Below you will find a list of our current or recent offerings. See the course catalog for descriptions and updated information.

  • 51-014 Chemistry Appreciation
    A presentation of historic and modern theories and concepts of the nature of matter and bonding. Current problems dealing with synthetic and natural products and their pollutants will be discussed in light of their impact on society. Individual experiments and group demonstrations will be conducted in the laboratory. Contributes to Environmental Studies. (NSL)
  • 51-024 Chemistry of the Environment
    This course provides an overview of basic chemical principles and their importance in understanding the complexities of our natural environment. In particular, the course will discuss fundamental chemical concepts such as equilibrium, solubility and acid-base chemistry and their application to environmental processes. Major topics that will be covered include atmospheric and aquatic chemistry, energy production and usage, and principles of toxicology. Contributes to Environmental Studies. (NSL)
  • 51-034 Chemistry of Food
    Students in this course will develop a better understanding of food, cooking, and nutrition using basic chemical concepts. Topics that will be discussed include the chemical basis of taste, flavor and aroma; the role of fermentation and chemical reactions in cooking, food, and beverage production; antioxidants and other macro- and micronutrients in the human diet; modern agricultural practices; and the economic, political and social justice issues surrounding the use of food and its availability. The laboratory portion of the course will focus on kitchen experimentation and cooking techniques, flavor pairing, and molecular gastronomy. (NSL)
  • 51-064 Chemistry of the Environment (2-2)
    This course provides an overview of basic chemical principles and their importance in understanding the complexities of our natural environment. In particular, the course will discuss fundamental chemical concepts such as equilibrium, solubility and acid-base chemistry and their application to environmental processes. Major topics that will be covered include atmospheric and aquatic chemistry, energy production and usage, and principles of toxicology. Also Environmental Studies 49-064. (NSL)
  • 51-101 Chemical Methods and Techniques Lab
    This laboratory course will provide students an opportunity to learn and practice common laboratory techniques through self-directed laboratory experiments. To be taken concurrently with Chemistry 51-103. Contributes to Environmental Studies. (NSL)
  • 51-103 Principles of General Chemistry
    This course will introduce students to fundamental chemical principles and concepts such as atomic structure, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, periodicity, solution chemistry, properties of gases and selected topics in descriptive chemistry. Prerequisite: Mastery of high school-level chemistry. To be taken concurrently with Chemistry 51-101. Contributes to Environmental Studies. (NSL)
  • 51-201 Chemical Kinetics & Equilibrium Lab
    Students will conduct inquiry-based experiments to enhance their understanding of kinetics, thermodynamics, equilibrium concepts and other topics covered in lecture. Prerequisites: Chemistry 51-103/101. To be taken concurrently with Chemistry 51-203. (NSL)
  • 51-203 Chemical Kinetics & Equilibrium
    This course will introduce topics such as thermodynamics, kinetics and equilibrium. Prerequisites: Chemistry 51-103/101. Students must demonstrate mastery of important concepts from the first-semester of general chemistry if the course was not taken at Southwestern or during the previous semester. To be taken concurrently with Chemistry 51-201. (NSL)
  • 51-311 Organic Chemistry I Lab
    Students will be introduced to techniques used to perform experiments on the macroscale as well as the microscale level. Prerequisites: Chemistry 51-203/201. To be taken concurrently with Chemistry 51-314.
