Below you will find a list of our current or recent offerings. See the course catalog for descriptions and updated information.

  • 51-014 Chemistry Appreciation
    A presentation of historic and modern theories and concepts of the nature of matter and bonding. Current problems dealing with synthetic and natural products and their pollutants will be discussed in light of their impact on society. Individual experiments and group demonstrations will be conducted in the laboratory. Contributes to Environmental Studies. (NS)
  • 51-024 Chemistry of the Environment
    This course provides an overview of basic chemical principles and their importance in understanding the complexities of our natural environment. In particular, the course will discuss fundamental chemical concepts such as equilibrium, solubility and acid-base chemistry and their application to environmental processes. Major topics that will be covered include atmospheric and aquatic chemistry, energy production and usage, and principles of toxicology. Contributes to Environmental Studies. (NS)
  • 51-034 Chemistry of Food
    Students in this course will develop a better understanding of food, cooking, and nutrition using basic chemical concepts. Topics that will be discussed include the impact our food choices make on the environment; modern agricultural practices; and the economic, political and social justice issues surrounding the use of food and its availability. Contributes to Environmental Studies and Health Studies. (NS)
  • 51-044 Adderall to Zoloft Undrstndng Struc Drug
    This course explores the three-dimensional structure of carbon-based molecules through the lens of pharmaceutical drugs. Students will learn how to interpret the structure of common pharmaceuticals and discern how those structures dictate their interactions with the body. Emphasis will be placed on the cultural, societal, and economic ramifications of the synthesis of these drugs. Contributes to Health Studies. (NS)
  • 51-064 Chemistry of the Environment (2-2)
    This course provides an overview of basic chemical principles and their importance in understanding the complexities of our natural environment. In particular, the course will discuss fundamental chemical concepts such as equilibrium, solubility and acid-base chemistry and their application to environmental processes. Major topics that will be covered include atmospheric and aquatic chemistry, energy production and usage, and principles of toxicology. Also Environmental Studies 49-064. (NSL)
  • 51-101 Chemical Methods & Techniques Lab I
    This laboratory course will provide students an opportunity to learn and practice common laboratory techniques through self-directed laboratory experiments. To be taken concurrently with Chemistry 51-103. Contributes to Environmental Studies and Health Studies. (NS) (Fall)
  • 51-103 General Chemistry I
    This course will introduce students to fundamental chemical principles and concepts such as atomic structure, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, periodicity, solution chemistry, properties of gases and selected topics in descriptive chemistry. Prerequisite: Mastery of high school-level chemistry. To be taken concurrently with Chemistry 51-103. Contributes to Environmental Studies and Health Studies. (NS) (Fall)
  • 51-201 Chemical Methods & Techniques Lab II
    Students will conduct inquiry-based experiments to enhance their understanding of kinetics, thermodynamics, equilibrium concepts and other topics. Contributes to Health Studies. Prerequisites: Chemistry 51-101 and Chemistry 51-103. To be taken concurrently with Chemistry 51-203. (NS) (Spring)
  • 51-203 General Chemistry II
    This course will introduce topics such as thermodynamics, kinetics and equilibrium. Contributes to Health Studies. Prerequisites: Chemistry 51-103 and Chemistry 51-101. To be taken concurrently with Chemistry 51-201. Students must demonstrate mastery of important concepts from the first semester of general chemistry if the course was not taken at Southwestern or during the previous semester. (NS) (Spring)
  • 51-310 Organic Chem I Lect Recitation
    This course is a supplement to Chemistry 51-314. It gives students the opportunity to use their fundamental understanding of chemical principles to develop new skills and improve their understanding of organic chemistry. To be taken concurrently with Chemistry 51-314. (Fall)
  • 51-314 Organic Chemistry I
    This course is a study of the nature of bonding in carbon-containing molecules and their reactivity. Beginning with fundamental principles, emphasis will be placed on making connections between theory and application. Synthetic and mechanistic approaches will be introduced that lay the groundwork for Organic Chemistry II. Spectroscopic methods for structural determination of organic molecules will be discussed. Prerequisites: Chemistry 51-203. To be taken concurrently with Chemistry 51-310. (NS) (Fall)
  • 51-320 Organic Chemistry Lecture Recitation
    This is course is a supplement to Chemistry 51-324. It gives students the opportunity to use their fundamental understanding of chemical principles to develop new skills and improve their understanding of organic chemistry. To be taken concurrently with Chemistry 51-324. (Fall)
  • 51-323 Organic Chemistry II
    This course is the continuation of Chemistry 51-313. The primary focus will be on the reactions of functional groups: their mechanism and their use in complex synthesis. An introduction to biologically relevant classes of organic molecules as well as modern synthetic methods in organic chemistry will also be included. Three hours per week, plus one hour discussion. Prerequisite: Chemistry 51-313/311. To be taken concurrently with Chemistry 51-321 or 331. (NS) (Spring)
  • 51-324 Organic Chemistry II
