Applied Physics

Courses

Below you will find a list of our current or recent offerings. See the course catalog for descriptions and updated information.

We offer private studio lessons with award winning faculty in the following areas:

  • Bassoon
  • Brass
  • Cello
  • Clarinet
  • Euphonium
  • Flute
  • French Horn
  • Guitar
  • Harp
  • Harpsichord
  • Keyboard
  • Oboe
  • Organ
  • Piano
  • Percussion
  • Saxophone
  • Strings
  • String Bass
  • Trombone
  • Trumpet
  • Tuba
  • Viola
  • Violin
  • Voice
  • Woodwind

See the course catalog for complete course descriptions.

Art History

  • ARH71-024 Intro Art Hist: East Asian Art & Arch
    This course provides an introduction to the disciplinary methods and concepts of art history, presented in the context of the art and architecture of China, Korea, and Japan. Emphasis will be placed on how the distinctive styles, genres, and traditions of each region emerged in relation to one another and in the context of a shared East Asian cultural heritage. Open only to first- or second-year students, or with consent of the instructor. Contributes to International Studies. (Annually) (FAL) (WA)
  • ARH71-214 Arts of China
    This course surveys the arts of China from the Neolithic to the contemporary period. Each lecture will consist of an in-depth examination of one of twenty-three landmarks of Chinese art. A variety of works will be considered including jades, ancient bronzes, calligraphy, Buddhist murals, landscape paintings, Chinese gardens, temples, contemporary works, and more. Each work will be examined in its historical context, introducing students to China's social and political history, as well as its major religious and humanistic traditions including Confucianism, Buddhism, and Daoism. Contributes to International Studies. (Biennially) (FAL) (WA)
  • ARH71-224 Arts of Japan
    This course introduces the visual arts of Japan from the Neolithic to the late twentieth century. It will consider the development of the pictorial, sculptural and architectural traditions in light of themes such as religion, gender, cross-cultural exchange, and changes in socio-political life. Biweekly sessions will cover a range of subjects including ceramics, woodblock printing, ink painting, gardens, religious and castle architecture, calligraphy, tea ceremony, and contemporary works. Contributes to International Studies. (Biennially) (FAL) (WA)
  • ARH71-234 Ancient Chinese Art and Civilization
    This course covers China's rich and complex ancient civilization, beginning in the Neolithic and concluding with the fall of China's first long-lasting imperial administration, the Han dynasty. It considers the development and trajectory of Chinese art and architecture in relation to the formation of local states, kingdoms, and the early Chinese empires. Topics covered include painted ceramics, jades, oracle bones, bronze vessels and bells, lacquer works, mummies, gold ornaments, stone shrines, early palaces and cities, silk, and much more. Art works will be studied in the archaeological context in which they were discovered and in relation to the material culture surrounding them. Contributes to International Studies. (Biennially) (FAL) (WA)
  • ARH71-264 Art in China Since 1911
    This course presents an overview of the development of visual arts in China from the late 19th century to the present. Students will consider the ways that recent works created by Chinese artists responded to the turbulent politics of the 20th century, the global art market, and past traditions of Chinese art. Works in a range of mediums will be considered-from painting and calligraphy to architecture, film, and performance works. Contributes to Feminist Studies, International Studies, and Race and Ethnicity Studies. (Biennially) (FAL) (WA)

Chinese

  • CHI22-332 Topics in Intrm/Adv Modern Chinese
    This course facilitates active development of proficiency abilities in presentational, interpretive and interpersonal modes. Materials are primarily texts of various genres, accommodated to mixed ability levels. Topics will usually center on the cultural and functional issues in the ecology and environment as presented in Chinese language, including topics as diverse as daily interactions and business transactions, or traditional and modern literature and historical reference. The course is offered for 2 and 4 credits in any given semester and can be repeated. Contributes to Environmental Studies and International Studies Prerequisite: Chinese 22-204, or equivalent placement. Taking two 2-credit courses in Chinese can count toward one required Humanities course in General Education. (H)
  • CHI22-334 Topics Intrm/Adv Modern Chinese
    This course facilitates active development of proficiency abilities in presentational, interpretive and interpersonal modes. Materials are primarily texts of various genres, accommodated to mixed ability levels. Topics will usually center on the cultural and functional issues in the ecology and environment as presented in Chinese language, including topics as diverse as daily interactions and business transactions, or traditional and modern literature and historical reference. The course is offered for 2 and 4 credits in any given semester and can be repeated. Contributes to Environmental Studies and International Studies Prerequisite: Chinese 22-204, or equivalent placement. Taking two 2-credit courses in Chinese can count toward one required Humanities course in General Education. (H)

History

  • HIS16-214 History of East Asia
    This course is a broad introduction to the major developments in East Asian history, society, and culture from pre-history to the present, with an emphasis on China. It examines key concepts from politics, philosophy, religion, art, and literature, paying attention to invention and reinvention. It also considers the role of communication and exchange within Asia and across the globe. Contributes to International Studies. (Biennially) (H)
  • HIS16-324 Topics in Asian History
    Thematic courses with a focus on Asian history. May be repeated with change in topic. Contributes to International Studies. (H)

Political Science

  • PSC32-284 Japanese Politics, Culture & Society
    This course explores the historical and cultural context of contemporary Japanese politics, the political institutions of the 1955 system, the policy-making process in post-war Japan, and the effects of the 1994 political reforms. This course is open only to first years and sophomores. Juniors and seniors may register with the permission of the instructor. Contributes to International Studies. (ScS) (Comparative politics)
  • PSC32-624 Germany & Japan: Losers of World War II Institutions, Economic Growth, and Political Culture in Japan and Germany in the Postw
    This course compares democratic institutions, economic growth, and political culture in Japan and Germany in the postwar era. It also examines current challenges, including women in politics, nuclear power, immigration and regional dynamics. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: Political Science 32-364 or 32-384, or permission of instructor. (ScS) (Comparative politics)
  • PSC32-644 The Chinese Cultural Revolution
    This seminar explores the causes of the Cultural Revolution, the role of Mao and Mao Zedong thought, the experiences of various groups in society during the Cultural Revolution, and the effects of the Cultural Revolution on contemporary China. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: Political Science 32-364 or 32-384, or permission of instructor. (ScS) (Comparative politics)
  • PSC32-654 Women and Politics in Europe and Asia
    A study of women and politics in Europe and Asia from a comparative perspective. Explores the role ideology, institutions, culture and social movements play in creating opportunities and constraints for women in the political realm. Contributes to Feminist Studies and International Studies. Prerequisite: Political Science 32-144. (ScS) (SJ) (Comparative Politics)

Religion

  • REL19-284 Buddhist Traditions
    A historical and thematic introduction to the central ideas and practices of Buddhism. The course takes a multi-disciplinary approach to central religious concepts and myths in classical texts and popular traditions, beginning with the historical Buddha and early developments in India, Sri Lanka and Tibet. The course surveys the spread of Buddhism throughout Asia and to other regions of the world, including North America. Ethics, gender issues, and social movements are explored. Contributes to International Studies. (H) (SJ)

Music ensembles (ENS) are open to all University students by audition. One hour of credit per semester is granted for each ensemble. All introductory level ensembles (100-level numbers) may be repeated for up to two hours of credit, and each ensemble above the introductory level (200-level numbers) may be repeated for up to six semester hours of credit. Students register for introductory level ensembles in the first two semesters and upper-level ensembles in subsequent semesters. All ensembles may require additional meeting, rehearsal and performance times outside of scheduled class periods, as indicated by the instructor.

  • 78-101 Southwestern University Wind Ensemble
    The SU Wind Ensemble performs one classical music concert per semester and also serves the University by performing at its annual Commencement ceremony. The Ensemble is comprised of music majors and non-music majors. This class exposes all students (and their audience) to as rich and diverse a classical music repertoire as possible while maintaining a commitment to the tenets of a liberal arts education. Students in this course learn to combine artistic expression with disciplined performance practice and to incorporate historical and theoretical knowledge into their understanding of the musical arts. This course is open to all University students with 3-4 years of high school ensemble experience. (Each semester) (FAP)
  • 78-111 Southwestern University Jazz Band
    The SU Jazz Band is open to all University students by audition. This course presents the opportunity to develop the skills necessary to perform in a jazz ensemble while gaining exposure to idiomatic performance practicesand other commercial music genres. Students perform in at least one public concert and feature the music of noted jazz composers such as Miles Davis, Duke Ellington, Thelonious Monk and others. (Each semester) (FAP)
  • 78-121 Southwestern University Singers
    The Southwestern University Singers is open to all students who enjoy choral singing. The goal is to provide a rewarding experience in choral music while developing skills in vocal technique and reading music. The SU Singers perform a wide variety of styles including traditional choral music, folk music, musical theater and spirituals. No audition required. (Each semester) (FAP)
  • 78-131 Southwestern University Chorale
    The purpose of the Southwestern University Chorale is to provide a pre-professional musical experience for vocal music majors. However, membership in the Chorale is open to all students who are experienced choral singers, willing to work at the highest possible level. The Chorale is devoted to rehearsing and performing great choral music of all style periods from the 15th century to the present. Membership is open by audition in first semester of enrollment. (Each semester) (FAP)
  • 78-141 Opera Theatre
    Opera Theatre is open to all students by audition. Students will learn basic stage movement and acting techniques for the lyric theatre, culminating in public performance. All performances will be from memory. One semester each year will be fully costumed with minimal set, while the alternate semester will be minimally produced and performed in concert dress with the goal of helping students grow both as singing actors and in ensemble work. Includes additional lab as indicated by instructor. Prerequisite: concurrent enrollment in applied voice and permission of the instructor. (Each semester) (FAP
  • 78-151 Chamber Music (instrumental)
    The SU instrumental chamber music program seeks to foster a high level of ensemble technique and musicianship among participants. Ensembles are coached by music faculty and give frequent performances in different concert venues, which include events at Southwestern University, regional and statewide conventions. Must be taken concurrently with applied music. Audition required in first semester of enrollment. (Each semester) (FAP)
  • 78-161 Chamber Music (voice)
    The SU vocal chamber music program seeks to foster a high level of ensemble technique among participants. Ensembles are coached by music faculty and give performances in various venues. (Each semester) (FAP)
  • 78-171 Southwestern University Orchestra
    The SU Orchestra performs one classical music concerts per semester and also combines forces on occasion with SU Musical Theatre, Chorale, and Opera Theatre programs. The Orchestra is comprised of music majors and non-music majors. This class exposes all students (and their audience) to as rich and diverse a classical music repertoire as possible while maintaining a commitment to the tenets of a liberal arts education. Students in this course learn to combine artistic expression with disciplined performance practice and to incorporate historical and theoretical knowledge into their understanding of the musical arts. This course is open to all University students with 3-4 years of high school ensemble experience. (Each semester) (FAP)
  • 78-201 Southwestern University Wind Ensemble
    The SU Wind Ensemble performs one classical music concert per semester and also serves the University by performing at its annual Commencement ceremony. The Ensemble is comprised of music majors and non-music majors. This class exposes all students (and their audience) to as rich and diverse a classical music repertoire as possible while maintaining a commitment to the tenets of a liberal arts education. Students in this course learn to combine artistic expression with disciplined performance practice and to incorporate historical and theoretical knowledge into their understanding of the musical arts. This course is open to all University students with 3-4 years of high school ensemble experience. (Each semester) (FAP)
  • 78-211 Southwestern University Jazz Band
    The SU Jazz Band is open to all University students by audition. This course presents the opportunity to develop the skills necessary to perform in a jazz ensemble while gaining exposure to idiomatic performance practicesand other commercial music genres. Students perform in at least one public concert and feature the music of noted jazz composers such as Miles Davis, Duke Ellington, Thelonious Monk and others. (Each semester) (FAP)
  • 78-221 Southwestern University Singers
    The Southwestern University Singers is open to all students who enjoy choral singing. The goal is to provide a rewarding experience in choral music while developing skills in vocal technique and reading music. The SU Singers perform a wide variety of styles including traditional choral music, folk music, musical theater and spirituals. No audition required. (Each semester) (FAP)
  • 78-231 Southwestern University Chorale
    The purpose of the Southwestern University Chorale is to provide a pre-professional musical experience for vocal music majors. However, membership in the Chorale is open to all students who are experienced choral singers, willing to work at the highest possible level. The Chorale is devoted to rehearsing and performing great choral music of all style periods from the 15th century to the present. Membership is open by audition in first semester of enrollment. (Each semester) (FAP)
  • 78-241 Opera Theatre
    Opera Theatre is open to all students by audition. Students will learn basic stage movement and acting techniques for the lyric theatre, culminating in public performance. All performances will be from memory. One semester each year will be fully costumed with minimal set, while the alternate semester will be minimally produced and performed in concert dress with the goal of helping students grow both as singing actors and in ensemble work. Includes additional lab as indicated by instructor. Prerequisite: concurrent enrollment in applied voice and permission of the instructor. (Each semester) (FAP
  • 78-251 Chamber Music (instrumental)
    The SU instrumental chamber music program seeks to foster a high level of ensemble technique and musicianship among participants. Ensembles are coached by music faculty and give frequent performances in different concert venues, which include events at Southwestern University, regional and statewide conventions. Must be taken concurrently with applied music. Audition required in first semester of enrollment. (Each semester) (FAP)
  • 78-261 Chamber Music (voice)
    The SU vocal chamber music program seeks to foster a high level of ensemble technique among participants. Ensembles are coached by music faculty and give performances in various venues. (Each semester) (FAP)
  • 78-271 Southwestern University Orchestra
    The SU Orchestra performs one classical music concerts per semester and also combines forces on occasion with SU Musical Theatre, Chorale, and Opera Theatre programs. The Orchestra is comprised of music majors and non-music majors. This class exposes all students (and their audience) to as rich and diverse a classical music repertoire as possible while maintaining a commitment to the tenets of a liberal arts education. Students in this course learn to combine artistic expression with disciplined performance practice and to incorporate historical and theoretical knowledge into their understanding of the musical arts. This course is open to all University students with 3-4 years of high school ensemble experience. (Each semester) (FAP)

CHEMICAL CONCEPTS AND PROPERTIES I LAB (51-151) (0-4). The laboratory consists of quantitative analysis. To be taken concurrently with Chemistry 51-153.
CHEMICAL CONCEPTS AND PROPERTIES I (51-153) (3-0). General chemistry. Correlation of physical laws with the structure of matter and chemical properties. (POK-Natural World: Physical Science). To be taken concurrently with Chemistry 51-151.
CHEMICAL CONCEPTS AND PROPERTIES II LAB (51-161) (0-4). Prerequisites: Chemistry 51-153/151. To be taken concurrently with Chemistry 51-163.
CHEMICAL CONCEPTS AND PROPERTIES II (51-163) (3-0). Continuation of Chemistry 51-153. Prerequisites: Chemistry 51-153/151. To be taken concurrently with Chemistry 51-161.
PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I (51-713) (3-0). A quantitative study of the states of matter, the laws of thermodynamics, chemical equilibrium, the theory of solutions, and electrochemistry. Prerequisites: Chemistry 51-163/161 or 173/171, Physics 53-154, and Mathematics 52-253. Mathematics 52-753 or 353 is recommended. To be taken concurrently with Chemistry 51-711.

See the course catalog for complete course descriptions.

Art History

  • ARH71-044 Intro to Art Hist: Greek & Ital Renaiss.
    This course provides an introduction to the disciplinary methods and concepts of art history, presented in the context of Greek Classical and Hellenistic art and Italian Renaissance art. Open only to first- or second-year students, or with consent of the instructor. Contributes to Early Modern Studies and International Studies. (Annually) (FAL) (WA)
  • ARH71-054 Introduction to Art History: Modern Era
    This course provides an introduction to the disciplinary methods and concepts of art history, presented in the context of European and American art from the 18th to the 20th centuries. Open only to first- or second-year students, or with consent of the instructor. Contributes to International Studies. (Annually) (FAL) (WA)
  • ARH71-414 Greek & Roman Art of Hellenistic Era
    A survey of the formation of Roman art and ancient art theory within the context of the Hellenistic world, c. 400 B.C. to c. A.D. 79. It covers Greek art from the Classical and Hellenistic periods (c. 480 - 30 B.C.) and contemporary Roman art of the Mid and Late Republic and early Empire (c. 390 B.C - c. A.D. 79). The course will involve considerable study of cultural context and social structure and will examine theoretical models of cultural formation. It uses extensive readings in ancient history and original ancient texts (in translation). Contributes to Classics and International Studies. (Annually) (FAL) (WA)
  • ARH71-424 Art of Spain, 711-1700
    A survey of the art and architecture of Spain, from the Muslim conquest of Toledo to the end of the Habsburg Monarchy, with a concentration on the ideological and political shifts that occurred during Spain's emergence as a global power. Beginning with the convivencia (coexistence) between Christians, Muslims and Jews, the course examines aspects of Mozarabic and Mudejar art and identity and the production and trade of Islamic and Christian religious and courtly objects and luxury arts. After examining the complex of events that occurred in 1492, the final part of the course concentrates on Spanish Golden Age painting under the Habsburg Empire. Contributes to Early Modern Studies and International Studies. (Annually) (FAL) (WA)
  • ARH71-494 Modern Architecture
    A survey of Euro-American architecture from c. 1750 through present day. Material considers the context of intellectual history, industrial and political revolutions, mass culture and technological innovation. It is also an introduction to issues of architectural theory and the history of the modern architectural profession. Contributes to International Studies. (Biennially) (FAL) (WA)
  • ARH71-514 Rococo to Romanticism
    Encompasses the visual arts produced in Europe and the United States during the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Considers Rococo art made under the ancient régime, the influence of Enlightenment thought on the academic tradition, Salon culture, Neo-Classicism in art, Romantic painting, and native and colonial American art. Issues to be addressed include the relationship between revolution and art; the representations of gender, race and class; the tensions between Enlightenment and Romantic philosophies, and the connections between imperialism and art. Contributes to International Studies. (Biennially) (FAL) (WA)
  • ARH71-524 19th C Art In Europe & the United State
    Encompasses the visual arts produced in Europe and the United States between 1830 and 1900. Organized according to chronological developments in the history of nineteenth-century art, concentrating on the emergence of a photographic visual culture, Realism in art, painting in the academy, the Impressionists, and post-Impressionist movements such as Divisionism, Symbolism, and Art Nouveau. The course also focuses on thematic issues including the rise of mass culture; class identity and conflict; gender in artistic representation and practice; and the politicization of art. Contributes to International Studies. (Biennially) (FAL) (WA)
  • ARH71-534 Modernism and the 20th C Avant Gardes
    Encompasses the visual arts produced in Europe and the United States between 1900 and 1945. Organized according to chronological developments in the history of twentieth-century art, concentrating on fin de siècle design, Fauvism, Cubism, Expressionism, the Russian avant-garde, De Stijl, photography and painting between the wars, Surrealism, and art under totalitarian regimes. The course also focuses on thematic issues including primitivism and the colonial imaginary; gender and modern art; abstraction in theory and practice; and the politics of modernism. Contributes to International Studies. (Biennially) (FAL) (WA)

