Art History

Notable Faculty & Student Achievements

October 2018

  • Associate Professor of Art History Patrick Hajovsky was the commentator for a panel titled “For Now We See through a Glass, Darkly: European Tropes through a Native Lens” at the American Society for Ethnohistory’s 2018 annual meeting in Oaxaca, Mexico, Oct. 1113.





  • Professor of Art and Art History, Chair of Art History, and Coordinator General of the Restoring Ancient Stabiae Foundation Thomas Noble Howe recently published a book chapter titled “The Social Status of the Villas of Stabiae” in Roman Villas in the Mediterranean Basin: Late Republic to Late Antiquity (eds. G. Métraux and A. Marzano; Cambridge University Press, 2018; pp. 97–119). Howe and Uri Dromi, director general of the Mishkenot Sha’ananim Convention Center in Jerusalem and spokesman of the Rabin and Peres governments (1992–1996), were co-organizers. The publication and conference are the first comprehensive Mediterranean-wide study on the topic involving all national scholarly communities in the Mediterranean. The paper lays out the broad questions of the history of the Stabiae villas in order to guide the research questions at the time of the outset of excavation in 2007.





  • Professor of Art History Kimberly Smith  gave a conference talk titled “Invisible Labor: German Modernist Art and Women’s Work” at the Feminist Art History Conference held at American University in Washington, D.C., Sept. 28 30, 2018.





  • Associate Professor of Art History Allison Miller published the chapter “The Han Hybrid Style: Sculpting an Imperial Utopia” in Dialogue with the Ancients: 100 Bronzes of the Shang, Zhou, and Han Dynasties: The Shen Zhai Collection, edited by Patrick K.M. Kwok. Other contributors to the catalogue include Tianlong Jiao (Denver Art Museum), Wang Tao (Art Institute of Chicago), Eugene Y. Wang (Harvard University), Li Feng (Columbia University), and Sarah Wong (Eskenazi Limited).





  • Professor of Art and Art History and Coordinator General of the Restoring Ancient Stabiae Foundation in Italy Thomas Noble Howe gave an invitational plenary session keynote lecture, “The Development of Panoramic Sensibilities in Art, Literature, Architecture and Gardens in the Villas in the Bay of Naples in the Late Republic and Early Empire: the Perspective from Stabiae,” at the conference Actual Problems of Theory and History of Art (Актуальные проблемы теории и истории искусства), organized by the Lomonosov Moscow State University, Saint Petersburg State University, State Tretyakov Gallery, and State Hermitage Museum, at the Moscow State University, Moscow on Oct. 2, 2018. The lecture points out that a coincidence of innovations in developing a “panoramic” sensibility and cross-axial views uniting architecture to nature in Roman painting, architecture, landscape design, and poetry all occurred simultaneously between c. 30 B.C and A.D. 30 at the end of the Civil Wars and beginning of the Empire.





September 2018

  • Professor of Art and Art History and Coordinator General of the Restoring Ancient Stabiae Foundation Thomas Noble Howe just published an invitational lecture “Прогулка с властью: новый свет на контроль движения и просмотра в элитных римских вилл Стабии” (“Strolling with Power: New Light on Movement and Viewing in the Elite Villas of Stabiae”), originally delivered at the Gasparow Readings: Literature and Politics in Classical Antiquity conference, organized jointly by the Russian State University for the Humanities (RSUH) and by the Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration (RANEPA), at the RSUH in Moscow, April 1922, 2017, in volume 3, issue 4 of Shagi/Steps(2018; pp. 234–250; in Russian). Howe has been working with a team from the State Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg, Russia, since 2010 at Stabiae. The article presents interpretations on how guests actually moved around the garden of the Villa Arianna, Stabiae, based on results of recent excavations and publications from 2007 to 2017.





