Art History

Notable Faculty & Student Achievements

April 2019

  • Professor of Art and Art History Thomas Noble Howe  published a review of the book Autour des Machines de Vitruv, l’Ingénierie Romaine: Textes, Archéologie. et Restitution, Actes du Colloque Organizé par ERLIS à Caen  (3–4 Jin 2015; eds. Sophie Madelaine and Philippe Fleury, Presses Universitaries de Caen, 2017) for the April 2019 issue of The American Journal of Archaeology  (vol. 123, no. 2).





  • Professor of Art and Art History and Chair of Art History Thomas Noble Howe presented an invitational lecture titled “What Were the First Greek Architects: Designers, Engineers, or Polymaths?” at the conference “Firmitas/Aedificatio”: Die Materiellen, “Körperlichen” Grundlagen der (Gebauten) Architektur, 8. Architekturtheoretisches Kolloquium der Stiftung Bibliothek Werner Oechslin in Zusammenarbeit with Dr. Christiane Salge, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Einsiedeln, Switzerland, April 26, 2019. The presentation was in English, with discussion and questions in German, French, Italian, and English. The lecture expands on several recent responses to his dissertation (Harvard, 1985) to propose that monumental Greek architecture was created not by craftsmen from the nascent building professions but rather by polymath intellectuals.





March 2019

  • Associate Professor of Art History Allison Miller presented the paper “Sculpting an All-Inclusive Empire: The Hybrid Style of Han Dynasty Luxury Bronzes” at the Association for Asian Studies Annual Meeting in Denver, CO, March 24. Her paper was presented as part of a panel titled “Empire Rediscovered: The Concept of Empire in Late Pre-Imperial and Early Imperial Archaeological and Transmitted Sources.”





February 2019

  • Associate Professor of Art History Allison Miller gave an invited lecture at the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World, New York University, on Feb. 12, 2019. Her talk was titled “The Archaeology of Colors: Polychromy and Classical Chinese Bronze Art.”





  • Professor of Art and Art History and Chair of Art History Thomas Noble Howe was invited to give a lecture on Feb. 15 at the School of Architecture and Urban Planning at the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee. Howe lectured on new interpretations of the recent excavations of the Roman villas of Stabiae near Pompeii. Howe is coordinator general of the Restoring Ancient Stabiae Foundation excavations. The University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee will provide one of the field teams for this upcoming season.





January 2019

  • Associate Professor of Art History PatrickHajovsky published “Shifting Panoramas: Contested Visions of Cuzco’s 1650 Earthquake” in The Art Bulletin (vol. 100, no. 4, December 2018, 34–61), the premier journal in the field of art history and one that is also read widely by specialists in other disciplines. The article takes a novel approach to understanding colonial-period religious activism and modern interpretations of an icon of the city of Cuzco, Peru: a large panorama of the devastating 1650 earthquake that has been on view in the city’s cathedral since the seismic event took place. One senior colleague and expert on the painting responded in an email, “Just read your wonderful and so insightful article on the Cuzco earthquake painting in Cuzco. Congratulations. Wonderful research! You have really cracked the  puzzle surrounding the painting and put in its proper context. I learned so much. I am most grateful.”





  • Associate Professor of Art History Patrick Hajovsky will present his current research at the annual Mesoamerica Meetings (formerly Maya Meetings) at the University of Texas-Austin on Saturday, Jan. 13. This year’s theme, “Mesoamerican Philosophies: Animate Matter, Metaphysics, and the Natural Environment,” includes workshops on Maya hieroglyphs and a symposium of top scholars in Aztec studies across disciplines.





November 2018

  • Professor of Art and Art History and Coordinator General of the Restoring Ancient Stabiae Foundation Thomas Nobel Howe has been invited to give a seminar lecture titled “Les Villas Panoramique de Stabies, Découvertes et Interpretations Récentes” in the seminar series “Décor et Architecture Antiques d’Orient et d’Occident” at the École Normale Supérieure in Paris, France, Nov. 29, 2018. The session synthesizes his interpretations of his recent and ongoing excavations at Stabiae with his forthcoming chapter on Hellenistic architecture for the 21st edition of SirBanister Fletcher’s A History of Architecture (Royal Institute of British Architects). The lecture will be in French.





October 2018

  • Associate Professor of Art History Patrick Hajovsky was the commentator for a panel titled “For Now We See through a Glass, Darkly: European Tropes through a Native Lens” at the American Society for Ethnohistory’s 2018 annual meeting in Oaxaca, Mexico, Oct. 1113.