  • 51-314 Organic Chemistry I
    This course is a study of the nature of bonding in carbon-containing molecules and their reactivity. Beginning with fundamental principles, emphasis will be placed on making connections between theory and application. Synthetic and mechanistic approaches will be introduced that lay the groundwork for Organic Chemistry II. Spectroscopic methods for structural determination of organic molecules will be discussed. Three hours per week, plus one hour discussion. Prerequisites: Chemistry 51-203/201. To be taken concurrently with Chemistry 51-311. (NSL)
  • 51-321 Organic Chemistry II Lab
    Prerequisite: Chemistry 51-311/314. To be taken concurrently with Chemistry 51-324. (NSL)
  • 51-324 Organic Chemistry II
    This course is the continuation of CHE51-314. The primary focus will be on the reactions of functional groups: their mechanism and their use in complex synthesis. An introduction to biologically relevant classes of organic molecules as well as modern synthetic methods in organic chemistry will also be included. Three hours per week, plus one hour discussion. Prerequisite: Chemistry 51-314/311. To be taken concurrently with Chemistry 51-321 or -331. (NSL)
  • 51-331 Organic Chemistry II for Majors Lab
    This lab is designed specifically for chemistry and biochemistry majors as well as those students interested in pursuing scientific research careers. The course will provide an introduction to advanced experimental techniques including both infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry. Prerequisite: Chemistry 51-314/311 or consent of instructor. To be taken concurrently with Chemistry 51-324. (NSL)
  • 51-334 Synthetic & Mechanistic Organic Chemistr
    This course focuses on advanced concepts in organic chemistry dealing broadly with mechanistic determination and synthetic strategies. Subtle electronic and steric factors that greatly affect the reactivity of molecules will be illustrated using a variety of case studies from current literature. These factors will then be applied to the synthesis of complex organic molecules of biological and industrial importance. Emphasis will be placed on modern methods in asymmetric synthesis and organometallics. Prerequisite: Chemistry 51-324/321 or Chemistry 51-324/331. (NS)
  • 51-404 Inorganic Chemistry & Biological Systems
    This course is an introduction to the structure and reactivity of metal complexes with an emphasis on their interaction with biological systems. Fundamental concepts such as electronic structure, symmetry, and molecular orbital theory will be used to determine the structure of transition metal complexes. These models will then be used to describe reactivity with regard to organometallic catalysis and bioinorganic chemistry. Prerequisite: Chemistry 51-314/311. (NSL)
  • 51-504 Instrumentation Envir & Biolog Analysis
    This course covers the basic principles and practical applications of instrumentation used to study the environment (i.e., water, air, and soil) as well as biological phenomena. Coursework places emphasis on fundamental techniques and the most recent advances in analytical instrumentation. In the laboratory, students will be engaged in a semester-long research project that will introduce them to the use of spectroscopic, chromatographic, and electrochemical instrumentation. Prerequisites: Chemistry 51-314/311 . Contributes to Environmental Studies. (NSL)
  • 51-543 Organic Chemistry I (3-0)
    This course is a study of the nature of bonding in carbon-containing molecules and their reactivity. Beginning with fundamental principles, emphasis will be placed on making connections between theory and application. Synthetic and mechanistic approaches will be introduced that lay the groundwork for Organic Chemistry II. Spectroscopic methods for structural determination of organic molecules will be discussed. Three hours per week, plus one hour recitation. Prerequisites: Chemistry 51-163/161. To be taken concurrently with Chemistry 51-541. (NSL)
  • 51-604 Principles of Biochemistry
    This course provides an overview of the major classes of biological macromolecules (proteins, carbohydrates, lipids and nucleic acids) and their functions in cellular structure, information pathways, and enzyme catalysis, and bioenergetics. This foundation will support an introduction to metabolism and key concepts in regulation of central metabolic pathways. This course is designed for students majoring in one of the natural sciences but who do not require a two-semester course in biochemistry. This course should not be taken by chemistry or biochemistry majors. Approved as a cellular/molecular course for use in the Biology major. Prerequisites: Chemistry 51-324/321 or Chemistry 51-324/331. (NS)
  • 51-614 General Biochemistry I
    /321 or Chemistry 51-324/331. (NS) 51-614 GENERAL BIOCHEMISTRY I (4-0). The course focuses on the structure and functional interrelations of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids and nucleic acids in life processes. It is the first course of a two-semester comprehensive sequence, and is designed specifically for chemistry and biochemistry majors as well as those students interested in pursuing scientific research careers. Approved as a cellular/molecular course for use in the Biology major. Prerequisites: Chemistry 51-324/331 or permission of instructor.