English

  • ENG10-154 Topics in British Literature I
    Beowulf to 1785. An historically organized course spanning a millennium of literary greatness, with particular emphases on social and cultural change and methods of literary analysis. May be taken independently of English 10-164. Contributes to Early Modern Studies, and International Studies. (H) (WA)
  • ENG10-164 Topics in British Literature II
    1785 to present. An historically organized course. May be taken independently of English 10-154. Contributes to International Studies. (H) (WA)
  • ENG10-604 Topics in Medieval Literature
    An advanced introduction to some of the best literature of the medieval period. Topics will vary but may include such authors as the Beowulf-poet, Chaucer, Malory and Langland. Some possible topics include quest-narratives, piety, drama, images of women, autobiography, and allegory. May be repeated with change in topic. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: One course in English or permission of instructor. (H)
  • ENG10-614 Topics in Early English Literature
    This course covers literature of the Medieval and Renaissance periods, with varying focus. Potential themes include Medieval and Renaissance Drama, Early English Lyric Poetry, the Renaissance, Narrative Form and Earlier English Religious Poetry. May be repeated with change in topic. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: One course in English or permission of instructor. (H)
  • ENG10-624 Shakespeare
    An intensive introduction to the works of William Shakespeare. The selection of works will vary from semester to semester but will address the breadth of Shakespeare's achievement. Contributes to Early Modern Studies, International Studies, and Theatre. Prerequisite: One course in English or permission of instructor. (H)
  • ENG10-654 Topics in 18th Century British Lit
    A study of British writing of the long 18th century (1660-1800), with particular attention to cultural continuity and change. Focus and authors will vary; offerings include Sexual Politics of the Restoration Age, Reason and Madness in 18th-Century Fiction, Enlightenment Self-Fashioning, Center and Periphery: the Problem of the British 18th Century. May be repeated with change in topic. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: One course in English or permission of instructor. (H)
  • ENG10-664 Topics in Romanticism
    This course will emphasize the poetry and prose of traditional Romantic writers such as Wordsworth, Keats, Coleridge, Hazlitt, Tighe and Barbauld, and will explore the Romantic-era work of novelists like Jane Austen, Mary Shelley, Charlotte Smith, Sir Walter Scott and Ann Radcliffe. Topics for this course will vary and may include Romanticism and Gender, The Byronic Hero, and Romanticism and Aesthetics. May be repeated with change in topic. Contributes to Feminist Studies and International Studies. Prerequisite: One course in English or permission of instructor. (H)
  • ENG10-674 Topics in Victorian Lit & Culture
    This course will explore the Victorian period in British culture through the dominant literary genre of that period: the novel. Authors studied may include Dickens, Eliot, Trollope, Hardy, Braddon, Wilde, Collins and the Brontë sisters. Specific topics for this course will vary and may include Austen and Brontë, Victorian Mystery, Realism and Sensationalism, and Victorian Arts. May be repeated with change in topic. Contributes to Feminist Studies and International Studies. Prerequisite: One course in English or permission of instructor. (H)
  • ENG10-684 Topics in 20th Century British Lit
    This course will focus on the development of British modernisms and postmodernisms, with particular attention to the diverse aesthetic strategies that challenged, reinforced, and reconstructed ideas about subjectivity, gender, sexuality, nation and novels. Contributes to Feminist Studies and International Studies May be repeated with change in topic. Prerequisite: One course in English or permission of instructor. (H)

French

  • FRE11-314 Topics in Literature and Film
    This course introduces the critical appreciation of a wide variety of texts, including but not limited to film, poetry, short stories, essays, novellas, novels, diaries, journalism and stories told through music or images. Focused topics encourage students to make interdisciplinary connections regarding current social, political and cultural issues. Students greatly refine their reading, writing, critical thinking and cultural literacy skills, including through regular group discussion of French and Francophone cultures as portrayed in literature and film. Develops intermediate and advanced oral and written proficiencies. May be repeated with change in topic. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: French 11-204, or equivalent placement. (H) (WA)

FRE 11-344 French Cinema
This course provides an introduction to French cinema. It closely analyzes films from the period 1900-present. Topics encourage students to make interdisciplinary connections regarding social, political and cultural issues. Students refine their critical thinking and cultural literacy skills, sharpen their linguistic facility and accuracy, and expand their awareness of the French and Francophone world. The course also includes practice of essay writing skills as related to contemporary film. Offerings alternate between French Cinema and Women in/on Film. Develops intermediate and advanced oral and written proficiencies. May be repeated with change in topic. Prerequisite: French 11-124 or French 11-204, or equivalent placement. (H) (WA)

  • FRE11-354 Topics in French Culture
    This course closely analyzes French and/or Francophone identities as voiced in authentic materials including text, images, video, films and music. Focused topics encourage students to make interdisciplinary connections regarding social, political and cultural issues. Develops intermediate and advanced cultural proficiencies. Offerings alternate between French Civilization 1: History of French Culture, French Civilization 2: Contemporary French Culture, and French Civilization 3: French Food Culture. May be repeated with change in topic. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: French 11-204, or equivalent placement. (H) (WA)
  • FRE11-514 Studies in French Literature
    This course studies selected texts from the modern period, as related to French social, cultural and literary history. Intensive work supports the development of advanced proficiency. May be repeated with change in topic. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: One course from French 11-314, 11-334, or 11-354. (Spring) (H) (WA)
  • FRE11-604 Topics in Literature and Culture
    This course focuses on single authors, movements or themes. Offerings include Moralist Literature/Human Condition, Eighteenth Century/Dangerous Liaisons, Paris/Cities/Parisians, and Writing/Identity/Difference, and Plural France. Intensive work supports the development of advanced proficiency regarding social, cultural and literary contexts. May be repeated with change in topic. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: One course from French 11-314, 11-334, or 11-354. (Spring) (H) (WA)

German

  • GER12-314 Reading German: Text in Context
    This course introduces the critical appreciation of a wide variety of texts. Personal stories (e.g. diary), public stories (e.g. journalistic writing), literary stories (e.g. poetry, novellas, short stories) and stories told in music and visual images form the textual basis for critical engagement. Intensive work supports the development of intermediate and advanced level proficiency. May be repeated with change in content. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: German 12-204, or equivalent placement. (H) (WA)
  • GER12-332 Speak German!
    This course focuses on the development of oral proficiency at all levels, organized around a framework of interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational modes of communication. It promotes autonomy in mixed-ability settings by integrating components where students collaborate as teachers and learners. Blended learning strategies support the development of multiple literacies. Students can take the course for 2 or 4 credits with assessments adjusted accordingly. Students pursuing a major or minor in German may repeat the course to reach the minimum required credits, as the topics rotate to reflect current events and advanced proficiencies. Contributes to Health Studies and International Studies. Prerequisite: German 12-144, or equivalent placement. (Spring) (H)
  • GER12-334 Speak German!
    This course focuses on the development of oral proficiency at all levels, organized around a framework of interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational modes of communication. It promotes autonomy in mixed-ability settings by integrating components where students collaborate as teachers and learners. Blended learning strategies support the development of multiple literacies. Students can take the course for 2 or 4 credits with assessments adjusted accordingly. Students pursuing a major or minor in German may repeat the course to reach the minimum required credits, as the topics rotate to reflect current events and advanced proficiencies. Contributes to Health Studies and International Studies. Prerequisite: German 12-144, or equivalent placement. (Spring) (H)
  • GER12-344 Topics in German Literature & Film Film
    This course emphasizes writing and discussions on selected literary texts and films. Students develop and implement their critical and argumentative skills at and beyond the intermediate level, crafting increasingly complex analyses both individually and in small groups. Students are encouraged to develop their own poetic voice in creative writing assignments at the intermediate and advanced proficiency levels. May be repeated with change in topic. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: German 12-204, or equivalent placement. (H) (WA)
  • GER12-354 Topics in German Culture
    Students develop intermediate and advanced proficiencies, analyzing and comparing culturally significant topics represented in authentic materials. Themes represented in texts, images, videos, films, and music connect areas of literature, history, philosophy, and politics. A focus on social justice and environmentalism invites comparisons in European and global contexts. Course may be repeated as topics rotate: 1. Identities; 2. Movements; 3. Innovations. Contributes to Environmental Studies and International Studies Prerequisite: German 12-204, or equivalent placement. (H) (WA) (SJ)
  • GER12-454 Feminist Studies in German
    Based on readings and discussions on a variety of texts addressing categories of difference including gender, race, class, nation, sexuality, age, ability and religion, students develop advanced proficiency by exploring critical approaches to literature and film. Text selections suggest connections across times and spaces from medieval visionary Hildegard von Bingen to contemporary Literature Nobel Prize winners Herta M
  • GER12-514 Studies in German Literature
    This course studies selected texts from a variety of periods as related to German social, intellectual, cultural and literary history. Text selections productively balance tradition and innovation. The course develops advanced proficiencies in critical and analytical work in the target language, including through intensive practice of academic writing for research purposes and oral expression. May be repeated with change in topic. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: One course from German 12-314, 12-334 or 12-354. (H) (WA)
  • GER12-614 Texts/Contexts
    This course provides practice in close readings of texts as they relate to multiple fields of study. Topics may include Climate Fiction Cli-Fi, Fairy Tales, Genius and Madness, the Figure of the Artist, Memory and Identity, Transnational Writing in German, or Texts of German Environmentalism. Students continue to enlarge their repertoire of strategies for processing meaning and practice increasingly sophisticated modes of expression. Intensive work develops advanced proficiency in academic writing for research purposes and oral expression. May be repeated with change in topic. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: One course from German 12-314, 12-334, or 12-354. No prerequisite if taught in English. (H) (WA)
  • GER12-714 Transnational Identity Narrative: Gender/Nature/Culture
    Taught in English to serve students beyond the German Program, with a corresponding German Tutorial to maintain or develop proficiency in German. Develops literacy in interdisciplinary theoretical frameworks, with a focus on feminist and eco-critical theories. Students practice articulating sophisticated arguments, orally and in writing, when comparing literary and filmic representations of the experience of migration captured in the themes of loss, witness, translation, identity formations, exclusion, relationships to place and cultural memory, through texts from different cultures, media, and historical periods. Further develops intercultural knowledge and competence. Contributes to Environmental Studies, Feminist Studies, Health Studies, International Studies, and Race and Ethnicity Studies. (H) (SJ)
  • GER12-734 Global Leadership and Intercultural Communication
    Taught in English to serve students beyond the German Program, with a corresponding German Tutorial to maintain or develop proficiency in German. The course supports the development of intercultural knowledge and the skills and attitudes required for communicating across cultures. Focus on research and case studies, e.g. of Germany's Mittelstand (small and mid-size enterprises), documenting increasing importance of intercultural communication for global leadership. Contributes to Business and International Studies. (H)

History

  • HIS16-254 History of Early Modern Europe
    This course explores and questions the concept of the early modern period of European history, from the close of the fifteenth to the dawn of the nineteenth century. Students will examine political, cultural, and intellectual developments from the period of feudalism to the modernity ushered in by Atlantic-wide revolutions. The course will examine Renaissance art and theory, Reformation and confessional tumult, sovereignty and expansion. Contributes to Early Modern Studies and International Studies (Biennially) (H)
  • HIS16-264 History of Modern Europe
    This course surveys the history of Europe from the late eighteenth century revolutions through the creation and expansion of the European Union. We explore social, political, intellectual, and cultural developments, paying particular attention to reform movements and revolutions. The course tracks shifting ideas of gender, race, and class, as well as examining Europe's role in the world. Contributes to Data Science, Feminist Studies, and International Studies. (Biennially) (H)
  • HIS16-344 Topics in European History
    Thematic courses with a focus on European history. May be repeated with change in topic. Contributes to International Studies. (H)
  • HIS16-504 History of the British Isles Since 1688
    This course examines the British Isles since the Glorious Revolution via political, social, cultural, and intellectual lenses, integrating imperial and oceanic perspectives. It explores how British inhabitants formed, developed, and governed four distinct nations (England, Ireland, Scotland, and Wales) as part of a single kingdom, constructing one of the most powerful empires of the modern age, leaving a profound legacy in a globalized, post-colonial world. Contributes to International Studies. (Biennially) (H)
  • HIS16-514 Modern France and Empire
    This course investigates French history from 1789 to the present, charting political, social, and cultural developments within France and determining the extent to which these altered, or were influenced by, events outside the borders of the hexagon-in the Empire or in foreign relations. The course pays particular attention to attempts to define French identity within a global context. Contributes to International Studies. (Biennially) (H) (SJ)
  • HIS16-524 Real Game Thrones: Medieval Era in Hist
    This course will chart the development of European society, culture, and politics from ca. 1000 to 1500, from British, European, Atlantic and global perspectives. We will study the combination of legend and history manifest in contemporary and modern appraisals of an era when lines between reality and lore, truth and superstition, secular and spiritual were blurred. Contributes to Early Modern Studies and International Studies. (Biennially) (H)
  • HIS16-534 The Tudors: Politics & Culture
    This course examines the Tudor dynasty, an age of personal monarchy, tyranny, national consolidation, imperial expansion, patriarchy and the rule of wealthy courtiers. Students will explore how the Tudor-Stewart revolution in politics and culture fundamentally transformed Britain and Ireland, with great consequences for the world beyond its borders, between the accession of Henry VII and the death of Elizabeth I. Contributes to Early Modern Studies, Feminist Studies, and International Studies. (Biennially) (H)
  • HIS16-544 History of Human Rights
    This course places contemporary human rights debates within a long historical context, from Classical and religious traditions, through the Enlightenment, the abolition of slavery, and the growth of socialism, to the signing of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948, the movements for decolonization, and the present day. We track the gradual expansion of notions of rights, as well as changing understandings of who counts as human. The course includes discussions of political rights, social and economic rights, women's rights, minority rights, cultural rights, and environmental rights (among many others). Contributes to Data Science, Feminist Studies, and International Studies. (Biennially) (H) (SJ)
  • HIS16-554 The History of Europe's Muslims
    This course traces the history of Muslim presence in Europe from the early Islamic empires in Andalusia, through European imperial experiences with Muslims in Africa and Asia, to the more recent reception of Muslim migrants on European soil. The course questions the intellectual and political utility of defining populations of such cultural, linguistic, and geographical breadth solely by their religion; discusses the development of a European Islam; and debates the existence of a clash of civilizations or a shared Mediterranean culture. Contributes to International Studies, and Race and Ethnicity Studies. (Biennially) (H)

Music

  • MUL80-114 Music Literature I
    A survey of the principle periods of music history and the most important genres, styles, compositional techniques, and composers of each period. Prerequisites: Music Theory 76-101 and 76-103, or permission of instructor. Contributes to International Studies. (Spring) (FAL)
  • MUL80-214 Music Literature II
    A historical survey of music from Classical Antiquity through the Baroque. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: Music Literature 80-114, or permission of instructor. (Fall) (FAL)
  • MUL80-314 Music Literature III
    A historical survey of music since ca. 1750. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: Music Literature 80-214, or permission of instructor. (Spring) (FAL)
  • MUL80-414 Music Literature IV
    Special topics in Music Literature. Contributes to International Studies. (Fall) (FAL) (WA)
  • MUL80-424 Medieval and Renaissance Music
    A survey of Western European music to 1600. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: Music Literature 80-314. (FAL)
  • MUL80-434 Baroque Music
    A survey of Western European music from 1600 to 1750. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: Music Literature 80-314. (FAL) (WA)
  • MUL80-444 Classical and Romantic Music
    A survey of Western European music from 1750 to 1900. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: Music Literature 80-314. (FAL) (WA)
  • MUL80-454 20th Century Music
    A survey of music from 1900 to present day. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: Music Literature 80-314. (FAL) (WA)

Philosophy

  • PHI18-614 Ethos, Identities, Differences
    This course will focus on historical understandings of the interactions between individuals and society, especially on the ways in which a society's ethos, its overarching set of ideals, values and beliefs, relates to the ideals, values and beliefs of individuals within that society. It will examine the ways in which both individual identities and social identities are formed, the extent to which a society constructs individual identity, and vice versa. Further, the course will examine the ways in which differences emerge both within individuals and in society and the extent to which the societal ethos allows and is transformed by difference. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: One course in Philosophy. (H) (CRITICAL HISTORIES)
  • PHI18-624 Being, Structure, Change
    This course focuses upon the conceptual categories through which human beings negotiate their experience of themselves and the world and examines how those categories are formed and gain or lose currency. In every age and currently, ideas about order and structure; what kinds of things there are and how they relate; how things work, be, or become the things they are; and how we are to understand both the processes of change and the background within which change occurs, such as space and time itself, shape both how we see ourselves and the world and how we act in it. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: One course in Philosophy. (H) (CRITICAL HISTORIES).
  • PHI18-634 Experience, Language, Knowledg
    Humans are knowers: we generate truths and beliefs about the world and our place in it that guide our behavior and our work, as well as our cultural and political forms. This course asks questions such as: How is knowledge possible? What counts as knowledge? What are the limits of human knowledge? This kind of inquiry analyses the way knowledge is determined by mental, perceptual, emotional and social phenomena, particularly experience and language, and whether this determination is informed by historical processes. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: One course in Philosophy. (H) (CRITICAL HISTORIES).
  • PHI18-644 Peoples, Power, Organization
    This course focuses on historical understandings and productions of collective social and political identities and agents, the manners (political, economic, cultural, etc.) in which such collectives relate to one another, and the various ways in which such relations have been and could be organized. How might understandings different forms of power and organization assist us in redressing various forms of oppression, domination, exploitation; in furthering various forms of empowerment, equality, justice, liberation? What is the relationship between philosophy and social transformation? Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: One course in Philosophy. (H) (CRITICAL HISTORIES)

Political Science

  • PSC32-414 European Politics
    This course provides an in-depth analysis of the political cultures, structures, processes and policies of selected systems in Europe. In addition, the nature and function of the European Union is considered. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: Political Science 32-144. (ScS) (Comparative politics)
  • PSC32-624 Germany & Japan: Losers of World War II Institutions, Economic Growth, and Political Culture in Japan and Germany in the Postw
    This course compares democratic institutions, economic growth, and political culture in Japan and Germany in the postwar era. It also examines current challenges, including women in politics, nuclear power, immigration and regional dynamics. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: Political Science 32-364 or 32-384, or permission of instructor. (ScS) (Comparative politics)
  • PSC32-654 Women and Politics in Europe and Asia
    A study of women and politics in Europe and Asia from a comparative perspective. Explores the role ideology, institutions, culture and social movements play in creating opportunities and constraints for women in the political realm. Contributes to Feminist Studies and International Studies. Prerequisite: Political Science 32-144. (ScS) (SJ) (Comparative Politics)

