsular Spanish cultures incorporating a variety of materials and approaches, such as geography, history, architecture, literature, music, art and religion. Also offered as part of SU's advanced Spanish summer study abroad program to Spain in odd-numbered years. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: Spanish 15-164 or equivalent placement or permission of instructor. (H) (SJ) (Spring, Summer)
  • SPA15-444 Iberian Literature Abroad
    Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: One 200 or 300 level course. (H)
  • SPA15-454 Race & Immigration in Spanish Literature Literature
    Exploration of literature written by and about immigrants and people classified as other in Spain. Contributes to Feminist Studies, International Studies, and Race and Ethnicity Studies. Prerequisite: One 200 or 300 level course. (H) (WA)
  • SPA15-464 Spanish Civil War
    Exploration and analysis of literature and film about the Spanish Civil War. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisites: One 200 or 300 level course. (H)(WA)
  • SPA15-644 Gender, Race and Nationalism in Spanish Cinema
    Discussion of topics such as body, performance, migration and cultural exchange through the viewing, discussing and analyzing of recent films from Spain and the Mediterranean world. Contributes to Feminist Studies, International Studies, and Race and Ethnicity Studies. Prerequisite: One 200 or 300 level course. (WA) (H)

See the course catalog  for complete course descriptions.

Anthropology

  • ANT35-244 Race, Class and Gender in the Caribbean
    This course critically examines how the constructs of race, class and gender shape everyday life in the Caribbean. The course will cover history, human-environmental relations, the global circulations of people and capital that continue to create the Caribbean (migration, tourism and development), spiritualities, language, music, and Carnival. Contributes to Feminist Studies, International Studies, Latin American and Border Studies, and Race and Ethnicity Studies. Prerequisite: Anthropology 35-104 or Feminist Studies 04-104. (ScS) (SJ)

Art History

  • ARH71-034 Intro to Art History: Latin American
    This course provides an introduction to the disciplinary methods and concepts of art history, presented in the context of Latin American art, from the pre-Columbian, colonial, and modern eras, including U.S. - Latino art. Open only to first- or second-year students, or with consent of the instructor. Contributes to International Studies, Latin American and Border Studies, and Race and Ethnicity Studies. (Annually) (FAL) (WA) (SJ)
  • ARH71-314 Art of Mesoamerica
    A survey of the ancient Americas, concentrating on the archaeology and ritual aesthetics of the Mezcala, Olmec, Zapotec, Maya, Nayarít, Chupícuaro, Teotihuacan, Totonac, Toltec, Mixtec, Purépecha and Aztec, among others, and focusing on each culture's sense of past and place. In so doing, this course examines the role of archaeology in shaping current understanding of the ancient past, and how that past is exhibited and made part of modern visual culture. Course themes explore social and ritual landscapes, cosmology, palaces, divine kingship, hieroglyphs and Mesoamerican calendars. Contributes to International Studies and Latin American and Border Studies. (Biennially) (FAL) (WA)
  • ARH71-324 Art of the Andes
    A survey of the ancient Americas, concentrating on the archaeology and ritual aesthetics of the Valdivia, Chavín, Jama-Coaque, Tairona, Coclé, Paracas, Nazca, Moche, Tiwanaku, Wari, Chimu and Inca, among others, and focusing on each culture's sense of past and place. In so doing, this course examines the role of archaeology in shaping current understanding of the ancient past, and how that past is exhibited and made part of modern visual culture. Course themes explore social and ritual landscapes, cosmology, mummification, warrior cults, shamanism, visual metaphors and formal processes of abstraction. Contributes to International Studies and Latin American and Border Studies. (Annually) (FAL) (WA)
  • ARH71-364 Native Books, Images and Objects
    As the primary vehicle of communication in the 16th century, and as a model of religion, the Book was part of Spain's effort to colonize the Americas. Yet there already existed systems of recording in Mesoamerica and the Andes, which were both conflicting and commensurate with European notions of the Book. This course examines these concepts by considering books as repositories of spoken words and thought. It questions Western hierarchies of literacy in the pursuit of truth and knowledge, and seeks to understand indigenous American voices in the process. Contributes to Early Modern Studies, International Studies, Latin American and Border Studies, and Race and Ethnicity Studies. (Biennially) (FAL) (WA) (SJ)