    This course is the continuation of Chemistry 51-314. The primary focus will be on the reactions of functional groups: their mechanism and their use in complex synthesis. An introduction to biologically relevant classes of organic molecules as well as modern synthetic methods in organic chemistry will also be included. Prerequisite: Chemistry 51-314. To be taken concurrently with Chemistry 51-320. (NS) (Spring)
  • 51-334 Synthetic & Mechanistic Organic Chemistr
    This course focuses on advanced concepts in organic chemistry dealing broadly with mechanistic determination and synthetic strategies. Subtle electronic and steric factors that greatly affect the reactivity of molecules will be illustrated using a variety of case studies from current literature. These factors will then be applied to the synthesis of complex organic molecules of biological and industrial importance. Emphasis will be placed on modern methods in asymmetric synthesis and organometallics. Prerequisite: Chemistry 51-324. (NS)
  • 51-404 Inorganic Chemistry & Biological Systems
    This course is an introduction to the structure and reactivity of metal complexes with an emphasis on their interaction with biological systems. Fundamental concepts such as electronic structure, symmetry, and molecular orbital theory will be used to determine the structure of transition metal complexes. These models will then be used to describe reactivity with regard to bioinorganic chemistry. Prerequisite: Chemistry 51-314. (NS)
  • 51-414 Organometallic Chemistry
    Metal-carbon bonds lie at the interface of classical organic and inorganic chemistry. This course will explore the nature of this type of bond with an emphasis on its importance in catalysis, biological systems, and pharmaceutical drug design. Fundamental concepts such as symmetry and structure of transition metal complexes will be used to elucidate mechanistic information on the reactions of organometallic complexes. Prerequisite: Chemistry 51-324. (NS)
  • 51-424 Fund of Materials Science & Engineering
    This course focuses on the emergence of structural properties from atomic and molecular-scale interactions by conducting a survey of three broad classes of materials: metals, ceramics and polymers. Particular attention will be paid to atomic structure and bonding, the structure of crystalline solids, phase diagrams, and the application and processing of polymers deployed in additive manufacturing (e.g., 3D Printing) and biomaterials. Also Physics 53-364. Prerequisites: Physics 53-154. Chemistry 51-103 is a pre- or co-requisite for this course. (Spring) (NS)
  • 51-504 Instrumentation Envir & Biolog Analysis
    This course covers the basic principles and practical applications of instrumentation used to study the environment (i.e., water, air, and soil) as well as biological phenomena. Coursework places emphasis on fundamental techniques and the most recent advances in analytical instrumentation. Contributes to Environmental Studies. Prerequisites: Chemistry 51-314. (NS)
  • 51-514 Quantitative Chemical Analysis
    This course focuses on the basic principles of analytical chemistry and how these principles apply to chemical problems. Topics of discussion include statistical analysis in chemistry, calibration methods, chemical equilibria, and spectroscopic methods of analysis. Prerequisites: Chemistry 51-203. (NS)
  • 51-604 Principles of Biochemistry
    This course provides an overview of the major classes of biological macromolecules (proteins, carbohydrates, lipids and nucleic acids) and their functions in cellular structure, information pathways, and enzyme catalysis, and bioenergetics. This foundation will support an introduction to metabolism and key concepts in regulation of central metabolic pathways. This course is designed for students majoring in one of the natural sciences but who do not require a two-semester course in biochemistry. This course should not be taken by chemistry or biochemistry majors. Approved as a cellular/molecular course for use in the Biology major. Prerequisite: Chemistry 51-324. (NS) (Fall)
  • 51-614 General Biochemistry I
    This course focuses on the structure and functional interrelations of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids and nucleic acids in life processes. It is the first course of a two-semester comprehensive sequence, and is designed specifically for chemistry and biochemistry majors as well as those students interested in pursuing scientific research careers. Approved as a cellular/molecular course for use in the Biology major. Prerequisite: Chemistry 51-324. (NS) (Fall)
  • 51-624 General Biochemistry II
    This course focuses on the metabolism (break-down and formation) of carbohydrates, lipids and proteins in the human body and the energy involved with such processes. It is the second course of a two-semester comprehensive sequence and is designed specifically for chemistry and biochemistry majors as well as those students interested in pursuing scientific research careers. Approved as a cellular/molecular course for use in the Biology major. Prerequisites: Chemistry 51-604 or Chemistry 51-614. (NS) (Spring)
  • 51-634 Pharmaceutical Chemistry
    From neurotransmitters to antibiotics, small molecules play a key role in biological processes and human health. This course will explore the structure and function of these secondary metabolites from a chemical perspective. Emphasis will be placed on industrial and bio-synthesis, mechanism of action, clinical applications, and cultural relevance of various classes of biologically relevant molecules (steroids, stimulants, analgesics, anti-virals). Prerequisites: Chemistry 51-604 or Chemistry 51-614. (NS)
  • 51-654 Biochemistry of Nucleic Acids
    A survey of nucleic acid structure and function including topics such as drug- and protein-DNA interactions, molecular recognition, DNA damage modifications and mechanisms, and DNA repair. This course also describes techniques and methods used to analyze nucleic acids. Prerequisites: Chemistry 51-604 or Chemistry 51-614. (NS)
  • 51-694 Biochemistry of Nucleic Acids