Spanish

  • SPA15-364 Cultures of Spain
    Exploration of Peninsular Spanish cultures incorporating a variety of materials and approaches, such as geography, history, architecture, literature, music, art and religion. Also offered as part of SU's advanced Spanish summer study abroad program to Spain in odd-numbered years. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: Spanish 15-164 or equivalent placement or permission of instructor. (H) (SJ) (Spring, Summer)
  • SPA15-444 Iberian Literature Abroad
    Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: One 200 or 300 level course. (H)
  • SPA15-454 Race & Immigration in Spanish Literature Literature
    Exploration of literature written by and about immigrants and people classified as other in Spain. Contributes to Feminist Studies, International Studies, and Race and Ethnicity Studies. Prerequisite: One 200 or 300 level course. (H) (WA)
  • SPA15-464 Spanish Civil War
    Exploration and analysis of literature and film about the Spanish Civil War. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisites: One 200 or 300 level course. (H)(WA)
  • SPA15-644 Gender, Race and Nationalism in Spanish Cinema
    Discussion of topics such as body, performance, migration and cultural exchange through the viewing, discussing and analyzing of recent films from Spain and the Mediterranean world. Contributes to Feminist Studies, International Studies, and Race and Ethnicity Studies. Prerequisite: One 200 or 300 level course. (WA) (H)
  • 36-114 Fundamentals of Accounting
    An introduction to financial and managerial accounting concepts and techniques. The course will emphasize the development of the accounting model, analysis of financial statements and the use of accounting information. No previous knowledge of accounting is assumed. (ScS)
  • 36-204 Intermediate Accounting I
    An in-depth study of financial accounting principles, standards and techniques. Covers financial statements, cash, receivables, inventory, plant assets, intangible assets and investments. Special attention is paid to underlying accounting theory. Prerequisite: Accounting 36-114.
  • 36-324 Taxation
    Study of the taxation of income of individual taxpayers: includability or excludability of various types of income, deductibility of costs and expenses, capital gains and losses, and preparation of returns. Prerequisite: Accounting 36-114.
  • 36-524 Auditing
    Study of auditing concepts, standards, objectives and procedures. Includes internal control evaluation, audit reports, evidence, statistical sampling, professional responsibilities and generally accepted auditing standards. Prerequisite: Accounting 36-204.
  • 36-594 Financial Statement Analysis
    Prerequisites: Business 30-474 or Economics 31-474. See Business 30-594. (ScS)

THEATRE COMPANY

Students enrolled in this course will form a company of artists who will support departmental productions by working six hours per week in the areas of scenery, costumes, lighting, or sound. Additionally, students will fulfill back stage crew or front of house management and ushering assignments; and serve as assistant directors, designers, shop managers, and stage managers. Students will also participate in a specified number of workshops, master classes, dramatic literature lecture/discussions, and attend professional and educational performances. The final two semesters of Theatre Company must occur during their senior year.

DESIGN FUNDAMENTALS

This beginning design course provides students the opportunity to explore the major areas of design for theatrical production: costume, scenery/props, sound and lighting. Students will be exposed to theatrical drawing, rendering, script analysis and collaboration. The format of this class will vary from discussion to lecture to group activities.  This course is open to only first year students and sophomores. Juniors and seniors may register with the permission of the instructor.

THEATRE LABORATORY

This course is designed to complement Theatre Company by providing a laboratory setting for students to learn and develop their skills in technical theatre which in turn will support the production component of the curriculum. 

THEATRE PRODUCTION PRACTICUM

One credit is granted for assistant stage management and design positions for main-stage theatre productions. This course may be repeated for up to four credits. Prerequisite: Must be chosen for an assistant stage management or design position for the production season. For non-major students only.

MAKEUP DESIGN

Design and practice in the art of stage, screen and print makeup. The course focuses on development of skills for the practicing theatre artist. 

THEATRE ARTS MANAGEMENT

Studies of the managerial aspects of creating, producing and promoting both commercial and non-profit theatre (educational, community and professional). 

COSTUME DESIGN

A study of the art and practice of theatrical costume design. Emphasis will be placed on the costume designer’s requirements for pre-production. Topics covered include analysis, research, basic figure proportion, color theory, sketching, swatching and rendering. Students will present design concepts through a series of renderings for selected periods and plays.

SCENIC DESIGN

A study of the art and practice of theatrical scenic design. The focus of the course will be on the traditional approaches to scenic design and a study of the elements of composition as they apply to scenery. Students will work with different theatrical styles and settings and will present design concepts through painted renderings and/or models as well as draftings. 

THEATRE SUSTAINABILITY

Using the black-box space Heather Hall as a model, this course introduces students to a variety of strategies that seek to lessen the wasteful material nature often associated with traditional theatre production. Electrical energy consumption and renewable energy production are major facets of study; however, scenery, properties, costumes, performance and the business aspects of theatre production will also be explored. Also Environmental Studies 49-814.

LIGHTING DESIGN

An introductory study of the art and practice of lighting design. Students are introduced to the unique process via hands-on lighting projects in the department’s performance spaces. Design projects include recorded observations of natural and artificial lighting sources followed by the study and research of a selected classic painting. Related topics include additive color theory, lighting in a variety of theatrical spaces, and working with incandescent and LED fixtures.

AUDIO TECHNOLOGY AND DESIGN

An introductory study of theatre sound systems and design for theatrical performance. Using the systems in the Department’s performance spaces, students will become familiar with mixers, effects processors, amplification and microphone technology. Students will experience the design process and gain hands-on experience as assistant designers, audio engineers and programmer/operators in plays produced by the Department. 

SCENIC ELEMENTS AND STAGE PROPERTIES

This course specializes in the area of scenic building and properties production for the stage. Areas covered include basic sewing for the stage and more advanced prop fabrication. From initial script analysis for props, to working with designers, directors, stage management and prop assistants, the student will explore ways to build/buy/borrow or find the props best suited to the production.

SCENE PAINTING

A practical activity-based and lecture course which specializes in the study of various paint finishes and techniques that are applied to stage scenery. When working on class assignments, students will have the opportunity to experiment with paint, binders, tools and techniques. The techniques covered serve as a foundation for further study and exploration in the art of scene painting. 

STAGE MANAGEMENT FOR THE THEATRE

An introduction to stage management for academic and professional theatre. This project-oriented course provides students with a survey of techniques and strategies aimed at modeling successful stage management. Students will gain hands-on experience by working in stage management in the Department’s performance spaces.

  • 77-311 String Methods
    This course is designed to provide a survey of instruction for students studying string instruments. Ability to read music is required and previous experience with a musical instrument is recommended, as this is a performance-oriented course. (Fall) (FAP)
  • 77-321 Woodwind Methods
    This course is designed to provide a survey of instruction for students studying woodwind instruments. Ability to read music is required and previous experience with a musical instrument is recommended, as this is a performance-oriented course. (Fall) (FAP)
  • 77-331 Brass Methods
    This course is designed to provide a survey of instruction for students studying brass instruments. Ability to read music is required and previous experience with a musical instrument is recommended, as this is a performance-oriented course. (Spring) (FAP)
  • 77-341 Percussion Methods
    This course is designed to provide a survey of instruction for students studying instrumental music. Ability to read music is required and previous experience with a musical instrument is recommended, as this is a performance-oriented course. (Spring) (FAP)
  • 77-351 Vocal Methods
    For the Music Education major (instrumental emphasis) degree program. This course provides basic singing instruction and pedagogy. (Spring of odd-numbered years) (FAP)
  • 77-423 Methods of Music in Elementary School
    Methods of presenting music materials to children in grades K-6. Open only to students who have passed the Sophomore Barrier Examination and been admitted to the Music Education major. (Fall of odd-numbered years) (FAL)
  • 77-443 Choral Music Education
    A survey of the material available for junior and senior high school choirs. A study of the organization and problems of choral groups and vocal pedagogy for choral ensembles. Arranging for choral ensembles. Each student will rehearse the class for small-ensemble experience. Prerequisites: Music Theory 76-211, 76-213, and Music Literature 80-214; or permission of the instructor. (Spring of even-numbered years) (FAL)
  • 77-473 Methods of Marching Band Performance
    A study of the marching band as a medium of entertainment and of its value to the instrumental program in the public schools. The study includes fundamentals of marching, precision drill, designing of formations, and planning and execution of a half-time show. Open only to students who have passed the Sophomore Barrier Examination and been admitted to the Music Education major. (Fall)
  • 77-522 Vocal Pedagogy
    A discussion of historical and current pedagogical techniques; the physiology of singing and voice types; training the young singer; vocal development through repertoire choice. Prerequisites: Two semesters of applied voice study at the college level and concurrent enrollment in applied voice study. (FAL) (Spring of even-numbered years)
  • 77-532 Piano Pedagogy
    Presentation of methods and materials used in individual and class instruction of piano students. Prerequisites: Passage of the Sophomore Barrier Examination and admission to the Keyboard Performance major; or four semesters of applied piano or organ study; or permission of instructor. (FAL)
  • 77-603 Choral Conducting
    Introduction of baton techniques and rehearsal procedures. Each student will conduct the class for small-ensemble experience. Prerequisites: Music Theory 76-211, 76-213 and Music Literature 80-214; or permission of instructor. (Fall of even-numbered years) (FAP)
  • 77-613 Instrumental Conducting
    This course is an introduction to manual conducting techniques. Each student will conduct members of the class and a rehearsal pianist for small-ensemble experience and then conduct their final exam with the SU Wind Ensemble. Prerequisites: Music Theory 76-211, 76-213, Music Literature 80-214 and a minimum of four semesters of applied music study in one area; or consent of instructor. (Fall) (FAP)
  • 77-623 Advanced Instrumental Conducting
    This course is a continuation of the beginning course, plus in-depth score study and development of good rehearsal techniques. Students will rehearse the SU Wind Ensemble or Orchestra throughout the semester and then conduct a portion of a public concert for their final exam. Prerequisite: Music Education 77-603 or 77-613. (Spring) (FAP) (WA)
  • 77-633 Advanced Choral Conducting
    A continuation of manual conducting techniques, score reading and performance preparation. Students will conduct a portion of a public concert. Each student will conduct the class for small-ensemble experience. Prerequisite: Music Education 77-603 or 77-613. (Spring of odd-numbered years) (FAP)
  • 77-804 Student Teaching
    See Education 40-804, 40-808, 40-824, 40-828
  • 77-808 Student Teaching
    See Education 40-804, 40-808, 40-824, 40-828
  • 48-121 Investigations Human Anat & Phys I
    This laboratory course will provide an opportunity for students to develop an applied understand of human anatomy and physiology with a focus on the musculoskeletal system as it relates to kinesiology, health, and wellness. To be taken concurrently with 48-123. Contributes to Health Studies. (Fall and Spring) (NS)
  • 48-123 Intro to Human Anatomy & Physiology
    This course will provide an overview of human anatomy and physiology with a particular focus on organ systems related to kinesiology, health, and wellness. Topics include structure, function, and the interrelationships of organ systems. To be taken concurrently with 48-121. Contributes to Health Studies. (Fall and Spring) (NS)
  • 48-134 Health and Fitness Concepts
    Students are presented current scientific information concerning the roles of physical activity, nutrition and life choices in healthy living. Emphasis is placed on incorporating this information into a lifestyle that will produce lifelong optimal health. In addition, issues related to the impact of health-related diseases on society are discussed. Contributes to Health Studies. (Fall and Spring) (NS)
  • 48-214 Research Methods in Kinesiolog
    This course covers the basic concepts of research methods used in the discipline of kinesiology. It is designed to help students think critically, to give students hands-on experiences with research design, data analysis and interpretation, and to report results to a professional audience. Prerequisite: Mathematics 52-114 or permission of instructor. (Fall and Spring) (NS) (WA)
  • 48-244 Stress Management
    This course is designed to provide methods and content whereby students may discover their stressors and assemble appropriate tools to help them avoid, alleviate, or rebound from stress more effectively. This class will expose the students to a holistic approach to stress management with an emphasis on the relationship between lifestyle habits and health. Students will learn both cognitive skills and relaxation techniques with the intention of preventing and/or alleviating the physical symptoms of stress. This interactive course will consist of both lecture and lab. Contributes to Health Studies.
  • 48-251 Integrative Approach Human A & P I
    This laboratory course will provide students with an opportunity to design, execute, and analyze experiments which examine the structure and function of the human body. Experiments and activities include application and critical evaluation of human anatomy and physiology in health and disease corresponding with the topics in Human Anatomy and Physiology I. Also Biology 50-251. Contributes to Health Studies. Prerequisites: Kinesiology 48-123/121 and Biology 50-123/121. To be taken concurrently with 48-253. (Fall) (NS)
  • 48-253 Human Anatomy & Physiology I
    This is the first of a two-course sequence in the study of human anatomy and physiology. This course is a detailed, systematic study of the structure and function of the human body with an additional focus on integrative physiology. This first course specifically examines cells, tissue histology, and the detailed anatomy and physiology of the nervous, endocrine, integumentary, skeletal, muscular, cardiovascular, and lymphatic systems. Integrative topics include homeostasis, control systems, reflexes, body movement control, and blood pressure. Also Biology 50-253. Contributes to Health Studies. Prerequisites: Kinesiology 48-123/121 and Biology 50-123/121. To be taken concurrently with 48-251. (Fall) (NS)
  • 48-261 Integrative Approach Human A & P II
    This laboratory course will provide students with an opportunity to design, execute, and analyze experiments which examine the structure and function of the human body. Experiments and activities include application and critical evaluation of human anatomy and physiology in health and disease corresponding with the topics in Human Anatomy and Physiology II. Also Biology 50-261. Contributes to Health Studies. Prerequisites: Kinesiology 48-253/251 or Biology 50-253/251. To be taken concurrently with 48-263. (Spring) (NS)
  • 48-263 Human Anatomy & Physiology II
    This is the second of a two-course sequence in the study of human anatomy and physiology. This course is a continuation of the systematic study of the structure and function of the human body with an additional focus on integrative physiology. This second course builds upon content from Human Anatomy and Physiology I, adding to cell and tissue histology knowledge, and specifically examines the detailed anatomy and physiology of the respiratory, urinary, digestive, immune, and reproductive systems. Additional integrative topics include gas exchange and transport, fluid and electrolyte balance, metabolism, exercise, and endocrine control of growth and metabolism. Also Biology 50-263. Contributes to Health Studies. Prerequisites: Kinesiology 48-253/251 or Biology 50-253/251. To be taken concurrently with 48-261. (Spring) (NS)
  • 48-274 Fundamentals of Movement Analysis
    An introductory course to develop observational and analytical skills as they relate to human movement. Emphasis is placed on developing a systematic approach to analysis. Students will use these skills (with emphasis placed on video analysis) to evaluate fundamental movement patterns including gait, jumping, throwing, catching and striking.
  • 48-284 Education Outreach Physical Act & Health
    The purpose of this course is to build and expand on students' existing health and physical activity knowledge and enhance their abilities to communicate that knowledge with the general public. The course will focus on engaging the local community with evidence based educational outreach activities to promote health and well-being.
  • 48-304 Selected Topics
    May be repeated with change in topic. Prerequisite: Permission of department chair.
  • 48-324 Motor Learning and Motor Control
    This course is a study of the factors affecting the learning and control of motor skills. Emphasis is given to information processing, motor programming and motor skill analysis. Study is centered upon understanding and application of conceptual frameworks that include open and closed looped models. Lab required. Prerequisite: Kinesiology 48-123/121 and Kinesiology 48-214, or permission of instructor. (Spring) (NS)
  • 48-334 Physiology of Exercise
    This course is the study of physiological responses and adaptations to the challenge of aerobic and anaerobic exercise. Emphasis will be placed on cardiorespiratory, neuromuscular, and endocrine systems and metabolism. Lab required. Prerequisites: Kinesiology 48-123/121, and Kinesiology 48-214, or permission of instructor. (Fall) (NS)
  • 48-344 Biomechanics
    This course is the study of basic anatomical and mechanical principles applied to human movement. Emphasis is placed on kinematic and kinetic concepts and the use of computerized movement analysis. Lab required. Prerequisites: Kinesiology 48-123/121 and Kinesiology 48-214, or permission of instructor. (Spring) (NS)
  • 48-364 Comparative Physiology of Exercise
    This course uses a comparative and integrative approach to athletic performance and environmental adaptations to highlight the anatomical and physiological similarities and differences between humans and other animal species. Contributes to Animal Studies. Prerequisite: Kinesiology 48-334 or Biology 50-424, or permission of instructor.
  • 48-394 Seminar in Kinesiology
    This course is designed to investigate special topics or problems of interest in kinesiology. Areas of study will be selected by both instructor and students with students taking an active role as both learners and teachers. Prerequisites: Kinesiology 48-214, and at least one of the following: Kinesiology 48-324, 48-334, or 48-344, or permission of instructor.
  • 48-404 Health and Fitness Concepts
    Students are presented current scientific information concerning the roles of physical activity, nutrition and life choices in healthy living. Emphasis is placed on incorporating this information into a lifestyle that will produce lifelong optimal health. In addition, issues related to the impact of health-related diseases on society are discussed. (NS) (Fall, Spring)
  • 48-424 Health Promotion and Programming
    Introduction to concepts of program planning for health education in the community. The purpose of this course is to provide students with the skills needed to develop, implement and evaluate health promotion programs with a special emphasis on behavior change initiatives. Prerequisite: Kinesiology 48-134 and 48-214.
  • 48-431 Research in Kinesiology I
    This is the first of two courses in the research capstone sequence. The capstone experience is a laboratory or field-based research experience designed to provide hands-on experience directed toward answering questions related to kinesiology. In this writing-intensive course, students work directly with a faculty member to develop a research proposal and complete an IRB proposal if necessary. Prerequisites: Kinesiology 48-214, 48-324, and either 48-334 or 48-344. (Spring) (WA)
  • 48-433 Research in Kinesiology II
    This is the second of two courses in the research capstone sequence. The capstone experience is a laboratory or field-based research project designed to provide hands-on experience directed toward answering questions related to kinesiology. In this course, students will collect and analyze experimental data for their capstone projects as proposed in 48-431. Each student will formally present results of the study in oral and written form. Prerequisites: Kinesiology 48-431. (Fall) (WA)
  • 48-444 Exercise Prescription
    This course is the study of current practices related to fitness assessment and exercise prescription. Emphasis is placed on the collection of data from fitness testing and the design of personalized exercise programs. Prerequisites: Kinesiology 48-214 and 48-334. (Spring) (NS)
  • 48-454 Tissue Mechanics
    This is an advanced course that explores the anatomical structure and physiological and mechanical function of tissues within the body including bone, cartilage, tendons, ligaments, nerves and muscle. Special attention is given to mechanical testing of these materials with application of this information to the study of injury mechanisms and diseases of these tissues. Also Biology 50-454. Contributes to Health Studies. Prerequisites: Kinesiology 48-123/121, and either Kinesiology 48-344 or Physics 53-154, or permission of instructor. (NS)
  • 48-464 Nutritional Physiology
    This course examines the biochemical, physiological, and cellular functions of energy macronutrients and micronutrients. Integrative topics include metabolism and energy balance, life cycle nutrition, athletic performance, and the function of nutrients as they relate to human health and disease. This course includes practical applications of this knowledge through review of scientific literature and critical thinking exercises. Contributes to Health Studies. Prerequisite: Kinesiology 48-334, or permission of instructor. (NS)
  • 48-474 Muscle Physiology
    This course is designed to enhance the student's knowledge of the field of muscle physiology. The course focuses on the functional properties of skeletal muscle as it impacts health and performance in normal and pathological situations with specific emphasis on cellular and molecular regulators of skeletal muscle adaptations. Prerequisite: Kinesiology 48-253/251, Biology 50-253/251, or Biology 50-424. (NS)
  • 48-824 Senior Capstone in Kinesiology
    This course is intended for students pursuing the BA degree. Students will complete laboratory-based activities representing the three major areas of kinesiology (Motor Learning & Control, Biomechanics, and Physiology of Exercise). These activities will be accompanied by in-depth analysis and critical review of current research topics. Prerequisites: Kinesiology 48-314, 48-424, 48-704, and 48-714. (WA) (Fall)
  • 48-843 Research in Kinesiology II
    This is the second of two courses in the research capstone sequence. The capstone experience is a laboratory or field-based research project designed to provide hands-on experience directed toward answering questions related to kinesiology. In this course, students will collect and analyze experimental data for their capstone projects as proposed in 48-831. Each student will formally present results of the study in oral and written form. Prerequisites: Kinesiology 48-831. (WA) (Fall)
  • 46-192 Foundations of Exercise and Sports Studies
    This course investigates the history, philosophy and principles that guide the discipline. In addition, career options and current issues in kinesiology are examined.
  • 46-272 Philosophy of Coaching
    This course focuses on developing general and sport-specific coaching philosophies. Topics include coaching roles, team management, relationships with constituency groups, various philosophies and theories as well as the importance of coaching tenets.
  • 46-282 Philosophy of Sport
    This course offers a look at the world of sport from a philosophical perspective. The sporting arena is used as a vehicle to investigate factors such as media influence, social perceptions and ethical concepts which help shape our society.
  • 46-292 Philosophy of Leadership in Sport
    This course focuses on applied leadership in the context of organized sport. Course material is designed to examine leadership issues that are specific to athlete, team, and staff development and management, as well as classic leadership theories. The course is geared toward helping students analyze real-world examples of sport leadership and to critically develop their own leadership style.
  • 46-312 Methods of Coaching Football
    This course presents the skills and techniques of coaching football. Included topics are offensive, defensive and special teams schematics, game and practice management, examination of the fundamental skills required of each position, player safety and the history of football.
  • 46-322 Methods of Coaching
    This course presents the theories and techniques of coaching selected individual and team sports in educational and recreational settings.
  • 46-332 Introduction to Sport Management
    This course introduces administrative philosophies and techniques and sport management topics in educational, athletic and recreational settings.
  • 46-342 Sport and Society
    This course will examine the nature of various sports and their role in American Society from an historical and contemporary perspective.
  • 46-402 Modern Sports Media
    This course explores the relationships the media has with athletes, public relations, advertising, marketing, promotion, and sports information disciplines and audiences in a multiplatform media environment. Through class activities and practical experiences, students will analyze media in relationship to the sports industry.
  • 46-472 Sport Law and Ethics
    This course is designed to present students with the opportunity to learn various legal concepts and how they apply to the sports industry. Actions and decisions in sport/athletics are compared to the known principles and rules of sports as set forth by their governing bodies.
  • 13-144 Greek I
    Essentials of grammar, composition, and reading. Students will acquire basic translation skills and build a core vocabulary, and they will support their language learning with the study of Greek society and culture. (Fall)
  • 13-154 Greek II
    Continued study of grammar, composition and reading. Students will learn more complex syntactical constructions and begin translating more sustained Greek passages. Prerequisite: Greek 13-144, or equivalent placement. (Spring)
  • 13-164 Greek III
    Students will build on the fundamentals they acquired in introductory Greek and strengthen their skills in translation and interpretation through a variety of Greek prose and poetry texts. Readings and cultural studies of prose authors such as Herodotus, Xenophon (history), Plato, and Aristotle (philosophy) and poetry by Hesiod, the anonymous Homeric Hymns (epic), and a selection by Hellenistic poets, as well as New Testament Greek. Prerequisite: Greek 13-154, or equivalent placement. (Fall)
  • 13-344 Intermediate Readings in Greek Literatur
    This course is specifically designed for intermediate students who have completed three semesters of Greek. In addition to strengthening skills in translation, interpretation, and textual analysis, students will encounter Greek texts in their cultural, historical, and political contexts and become familiar with scholarly commentaries. May be repeated with change in topic. Topics offered on a rotating basis of prose and poetry. The range of topics includes Homer's epic poems Iliad and Odyssey; the ethnographic writings of Herodotus; oratory in Classical Athens; and Archaic Lyric poetry by such authors as Archilochus, Alcaeus, and Sappho. Prerequisite: Greek 13-164; or equivalent placement. (Fall, Spring) (H)
  • 13-404 Advanced Readings in Greek Literature
    This course is specifically designed for advanced students and includes rigorous study of Greek texts in focused thematic areas. Students will encounter the texts in their cultural, historical, and political contexts and gain greater familiarity with issues of composition and transmission, as well as current interpretive approaches and important secondary scholarship. May be repeated with change in topic. Topics offered on a rotating basis of prose and poetry. The range of topics include Thucydides and his historiographical methods; selections of Euripidean tragedy; Greek historians under the Roman Empire; and Presocratic philosophers. Prerequisite: Greek 13-164 course; or equivalent placement. (Fall, Spring) (H)