History

  • HIS16-234 History of Colonial Latin America
    A time of collisions, encounters, and rebellions, Colonial Latin America explores the individual, social, cultural, and political experiences of Africans, Europeans, and Native Americans between the apogee of the Aztecs, Incas, and Mayas and the Creole wars of independence of the 19th century. By examining pre-Colombian states, early European explorations, la conquista, the settlement of mostly Spanish but also Portuguese and other European colonies, and the responses of a diverse group of local inhabitants, this course explores the complex societies that resulted from the growth and end of global empires and that shaped the future of this diverse region. Contributes to Early Modern Studies, Health Studies, International Studies, Latin American and Border Studies, and Race and Ethnicity Studies. (Biennially) (H)
  • HIS16-244 History of Modern Latin America
    After their independence in the early 19th century, Latin American countries faced the challenge to become nations. This course surveys the many paths that these countries followed, including the rise of nationalism and its overcoming by the neocolonial order, the revolutionary option in Mexico, Cuba, and Nicaragua during the 20th century, the authoritarian responses to national discontent, and the rise of neoliberalism. It also explores how these trends transformed the society, culture, economy, and policies at the local level in response to both national and international influences. Contributes to International Studies, Latin American and Border Studies, and Race and Ethnicity Studies. (Biennially) (H)
  • HIS16-404 Latin American Hist in Film & Literature
    Latin America is a complex territory and an idea suspended between the extremes of despair and hopefulness. Telling its history poses many challenges to the academic historian. Often the history of the land and its people is better expressed in the work of artists, writers and filmmakers. This course ventures into the magical relationships between the artist and that enigmatic territorial and spiritual landscape extending from the Rio Bravo to Tierra del Fuego. Contributes to International Studies, Latin American and Border Studies, and Race and Ethnicity Studies. (Biennially) (H) (SJ)
  • HIS16-414 The Mexican Revolution
    The Mexican Revolution was a fiesta of bullets that transformed Mexico and launched the 20th century. Using the Mexican Revolution as the event that shaped Mexican history throughout the 20th century, this course examines the conditions that mobilized Mexican such as Madero, Zapata, and Villa into a civil war in 1910 and that ended up with a new Constitution in 1917, the challenges, successes, and failures to create institutions that implemented the revolutionary values during the 1920s and 30s, and the value of the Revolution to promote social and political change in the second half of the 20th century. Contributes to International Studies, and Latin American and Border Studies. (Biennially) (H) (SJ)

Philosophy

  • PHI18-284 Philosophies of the Americas
    An introduction to the complex history of Latin American philosophy, including European and indigenous traditions of thought as well as their hybrids. Key issues will be the interpretation and criticism of notions of history and progress, race and ethnicity, colonialism and knowledge production, the philosophical status of indigenous knowledges, and the relation between philosophy and territory. Contributes to Latin American and Border Studies, and Race and Ethnicity Studies. (H)

Political Science

  • PSC32-184 Politics of Latin America & Caribbean
    This introduction to contemporary Latin American and Caribbean politics also allows students with previous knowledge about the region to further their interests. The course is built around some of the key issues which confront Latin America and the Caribbean. Contributes to Anthropology, International Studies, Latin American and Border Studies, Race and Ethnicity Studies, and Sociology. Course is approved to fulfill an upper-level course requirement in the Anthropology major (ScS) (SJ) (Comparative politics).