    A survey of nucleic acid structure and function including topics such as drug- and protein-DNA interactions, molecular recognition, DNA damage modifications and mechanisms, and DNA repair. This course also describes techniques and methods used to analyze nucleic acids. Prerequisites: Chemistry 51-574 (NS)
  • 51-704 Phys Chem: Thermodynamics & Kinetics
    This course focuses on the fundamental understanding and the quantitative description of chemical and biochemical processes. The course covers thermodynamics (whether processes occur) and kinetics (how fast processes occur). Chemistry majors, biochemistry majors and pre-engineering students are highly encouraged to take this course in their junior year. Prerequisites: Chemistry 51-203, Mathematics 52-264, and Physics 53-164. (NS)
  • 51-714 Quantum Mechanics
    A detailed introduction to quantum mechanics and its applications to atoms and molecules. Also Physics 53-424. Prerequisites: Chemistry 51-203, Mathematics 52-264, and Physics 53-164. (NS)
  • 51-832 Organic Chemistry Lab
    This integrated organic chemistry laboratory course introduces students to the synthesis of molecules and the determination of reaction mechanisms. An emphasis is put on spectroscopic characterization of reaction products and modern techniques in organic chemistry. Techniques include chromatography, distillation, extraction, melting point, and polarimetry. The curriculum is designed to make connections with culturally relevant and socially responsible topics. Prerequisite: Chemistry 51-314. (NS) (WA) (Fall and Spring)
  • 51-842 Advanced Lab in Inorganic Chemistry
    This laboratory course for chemistry and biochemistry majors focuses on the reactivity, structure and synthesis of inorganic and organometallic compounds. Techniques learned cover classic inorganic synthetic methods including inert atmosphere manipulations and theoretical underpinnings of instrumental techniques. Hands-on experience on advanced laboratory instrumentation is used to characterize the compounds synthesized in this course. Prerequisite: Chemistry 51-832. (NS) (WA)
  • 51-852 Advanced Lab in Analytical Chemistry
    This course introduces students to analytical chemistry through participation in a semester-long research project. Students work in groups to develop an original research question and create a proposed research plan, then carry out analytical experiments using available spectroscopic, chromatographic, and mass spectral instrumentation. The course also focuses on conducting appropriate statistical analyses of collected data and contextualizing experimental results within the broader chemical literature. Contributes to Environmental Studies. Prerequisites: Chemistry 51-832. (NS) (WA)
  • 51-862 Advanced Lab in Biochemistry
    A laboratory-based introduction to molecular and biochemical experimental methods and techniques that are commonly used for the analysis of biological molecules. May be repeated with changed topic. When taken in combination with Chemistry 51-604 or 51-614, approved as a cellular/molecular laboratory course for use in the Biology major. Prerequisite: Chemistry 51-832. Concurrent enrollment or credit in Chemistry 51-604 or 51-614. (NS) (WA) (Fall)
  • 51-872 Advanced Lab in Physical Chemistry
    This laboratory course will provide students an opportunity to engage in inquiry-based experiments and computation in thermodynamics, kinetics, quantum chemistry, and spectroscopy. Prerequisite: Chemistry 51-832. (NS) (WA)
  • 51-882 Advanced Lab in Organic Chemistry
    This course explores modern methods used in synthetic organic chemistry through participation in semester long research projects. Students will use chemical databases to develop a synthetic protocol for the formation of a molecule of medical, agricultural, or cultural significance. They will then utilize laboratory techniques such as air-free conditions, solvent purification, chromatography, and spectroscopic analysis to implement their research plans. Prerequisite: Chemistry 51-832. (NS) (WA)
  • 51-911 Research in Chemistry
    This is a laboratory course designed to give students hands-on experience conducting research on questions relevant to chemistry or biochemistry. Students work directly with faculty members in the department to read and analyze literature, design and perform experiments, collect and analyze data, and report the results. Students must make arrangements with individual faculty members before enrolling in this course. May be repeated.
  • 51-912 Research in Chemistry
    This is a laboratory course designed to give students hands-on experience conducting research on questions relevant to chemistry or biochemistry. Students work directly with faculty members in the department to read and analyze literature, design and perform experiments, collect and analyze data, and report the results. Students must make arrangements with individual faculty members before enrolling in this course. May be repeated.
  • 51-913 Research in Chemistry May Be Repeated.
    This is a laboratory course designed to give students hands-on experience conducting research on questions relevant to chemistry or biochemistry. Students work directly with faculty members in the department to read and analyze literature, design and perform experiments, collect and analyze data, and report the results. Students must make arrangements with individual faculty members before enrolling in this course. May be repeated.
  • 51-922 Senior Biochemistry Capstone
    This course requires students to reflect on their biochemistry curriculum and synthesize an original work that can be presented in both a written and oral format. Prerequisite: Senior standing. (WA)
  • 51-932 Senior Chemistry Capstone
    This course requires students to reflect on their laboratory experiences throughout their chemistry or biochemistry major. Students will be required to report their results using written and oral communication skills. Prerequisite: Senior standing. (WA)