INTRODUCTION TO PROGRAMMING (54-143). An introduction to computer programming in an object-oriented style for practical application. Topics include class definition, basic program constructs, basic data structures, interactive user interfaces and encapsulation. This course does not fulfill the Area One Mathematics requirement. (NS)
COMPUTER SCIENCE I (54-183). Computer programming in an object-oriented style. Topics include primitive types and operations, assignment, selection, iteration, arrays, classes, methods, recursion, encapsulation, type extension, inheritance and reasoning about programs. Prerequisite: Previous programming with departmental approval, or Computer Science 54-143. (Each semester) (NS)

The Computer Science curriculum is traditional, at least in the early courses. The first two courses in the major are taught in Java, which is an excellent language for introducing object-oriented concepts. 

The following list of courses represents current or recent course offerings. See the course catalog for updated information.

  • 54-144 Explorations in Computing
    This course is an introduction to the discipline of computer science with an emphasis on applications in the liberal arts. Topics include basic programming constructs, basic data structures, algorithmic computation, selection, iteration, interactive user interfaces, abstraction and reasoning about computer programs. This is an introductory course intended for humanities, social science and fine arts majors. May not be used for the Computer Science major or minor. Cannot be taken after successful completion of Computer Science 54-184, 54-284, or 54-454 without departmental approval. Contributes to Data Science. (Spring) (NS)
  • 54-184 Computer Science I
    This is the standard first course in computer programming in an object-oriented style. It is primarily intended for students pursuing a major or minor in computer science, mathematics or other disciplines in the natural sciences. Topics include primitive types and operations, assignment, conditional execution, iteration, arrays, classes, methods, recursion, encapsulation, type extension, inheritance and reasoning about programs in Java. The course includes a laboratory component designed to explore applications and to enhance conceptualization. Contributes to Data Science. (Fall, Spring) (NS)
  • 54-281 Colloquium in Computer Science Seminar-Style Course, Each Student Will Give a Lecture on a Topic in Computer Science Not Norma
    Presentation of one lecture and participation in discussions is required. This course may be repeated for credit, but may not be counted toward the major or minor. Must be taken Pass/D/F. Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in Computer Science 54-284, and permission of the instructor.
  • 54-284 Computer Science II
    This course is a continuation of 54-184 Computer Science I, with an emphasis on abstract data objects such as lists, stacks, queues, trees and graphs, and test-first programming using the automated testing paradigm JUnit. Topics include algorithms for searching, sorting, traversing, inserting and deleting, and reasoning about these algorithms. The course includes a laboratory component designed to explore applications and to enhance conceptualization. Prerequisite: Computer Science 54-184 or permission of instructor. Contributes to Design Thinking. (Spring) (NS)
  • 54-291 Puzzling Programs
    Given a precise program specification and a few input/output examples, students will gain experience quickly devising a solution that passes a suite of unseen (and generally more complicated) input/output examples. Teamwork, troubleshooting code based on very limited feedback from automated systems, effectively reading problem descriptions, and discerning relevant details will be practiced. This course (or prior enrollment in this course) is required for students wishing to compete in the South Central USA Regional ACM Programming Contest. This course may be repeated for credit, but may not be counted towards the major or minor. Must be taken P/D/F. Prerequisite: Computer Science 54-184. (Fall)
  • 54-384 Discrete Mathematics
    This course investigates concepts in the modeling of discrete phenomena. Topics include logic, structure of proof, set theory, combinatorics, graphs, induction and recurrence relations. Also Mathematics 52-384. Prerequisites: Mathematics 52-164, Computer Science 54-184, and either Mathematics 52-264 or Computer Science 54-284, or permission of instructor. (Fall) (NS)
  • 54-394 Computer Organization
    This course studies computer architecture, internal representation of data, assembly language programming, subroutines and parameter passing, design of machine language instruction sets, bus structure, digital logic, and support for parallelism. The course includes a laboratory component designed to explore applications and to enhance conceptualization. Prerequisite: Computer Science 54-284 or permission of instructor. (Fall) (NS)
  • 54-414 Operations Research
    Formulation and solution of problems with management, economics, engineering and science applications using modeling, optimization techniques, and simulation. Topics include linear and integer programming, simplex method, duality, sensitivity analysis, branch and bound algorithm, transportation and assignment problems, network optimization, and problem solving using optimization software. Also Mathematics 52-414 and Business 30-414. Prerequisites: Mathematics 52-164 (Modern Calculus I), and either Business 30-474 (Finance) or Mathematics 52-674 (Linear Algebra), or permission of the instructor. Contributes to Data Science.
  • 54-424 Artificial Intelligence
    This course studies the use of computer algorithms to emulate the cognitive and problem solving capabilities of humans. Topics include: search, optimization, reinforcement learning, evolutionary computation, statistical methods and (deep) neural networks. Prerequisite: Computer Science 54-284 or permission of instructor. (NS)
  • 54-454 Algorithms
    An introduction to the design and analysis of algorithms and their implementation in C++. Topics include: greedy, divide-and-conquer, dynamic programming, graph, and randomized algorithms; asymptotic analysis and computational tractability (e.g. NP-completeness); practical data structures (stacks, trees, queues, graphs, hash tables, heaps). Prerequisite: Computer Science 54-284, or permission of instructor. Contributes to Design Thinking. (Spring) (NS)
  • 54-474 Programming Languages
    A study of the principles and practice in the design and implementation of imperative, functional, logic and object-oriented programming languages. Prerequisite: Computer Science 54-394 or permission of instructor. (Fall) (NS)
  • 54-514 Database Management
    An introduction to the theory and practice of database management systems. Topics include database terminology, the entity-relationship model, the relational model, normalization, querying databases using SQL, and exploration of other database technologies. The course includes a laboratory component designed to explore applications and to enhance conceptualization. Prerequisite: Computer Science 54-284 or permission of instructor. (NS)
  • 54-524 Introduction to Numerical Analysis
    See Mathematics 52-524. (NS)
  • 54-534 Functional Programming
    An introduction to functional programming. Topics include functions, lists, types, induction and recursion, pattern matching, infinite lists and trees. A functional programming language such as Haskell, Lisp or ML will be used in the course. There will be a large number of programming projects. Prerequisite: Computer Science 54-284 or permission of instructor. (NS)
  • 54-644 Computer Systems
    An introduction to operating systems and computer networks. Topics include process control, scheduling, threads, concurrency, memory management, virtual memory, network protocol layers, packets, routing and network security. Prerequisite: Computer Science 54-394. (Spring) (NS)
  • 54-844 Seminar in Special Topics
    A limited enrollment seminar not generally covered in other courses. This course may be repeated for credit as topics vary. (NS)
  • 54-894 Senior Seminar in Software Engineering
    Introduction to techniques and theories for the development of large software systems. This course will fulfill the capstone requirement in Computer Science. Topics include: software design and quality, ethics, professional issues, the study of current software engineering trends, theory and practice. Each student will contribute substantially to a major semester project, do at least one major individual presentation, and have significant class participation. Each student will take the Major Field Test. Prerequisite: Six courses in the major at the 300 level or above, and permission of instructor. Must have completed one of Computer Science 54-454, 54-514, or 54-474. (Spring) (NS) (WA)

See the course catalog for complete course descriptions.

Anthropology

  • ANT35-244 Race, Class and Gender in the Caribbean
    This course critically examines how the constructs of race, class and gender shape everyday life in the Caribbean. The course will cover history, human-environmental relations, the global circulations of people and capital that continue to create the Caribbean (migration, tourism and development), spiritualities, language, music, and Carnival. Contributes to Feminist Studies, International Studies, Latin American and Border Studies, and Race and Ethnicity Studies. Prerequisite: Anthropology 35-104 or Feminist Studies 04-104. (ScS) (SJ)

Art History

  • ARH71-034 Intro to Art History: Latin American
    This course provides an introduction to the disciplinary methods and concepts of art history, presented in the context of Latin American art, from the pre-Columbian, colonial, and modern eras, including U.S. - Latino art. Open only to first- or second-year students, or with consent of the instructor. Contributes to International Studies, Latin American and Border Studies, and Race and Ethnicity Studies. (Annually) (FAL) (WA) (SJ)
  • ARH71-314 Art of Mesoamerica
    A survey of the ancient Americas, concentrating on the archaeology and ritual aesthetics of the Mezcala, Olmec, Zapotec, Maya, Nayarít, Chupícuaro, Teotihuacan, Totonac, Toltec, Mixtec, Purépecha and Aztec, among others, and focusing on each culture's sense of past and place. In so doing, this course examines the role of archaeology in shaping current understanding of the ancient past, and how that past is exhibited and made part of modern visual culture. Course themes explore social and ritual landscapes, cosmology, palaces, divine kingship, hieroglyphs and Mesoamerican calendars. Contributes to International Studies and Latin American and Border Studies. (Biennially) (FAL) (WA)
  • ARH71-324 Art of the Andes
    A survey of the ancient Americas, concentrating on the archaeology and ritual aesthetics of the Valdivia, Chavín, Jama-Coaque, Tairona, Coclé, Paracas, Nazca, Moche, Tiwanaku, Wari, Chimu and Inca, among others, and focusing on each culture's sense of past and place. In so doing, this course examines the role of archaeology in shaping current understanding of the ancient past, and how that past is exhibited and made part of modern visual culture. Course themes explore social and ritual landscapes, cosmology, mummification, warrior cults, shamanism, visual metaphors and formal processes of abstraction. Contributes to International Studies and Latin American and Border Studies. (Annually) (FAL) (WA)
  • ARH71-364 Native Books, Images and Objects
    As the primary vehicle of communication in the 16th century, and as a model of religion, the Book was part of Spain's effort to colonize the Americas. Yet there already existed systems of recording in Mesoamerica and the Andes, which were both conflicting and commensurate with European notions of the Book. This course examines these concepts by considering books as repositories of spoken words and thought. It questions Western hierarchies of literacy in the pursuit of truth and knowledge, and seeks to understand indigenous American voices in the process. Contributes to Early Modern Studies, International Studies, Latin American and Border Studies, and Race and Ethnicity Studies. (Biennially) (FAL) (WA) (SJ)

History

  • HIS16-234 History of Colonial Latin America
    A time of collisions, encounters, and rebellions, Colonial Latin America explores the individual, social, cultural, and political experiences of Africans, Europeans, and Native Americans between the apogee of the Aztecs, Incas, and Mayas and the Creole wars of independence of the 19th century. By examining pre-Colombian states, early European explorations, la conquista, the settlement of mostly Spanish but also Portuguese and other European colonies, and the responses of a diverse group of local inhabitants, this course explores the complex societies that resulted from the growth and end of global empires and that shaped the future of this diverse region. Contributes to Early Modern Studies, Health Studies, International Studies, Latin American and Border Studies, and Race and Ethnicity Studies. (Biennially) (H)
  • HIS16-244 History of Modern Latin America
    After their independence in the early 19th century, Latin American countries faced the challenge to become nations. This course surveys the many paths that these countries followed, including the rise of nationalism and its overcoming by the neocolonial order, the revolutionary option in Mexico, Cuba, and Nicaragua during the 20th century, the authoritarian responses to national discontent, and the rise of neoliberalism. It also explores how these trends transformed the society, culture, economy, and policies at the local level in response to both national and international influences. Contributes to International Studies, Latin American and Border Studies, and Race and Ethnicity Studies. (Biennially) (H)
  • HIS16-404 Latin American Hist in Film & Literature
    Latin America is a complex territory and an idea suspended between the extremes of despair and hopefulness. Telling its history poses many challenges to the academic historian. Often the history of the land and its people is better expressed in the work of artists, writers and filmmakers. This course ventures into the magical relationships between the artist and that enigmatic territorial and spiritual landscape extending from the Rio Bravo to Tierra del Fuego. Contributes to International Studies, Latin American and Border Studies, and Race and Ethnicity Studies. (Biennially) (H) (SJ)
  • HIS16-414 The Mexican Revolution
    The Mexican Revolution was a fiesta of bullets that transformed Mexico and launched the 20th century. Using the Mexican Revolution as the event that shaped Mexican history throughout the 20th century, this course examines the conditions that mobilized Mexican such as Madero, Zapata, and Villa into a civil war in 1910 and that ended up with a new Constitution in 1917, the challenges, successes, and failures to create institutions that implemented the revolutionary values during the 1920s and 30s, and the value of the Revolution to promote social and political change in the second half of the 20th century. Contributes to International Studies, and Latin American and Border Studies. (Biennially) (H) (SJ)

Philosophy

  • PHI18-284 Philosophies of the Americas
    An introduction to the complex history of Latin American philosophy, including European and indigenous traditions of thought as well as their hybrids. Key issues will be the interpretation and criticism of notions of history and progress, race and ethnicity, colonialism and knowledge production, the philosophical status of indigenous knowledges, and the relation between philosophy and territory. Contributes to Latin American and Border Studies, and Race and Ethnicity Studies. (H)

Political Science

  • PSC32-184 Politics of Latin America & Caribbean
    This introduction to contemporary Latin American and Caribbean politics also allows students with previous knowledge about the region to further their interests. The course is built around some of the key issues which confront Latin America and the Caribbean. Contributes to Anthropology, International Studies, Latin American and Border Studies, Race and Ethnicity Studies, and Sociology. Course is approved to fulfill an upper-level course requirement in the Anthropology major (ScS) (SJ) (Comparative politics).