Spanish

  • SPA15-334 Conversation Through Hispanic Cinema
    An intermediate level course designed to improve conversational, written, and presentational Spanish skills through the discussion of movies from around the Spanish-speaking world. This course is designed specifically for students who have not yet reached confident fluency in the Spanish language. Contributes to International Studies, and Latin American and Border Studies Prerequisite: Spanish 15-164 or equivalent placement.. (WA) (H) (Fall, Spring)
  • SPA15-354 Cultures of Latin America
    Exploration of Latin American cultures incorporating a variety of materials and approaches, such as geography, history, architecture, literature, music, art and religion. Also offered as part of SU's advanced Spanish summer study abroad program to Latin America offered in even-numbered years. Contributes to International Studies, and Latin American and Border Studies. Prerequisite: Spanish 15-164 or equivalent placement or permission of instructor. (H) (SJ) (Fall, Summer)
  • SPA15-504 Selected Topics in Hispano-American Literature
    May be repeated for credit with change in topic. Contributes to International Studies, and Latin American and Border Studies. Prerequisite: One 200 or 300 level course. (H)
  • SPA15-524 Readings in Contemporary Hisp-Amer Liter Hispano-American Literature
    Interpretation and analysis of 20th- and/or 21st-century representative texts from Hispano-America. May be repeated for credit with change in topic. Contributes to International Studies, and Latin American and Border Studies. Prerequisite: One 200 or 300 level course. (H) (WA)
  • SPA15-534 Cultural Memory in Latin America
    This interdisciplinary course will explore the construction of cultural memory-collective meaningful understandings of the past and present in a given socio historical context-in contemporary Latin America through the examination of symbolic systems, practices, and cultural products: written and audiovisual narratives, music, memorials, and popular traditions. Contributes to International Studies, Latin American and Border Studies, and Race and Ethnicity Studies. Prerequisite: One 200 or 300 level course. (H) (WA) (SJ)
  • SPA15-614 Topics in Hispanic Film
    Interpretation and analysis of selected works by Spanish and/or Latin American directors. May be repeated for credit with change in topic. Contributes to International Studies, and Latin American and Border Studies. Prerequisite: One 200 or 300 level course. (H) (WA)
  • SPA15-654 Citizenship & Conflict Colombian Cinema
    Interpretation and analysis of contemporary Colombian films that expose the complex relation between citizenship, state practices and insurgent forces. Contributes to International Studies, Latin American and Border Studies, and Race and Ethnicity Studies. Prerequisite: One 200 or 300 level course. (SJ) (WA) (H)

See the course catalog  for complete course descriptions.

Anthropology

  • ANT35-334 Global Environmental Justice
    An exploration of global environmental issues from a perspective that foregrounds questions of social inequality (differences in socioeconomic status, race, gender, indigeneity, national identity, etc.). The course includes an overview of the U.S. environmental justice movement, a consideration of global inequality, and social theories of nature and culture. Topics addressed may include global climate change, consumerism, pollution and toxic substances, resource extraction, bio-diversity conservation, food production systems, natural disasters, and water scarcity. Students will be required to engage in environmentally oriented activism or service, and to reflect on their experiences as a part of the course. Contributes to Environmental Studies, Feminist Studies, Health Studies, International Studies, and Race and Ethnicity Studies. Prerequisite: Anthropology 35-104, Environmental Studies 49-104, or Feminist Studies 04-104. (ScS) (SJ)

Economics & Business

  • ECO31-564 International Economics
    The theory of comparative advantage, analysis of commercial policy and principles of international finance. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: Economics 31-104. (ScS)
  • BUS30-484 International Management
    An introduction to the issues facing international business today. Explores the dynamic global environment of business management by reviewing the political, legal, technological, competitive, and cultural factors that shape corporations worldwide. Strategic and operational strategies for operating across borders will be identified, along with the complexities of managing individuals in an international business context. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: Business 30-214. (ScS)
  • BUS30-584 International Business
    This course develops a conceptual framework for making business decisions in a globally competitive company. This framework requires an understanding of an environment that has different cultures and values, multiple foreign currencies, alternative capital markets, and country specific risks. The course focuses on the multinational firm's operating environment, global strategy and functional operations. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: Business 30-214 or permission of instructor. (ScS)

English

  • ENG10-514 World Cinema
    A history of narrative film from its origins to the present with an emphasis upon European, Asian, Indian and Third World cinema. Cultural contexts and technological evolution are emphasized. Lang, Eisenstein, Renoir, Truffaut, Fellini, Bergman, Fassbinder, Kurosawa, Ray, Almodovar, and Campion are among the directors studied. German cinema of the Weimar Period, Soviet Silent Cinema and the Theory of Montage, Italian Neorealism, the French New Wave, the Japanese Postwar Renaissance and emergent Third World Cinema are among the organizing principles of this survey. Contributes to International Studies. (H)

