The Early Modern Studies Minor curriculum is composed of two groups of courses:

  • Broad Courses: “Broad” courses are structured to “cover” a period, region or subject area.
  • Focus Courses: “Focus” courses are centered on a theme, author, object or issue.

Minor in Early Modern Studies: Five courses from two categories, Broad and Focus. No more than two courses can be selected from any one academic discipline (3 letter prefix).

  • At least two Broad courses from:
  • ARH71-424 Art of Spain, 711-1700
    A survey of the art and architecture of Spain, from the Muslim conquest of Toledo to the end of the Habsburg Monarchy, with a concentration on the ideological and political shifts that occurred during Spain's emergence as a global power. Beginning with the conflicts and resolutions between Christians, Muslims and Jews, the course examines aspects of Mozarabic and Mudejar art and identity, especially in Toledo, and the production and trade of Islamic and Christian manuscripts and luxury arts across Islamic and Christian borders. In Andalusia, the course will dwell on the Great Mosque of Córdoba and the Islamic palaces Madinat al-Zahra and al-Hambra. In the Christian north, the course will dwell on Romanesque architecture and the pilgrimage route to Santiago de Compostela. After examining the complex of events that occurred in 1492, the final part of the course concentrates on Spanish Golden Age painting under the Habsburg Empire. (Annually) (FAL) (WA)
  • HIS16-254 History of Early Modern Europe
    This course explores and questions the concept of the early modern period of European history, from the close of the fifteenth to the dawn of the nineteenth century. Students will examine political, cultural, and intellectual developments from the period of feudalism to the modernity ushered in by Atlantic-wide revolutions. The course will examine Renaissance art and theory, Reformation and confessional tumult, sovereignty and expansion. (Biennially) (H) (IP)
  • PSC32-364 Introduction to Political Theory
    This course introduces students to political theory, through critically analyzing key texts of the Western canon and practicing the methods of conceptual analysis that shape the subfield. We analyze ideologies as well as foundational yet essentially contested political concepts -- such as justice, equality, reason, sovereignty, democracy, consent, obligation, and freedom -- to learn how power shapes ideas and how politics operates within theories. We critically analyze the standpoints, assumptions, and exclusions that shape the canon, with attentiveness to identity and difference. Contributes to Race and Ethnicity Studies. Prerequisites: Political Science 32-114 and 32-144. (ScS) (WA) (SJ) (Political theory)
  • THE72-234 Theatre History
    A course exploring Western theatre and drama in a variety of periods. Theatre performances and plays will be analyzed as functions of different fields of influence (economic realities of production and attendance; politics and power relations within and outside the theatre; social norms regarding gender, race, ethnicity, religion, family, etc.; aesthetic values of the time). In addition, the course is meant to introduce students to methods of critical research and issues of historiography. Contributes to Race and Ethnicities Studies. (Fall) (WA) (FAL)
  • At least two Focus courses from:
  • ARH71-364 Native Books, Images and Objects
    As the primary vehicle of communication in the 16th century, and as a model of religion, the Book was part of Spain's effort to colonize the Americas. Yet there already existed systems of recording in Mesoamerica and the Andes, which were both conflicting and commensurate with European notions of the Book. This course examines these concepts by considering books as repositories of spoken words and thought. In so doing, it questions Western hierarchies of literacy in the pursuit of truth and knowledge, and seeks to understand indigenous American voices in the process. Course topics include: space, place and time in Mexican manuscripts; indigenous cartography; ritual texts and performance; the social roles of indigenous artist-scribes; authorship and historical memory; and alternative recording practices. Students are strongly encouraged but not required to take any 300- course in Latin American art as preparation. Contributes to Latin American and Border Studies, and Race and Ethnicity Studies. (Biennially) (FAL) (WA) (SJ)
  • HIS16-524 Real Game Thrones: Medieval Era in Hist
    This course will chart the development of European society, culture, and politics from ca. 1000 to 1500, from British, European, Atlantic and global perspectives. We will study the combination of legend and history manifest in contemporary and modern appraisals of an era when lines between reality and lore, truth and superstition, secular and spiritual were blurred. (Biennially) (H)
  • ARH71-364 Native Books, Images and Objects
    As the primary vehicle of communication in the 16th century, and as a model of religion, the Book was part of Spain's effort to colonize the Americas. Yet there already existed systems of recording in Mesoamerica and the Andes, which were both conflicting and commensurate with European notions of the Book. This course examines these concepts by considering books as repositories of spoken words and thought. In so doing, it questions Western hierarchies of literacy in the pursuit of truth and knowledge, and seeks to understand indigenous American voices in the process. Course topics include: space, place and time in Mexican manuscripts; indigenous cartography; ritual texts and performance; the social roles of indigenous artist-scribes; authorship and historical memory; and alternative recording practices. Students are strongly encouraged but not required to take any 300- course in Latin American art as preparation. Contributes to Latin American and Border Studies, and Race and Ethnicity Studies. (Biennially) (FAL) (WA) (SJ)
  • HIS16-534 The Tudors: Politics & Culture
    This course examines the Tudor dynasty, an age of personal monarchy, tyranny, national consolidation, imperial expansion, patriarchy and the rule of wealthy courtiers. Students will explore how the Tudor-Stewart revolution in politics and culture fundamentally transformed Britain and Ireland, with great consequences for the world beyond its borders, between the accession of Henry VII and the death of Elizabeth I. Contributes to Feminist Studies. (Biennially) (H) (IP)
  • HIS16-614 Witches, Nuns, Prostitues, Wives & Queen
    This course explores the multifaceted experiences of women in the British World, from the medieval era to the present. We consider how gender and sexuality have been constructed differently over time and space; the role of churches, states, and empires in defining and proscribing sexual activity, masculinity, and femininity; the social and political expectations placed upon men and women; cultural representations and manifestations of gender and sexuality; the intersection of gender and other categories of difference; and how pivotal, transnational historical events like the Reformation and decolonization affected women and notions of gender. Contributes to Feminist Studies. (Biennially) (H)

Additionally, after students declare as a minor, they will be required to write a brief (2-page) paper on how their experience of two different departments encouraged them to think differently about the topic. This will be assessed by the Minor core faculty, and may replace an existing assignment in one of our courses for Minor students. Each semester the registrar will provide a list of courses that satisfy the minor via Web Advisor.