Spanish

  • SPA15-334 Conversation Through Hispanic Cinema
    An intermediate level course designed to improve conversational, written, and presentational Spanish skills through the discussion of movies from around the Spanish-speaking world. This course is designed specifically for students who have not yet reached confident fluency in the Spanish language. Contributes to International Studies, and Latin American and Border Studies Prerequisite: Spanish 15-164 or equivalent placement.. (WA) (H) (Fall, Spring)
  • SPA15-354 Cultures of Latin America
    Exploration of Latin American cultures incorporating a variety of materials and approaches, such as geography, history, architecture, literature, music, art and religion. Also offered as part of SU's advanced Spanish summer study abroad program to Latin America offered in even-numbered years. Contributes to International Studies, and Latin American and Border Studies. Prerequisite: Spanish 15-164 or equivalent placement or permission of instructor. (H) (SJ) (Fall, Summer)
  • SPA15-504 Selected Topics in Hispano-American Literature
    May be repeated for credit with change in topic. Contributes to International Studies, and Latin American and Border Studies. Prerequisite: One 200 or 300 level course. (H)
  • SPA15-524 Readings in Contemporary Hisp-Amer Liter Hispano-American Literature
    Interpretation and analysis of 20th- and/or 21st-century representative texts from Hispano-America. May be repeated for credit with change in topic. Contributes to International Studies, and Latin American and Border Studies. Prerequisite: One 200 or 300 level course. (H) (WA)
  • SPA15-534 Cultural Memory in Latin America
    This interdisciplinary course will explore the construction of cultural memory-collective meaningful understandings of the past and present in a given socio historical context-in contemporary Latin America through the examination of symbolic systems, practices, and cultural products: written and audiovisual narratives, music, memorials, and popular traditions. Contributes to International Studies, Latin American and Border Studies, and Race and Ethnicity Studies. Prerequisite: One 200 or 300 level course. (H) (WA) (SJ)
  • SPA15-614 Topics in Hispanic Film
    Interpretation and analysis of selected works by Spanish and/or Latin American directors. May be repeated for credit with change in topic. Contributes to International Studies, and Latin American and Border Studies. Prerequisite: One 200 or 300 level course. (H) (WA)
  • SPA15-654 Citizenship & Conflict Colombian Cinema
    Interpretation and analysis of contemporary Colombian films that expose the complex relation between citizenship, state practices and insurgent forces. Contributes to International Studies, Latin American and Border Studies, and Race and Ethnicity Studies. Prerequisite: One 200 or 300 level course. (SJ) (WA) (H)
  • 30-114 Fundamentals of Accounting
    An introduction to financial and managerial accounting concepts and techniques. The course will emphasize the development of the accounting model, analysis of financial statements and the use of accounting information. No previous knowledge of accounting is assumed. (ScS)
  • 30-154 Quantitative Methods in Business
    The mathematical skills necessary to make business decisions and solve business problems. Course content includes basic algebraic properties, the study of limits and continuity, differentiation, optimization and graphing, and the mathematics of finance.
  • 30-201 Selected Topics
    May be repeated with change in topic. Four credits will count as one upper-level course, and a maximum of four credits may be applied toward the major.
  • 30-202 Selected Topics
    May be repeated with change in topic. Four credits will count as one upper-level course, and a maximum of four credits may be applied toward the major.
  • 30-204 Selected Topics
    May be repeated with change in topic. Four credits will count as one upper-level course, and a maximum of four credits may be applied toward the major.
  • 30-214 Foundations of Business
    A study that integrates traditional macro issues in management, marketing and operations, including production systems, organization structure and design, market segmentation, pricing promotion, consumer behavior, group effectiveness and strategy. Strategic thinking approaches provide integrating frameworks. Prerequisites: Accounting 36-114, Economics 31-104, Mathematics 52-114, and Mathematics 52-164 or Business 30-154. Sophomore standing required. (Fall and Spring) (ScS)
  • 30-254 Business Law
    The role of law in society; introduction to legal reasoning, the judicial process and other areas of law. The study of contracts, agency and partnerships. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. (ScS)
  • 30-301 Selected Topics
    May be repeated with change in topic. Four credits will count as one upper-level course, and a maximum of four credits may be applied toward the major.
  • 30-304 Selected Topics
    May be repeated with change in topic. Four credits will count as one upper-level course, and a maximum of four credits may be applied toward the major.
  • 30-354 International Marketing
    This course challenges students to understand the marketing implications of the different political, economic, social and cultural variables that exist in global markets. Students will learn the process of creating an in-depth market analysis and will use that analysis to evaluate the potential impacts to a company's marketing strategy and marketing mix. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: Business 30-214 or permission of instructor. (ScS)
  • 30-374 Communicating Leadership
    This course examines current scholarship about how leadership is created and communicated in organizations and other aspects of our lives. Students will demonstrate an understanding of leadership, leadership styles, and the communication strategies of leadership. Discussion, reflective writing, critical thinking, and engagement will be used to assess these goals. (H) (FY)
  • 30-394 Consumer Behavior
    Understanding the buying processes of individuals and groups. Focuses on the demographic and psychographic characteristics of individual consumers, the social influences that affect their behavior, and how marketers attempt to persuade buyers. Contributes to Design Thinking. Prerequisite: Business 30-214. (ScS)
  • 30-414 Operations Research
    Formulation and solution of problems with management, economics, engineering and science applications using modeling, optimization techniques, and simulation. Topics include linear and integer programming, simplex method, duality, sensitivity analysis, branch and bound algorithm, transportation and assignment problems, network optimization, and problem solving using optimization software. Also Mathematics 52-414 and Computer Science 54-414. Prerequisites: Mathematics 52-164, and either Business 30-474 or Mathematics 52-674, or permission of the instructor.
  • 30-424 Strategic Marketing
    This course utilizes business cases and discussions to illustrate fundamental business issues which include: defining an organization's business and mission, developing strategies for business growth, and devising strategies to contend with unanticipated business changes. The course emphasizes the role of marketing in all of these strategic decisions and in delivering value to the end consumer. Students analyze a variety of issues including new product launch decisions, advertising campaigns, ethical dilemmas related to business operations, and global expansion strategies. Contributes to Data Science, Design Thinking and Health Studies. Prerequisite: Business 30-214. (ScS)
  • 30-434 Digital Marketing
    This course covers the fundamentals of digital marketing. Students learn how to apply and adapt traditional marketing strategies to an electronic domain (e.g., understanding the Internet for distribution). The classes and readings introduce students to search engine optimization (SEO), website management, and e-mail campaign strategies. The course also includes discussions of the ethical issues surrounding and related to e-marketing including privacy and psychological well-being. The latter part of the class is focused on social media. This includes analysis of social media metrics and user sentiment. Contributes to Data Science. Prerequisite: Business 30-214. (ScS)
  • 30-470 Finance Lab
    Accompanies BUS30-474.
  • 30-474 Finance
    Analysis and application of the principles of managerial finance, especially the valuation of financial assets, capital budgeting and financial planning. Proficiency is gained in the application of calculators and computer spread sheets to financial analysis. Also Economics 31-474. Prerequisites: Accounting 36-114, Economics 31-104, Mathematics 52-114, and Mathematics 52-164 or Business 30-154, and 42 credits. (Fall and Spring) (ScS)
  • 30-484 International Management
    An introduction to the issues facing international business today. Explores the dynamic global environment of business management by reviewing the political, legal, technological, competitive, and cultural factors that shape corporations worldwide. Strategic and operational strategies for operating across borders will be identified, along with the complexities of managing individuals in an international business context. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: Business 30-214. (ScS)
  • 30-514 Business Ethics & Social Responsibility
    This course seeks to develop students as virtuous business leaders in society by challenging norms, evaluating assumptions and systematically crystallizing personal moral imperatives. The course fosters ethical reasoning and distinguishes between legal and social obligation. Topics include integrity, objectivity, independence and other core values. Advanced critical thinking and self-reflection capabilities are necessary for success. Prerequisite: Business 30-214. (ScS)
  • 30-554 Organizational Behavior
    A study of the process of management focused on the behavioral approach to management of modern business organizations with emphasis on individual, group, intergroup and total organizational behavior. Communication, leadership styles, perceptual differences and motivation in organizations are stressed. Prerequisite: Business 30-214. (ScS)
  • 30-564 Strategic Management
    This course integrates core business concepts and applies them to organization decision making, focusing on top management perspectives. Theories and case analyses integrate functional, business and corporate level strategies. Computer-simulated businesses demonstrate the dynamic nature of strategic management. Prerequisite: Business 30-214, Business 30-474 or Economics 31-474, and Junior standing. (ScS)
  • 30-574 Investments
    Principles of portfolio management and institutional investment analysis; various theories of the securities markets and their relation to the economy; the relation between investment theory and corporate investment; relation of investment to corporate capital structure; and different approaches to security evaluation using Excel models. Also Economics 31-574. Prerequisites: Business 30-474 or Economics 31-474, and Mathematics 52-164 or Business 30-154, or permission of instructor. (ScS)
  • 30-584 International Business
    This course develops a conceptual framework for making business decisions in a globally competitive company. This framework requires an understanding of an environment that has different cultures and values, multiple foreign currencies, alternative capital markets, and country specific risks. The course focuses on the multinational firm's operating environment, global strategy and functional operations. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: Business 30-214 or permission of instructor. (ScS)
  • 30-594 Financial Statement Analysis
    Application of accounting information to financial decision making: assessing the financial strengths and weaknesses of corporations; measuring operating and financial performance using financial statements and cash flows; constructing pro forma financial statements and forecasts of sales and earnings; and identifying sources of earning manipulation. Also Accounting 36-594. Prerequisites: Business 30-474 or Economics 31-474. (Spring) (ScS)
  • 30-912 Financial Analyst Program
    Intensive, hands-on, real world experience in applying the concept of business analysis and valuation to develop analytical skills and experiences as a financial analyst. Student analysts are responsible for managing an over $400,000 investment portfolio that is part of S.U.'s endowment. Students learn to assess the operating, financial, and investment performance of companies as well as make financial projections; then combine them with technical analyses to make final common stock recommendations for the FAP Portfolio. Prerequisites: Business 30-474. One-year commitment required. Concurrent registration in Business 30-574 during the Fall. Concurrent registration in Business 30-594 during the Spring. Members of the program are selected through an application and interview process. May be repeated. Four credits will count as one upper-level course, and a maximum of four credits may be applied toward the major. Must be taken P/D/F.
  • 30-951 Independent Study and Research
    Four credits will count as one upper-level course, and a maximum of four credits may be applied toward the major.
  • 30-952 Independent Study and Research
    Four credits will count as one upper-level course, and a maximum of four credits may be applied toward the major.
  • 30-953 Independent Study and Research
    Four credits will count as one upper-level course, and a maximum of four credits may be applied toward the major.
  • 30-954 Independent Study and Research
    Four credits will count as one upper-level course, and a maximum of four credits may be applied toward the major.
  • 30-964 Capstone in Business
    Topics may vary from year to year. Students integrate and apply core concepts from multiple disciplines of business, incorporate societal context of business, consider a business issue from systemic perspectives, explore interactive effect of multiple variables, analyze and synthesize complex ideas and distill implications, present logic orally and in writing, and conduct a cumulative self-assessment. Includes completion of Field Test and may include a mandatory field trip. Prerequisites: Business 30-214, Business 30-474 or Economics 31-474, and senior standing or permission of instructor. (Fall and Spring)

THEATRE APPRECIATION

An introduction to the various elements that contribute to the development of theatre as a specialized art form, with particular emphasis placed on the role of theatre as an artistic and humanizing experience. Topics covered include historical and cultural influences, the nature and variety of dramatic texts, the nature of acting, the functions of theatrical design and the integration of theatrical aesthetics in performance. Several plays illustrating the a…

THEATRE ARTS IN LONDON

A theoretical and experiential survey of the art of the theatre, its past and present, with an emphasis on the role of theatre within the society and the techniques employed to achieve its purpose. Emphasis will be upon attending performances in London. This course is taught by faculty from Goldsmith College, University of London. An additional fee is levied to pay for admission to theatre performances. (Fall in London Program only)

INTRODUCTION TO PLAY ANALYSIS

A course exploring various critical approaches to Western written texts intended for the stage. The selection of plays will help students develop the ability to analyze and evaluate a variety of scripts in terms of form ,structure, tone and style. Students will be introduced to some of the most important realistic plays of the twentieth century while also exploring texts that depart from realism.

THEATRE HISTORY

A course exploring Western theatre and drama in a variety of periods. Theatre performances and plays will be analyzed as functions of different fields of influence (economic realities of production and attendance; politics and power relations within and outside the theatre; social norms regarding gender, race, ethnicity, religion, family, etc; aesthetic values of the time). In addition, the course is meant to introduce students to methods of critical research and issues of historiography.

EAST MEETS WEST: INTERCULTURALISM AND THEATRE

An investigation of theatrical interculturalism in a world-wide context. This course examines the series of exchanges, imitations, misunderstandings, and betrayals that took place in theatre during the twentieth-century and the new forms produced at the intersection of cultures.

PLAYWRITING

Theory and practices of playwriting. Includes the writing of scripts for theatre reading and production.

DRAMATURGY

Fundamentals for the development of a dramaturgical sensibility in order to promote integration between theory (the knowledge of theatre history, dramatic literature, and criticism) and practice (the know-how and expertise needed to realize the potential of a play in a particular production). This course is a prerequisite for those students who intend to dramaturg for SSFA productions.

COSTUME HISTORY I

A survey of historic costume and fashion in the Western world from classical antiquity through the 18th century. This course focuses on the exploration of the relationship between social, political and cultural occurrences and fashion, art and clothing. The ability to identify historical periods by costume silhouette and major events will be acquired in addition to the procurement of a broad vocabulary of costume and fashion terminology.

COSTUME HISTORY II

A survey of historic costume and fashion in the Western world from the late 18th century through the present. This course focuses on the exploration of the relationship between social, political and cultural occurrences and fashion, art and clothing. The ability to identify historical periods by costume silhouette and major events will be acquired in addition to the procurement of a broad vocabulary of costume and fashion terminology. Special attention will be given to the late 20th century and the impact costume and fashion has on the student themselves.