History

  • HIS16-014 Disease, Health & Medicine in World Hist
    What is disease? How have different cultures experienced and responded to it? Using case studies from Africa, Europe, Asia, and the Americas, this course examines global ecological changes and global human exchanges as a key factor in the spread of epidemic disease. It also highlights the role of medical and scientific knowledge in the human responses to disease. We explore the changing notions of the body's anatomy and physiology; the role of the environment; the interaction between healers, doctors, and patients; the nature of different therapeutic approaches; and the structure of health care institutions. Contributes to Environmental Studies, Health Studies, and International Studies. (Annually) (H) (WA)
  • HIS16-024 Empires & Empires of Mind in World Hist
    This course traces the evolution of a variety of empires (real or imagined), from the pre-Columbian indigenous, Iberian, French, British, and Dutch empires through the Age of Revolutions, the rise of industry, capitalism, nationalist movements, World Wars, and communism. We will conclude with the process of decolonization and the possible development of an American Empire and other new kinds of empires. Empires, very broadly construed, will be our lens to interpret world history. Contributes to Design Thinking and International Studies (Annually) (H)
  • HIS16-034 Nations and Nationalism in World History
    This course investigates the development of national identities around the world and the nationalisms that describe or defend them. We explore how nations are defined, whether nations are natural expressions of human community, why nationalism has often led to violence, and what the future may be for the nation-state. Contributes to Design Thinking, International Studies, and Race and Ethnicity Studies. (Annually) (H) (WA)
  • HIS16-094 Topics in World History
    This course offers an alternative thematic approach to the study of societies, cultures, and civilizations around the world and their interactions. May be repeated with change in topic. Contributes to International Studies. (Biennially) (H) (WA)
  • HIS16-204 History of Africa
    This survey is an introduction to African cultures and history from pre-colonial times to the present, emphasizing Africa's variety and its connections to other parts of the world. Topics include: environmental challenges; pre-colonial social and political organization; the spread of Islam and Christianity; the impact of the Atlantic slave trade; conquest and resistance; social change under colonial rule; decolonization; neo-colonialism and postcolonial challenges. Contributes to International Studies, and Race and Ethnicity Studies. (Biennially) (H)
  • HIS16-314 Topics in African History
    Thematic courses with a focus on African history. May be repeated with change in topic. Contributes to International Studies. (H)
  • HIS16-374 Topics in Transregional History
    Thematic courses with a comparative or transregional theme (covering at least three different world regions). May be repeated with change in topic. Contributes to International Studies. (H)
  • HIS16-604 Science and Its Publics
    This course explores the relationship between science, technology, and medicine and their publics since the Early Modern period to our recent past. Drawing from case studies that examine the role of scientific societies, formal education, textbooks, popular literature, publicity, and other formal and informal means to disseminate knowledge, students will understand the changing relationship between science and the public sphere, the role that the popularization of science plays in democratic societies, and the impact of popular science and the public perception of science in the production of new scientific knowledge. Contributes to International Studies. (Biennially) (H)
  • HIS16-614 Witches, Nuns, Prostitues, Wives & Queen
    This course explores the multifaceted experiences of women in the British World, from the medieval era to the present. We consider how gender and sexuality have been constructed differently over time and space; the role of churches, states, and empires in defining and proscribing sexual activity, masculinity, and femininity; the social and political expectations placed upon men and women; cultural representations and manifestations of gender and sexuality; the intersection of gender and other categories of difference; and how pivotal, transnational historical events like the Reformation and decolonization affected women and notions of gender. Contributes to Early Modern Studies, Feminist Studies, and International Studies. (Biennially) (H)
  • HIS16-624 History of the Islamic World
    This course traces the development of Islamic societies and cultures throughout the world from Mohammad's seventh-century revelations to the present. Topics include Islamic empires, relations with other groups, art and architecture, science and philosophy, evolution and adaptation. Contributes to International Studies. (H)

Philosophy

  • PHI18-134 Philosophy, Race & Revolution
    This course is oriented around the Haitian Revolution, the only successful slave revolution in history, examining the ways in which it both reflected and responded to the internal contradictions of Western philosophy's developing notion of race and the colonial mission and, on the other hand, its new universalist vision of human rights. How slave revolt exploded this contradiction from within, what its historical and theoretical effects were, and the ways in which related tensions rose again in the wave of anti-colonial revolutions in the 1960s and '70s will be the main focus. We will also consider the rise of postcolonial and decolonial theory in those revolutions' wake. Contributes to Latin American and Border Studies and Race and Ethnicity Studies. (H)