  • Professor of Art and Art History and Coordinator General of the Restoring Ancient Stabiae Foundation in Italy Thomas Howe just published an invitational lecture titled “A Most Fragile Art Object: Interpreting and Presenting the Strolling Garden of the Villa Arianna, Stabia,” which he gave at the 7th Actual Problems of Theory and History of Art (Актуальные проблемы теории и истории искусства) international research conference, organized by Saint Petersburg State University, Lomonosov Moscow State University, and the State Hermitage Museum, at the State Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg, Russia, October 11–15, 2016. The article appears on pages 691–700 of volume 8 of the conference proceedings.





August 2018

  • Professor of Art and Art History and Chair of Art History Thomas Noble Howe coordinated about fifty people from several teams on the site of the ancient Roman villas of Stabiae near Pompeii in June and July 2018. They included conservators and excavators from the State Hermitage Museum, Saint Petersburg, Russia, and the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, München; conservators from the Warsaw Academy of Fine Arts; architects from the University of Maryland and other schools (including four from Southwestern: Jake Stagner ’20, Haley Druart ’21, Kyle Leon ’20, and Abigail Jendrusch ’19); LiDAR from the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee; and coordination with a team of garden archaeologists from Cornell working in Pompeii. This was Howe’s tenth field season, and November will mark the twentieth year since the start of the project and Howe’s initiation of the Master Plan 2001. Howe is scientific director of the Restoring Ancient Stabiae Foundation.





July 2018

  • Associate Professor of Art History Allison Miller presented the paper “Purple Pigments and Dyes in Han China” at the Eighth Worldwide Conference of the Society for East Asian Archaeology at Nanjing University in Nanjing, China, on Sunday, June 10. Her paper was presented on a panel that she organized and chaired titled “New Research on Technology and Cross-Cultural Exchange in Han China.”





May 2018

  • Professor of Art and Art History Thomas Noble Howe has been invited to present a lecture titled “The Birth and Death of Modern Architecture in America, 1930–1970” in the conference After and Beyond the Crisis: The USA in the 1930s at the University of Perugia, Italy, on May 15, 2018. The conference is part of the lecture series “American Voices in Italy” sponsored by the American Embassy in Rome.





  • Professor of Art and Art History and Chair of Art History Thomas Noble Howe just published a conference paper titled “Bold Imitator: Greek ‘Orders,’ the Autodidact Polymath Architect and the Apollonion of Syracuse” in “The Many Faces of Mimesis, Selected Essays from the 2017 Symposium on the Hellenic Heritage of Western Greece, Siracusa, Sicily, May, 2017,” eds. Heather Reid, Jeremy DeLong, (Parnassos Press, Sioux City, IA, 2018) 1-20. The paper was written from a keynote address he delivered at a conference in Siracusa, Sicily, in May 2017. The paper returns to Howe’s much-referenced dissertation “The Invention of the Doric Order” (Harvard, 1985) and exploits recent scholarship to strengthen his argument that the complex Doric order of architecture was (incredibly) created all at once in one project (the Apollonionthe Apollo Temple), and was nearly complete on its first appearance because it was an adaptive imitation of a type of Egyptian colonnade, by arguing that the first Greek architects were the same type of well-travelled polymaths and masters of rule-and-compass geometry as the first so-called Greek “physiological” philosophers (the ‘Milesians’). The first true ‘liberal arts’-trained (i.e. self-trained) professionals were therefore not philosophers, but architects, who were the first Greeks to write actual prose treatises. Then, as throughout history, what constituted an ‘architect’ was very fluid. The underlying theoretical basis of the paper is that adaptive inheritance is essential to successful innovation and that fluid borders between creative professions are too.





  • Associate Professor of Art History Patrick Hajovsky was invited to a conference on “Sacrifice and Conversion,” held at Harvard University’s Villa I Tatti, outside of Florence, Italy, April 1920, 2018. He presented on Aztec concepts of blood and heart sacrifice and their conversion into Christian idioms through ideas of the body and excess. While there, he was interviewed by a reporter for Arqueología mexicanato respond on the recent theory that the central face of the Aztec Calendar Stone is a portrait of the king Moteuczoma (r. 1502-20).