  • 80-100 Recital Attendance
    Students enrolled in this course are required to attend a set number of musical performances in the Music Department and elsewhere during the semester. In addition, each student must attend one SU Theatre production or Art gallery opening event. Students will also gather with faculty for several required listening sessions during the semester. Six semesters must be satisfactorily completed to fulfill requirements for the BM or BA (Music) degrees. Four semesters are required for transfer students, and for students who begin at Southwestern and are admitted to the music major by audition later than the end of their second semester of residence. Must be taken Pass/D/F. (Each semester)
  • 80-104 Introduction to Music
    A course for non-music majors designed to give students a general understanding of music and to increase their enjoyment of music through musical participation and the development of listening skills. Students will consider the various basic applications and manifestations of harmony, melody, time, timbre, texture, genre and form. They will refine their skill of aural perception in order to enhance the ability to sharply focus and sustain concentration in listening. Students will develop an understanding of musical style by examining works representative of the main musical style periods. (Each semester) (FAL)
  • 80-114 Music Literature I
    A survey of the principle periods of music history and the most important genres, styles, compositional techniques, and composers of each period. Prerequisites: Music Theory 76-101 and 76-103, or permission of instructor. Contributes to International Studies. (Spring) (FAL)
  • 80-124 World Music
    An introduction to the music of non-Western cultures, including the study of the music of Africa, India, Bosnia, Japan, Latin America, Native America and Indonesia. Issues include the interaction of traditional music with modern/Western music and the use of music to create a national or ethnic identity. (Fall) (FAL)
  • 80-134 Music in the United States
    A survey of American musical interactions viewed through the lens of cultural history. This course explores the traditions of popular song, concert music, and indigenous styles, and in so doing, negotiates and challenges ideas around canonical great works by considering music, musicians and traditions that are generally considered to be at the center of that canon, as well as those that have been historically excluded from it. Contributes to Race and Ethnicity Studies. (FAL)
  • 80-214 Music Literature II
    A historical survey of music from Classical Antiquity through the Baroque. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: Music Literature 80-114, or permission of instructor. (Fall) (FAL)
  • 80-314 Music Literature III
    A historical survey of music since ca. 1750. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: Music Literature 80-214, or permission of instructor. (Spring) (FAL)
  • 80-414 Music Literature IV
    Special topics in Music Literature. Contributes to International Studies. (Fall) (FAL) (WA)
  • 80-424 Medieval and Renaissance Music
    A survey of Western European music to 1600. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: Music Literature 80-314. (FAL)
  • 80-434 Baroque Music
    A survey of Western European music from 1600 to 1750. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: Music Literature 80-314. (FAL) (WA)
  • 80-444 Classical and Romantic Music
    A survey of Western European music from 1750 to 1900. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: Music Literature 80-314. (FAL) (WA)
  • 80-454 20th Century Music
    A survey of music from 1900 to present day. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: Music Literature 80-314. (FAL) (WA)
  • 80-602 Piano Solo Repertoire, A
    This course is offered for applied majors as a survey of piano literature. (FAL)
  • 80-612 Piano Solo Repertoire, B
    A continuation of Music Literature 80-602. (FAL) .
  • 80-622 Instrumental Pedagogy & Literature
    Pedagogy and Literature courses will survey their instrument's most significant solo and ensemble literature from relevant style periods and examine pedagogical practices from a historical and contemporary perspective. This course is intended for Instrumental Performance majors. Preqrequisite: Successful completion of the Sophomore Barrier Examination. (FAP)
  • 80-701 Diction in Vocal Music I
    The principles of pronunciation and diction in French, German and Italian for the beginning voice student, including an intensive application of these principles to vocal literature in these languages. Prerequisite: two semesters of applied voice study at the college level, Music Theory 76-113 and concurrent enrollment in applied voice. (Fall of even-numbered years) (FAL)
  • 80-711 Diction in Vocal Music II
    A continuation of Diction in Vocal Music I. Prerequisite: Music Literature 80-701. (Spring of odd-numbered years) (FAL)
  • 80-712 Song Literature and Performance
    A survey of great solo art song literature and its performance practice. Prerequisite: Two semesters of applied voice study at the college level, or Music Theory 76-113 and concurrent enrollment in applied voice. (Fall of odd-numbered years) (FAL)
  • 47-011 Barre Above Fitness
    Course combines the disciplines of ballet, Pilates, and yoga for a total body workout. Must be taken Pass/D/F.
  • 47-021 Tennis
    Rules, fundamentals and/or appropriate level techniques, and recreational skills for all levels of skills for tennis players. Must be taken Pass/D/F.
  • 47-031 Bowling
    Rules, fundamentals and/or appropriate level techniques, and recreational skills for all levels of skills for bowlers. Lab fee required. Must be taken Pass/D/F.
  • 47-051 Golf
    Rules, fundamentals and/or appropriate level techniques, and skill development for all levels of skill. Lab fee required. Must be taken Pass/D/F
  • 47-091 Fencing
    Development of knowledge, skills, strategies and equipment used in the ancient art of sword play. Emphasis will be placed on foil fencing. Lab fee required. Must be taken Pass/D/F.
  • 47-101 Swim for Fitness
    Course is designed to enjoy the benefits of swimming as a means of obtaining aerobic fitness. Must be able to pass a basic swimming test to enroll. Must be taken Pass/D/F.
  • 47-121 Racquetball/Pickleball
    RACQUETBALL./PICKLEBALL: Rules, fundamentals and/or appropriate level techniques, and recreational skills for all levels of racquetball/pickleball players. Must be taken Pass/D/F.
  • 47-131 Mixed Martial Arts
    Basic mixed martial arts movements and skills. Must be taken Pass/D/F.
  • 47-141 Martial Arts
    Beginning Tae Kwon Do/Karate or Beginning Hapkido/Judo and/or advanced levels of either are offered on a rotating basis. Each is studied with regard to the history, customs, skills/techniques and unique features of the specific martial art. Must be taken Pass/D/F.
  • 47-151 Total Fitness
    Course designed to give the participant the basics for developing and maintaining a full workout regime. Must be taken Pass/D/F.
  • 47-161 Weight Training
    Teaches safe and effective techniques for weight training at all levels. Provides a background of information concerning techniques for muscle and strength development utilizing conventional free weight exercise coupled with exercise machines. Must be taken Pass/D/F.
  • 47-171 Zumba
    Course includes basic instruction of a Zumba workout. Participant will be required to participate in a cardio intensive workout. Must be taken Pass/D/F.
  • 47-181 Leisure Sports & Rec
    Course will expose participants to a wide variety of activities that will encourage life-long participation and wellness. Must be taken Pass/D/F.
  • 47-211 Adapted Recreation/Fitness Activities I
    A course for students who, for various reasons, need individual attention concerning physical activity. Consent of instructor is required. Must be taken Pass/D/F.
  • 47-221 Adapted Recreation/Fitness Activities II
    A course for students who, for various reasons, need individual attention concerning physical activity. Consent of instructor is required. Must be taken Pass/D/F.
  • 47-231 Cardio Core
    Course designed to give the participant the basics for developing and maintaining an intensive cardio and core workout. Must be taken Pass/D/F.
  • 47-241 Recess Sports
    Course designed to allow participants to be involved in activities that harken back to school recess or gym classes. Must be taken Pass/D/F.
  • 48-121 Investigations Human Anat & Phys I
    This laboratory course will provide an opportunity for students to develop an applied understand of human anatomy and physiology with a focus on the musculoskeletal system as it relates to kinesiology, health, and wellness. To be taken concurrently with 48-123. Contributes to Health Studies. (Fall and Spring) (NS)
  • 48-123 Intro to Human Anatomy & Physiology
    This course will provide an overview of human anatomy and physiology with a particular focus on organ systems related to kinesiology, health, and wellness. Topics include structure, function, and the interrelationships of organ systems. To be taken concurrently with 48-121. Contributes to Health Studies. (Fall and Spring) (NS)
  • 48-134 Health and Fitness Concepts
    Students are presented current scientific information concerning the roles of physical activity, nutrition and life choices in healthy living. Emphasis is placed on incorporating this information into a lifestyle that will produce lifelong optimal health. In addition, issues related to the impact of health-related diseases on society are discussed. Contributes to Health Studies. (Fall and Spring) (NS)
  • 48-214 Research Methods in Kinesiolog
    This course covers the basic concepts of research methods used in the discipline of kinesiology. It is designed to help students think critically, to give students hands-on experiences with research design, data analysis and interpretation, and to report results to a professional audience. Prerequisite: Mathematics 52-114 or permission of instructor. (Fall and Spring) (NS) (WA)
  • 48-244 Stress Management
    This course is designed to provide methods and content whereby students may discover their stressors and assemble appropriate tools to help them avoid, alleviate, or rebound from stress more effectively. This class will expose the students to a holistic approach to stress management with an emphasis on the relationship between lifestyle habits and health. Students will learn both cognitive skills and relaxation techniques with the intention of preventing and/or alleviating the physical symptoms of stress. This interactive course will consist of both lecture and lab. Contributes to Health Studies.
  • 48-251 Integrative Approach Human A & P I
    This laboratory course will provide students with an opportunity to design, execute, and analyze experiments which examine the structure and function of the human body. Experiments and activities include application and critical evaluation of human anatomy and physiology in health and disease corresponding with the topics in Human Anatomy and Physiology I. Also Biology 50-251. Contributes to Health Studies. Prerequisites: Kinesiology 48-123/121 and Biology 50-123/121. To be taken concurrently with 48-253. (Fall) (NS)
  • 48-253 Human Anatomy & Physiology I
    This is the first of a two-course sequence in the study of human anatomy and physiology. This course is a detailed, systematic study of the structure and function of the human body with an additional focus on integrative physiology. This first course specifically examines cells, tissue histology, and the detailed anatomy and physiology of the nervous, endocrine, integumentary, skeletal, muscular, cardiovascular, and lymphatic systems. Integrative topics include homeostasis, control systems, reflexes, body movement control, and blood pressure. Also Biology 50-253. Contributes to Health Studies. Prerequisites: Kinesiology 48-123/121 and Biology 50-123/121. To be taken concurrently with 48-251. (Fall) (NS)
  • 48-261 Integrative Approach Human A & P II
    This laboratory course will provide students with an opportunity to design, execute, and analyze experiments which examine the structure and function of the human body. Experiments and activities include application and critical evaluation of human anatomy and physiology in health and disease corresponding with the topics in Human Anatomy and Physiology II. Also Biology 50-261. Contributes to Health Studies. Prerequisites: Kinesiology 48-253/251 or Biology 50-253/251. To be taken concurrently with 48-263. (Spring) (NS)
  • 48-263 Human Anatomy & Physiology II
    This is the second of a two-course sequence in the study of human anatomy and physiology. This course is a continuation of the systematic study of the structure and function of the human body with an additional focus on integrative physiology. This second course builds upon content from Human Anatomy and Physiology I, adding to cell and tissue histology knowledge, and specifically examines the detailed anatomy and physiology of the respiratory, urinary, digestive, immune, and reproductive systems. Additional integrative topics include gas exchange and transport, fluid and electrolyte balance, metabolism, exercise, and endocrine control of growth and metabolism. Also Biology 50-263. Contributes to Health Studies. Prerequisites: Kinesiology 48-253/251 or Biology 50-253/251. To be taken concurrently with 48-261. (Spring) (NS)
  • 48-274 Fundamentals of Movement Analysis
    An introductory course to develop observational and analytical skills as they relate to human movement. Emphasis is placed on developing a systematic approach to analysis. Students will use these skills (with emphasis placed on video analysis) to evaluate fundamental movement patterns including gait, jumping, throwing, catching and striking.
  • 48-284 Education Outreach Physical Act & Health
    The purpose of this course is to build and expand on students' existing health and physical activity knowledge and enhance their abilities to communicate that knowledge with the general public. The course will focus on engaging the local community with evidence based educational outreach activities to promote health and well-being.
  • 48-304 Selected Topics
    May be repeated with change in topic. Prerequisite: Permission of department chair.
  • 48-324 Motor Learning and Motor Control
    This course is a study of the factors affecting the learning and control of motor skills. Emphasis is given to information processing, motor programming and motor skill analysis. Study is centered upon understanding and application of conceptual frameworks that include open and closed looped models. Lab required. Prerequisite: Kinesiology 48-123/121 and Kinesiology 48-214, or permission of instructor. (Spring) (NS)
  • 48-334 Physiology of Exercise
    This course is the study of physiological responses and adaptations to the challenge of aerobic and anaerobic exercise. Emphasis will be placed on cardiorespiratory, neuromuscular, and endocrine systems and metabolism. Lab required. Prerequisites: Kinesiology 48-123/121, and Kinesiology 48-214, or permission of instructor. (Fall) (NS)
  • 48-344 Biomechanics
    This course is the study of basic anatomical and mechanical principles applied to human movement. Emphasis is placed on kinematic and kinetic concepts and the use of computerized movement analysis. Lab required. Prerequisites: Kinesiology 48-123/121 and Kinesiology 48-214, or permission of instructor. (Spring) (NS)
  • 48-364 Comparative Physiology of Exercise
    This course uses a comparative and integrative approach to athletic performance and environmental adaptations to highlight the anatomical and physiological similarities and differences between humans and other animal species. Contributes to Animal Studies. Prerequisite: Kinesiology 48-334 or Biology 50-424, or permission of instructor.
  • 48-394 Seminar in Kinesiology
    This course is designed to investigate special topics or problems of interest in kinesiology. Areas of study will be selected by both instructor and students with students taking an active role as both learners and teachers. Prerequisites: Kinesiology 48-214, and at least one of the following: Kinesiology 48-324, 48-334, or 48-344, or permission of instructor.
  • 48-404 Health and Fitness Concepts
    Students are presented current scientific information concerning the roles of physical activity, nutrition and life choices in healthy living. Emphasis is placed on incorporating this information into a lifestyle that will produce lifelong optimal health. In addition, issues related to the impact of health-related diseases on society are discussed. (NS) (Fall, Spring)
  • 48-424 Health Promotion and Programming
    Introduction to concepts of program planning for health education in the community. The purpose of this course is to provide students with the skills needed to develop, implement and evaluate health promotion programs with a special emphasis on behavior change initiatives. Prerequisite: Kinesiology 48-134 and 48-214.
  • 48-431 Research in Kinesiology I
    This is the first of two courses in the research capstone sequence. The capstone experience is a laboratory or field-based research experience designed to provide hands-on experience directed toward answering questions related to kinesiology. In this writing-intensive course, students work directly with a faculty member to develop a research proposal and complete an IRB proposal if necessary. Prerequisites: Kinesiology 48-214, 48-324, and either 48-334 or 48-344. (Spring) (WA)
  • 48-433 Research in Kinesiology II
    This is the second of two courses in the research capstone sequence. The capstone experience is a laboratory or field-based research project designed to provide hands-on experience directed toward answering questions related to kinesiology. In this course, students will collect and analyze experimental data for their capstone projects as proposed in 48-431. Each student will formally present results of the study in oral and written form. Prerequisites: Kinesiology 48-431. (Fall) (WA)
  • 48-444 Exercise Prescription
    This course is the study of current practices related to fitness assessment and exercise prescription. Emphasis is placed on the collection of data from fitness testing and the design of personalized exercise programs. Prerequisites: Kinesiology 48-214 and 48-334. (Spring) (NS)
  • 48-454 Tissue Mechanics
    This is an advanced course that explores the anatomical structure and physiological and mechanical function of tissues within the body including bone, cartilage, tendons, ligaments, nerves and muscle. Special attention is given to mechanical testing of these materials with application of this information to the study of injury mechanisms and diseases of these tissues. Also Biology 50-454. Contributes to Health Studies. Prerequisites: Kinesiology 48-123/121, and either Kinesiology 48-344 or Physics 53-154, or permission of instructor. (NS)
  • 48-464 Nutritional Physiology
    This course examines the biochemical, physiological, and cellular functions of energy macronutrients and micronutrients. Integrative topics include metabolism and energy balance, life cycle nutrition, athletic performance, and the function of nutrients as they relate to human health and disease. This course includes practical applications of this knowledge through review of scientific literature and critical thinking exercises. Contributes to Health Studies. Prerequisite: Kinesiology 48-334, or permission of instructor. (NS)
  • 48-474 Muscle Physiology
    This course is designed to enhance the student's knowledge of the field of muscle physiology. The course focuses on the functional properties of skeletal muscle as it impacts health and performance in normal and pathological situations with specific emphasis on cellular and molecular regulators of skeletal muscle adaptations. Prerequisite: Kinesiology 48-253/251, Biology 50-253/251, or Biology 50-424. (NS)
  • 48-824 Senior Capstone in Kinesiology
    This course is intended for students pursuing the BA degree. Students will complete laboratory-based activities representing the three major areas of kinesiology (Motor Learning & Control, Biomechanics, and Physiology of Exercise). These activities will be accompanied by in-depth analysis and critical review of current research topics. Prerequisites: Kinesiology 48-314, 48-424, 48-704, and 48-714. (WA) (Fall)
  • 48-843 Research in Kinesiology II
    This is the second of two courses in the research capstone sequence. The capstone experience is a laboratory or field-based research project designed to provide hands-on experience directed toward answering questions related to kinesiology. In this course, students will collect and analyze experimental data for their capstone projects as proposed in 48-831. Each student will formally present results of the study in oral and written form. Prerequisites: Kinesiology 48-831. (WA) (Fall)

The Computer Science curriculum is traditional, at least in the early courses. The first two courses in the major are taught in Java, which is an excellent language for introducing object-oriented concepts. 

The following list of courses represents current or recent course offerings. See the course catalog for updated information.

  • 54-144 Explorations in Computing
    This course is an introduction to the discipline of computer science with an emphasis on applications in the liberal arts. Topics include basic programming constructs, basic data structures, algorithmic computation, selection, iteration, interactive user interfaces, abstraction and reasoning about computer programs. This is an introductory course intended for humanities, social science and fine arts majors. May not be used for the Computer Science major or minor. Cannot be taken after successful completion of Computer Science 54-184, 54-284, or 54-454 without departmental approval. Contributes to Data Science. (Spring) (NS)
  • 54-184 Computer Science I
    This is the standard first course in computer programming in an object-oriented style. It is primarily intended for students pursuing a major or minor in computer science, mathematics or other disciplines in the natural sciences. Topics include primitive types and operations, assignment, conditional execution, iteration, arrays, classes, methods, recursion, encapsulation, type extension, inheritance and reasoning about programs in Java. The course includes a laboratory component designed to explore applications and to enhance conceptualization. Contributes to Data Science. (Fall, Spring) (NS)
  • 54-281 Colloquium in Computer Science Seminar-Style Course, Each Student Will Give a Lecture on a Topic in Computer Science Not Norma
    Presentation of one lecture and participation in discussions is required. This course may be repeated for credit, but may not be counted toward the major or minor. Must be taken Pass/D/F. Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in Computer Science 54-284, and permission of the instructor.
  • 54-284 Computer Science II
    This course is a continuation of 54-184 Computer Science I, with an emphasis on abstract data objects such as lists, stacks, queues, trees and graphs, and test-first programming using the automated testing paradigm JUnit. Topics include algorithms for searching, sorting, traversing, inserting and deleting, and reasoning about these algorithms. The course includes a laboratory component designed to explore applications and to enhance conceptualization. Prerequisite: Computer Science 54-184 or permission of instructor. Contributes to Design Thinking. (Spring) (NS)
  • 54-291 Puzzling Programs
    Given a precise program specification and a few input/output examples, students will gain experience quickly devising a solution that passes a suite of unseen (and generally more complicated) input/output examples. Teamwork, troubleshooting code based on very limited feedback from automated systems, effectively reading problem descriptions, and discerning relevant details will be practiced. This course (or prior enrollment in this course) is required for students wishing to compete in the South Central USA Regional ACM Programming Contest. This course may be repeated for credit, but may not be counted towards the major or minor. Must be taken P/D/F. Prerequisite: Computer Science 54-184. (Fall)
  • 54-384 Discrete Mathematics
    This course investigates concepts in the modeling of discrete phenomena. Topics include logic, structure of proof, set theory, combinatorics, graphs, induction and recurrence relations. Also Mathematics 52-384. Prerequisites: Mathematics 52-164, Computer Science 54-184, and either Mathematics 52-264 or Computer Science 54-284, or permission of instructor. (Fall) (NS)
  • 54-394 Computer Organization
    This course studies computer architecture, internal representation of data, assembly language programming, subroutines and parameter passing, design of machine language instruction sets, bus structure, digital logic, and support for parallelism. The course includes a laboratory component designed to explore applications and to enhance conceptualization. Prerequisite: Computer Science 54-284 or permission of instructor. (Fall) (NS)
  • 54-414 Operations Research
    Formulation and solution of problems with management, economics, engineering and science applications using modeling, optimization techniques, and simulation. Topics include linear and integer programming, simplex method, duality, sensitivity analysis, branch and bound algorithm, transportation and assignment problems, network optimization, and problem solving using optimization software. Also Mathematics 52-414 and Business 30-414. Prerequisites: Mathematics 52-164 (Modern Calculus I), and either Business 30-474 (Finance) or Mathematics 52-674 (Linear Algebra), or permission of the instructor. Contributes to Data Science.
  • 54-424 Artificial Intelligence
    This course studies the use of computer algorithms to emulate the cognitive and problem solving capabilities of humans. Topics include: search, optimization, reinforcement learning, evolutionary computation, statistical methods and (deep) neural networks. Prerequisite: Computer Science 54-284 or permission of instructor. (NS)
  • 54-454 Algorithms
    An introduction to the design and analysis of algorithms and their implementation in C++. Topics include: greedy, divide-and-conquer, dynamic programming, graph, and randomized algorithms; asymptotic analysis and computational tractability (e.g. NP-completeness); practical data structures (stacks, trees, queues, graphs, hash tables, heaps). Prerequisite: Computer Science 54-284, or permission of instructor. Contributes to Design Thinking. (Spring) (NS)
  • 54-474 Programming Languages
    A study of the principles and practice in the design and implementation of imperative, functional, logic and object-oriented programming languages. Prerequisite: Computer Science 54-394 or permission of instructor. (Fall) (NS)
  • 54-514 Database Management
    An introduction to the theory and practice of database management systems. Topics include database terminology, the entity-relationship model, the relational model, normalization, querying databases using SQL, and exploration of other database technologies. The course includes a laboratory component designed to explore applications and to enhance conceptualization. Prerequisite: Computer Science 54-284 or permission of instructor. (NS)
  • 54-524 Introduction to Numerical Analysis
    See Mathematics 52-524. (NS)
  • 54-534 Functional Programming
    An introduction to functional programming. Topics include functions, lists, types, induction and recursion, pattern matching, infinite lists and trees. A functional programming language such as Haskell, Lisp or ML will be used in the course. There will be a large number of programming projects. Prerequisite: Computer Science 54-284 or permission of instructor. (NS)
  • 54-644 Computer Systems
    An introduction to operating systems and computer networks. Topics include process control, scheduling, threads, concurrency, memory management, virtual memory, network protocol layers, packets, routing and network security. Prerequisite: Computer Science 54-394. (Spring) (NS)
  • 54-844 Seminar in Special Topics
    A limited enrollment seminar not generally covered in other courses. This course may be repeated for credit as topics vary. (NS)
  • 54-894 Senior Seminar in Software Engineering
    Introduction to techniques and theories for the development of large software systems. This course will fulfill the capstone requirement in Computer Science. Topics include: software design and quality, ethics, professional issues, the study of current software engineering trends, theory and practice. Each student will contribute substantially to a major semester project, do at least one major individual presentation, and have significant class participation. Each student will take the Major Field Test. Prerequisite: Six courses in the major at the 300 level or above, and permission of instructor. Must have completed one of Computer Science 54-454, 54-514, or 54-474. (Spring) (NS) (WA)
  • 14-144 Latin I
    Essentials of grammar, composition, and reading. Students will acquire basic translation skills and build a core vocabulary, and they will support their language learning with the study of Roman society and culture. (Fall)
  • 14-154 Latin II
    Continued study of grammar, composition and reading. Students will learn more complex syntactical constructions and begin translating more sustained Latin passages. Prerequisite: Latin 14-144, or equivalent placement. (Spring)
  • 14-164 Latin III
    Students will build on the fundamentals they acquired in introductory Latin and strengthen their skills in translation and interpretation through a variety of Latin prose and poetry texts. Readings and cultural studies of poets such as Catullus and Horace to prose writers of oratory (Cicero), natural history (the two Plinys), and society and politics (Tacitus) to later works such as those of Hildegard of Bingen (twelfth-century polymath and author of causae et curae) and Carolus Linnaeus (eighteenth-century botanist). Prerequisite: Latin 14-154, or equivalent placement. (Fall)
  • 14-344 Intermediate Readings Latin Literature
    This course is specifically designed for intermediate students who have completed three semesters of Latin. In addition to strengthening skills in translation, interpretation, and textual analysis, students will encounter Latin texts in their cultural, historical, and political contexts and become familiar with scholarly commentaries. May be repeated with change in topic. Topics offered on a rotating basis of prose and poetry. The range of topics includes readings in the epic poetry of Vergil's Aeneid; Cicero's public speeches and letters in their socio-political context; the poetic corpus of Catullus; Ovid's Metamorphoses; and Livy's history of Rome. Prerequisite: Latin 14-164; or equivalent placement. (Fall, Spring) (H)
  • 14-404 Advanced Readings in Latin Literature
    This course is specifically designed for advanced students and includes rigorous study of Latin texts in focused thematic areas. Students will encounter the texts in their cultural, historical, and political contexts and gain greater familiaritywith issues of composition and transmission, as well as current interpretive approaches and important secondary scholarship. May be repeated with change in topic. Topics offered on a rotating basis of prose and poetry. The range of topics includes readings in Latin elegiac poetry; political history of the early principate in Tacitus and Suetonius; the extensive epistolary corpus of Pliny the Younger; and the Roman epigraphic habit. Prerequisite: Latin 14-164, or equivalent placement. (Fall, Spring) (H)