  • Professor of Art and Art History, Chair of Art History, and Coordinator General of the Restoring Ancient Stabiae Foundation Thomas Noble Howe recently published a book chapter titled “The Social Status of the Villas of Stabiae” in Roman Villas in the Mediterranean Basin: Late Republic to Late Antiquity (eds. G. Métraux and A. Marzano; Cambridge University Press, 2018; pp. 97–119). Howe and Uri Dromi, director general of the Mishkenot Sha’ananim Convention Center in Jerusalem and spokesman of the Rabin and Peres governments (1992–1996), were co-organizers. The publication and conference are the first comprehensive Mediterranean-wide study on the topic involving all national scholarly communities in the Mediterranean. The paper lays out the broad questions of the history of the Stabiae villas in order to guide the research questions at the time of the outset of excavation in 2007.





  • Professor of Art History Kimberly Smith  gave a conference talk titled “Invisible Labor: German Modernist Art and Women’s Work” at the Feminist Art History Conference held at American University in Washington, D.C., Sept. 28 30, 2018.





  • Associate Professor of Art History Allison Miller published the chapter “The Han Hybrid Style: Sculpting an Imperial Utopia” in Dialogue with the Ancients: 100 Bronzes of the Shang, Zhou, and Han Dynasties: The Shen Zhai Collection, edited by Patrick K.M. Kwok. Other contributors to the catalogue include Tianlong Jiao (Denver Art Museum), Wang Tao (Art Institute of Chicago), Eugene Y. Wang (Harvard University), Li Feng (Columbia University), and Sarah Wong (Eskenazi Limited).





  • Professor of Art and Art History and Coordinator General of the Restoring Ancient Stabiae Foundation in Italy Thomas Noble Howe gave an invitational plenary session keynote lecture, “The Development of Panoramic Sensibilities in Art, Literature, Architecture and Gardens in the Villas in the Bay of Naples in the Late Republic and Early Empire: the Perspective from Stabiae,” at the conference Actual Problems of Theory and History of Art (Актуальные проблемы теории и истории искусства), organized by the Lomonosov Moscow State University, Saint Petersburg State University, State Tretyakov Gallery, and State Hermitage Museum, at the Moscow State University, Moscow on Oct. 2, 2018. The lecture points out that a coincidence of innovations in developing a “panoramic” sensibility and cross-axial views uniting architecture to nature in Roman painting, architecture, landscape design, and poetry all occurred simultaneously between c. 30 B.C and A.D. 30 at the end of the Civil Wars and beginning of the Empire.





September 2018

  • Professor of Art and Art History and Coordinator General of the Restoring Ancient Stabiae Foundation Thomas Noble Howe just published an invitational lecture “Прогулка с властью: новый свет на контроль движения и просмотра в элитных римских вилл Стабии” (“Strolling with Power: New Light on Movement and Viewing in the Elite Villas of Stabiae”), originally delivered at the Gasparow Readings: Literature and Politics in Classical Antiquity conference, organized jointly by the Russian State University for the Humanities (RSUH) and by the Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration (RANEPA), at the RSUH in Moscow, April 1922, 2017, in volume 3, issue 4 of Shagi/Steps(2018; pp. 234–250; in Russian). Howe has been working with a team from the State Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg, Russia, since 2010 at Stabiae. The article presents interpretations on how guests actually moved around the garden of the Villa Arianna, Stabiae, based on results of recent excavations and publications from 2007 to 2017.





  • Professor of Art and Art History and Coordinator General of the Restoring Ancient Stabiae Foundation in Italy Thomas Howe just published an invitational lecture titled “A Most Fragile Art Object: Interpreting and Presenting the Strolling Garden of the Villa Arianna, Stabia,” which he gave at the 7th Actual Problems of Theory and History of Art (Актуальные проблемы теории и истории искусства) international research conference, organized by Saint Petersburg State University, Lomonosov Moscow State University, and the State Hermitage Museum, at the State Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg, Russia, October 11–15, 2016. The article appears on pages 691–700 of volume 8 of the conference proceedings.





August 2018

  • Professor of Art and Art History and Chair of Art History Thomas Noble Howe coordinated about fifty people from several teams on the site of the ancient Roman villas of Stabiae near Pompeii in June and July 2018. They included conservators and excavators from the State Hermitage Museum, Saint Petersburg, Russia, and the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, München; conservators from the Warsaw Academy of Fine Arts; architects from the University of Maryland and other schools (including four from Southwestern: Jake Stagner ’20, Haley Druart ’21, Kyle Leon ’20, and Abigail Jendrusch ’19); LiDAR from the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee; and coordination with a team of garden archaeologists from Cornell working in Pompeii. This was Howe’s tenth field season, and November will mark the twentieth year since the start of the project and Howe’s initiation of the Master Plan 2001. Howe is scientific director of the Restoring Ancient Stabiae Foundation.





July 2018

  • Associate Professor of Art History Allison Miller presented the paper “Purple Pigments and Dyes in Han China” at the Eighth Worldwide Conference of the Society for East Asian Archaeology at Nanjing University in Nanjing, China, on Sunday, June 10. Her paper was presented on a panel that she organized and chaired titled “New Research on Technology and Cross-Cultural Exchange in Han China.”