April 2018

  • Professor of Art and Art History Thomas Noble Howe has been invited to speak to the University of Texas community and the public about his recent publication of the ten-year project to excavate, study, reconstruct and interpret the 108 m. long garden of the ancient Roman Villa Arianna at Stabiae near Pompeii. The lecture will take place Friday, April 20, at 4:00 p.m. in the Department of Classics on the University of Texas campus. The findings have been presented in the last two years at lectures in St. Petersburg, Moscow, Hong Kong, San Antonio, Seattle, the Pompeii area, Rome, and the Representations series on the SU campus, and other preliminary publications. Howe has been lead excavation director, editor and author.





  • Associate Professor of Art History Allison Miller gave an invited lecture titled “Terracotta Warriors after the First Emperor: Re-evaluating the Qin Legacy in the Han” at Saint Mary’s University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, April 5. Her lecture was sponsored by the departments of Modern Languages and Classics, History, and Asian Studies. On April 6, Miller flew to Fredericton, New Brunswick, to give an invited lecture on the same topic for the New Brunswick Society of the Archaeological Institute of America. This lecture, held at New Pavilion Beaverbrook Art Gallery, was organized by faculty from the University of New Brunswick-Fredericton and delivered as part of the Archaeological Institute of America’s 2017–2018 lecture program.





March 2018

  • Associate Professor of Art History Allison Miller gave an invited, remote guest lecture titled “Art & Politics in Mao’s China” in Patricia Schiaffini-Vedani’s “Politics of China Through Literature and Film” course at Texas State University on Feb. 22, 2018.





  • Professor of Art and Art History and Chair of Art History Thomas Noble Howe will lead the formal public presentation of the recent publication of the volume “Excavation and Study of the Garden of the Great Peristyle of the Villa Arianna at Stabiae, 2007-2012,” Quaderni di Studi Pompeiani, VII 1916 (1917) at the Centro di Studi Americani, Palazzo Mattei di Giove, Via Michelangelo Caetani 32, Roma, on March 12, 2018. The event is co-sponsored by the American Embassy in Rome, the American Academy in Rome and the Fondazione Restoring Ancient Stabiae, of which Howe is Scientific Director. The principal lecture, “Strolling with Power: Recent Discoveries at the Garden of the Villa Arianna, Stabiae,” to be given by Howe, will be either in English or Italian.





February 2018

  • Associate Professor of Art History Allison Miller was interviewed live on the television news show, China 24, produced by China Global Television Network. Miller discussed the significance of China’s terracotta army after one of the terracotta warriors was vandalized at the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia.





  • Assistant Professor of Art History Allison Miller gave an invited lecture titled “Terra-cotta Warriors after the First Emperor: Re-evaluating the Qin Legacy in the Han” at the University of Richmond on Feb. 1. The lecture was delivered as part of the Archaeological Institute of America’s 2017–2018 lecture program.





January 2018

  • Professor of Art and Art History and Chair of Art History Thomas Noble Howe in December published an article on the recently published Roman Garden at Stabiae in the journal of the national garden club of Italy, “Un giardino romano a pasesaggio (“A Roman Strolling Garden”) Garden Club, Organo uffficiale dell’ugai – Storia, Scienza, Arte e Mito delle piante e dei fiori, (47, novembre, 2017) 14-16.





  • Associate Professor of Art History Patrick Hajovsky will present his current research at the annual Mesoamerica Meetings (formerly Maya Meetings) at the University of Texas-Austin on Saturday, Jan. 13. This year’s theme, “Mesoamerican Philosophies: Animate Matter, Metaphysics, and the Natural Environment,” includes workshops on Maya hieroglyphs and a symposium of top scholars in Aztec studies across disciplines.