CALCULUS I (52-154). Functions and graphs; derivatives, applications of differentiation. Exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions, integration, applications of integration. The course includes a laboratory component designed to explore applications and to enhance conceptualization. Prerequisite: Mastery of high school level precalculus (algebra, trigonometry, exponential and logarithmic functions). (Each semester) (NS)
CALCULUS II (52-254). Numerical integration, methods of integration, applications of the definite integral, improper integrals, sequences and series, Taylor’s Formula and approximation, polar coordinates. The course includes a laboratory component designed to explore applications and to enhance conceptualization. Prerequisite: Mathematics 52-154. (Each semester) (NS)
CALCULUS III (52-353). A course in multivariable calculus. Vectors, vector functions, and curves. Functions of several variables, partial differentiation, multiple integration, applications of partial differentiation and of multiple integrals. Vector calculus, line integrals, Green’s Theorem, surface integrals. Prerequisite: Mathematics 52-254.
(Each semester) (NS)
LINEAR ALGEBRA (52-673). Linear equations and matrices, vector spaces, linear mappings, determinants, quadratic forms, vector products, groups of symmetries. Prerequisite: Mathematics 52-254 or permission of instructor. (Each semester) (NS)
ELEMENTARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS (52-753). Topics include first order differential equations, separable equations, exact equations, linear differential equations of order n>1, homogeneous equations with constant coefficients, nonhomogeneous equations,  the method of undetermined coefficients, variation of parameters, power series solutions,  and an introduction to the Laplace Transform. Prerequisite:  Mathematics 52-353, or permission of instructor. (Fall) (NS)

Topically, our courses cover issues central to our contemporary global society: questions of race class and gender; power and violence; cross-cultural constructions of masculinity and femininity; environmental injustice; global inequality; migration and identity; and advocacy and activism. Geographically, we specialize in the Caribbean, Latin America, and Latinos in the U.S.

Below you will find a list of our current or recent offerings. See the course catalog for descriptions and updated information.

  • 35-104 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
    This course provides a critical understanding of the similarities and differences in cultures and peoples through time and space, and of the application of anthropological knowledge to contemporary global issues. Topics covered may include the history of anthropology; human evolution; the idea of race; gender across cultures; kinship; political organization; economies; consumption; religion; language; ethics; and fieldwork. Contributes to International Studies. (Each semester) (ScS) (SJ)
  • 35-244 Race, Class and Gender in the Caribbean
    This course critically examines how the constructs of race, class and gender shape everyday life in the Caribbean. The course will cover history, human-environmental relations, the global circulations of people and capital that continue to create the Caribbean (migration, tourism and development), spiritualities, language, music, and Carnival. Contributes to Feminist Studies, International Studies, Latin American and Border Studies, and Race and Ethnicity Studies. Prerequisite: Anthropology 35-104 or Feminist Studies 04-104. (ScS) (SJ)
  • 35-304 Selected Topics
    These are courses that fall out of our typical range of anthropology courses. Offered infrequently. May be repeated with change in content.
  • 35-334 Global Environmental Justice
    An exploration of global environmental issues from a perspective that foregrounds questions of social inequality (differences in socioeconomic status, race, gender, indigeneity, national identity, etc.). The course includes an overview of the U.S. environmental justice movement, a consideration of global inequality, and social theories of nature and culture. Topics addressed may include global climate change, consumerism, pollution and toxic substances, resource extraction, bio-diversity conservation, food production systems, natural disasters, and water scarcity. Students will be required to engage in environmentally oriented activism or service, and to reflect on their experiences as a part of the course. Contributes to Environmental Studies, Feminist Studies, Health Studies, International Studies, and Race and Ethnicity Studies. Prerequisite: Anthropology 35-104, Environmental Studies 49-104, or Feminist Studies 04-104. (ScS) (SJ)
  • 35-424 Theory & Method in Cultural Anthropology
    This course introduces students to the different kinds of assumptions and questions that have informed anthropological inquiry in the past, and that currently orient research and writing in cultural anthropology. The course simultaneously explores the methodological techniques intertwined with these theories. Students will practice different methods (including participant observation and interviewing techniques) and use different theoretical approaches as they do so. This course prepares students to conduct the ethnographic research project required for the senior seminar. Prerequisite: Anthropology 35-104. Restricted to Majors. (Fall)
  • 35-964 Senior Seminar
    The anthropology capstone requires students to develop a major paper in which they contextualize the data generated from their ethnographic research project in relevant scholarly literature. Students will work with each other and their professor throughout the capstone in an intellectual community of knowledge producers. Students will present their paper to campus at the end of the course and will be encouraged to present at regional conferences and the Southwestern Undergraduate Works Symposium. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. (Spring) (WA) (ScS)

See the course catalog for complete course descriptions.

Anthropology

  • ANT35-334 Global Environmental Justice
    An exploration of global environmental issues from a perspective that foregrounds questions of social inequality (differences in socioeconomic status, race, gender, indigeneity, national identity, etc.). The course includes an overview of the U.S. environmental justice movement, a consideration of global inequality, and social theories of nature and culture. Topics addressed may include global climate change, consumerism, pollution and toxic substances, resource extraction, bio-diversity conservation, food production systems, natural disasters, and water scarcity. Students will be required to engage in environmentally oriented activism or service, and to reflect on their experiences as a part of the course. Contributes to Environmental Studies, Feminist Studies, Health Studies, International Studies, and Race and Ethnicity Studies. Prerequisite: Anthropology 35-104, Environmental Studies 49-104, or Feminist Studies 04-104. (ScS) (SJ)

Economics & Business

  • ECO31-564 International Economics
    The theory of comparative advantage, analysis of commercial policy and principles of international finance. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: Economics 31-104. (ScS)
  • BUS30-484 International Management
    An introduction to the issues facing international business today. Explores the dynamic global environment of business management by reviewing the political, legal, technological, competitive, and cultural factors that shape corporations worldwide. Strategic and operational strategies for operating across borders will be identified, along with the complexities of managing individuals in an international business context. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: Business 30-214. (ScS)
  • BUS30-584 International Business
    This course develops a conceptual framework for making business decisions in a globally competitive company. This framework requires an understanding of an environment that has different cultures and values, multiple foreign currencies, alternative capital markets, and country specific risks. The course focuses on the multinational firm's operating environment, global strategy and functional operations. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: Business 30-214 or permission of instructor. (ScS)

English

  • ENG10-514 World Cinema
    A history of narrative film from its origins to the present with an emphasis upon European, Asian, Indian and Third World cinema. Cultural contexts and technological evolution are emphasized. Lang, Eisenstein, Renoir, Truffaut, Fellini, Bergman, Fassbinder, Kurosawa, Ray, Almodovar, and Campion are among the directors studied. German cinema of the Weimar Period, Soviet Silent Cinema and the Theory of Montage, Italian Neorealism, the French New Wave, the Japanese Postwar Renaissance and emergent Third World Cinema are among the organizing principles of this survey. Contributes to International Studies. (H)

History

  • HIS16-014 Disease, Health & Medicine in World Hist
    What is disease? How have different cultures experienced and responded to it? Using case studies from Africa, Europe, Asia, and the Americas, this course examines global ecological changes and global human exchanges as a key factor in the spread of epidemic disease. It also highlights the role of medical and scientific knowledge in the human responses to disease. We explore the changing notions of the body's anatomy and physiology; the role of the environment; the interaction between healers, doctors, and patients; the nature of different therapeutic approaches; and the structure of health care institutions. Contributes to Environmental Studies, Health Studies, and International Studies. (Annually) (H) (WA)
  • HIS16-024 Empires & Empires of Mind in World Hist
    This course traces the evolution of a variety of empires (real or imagined), from the pre-Columbian indigenous, Iberian, French, British, and Dutch empires through the Age of Revolutions, the rise of industry, capitalism, nationalist movements, World Wars, and communism. We will conclude with the process of decolonization and the possible development of an American Empire and other new kinds of empires. Empires, very broadly construed, will be our lens to interpret world history. Contributes to Design Thinking and International Studies (Annually) (H)
  • HIS16-034 Nations and Nationalism in World History
    This course investigates the development of national identities around the world and the nationalisms that describe or defend them. We explore how nations are defined, whether nations are natural expressions of human community, why nationalism has often led to violence, and what the future may be for the nation-state. Contributes to Design Thinking, International Studies, and Race and Ethnicity Studies. (Annually) (H) (WA)
  • HIS16-094 Topics in World History
    This course offers an alternative thematic approach to the study of societies, cultures, and civilizations around the world and their interactions. May be repeated with change in topic. Contributes to International Studies. (Biennially) (H) (WA)
  • HIS16-204 History of Africa
    This survey is an introduction to African cultures and history from pre-colonial times to the present, emphasizing Africa's variety and its connections to other parts of the world. Topics include: environmental challenges; pre-colonial social and political organization; the spread of Islam and Christianity; the impact of the Atlantic slave trade; conquest and resistance; social change under colonial rule; decolonization; neo-colonialism and postcolonial challenges. Contributes to International Studies, and Race and Ethnicity Studies. (Biennially) (H)
  • HIS16-314 Topics in African History
    Thematic courses with a focus on African history. May be repeated with change in topic. Contributes to International Studies. (H)
  • HIS16-374 Topics in Transregional History
    Thematic courses with a comparative or transregional theme (covering at least three different world regions). May be repeated with change in topic. Contributes to International Studies. (H)
  • HIS16-604 Science and Its Publics
    This course explores the relationship between science, technology, and medicine and their publics since the Early Modern period to our recent past. Drawing from case studies that examine the role of scientific societies, formal education, textbooks, popular literature, publicity, and other formal and informal means to disseminate knowledge, students will understand the changing relationship between science and the public sphere, the role that the popularization of science plays in democratic societies, and the impact of popular science and the public perception of science in the production of new scientific knowledge. Contributes to International Studies. (Biennially) (H)
  • HIS16-614 Witches, Nuns, Prostitues, Wives & Queen
    This course explores the multifaceted experiences of women in the British World, from the medieval era to the present. We consider how gender and sexuality have been constructed differently over time and space; the role of churches, states, and empires in defining and proscribing sexual activity, masculinity, and femininity; the social and political expectations placed upon men and women; cultural representations and manifestations of gender and sexuality; the intersection of gender and other categories of difference; and how pivotal, transnational historical events like the Reformation and decolonization affected women and notions of gender. Contributes to Early Modern Studies, Feminist Studies, and International Studies. (Biennially) (H)
  • HIS16-624 History of the Islamic World
    This course traces the development of Islamic societies and cultures throughout the world from Mohammad's seventh-century revelations to the present. Topics include Islamic empires, relations with other groups, art and architecture, science and philosophy, evolution and adaptation. Contributes to International Studies. (H)

Philosophy

  • PHI18-134 Philosophy, Race & Revolution
    This course is oriented around the Haitian Revolution, the only successful slave revolution in history, examining the ways in which it both reflected and responded to the internal contradictions of Western philosophy's developing notion of race and the colonial mission and, on the other hand, its new universalist vision of human rights. How slave revolt exploded this contradiction from within, what its historical and theoretical effects were, and the ways in which related tensions rose again in the wave of anti-colonial revolutions in the 1960s and '70s will be the main focus. We will also consider the rise of postcolonial and decolonial theory in those revolutions' wake. Contributes to Latin American and Border Studies and Race and Ethnicity Studies. (H)

Political Science

  • PSC32-144 Comparative Politics
    An introductory survey of major political systems, representing both Western and non-Western countries. No single political system will be studied in depth. This course provides the tools for such study in the future. Contributes to Design Thinking and International Studies. (Fall, Spring) (ScS)
  • PSC32-224 Middle East Politics
    A survey of the comparative and international politics of the Middle East, focusing on major Arab states, Israel and Iran. Contributes to International Studies. (ScS) (Comparative politics)
  • PSC32-384 International Politics
    An introductory study of the theory and practice of international politics. The course examines both the origins and the consequences of the political organization of the modern world. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: Political Science 32-114 and 32-144. (WA) (ScS) (International relations)
  • PSC32-494 International Political Economy
    A seminar that examines how changes in the international political economy have affected international politics and international relations theory. Prerequisite: Political Science 32-384 or permission of instructor. (ScS) (International relations)
  • PSC32-634 Resistance, Rebellion & Revolution
    Insurrection and revolution have been among the most transformative events and processes in history, destroying powerful systems while creating new ideas, values, relations, and experiences. This course examines both broad conceptual questions about power, collective action, and agency and structuralism and the specificity of such key moments in different times and places. There is a substantial research and writing component. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: Political Science 32-364 or 32-384, or permission of instructor. (ScS) (Comparative politics)

Religion

  • REL19-204 Christian Traditions
    A historical and thematic introduction to the Christian thought and practice. The survey begins with the Jesus movement and continues through the current growth of Christianity in the southern hemisphere, particularly sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America. Literary genres, gender issues, political contexts, social movements and ethical dimensions are explored. Contributes to International Studies. (H) (SJ)
  • REL19-224 Jewish Traditions
    A survey of the history, practices and belief of Judaism from the period of the formation of the Hebrew Bible to the modern era. Contributes to International Studies. (H)
  • REL19-244 Islamic Traditions
    A survey of the history, practices, and beliefs of Islam from Muhammad's era to the modern. It investigates special themes such as mysticism, gender, and politics with attention to diverse cultural contexts. Contributes to International Studies. (H)
  • REL19-274 Hindu Traditions
    A historical and thematic introduction to the religious ideas and practices that developed primarily on the Indian subcontinent. The course surveys central religious concepts and myths in classical texts and popular traditions; the interaction with Buddhism, Jainism, Islam and Sikhism; gender issues; and the relationship between religion and politics in South Asia. Contributes to Feminist Studies and International Studies. (H) (SJ)
  • REL19-324 Women, Goddesses and Religion
    A cross-cultural study of the ways women's voices have been heard and silenced, of the ways that their lives have been influential (as well as violently ended) and of the vital roles women have played in various religious traditions. The course also investigates ways in which female divinity has been conceptualized in various ancient and modern religious traditions. Rituals, communities, visual symbols and sacred texts will provide the material for our explorations and a feminist methodology will provide the lens for our gaze. Contributes to Anthropology, Feminist Studies, and International Studies. (H) (WA) (SJ)
  • REL19-334 Apocalypse
    Why do we imagine the end of everything? Is it fear? Is it control? Is it wanting to let go of control? What do religious traditions do with the idea of apocalypse (a vision, a revelation of things to come)? This course examines those questions in both religious and secular settings (while questioning those boundaries) asking why humans have imagined end times. It also considers why these imaginings exist and how they function. In addition, it raises issues of social justice and expresses hope in a different (and better) future as well as current environmental fears of demise. Contributes to Environmental Studies. (H) (SJ)
  • REL19-344 Animals and Religion
    A cross-cultural study of the ways other-than-human animals are included in and influence several different religious traditions. The course also examines contemporary issues such as factory farming and biomedical experimentation. Ecofeminist and environmental theories and methods inform the course. Contributes to Animal Studies, Environmental Studies, Feminist Studies, and International Studies. (H) (SJ)
  • REL19-364 Pilgrimage
    A critical and comparative exploration of the religious, spiritual, social, cultural, environmental, economic, and political dimensions of religious journey. The course will investigate several theoretical approaches to pilgrimage that foreground issues such as the relation between place and sacred space; the distinction between physical and metaphorical journeys; pilgrims' motivations and goals; the relationship between religious journeying and ordinary life; how cultural values shape and are shaped by pilgrimages; the environmental impacts of pilgrimage; and the relationship between pilgrimage and tourism. Students will apply these theoretical approaches by focusing on particular religious journeys in several traditions. Contributes to Anthropology, Environmental Studies, and International Studies. (H)

Theater

  • THE72-254 East Meets West: Interculturalism & Thea
    An investigation of theatrical interculturalism in a world-wide context. This course examines the series of exchanges, imitations, misunderstandings, and betrayals that took place in theatre during the twentieth-century and the new forms produced at the intersection of cultures. (IP) (WA) (FAL)

The Mathematics curriculum is traditional, although many of the best practices for mathematics classrooms (technology, group projects, inquiry-based learning, writing mathematics, etc.) are being incorporated where appropriate to enhance the traditional topics.