  • 51-624 General Biochemistry II
    Bioenergetics and metabolism. Also Biology 50-624. Prerequisites: Chemistry 51-604 or Chemistry 51-614. (NS)
  • 51-634 Pharmaceutical Chemistry
    From neurotransmitters to antibiotics, small molecules play a key role in biological processes and human health. This course will explore the structure and function of these secondary metabolites from a chemical perspective. Emphasis will be places on industrial and bio-synthesis, mechanism of action, clinical applications, and cultural relevance of various classes of biologically relevant molecules (steroids, stimulants, analgesics, anti-virals). Prerequisites: Chemistry 51-604 or Chemistry 51-614. (NS)
  • 51-644 Advanced Topics in Biochemistry
    Selected topics from the areas of physical biochemistry, enzymology and protein chemistry, nucleic acids chemistry, cellular regulation and recombinant DNA technology will be presented and discussed. Prerequisites: Chemistry 51-604 or Chemistry 51-614. (NS)
  • 51-654 Biochemistry of Nucleic Acids
    A survey of nucleic acid structure and function including topics such as drug- and protein-DNA interactions, molecular recognition, DNA damage modifications and mechanisms, and DNA repair. This course also describes techniques and methods used to analyze nucleic acids. Prerequisites: Chemistry 51-604 or Chemistry 51-614. (NS)
  • 51-694 Biochemistry of Nucleic Acids
    A survey of nucleic acid structure and function including topics such as drug- and protein-DNA interactions, molecular recognition, DNA damage modifications and mechanisms, and DNA repair. This course also describes techniques and methods used to analyze nucleic acids. Prerequisites: Chemistry 51-574 (NS)
  • 51-704 Phys Chem: Thermodynamics & Kinetics
    This course focuses on the fundamental understanding and the quantitative description of chemical and biochemical processes. The course covers thermodynamics (whether processes occur) and kinetics (how fast processes occur) and includes an integrated laboratory that combines wet lab with computational exercises. Biochemistry majors and pre-engineering students are highly encouraged to take this course in their junior year. Prerequisites: Chemistry 51-203/201, Mathematics 52-254 and Physics 53-164. (NSL)
  • 51-714 Phys Chem: Quantum Mech & Stat Mthds
    This course focuses on applied quantum mechanics (how individual molecules behave and interact with each other and light) and statistical mechanics (how collections of molecules behave). Physics majors interested in chemical physics, and Mathematics/Computer Science students are highly encouraged to take this course. Prerequisites: Chemistry 51-203/201, Mathematics 52-254, and Physics 53-164. (NS)
  • 51-832 Advanced Lab in Organic Chemistry
    May be repeated with changed topic. (NSL)
  • 51-842 Advanced Lab in Inorganic Chemistry
    May be repeated with changed topic. (NSL)
  • 51-852 Advanced Lab in Analytical Chemistry
    May be repeated with changed topic. Contributes to Environmental Studies. (NSL)
  • 51-862 Advanced Lab in Biochemistry
    May be repeated with changed topic. Prerequisite or concurrent enrollment in Chemistry 51-604 or Chemistry 51-614. (NSL)
  • 51-872 Advanced Lab in Physical Chemistry
    May be repeated with changed topic. (NSL)
  • 51-911 Methods in Laboratory Research
    May be repeated.
  • 51-912 Methods in Laboratory Research
    May be repeated.
  • 51-921 Laboratory Research With Distinction
    This course is for students who have distinguished themselves in all aspects of research and have made significant progress in their laboratory work undertaken with a faculty member in the department. Students will work with a faculty member to complete their on-going research project. For seniors only upon invitation from the department. Converted to Methods in Laboratory Research (51-911, 912, 913) at the discretion of the instructor on or before the last class day. Prerequisite: Chemistry 51-911, 912, or 913.
  • 51-922 Laboratory Research With Distinction
    This course is for students who have distinguished themselves in all aspects of research and have made significant progress in their laboratory work undertaken with a faculty member in the department. Students will work with a faculty member to complete their on-going research project. For seniors only upon invitation from the department. Converted to Methods in Laboratory Research (51-911, 912, 913) at the discretion of the instructor on or before the last class day. Prerequisite: Chemistry 51-911, 912, or 913.
  • 51-923 Laboratory Research With Distinction
    This course is for students who have distinguished themselves in all aspects of research and have made significant progress in their laboratory work undertaken with a faculty member in the department. Students will work with a faculty member to complete their on-going research project. For seniors only upon invitation from the department. Converted to Methods in Laboratory Research (51-911, 912, 913) at the discretion of the instructor on or before the last class day. Prerequisite: Chemistry 51-911, 912, or 913.
  • 51-932 Senior Capstone
    This course is intended for students who have completed a departmentally approved independent research project. Students will be required to write a scientific article describing their research and complete a presentation and oral examination. Prerequisite: Two credits of Chemistry 51-91X and/or Chemistry 51-92X or eight credits of Chemistry 51-8X2. (NS) (WA)