Political Science

  • PSC32-144 Comparative Politics
    An introductory survey of major political systems, representing both Western and non-Western countries. No single political system will be studied in depth. This course provides the tools for such study in the future. Contributes to Design Thinking and International Studies. (Fall, Spring) (ScS)
  • PSC32-224 Middle East Politics
    A survey of the comparative and international politics of the Middle East, focusing on major Arab states, Israel and Iran. Contributes to International Studies. (ScS) (Comparative politics)
  • PSC32-384 International Politics
    An introductory study of the theory and practice of international politics. The course examines both the origins and the consequences of the political organization of the modern world. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: Political Science 32-114 and 32-144. (WA) (ScS) (International relations)
  • PSC32-494 International Political Economy
    A seminar that examines how changes in the international political economy have affected international politics and international relations theory. Prerequisite: Political Science 32-384 or permission of instructor. (ScS) (International relations)
  • PSC32-634 Resistance, Rebellion & Revolution
    Insurrection and revolution have been among the most transformative events and processes in history, destroying powerful systems while creating new ideas, values, relations, and experiences. This course examines both broad conceptual questions about power, collective action, and agency and structuralism and the specificity of such key moments in different times and places. There is a substantial research and writing component. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: Political Science 32-364 or 32-384, or permission of instructor. (ScS) (Comparative politics)

Religion

  • REL19-204 Christian Traditions
    A historical and thematic introduction to the Christian thought and practice. The survey begins with the Jesus movement and continues through the current growth of Christianity in the southern hemisphere, particularly sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America. Literary genres, gender issues, political contexts, social movements and ethical dimensions are explored. Contributes to International Studies. (H) (SJ)
  • REL19-224 Jewish Traditions
    A survey of the history, practices and belief of Judaism from the period of the formation of the Hebrew Bible to the modern era. Contributes to International Studies. (H)
  • REL19-244 Islamic Traditions
    A survey of the history, practices, and beliefs of Islam from Muhammad's era to the modern. It investigates special themes such as mysticism, gender, and politics with attention to diverse cultural contexts. Contributes to International Studies. (H)
  • REL19-274 Hindu Traditions
    A historical and thematic introduction to the religious ideas and practices that developed primarily on the Indian subcontinent. The course surveys central religious concepts and myths in classical texts and popular traditions; the interaction with Buddhism, Jainism, Islam and Sikhism; gender issues; and the relationship between religion and politics in South Asia. Contributes to Feminist Studies and International Studies. (H) (SJ)
  • REL19-324 Women, Goddesses and Religion
    A cross-cultural study of the ways women's voices have been heard and silenced, of the ways that their lives have been influential (as well as violently ended) and of the vital roles women have played in various religious traditions. The course also investigates ways in which female divinity has been conceptualized in various ancient and modern religious traditions. Rituals, communities, visual symbols and sacred texts will provide the material for our explorations and a feminist methodology will provide the lens for our gaze. Contributes to Anthropology, Feminist Studies, and International Studies. (H) (WA) (SJ)
  • REL19-334 Apocalypse
    Why do we imagine the end of everything? Is it fear? Is it control? Is it wanting to let go of control? What do religious traditions do with the idea of apocalypse (a vision, a revelation of things to come)? This course examines those questions in both religious and secular settings (while questioning those boundaries) asking why humans have imagined end times. It also considers why these imaginings exist and how they function. In addition, it raises issues of social justice and expresses hope in a different (and better) future as well as current environmental fears of demise. Contributes to Environmental Studies. (H) (SJ)
  • REL19-344 Animals and Religion
    A cross-cultural study of the ways other-than-human animals are included in and influence several different religious traditions. The course also examines contemporary issues such as factory farming and biomedical experimentation. Ecofeminist and environmental theories and methods inform the course. Contributes to Animal Studies, Environmental Studies, Feminist Studies, and International Studies. (H) (SJ)
  • REL19-364 Pilgrimage
    A critical and comparative exploration of the religious, spiritual, social, cultural, environmental, economic, and political dimensions of religious journey. The course will investigate several theoretical approaches to pilgrimage that foreground issues such as the relation between place and sacred space; the distinction between physical and metaphorical journeys; pilgrims' motivations and goals; the relationship between religious journeying and ordinary life; how cultural values shape and are shaped by pilgrimages; the environmental impacts of pilgrimage; and the relationship between pilgrimage and tourism. Students will apply these theoretical approaches by focusing on particular religious journeys in several traditions. Contributes to Anthropology, Environmental Studies, and International Studies. (H)

Theater

  • THE72-254 East Meets West: Interculturalism & Thea
    An investigation of theatrical interculturalism in a world-wide context. This course examines the series of exchanges, imitations, misunderstandings, and betrayals that took place in theatre during the twentieth-century and the new forms produced at the intersection of cultures. (IP) (WA) (FAL)