Art History

Notable Faculty & Student Achievements

January 2021

  • Associate Professor of Art History Allison Miller gave a lecture titled “Purple in Early China” to an art history class at Georgetown University on January 17, 2021.





  • Professor of Art and Art History Thomas Noble Howe  was one of the few authors to contribute two chapters—“Hellenistic” and “Christian Roman Empire”—to the book Sir Banister Fletcher’s Global History of Architecture  (21st edition, Bloomsbury, 2020), which has just been awarded the prestigious Colvin Prize for 2020 by the Society of Architectural Historians of Great Britain.





  • Professor of Art and Art History Thomas Noble Howe contributed four drawings and a short chapter in the recently published book The Artemis Temple at Sardis, by Fikret Yegül (Harvard University Press, 2020). Yegül arrived independently at the same conclusion about the chronology proposed circa 1985 by Howe.





  • Associate Professor of Art History Allison Miller was invited to put her book Kingly Splendor: Court Art and Materiality in Han China  to the Page 99 Test. The Page 99 Testis a blog edited by American screenwriter Marshal Zeringue that asks authors to test their books and analyze the content based on the following idea expressed by Ford Madox Ford: “Open the book to page 99 and read, and the quality of the whole will be revealed to you.” You can read Miller’s January 2nd entry here.





December 2020

  • Professor of Art History Kimberly Smith gave a talk in December 2020 titled “Modeling and Modernism: Charlotte Berend-Corinth’s Work” at the virtually held annual Southeastern College Art Conference (SECAC) hosted by Virginia Commonwealth University School of the Arts.





  • Associate Professor of Art History Allison Miller ’s book Kingly Splendor: Court Art and Materiality in Han China  was published by Columbia University Press.





July 2020

  • Associate Professor of Art History Allison Miller discussed her forthcoming book, Kingly Splendor: Court Art and Materiality in Han China, on a panel titled “The Problem of Objects and Material Culture” at the (virtual) conference, Envisioning East Asian Art History: 20 Books in 2020, hosted by the Society for the Promotion of International English-Language Scholarship on East Asian Art History on July 31. A recording of the conference and other information about the featured books can be found here.