The following list of courses represents current or recent course offerings. See the course catalog for updated information.

  • 52-104 Explorations in Mathematics
    This course presents the spirit and beauty of mathematics through topics chosen by the instructor, emphasizing the role that mathematics plays in society. Topics may include mathematics in art and literature, Euclid's Elements, game theory and voting theory. The mathematical content may include geometry, algebra, and number systems. The course is suitable for a general audience with a broad spectrum of backgrounds and abilities and also satisfies requirements for EC-6 or 4-8 teacher certification. This course may not be used for the Mathematics major or minor. (NS)
  • 52-114 Introduction to Statistics
    This course provides students in the social and biological sciences with the skills necessary to perform elementary statistical analysis. Topics include descriptive measures, probability, sampling theory, random variables, binomial and normal distributions, estimation and hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, regression and correlation. This course may not be used for the Mathematics major or minor. Contributes to Data Science and Health Studies (Fall, Spring) (NS)
  • 52-164 Modern Calculus I
    This course focuses on introducing calculus with a modeling first approach. The topics include functions as models of data, dimensional analysis, estimation techniques, differential calculus of functions of one and several variables, optimization, integration, and Taylor polynomials. Applications are drawn from varied areas, including biology, chemistry, economics, and physics. There is a strong emphasis on developing scientific computing. (Fall, Spring) (NS)
  • 52-204 Topics in Mathematics
    This course investigates a topic in Mathematics that varies according to the interests of professor. This course may be repeated with a change in the topic. (NS)
  • 52-264 Modern Calculus II
    This course focuses on calculus useful for both theoretical and applied work in the mathematical, natural, and social sciences. Topics include: differential equations, integration techniques, partial derivatives, gradients, contour plots, constrained and unconstrained optimization, optimization of multivariable functions, multiple integration, polar coordinates, and limits. Attention is given to both symbolic and numerical computing. Prerequisite: Mathematics 52-164. (Fall, Spring) (NS)
  • 52-291 Putnam Power Hour
    This course is designed to sharpen problem solving abilities. Students will tackle challenging problems from the William Lowell Putnam Competitions of previous years and study some of the published solutions. Students enrolled in this course will be encouraged to compete in the Putnam Competition in early December. This course may be repeated for credit, but may not be counted toward the major or minor, and must be taken P/D/F. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. (Fall)
  • 52-304 Selected Topics
    May be repeated with change in topic. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
  • 52-364 Modern Calculus III
    This course focuses on calculus useful for the mathematical and physical sciences. Topics include: scalar and vector-valued functions and derivatives; parameterization and integration over regions, curves, and surfaces; the divergence theorem; infinite series; power series; Taylor series; and mathematical definitions of the integral, derivative, and limit. Attention is given to both symbolic and numerical computing. Applications drawn from the natural sciences, probability, and other areas of mathematics. Prerequisite: Mathematics 52-264. (Fall, Spring) (NS)
  • 52-384 Discrete Mathematics
    See Computer Science 54-384. (Fall) (NS)
  • 52-404 Geometry
    This course investigates various approaches to geometry. Topics may include synthetic geometry, analytic geometry, projective geometry, differential geometry, Euclidean geometry and non-Euclidean geometry. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. (Fall, odd years) (NS)
  • 52-414 Operations Research
    See Computer Science 54-414 and Business 30-414. Contributes to Data Science.
  • 52-524 Introduction to Numerical Analysis
    This course investigates the derivations and applications of numerical techniques most frequently used by scientists: interpolation, approximation, numerical differentiation and integration, zeroes of functions and solution of linear systems. Also Computer Science 54-524. Prerequisites: Mathematics 52-264, 52-674, and Computer Science 54-184, or permission of instructor. (NS)
  • 52-574 Probability and Mathematical Statistics
    This course is a calculus-based, mathematical introduction to the fundamental principles of probability theory and applications. Topics include combinatorial analysis used in computing probabilities, the axioms and properties of probability, conditional probability, independence of events, discrete and continuous random variables, the standard distributions, expected value and variance, joint distributions, distributions of a function of a random variable, and sampling distributions. Also included are theoretical results such as Bayes' Theorem, Central Limit Theorem, Law of Large Numbers, the Empirical Rule, Hypothesis Testing and Confidence intervals at least for a single mean and a single proportion. Prerequisite: Mathematics 52-264. Contributes to Data Science. (Spring) (NS)
  • 52-674 Linear Algebra
    This course is an introduction to the basic structure of proofs, linear equations and matrices, vector spaces, linear mappings, determinants, quadratic forms, vector products and groups of symmetries. Prerequisite: Mathematics 52-164, and one approved Mathematics or Computer Science course at the 200-level or above, or permission of instructor. (Fall, Spring) (NS)
  • 52-684 Algebraic Structures
    This course investigates the theory of sets, relations, functions, groups and rings. A rigorous approach to learning and writing proofs is emphasized. Prerequisite: Mathematics 52-674 or permission of instructor. (Fall) (NS)
  • 52-754 Differential Equations
    This course investigates the theory and application of differential equations. Topics include both linear and nonlinear first order ordinary differential equations, numerical solutions, and higher order linear ordinary differential equations. Solution techniques may include undetermined coefficients, variation of parameters, power series solutions, and Laplace transforms. Additional topics may be chosen from linear systems, nonlinear systems and Fourier series analysis of partial differential equations with boundary conditions. Prerequisite: Mathematics 52-364, or permission of instructor. (Spring) (NS)
  • 52-834 Complex Analysis
    This course investigates the algebra and geometry of complex numbers. Topics include analytic and harmonic functions, series, contour integration, conformal maps and transformations. Prerequisite: Mathematics 52-364, or permission of instructor. (Fall, even years) (NS)
  • 52-844 Seminar in Special Topics
    This course is a limited enrollment seminar in a major area of mathematics not generally covered in other courses. Topics may include but are not limited to advanced analysis, combinatorics, logic and history of mathematics. The course may be repeated for credit as topics vary. (NS)
  • 52-854 Real Analysis
    This course investigates the algebra and topology of the real numbers. Topics include completeness, sequences, limits and continuity, differentiation, the Mean-Value Theorem, Taylors Theorem and infinite series. May also include sequences and series of functions. A rigorous approach to learning and writing proofs is emphasized. Prerequisite: Mathematics 52-674, or permission of instructor. (Spring) (NS)
  • 52-874 Seminar in Advanced Topics
    This course is intended to provide additional depth in one of the core subject areas offered in the department. It primarily serves as a second-semester course in algebraic structures, differential equations, or real analysis. The course may be repeated for credit as topics vary. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. (NS)
  • 52-894 Senior Seminar in Mathematical Modeling
    This course will fulfill the capstone requirement in Mathematics. Since it serves as a culmination of the student's undergraduate mathematical experience, a balance is sought between application and theory. Topics may include optimization methods with sensitivity analysis, numerical and analytic methods, linear and non-linear differential and difference equations, curve and surface fitting, statistics, and stochastic methods. Topics may vary with the instructor. Applications will be taken from the social and natural sciences. Collaboration and significant class participation are expected. Each student will take the Major Field Test. A major semester project resulting in a written paper and an oral presentation is required from each student; an external presentation may also be required. Prerequisites: Six courses in the major at the 300 level or above, Computer Science 54-184, and permission of instructor. Must have completed one of MAT52-574, MAT52-674, or MAT52-754. (Fall) (NS) (WA)

The Mathematics curriculum is traditional, although many of the best practices for mathematics classrooms (technology, group projects, inquiry-based learning, writing mathematics, etc.) are being incorporated where appropriate to enhance the traditional topics.

The following list of courses represents current or recent course offerings. See the course catalog for updated information.

  • 52-104 Explorations in Mathematics
    This course presents the spirit and beauty of mathematics through topics chosen by the instructor, emphasizing the role that mathematics plays in society. Topics may include mathematics in art and literature, Euclid's Elements, game theory and voting theory. The mathematical content may include geometry, algebra, and number systems. The course is suitable for a general audience with a broad spectrum of backgrounds and abilities and also satisfies requirements for EC-6 or 4-8 teacher certification. This course may not be used for the Mathematics major or minor. (NS)
  • 52-114 Introduction to Statistics
    This course provides students in the social and biological sciences with the skills necessary to perform elementary statistical analysis. Topics include descriptive measures, probability, sampling theory, random variables, binomial and normal distributions, estimation and hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, regression and correlation. This course may not be used for the Mathematics major or minor. Contributes to Data Science and Health Studies (Fall, Spring) (NS)
  • 52-164 Modern Calculus I
    This course focuses on introducing calculus with a modeling first approach. The topics include functions as models of data, dimensional analysis, estimation techniques, differential calculus of functions of one and several variables, optimization, integration, and Taylor polynomials. Applications are drawn from varied areas, including biology, chemistry, economics, and physics. There is a strong emphasis on developing scientific computing. (Fall, Spring) (NS)
  • 52-204 Topics in Mathematics
    This course investigates a topic in Mathematics that varies according to the interests of professor. This course may be repeated with a change in the topic. (NS)
  • 52-264 Modern Calculus II
    This course focuses on calculus useful for both theoretical and applied work in the mathematical, natural, and social sciences. Topics include: differential equations, integration techniques, partial derivatives, gradients, contour plots, constrained and unconstrained optimization, optimization of multivariable functions, multiple integration, polar coordinates, and limits. Attention is given to both symbolic and numerical computing. Prerequisite: Mathematics 52-164. (Fall, Spring) (NS)
  • 52-291 Putnam Power Hour
    This course is designed to sharpen problem solving abilities. Students will tackle challenging problems from the William Lowell Putnam Competitions of previous years and study some of the published solutions. Students enrolled in this course will be encouraged to compete in the Putnam Competition in early December. This course may be repeated for credit, but may not be counted toward the major or minor, and must be taken P/D/F. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. (Fall)
  • 52-304 Selected Topics
    May be repeated with change in topic. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
  • 52-364 Modern Calculus III
    This course focuses on calculus useful for the mathematical and physical sciences. Topics include: scalar and vector-valued functions and derivatives; parameterization and integration over regions, curves, and surfaces; the divergence theorem; infinite series; power series; Taylor series; and mathematical definitions of the integral, derivative, and limit. Attention is given to both symbolic and numerical computing. Applications drawn from the natural sciences, probability, and other areas of mathematics. Prerequisite: Mathematics 52-264. (Fall, Spring) (NS)
  • 52-384 Discrete Mathematics
    See Computer Science 54-384. (Fall) (NS)
  • 52-404 Geometry
    This course investigates various approaches to geometry. Topics may include synthetic geometry, analytic geometry, projective geometry, differential geometry, Euclidean geometry and non-Euclidean geometry. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. (Fall, odd years) (NS)
  • 52-414 Operations Research
    See Computer Science 54-414 and Business 30-414. Contributes to Data Science.
  • 52-524 Introduction to Numerical Analysis
    This course investigates the derivations and applications of numerical techniques most frequently used by scientists: interpolation, approximation, numerical differentiation and integration, zeroes of functions and solution of linear systems. Also Computer Science 54-524. Prerequisites: Mathematics 52-264, 52-674, and Computer Science 54-184, or permission of instructor. (NS)
  • 52-574 Probability and Mathematical Statistics
    This course is a calculus-based, mathematical introduction to the fundamental principles of probability theory and applications. Topics include combinatorial analysis used in computing probabilities, the axioms and properties of probability, conditional probability, independence of events, discrete and continuous random variables, the standard distributions, expected value and variance, joint distributions, distributions of a function of a random variable, and sampling distributions. Also included are theoretical results such as Bayes' Theorem, Central Limit Theorem, Law of Large Numbers, the Empirical Rule, Hypothesis Testing and Confidence intervals at least for a single mean and a single proportion. Prerequisite: Mathematics 52-264. Contributes to Data Science. (Spring) (NS)
  • 52-674 Linear Algebra
    This course is an introduction to the basic structure of proofs, linear equations and matrices, vector spaces, linear mappings, determinants, quadratic forms, vector products and groups of symmetries. Prerequisite: Mathematics 52-164, and one approved Mathematics or Computer Science course at the 200-level or above, or permission of instructor. (Fall, Spring) (NS)
  • 52-684 Algebraic Structures
    This course investigates the theory of sets, relations, functions, groups and rings. A rigorous approach to learning and writing proofs is emphasized. Prerequisite: Mathematics 52-674 or permission of instructor. (Fall) (NS)
  • 52-754 Differential Equations
    This course investigates the theory and application of differential equations. Topics include both linear and nonlinear first order ordinary differential equations, numerical solutions, and higher order linear ordinary differential equations. Solution techniques may include undetermined coefficients, variation of parameters, power series solutions, and Laplace transforms. Additional topics may be chosen from linear systems, nonlinear systems and Fourier series analysis of partial differential equations with boundary conditions. Prerequisite: Mathematics 52-364, or permission of instructor. (Spring) (NS)
  • 52-834 Complex Analysis
    This course investigates the algebra and geometry of complex numbers. Topics include analytic and harmonic functions, series, contour integration, conformal maps and transformations. Prerequisite: Mathematics 52-364, or permission of instructor. (Fall, even years) (NS)
  • 52-844 Seminar in Special Topics
    This course is a limited enrollment seminar in a major area of mathematics not generally covered in other courses. Topics may include but are not limited to advanced analysis, combinatorics, logic and history of mathematics. The course may be repeated for credit as topics vary. (NS)
  • 52-854 Real Analysis
    This course investigates the algebra and topology of the real numbers. Topics include completeness, sequences, limits and continuity, differentiation, the Mean-Value Theorem, Taylors Theorem and infinite series. May also include sequences and series of functions. A rigorous approach to learning and writing proofs is emphasized. Prerequisite: Mathematics 52-674, or permission of instructor. (Spring) (NS)
  • 52-874 Seminar in Advanced Topics
    This course is intended to provide additional depth in one of the core subject areas offered in the department. It primarily serves as a second-semester course in algebraic structures, differential equations, or real analysis. The course may be repeated for credit as topics vary. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. (NS)
  • 52-894 Senior Seminar in Mathematical Modeling
    This course will fulfill the capstone requirement in Mathematics. Since it serves as a culmination of the student's undergraduate mathematical experience, a balance is sought between application and theory. Topics may include optimization methods with sensitivity analysis, numerical and analytic methods, linear and non-linear differential and difference equations, curve and surface fitting, statistics, and stochastic methods. Topics may vary with the instructor. Applications will be taken from the social and natural sciences. Collaboration and significant class participation are expected. Each student will take the Major Field Test. A major semester project resulting in a written paper and an oral presentation is required from each student; an external presentation may also be required. Prerequisites: Six courses in the major at the 300 level or above, Computer Science 54-184, and permission of instructor. Must have completed one of MAT52-574, MAT52-674, or MAT52-754. (Fall) (NS) (WA)
  • 31-104 Principles of Economics
    A study of the general characteristics of economic systems, including unemployment, inflation, economic growth, and monetary and fiscal policy. The principles and problems related to the determination of prices, the economics of the firm and the distribution of income are also studied. (Fall and Spring) (ScS)
  • 31-214 Money, Banking and Financial Markets
    Nature and structure of financial markets, monetary theory and policy, the regulation of financial institutions and international finance. Prerequisite: Economics 31-104.
  • 31-224 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory
    Intermediate economic theory relating to the analysis of price and value, production, distribution of income and economic welfare. Prerequisites: Economics 31-104 and Mathematics 52-164, or permission of instructor. (Fall) (ScS)
  • 31-234 Intermediate MacRoeconomic Theory
    Intermediate economic theory relating to the analysis of employment, inflation, economic growth and the balance of payments. Prerequisite: Economics 31-104 and Mathematics 52-164. (Spring) (ScS)
  • 31-304 Selected Topics
    May be repeated with change in topic. Four credits will count as one upper-level course, and a maximum of four credits may be applied toward the major.
  • 31-314 Econometrics
    Quantitative and qualitative research methods for economic problems. Research design, data collection and statistical analysis of cross-sectional and time series data are covered. A major research paper and a weekly computer lab are required. Prerequisites: Economics 31-224, 31-234 and Mathematics 52-114, or permission of instructor. Contributes to Data Science. (Fall) (WA) (ScS)
  • 31-324 Environmental Economics
    This course examines the economic theory behind environmental policies that address the market failure inherent in environmental problems. This course covers both theoretical models and evaluates current policy and global agreements in the context of economic models. Contributes to Environmental Studies. Prerequisite: Economics 31-104. (ScS)
  • 31-434 Public Economics
    Deals with the justification for government activities, the design of programs consistent with these justifications, and the effects of major existing and proposed expenditure programs and taxes. Contributes to Health Studies. Prerequisites: Economics 31-104 and Mathematics 52-114. Economics 31-224 is recommended. (ScS)
  • 31-470 Finance Lab
    Accompanies BUS30-474 or ECO31-474.
  • 31-474 Finance
    See Business 30-474. Prerequisites: Accounting 36-114, Economics 31-104, Mathematics 52-114, and Mathematics 52-164 or Business 30-154, and 42 credits. (Fall and Spring) (ScS)
  • 31-494 Financial Economics
    This course focuses on asset pricing and the general valuation of risky cash flows. After developing the foundations of consumer decision-making under uncertainty, it applies that framework to understanding both equilibrium and no-arbitrage theories of securities pricing. This includes the capital asset pricing model (CAPM), the consumption capital asset pricing model (CCAPM), Arrow-Debreu theories of asset pricing, martingale pricing methods, and the arbitrage pricing theory (APT). The course also studies insurance markets the value of signaling in markets. Prerequisites: Mathematics 52-164, and Business 30-474 or Economics 31-474. (ScS)
  • 31-564 International Economics
    The theory of comparative advantage, analysis of commercial policy and principles of international finance. Contributes to International Studies. Prerequisite: Economics 31-104. (ScS)
  • 31-574 Investments
    See Business 30-574. Prerequisites: Business 30-474 or Economics 31-474, and Mathematics 52-164 or Business 30-154, or permission of instructor. (Fall) (ScS)
  • 31-634 Data Analytics
    An introduction to commonly used techniques in data analytics. The application of statistical analysis and data visualization to draw conclusions about data. Applications will include sampling, forecasting, extrapolation, and regression analysis. Contributes to Data Science. Prerequisites: Mathematics 52-114, and Mathematics 52-164 or Business 30-154, or permission of instructor. (ScS)
  • 31-951 Independent Study and Research
    Four credits will count as one upper-level course, and a maximum of four credits may be applied toward the major.
  • 31-952 Independent Study and Research
    Four credits will count as one upper-level course, and a maximum of four credits may be applied toward the major.
  • 31-953 Independent Study and Research
    Four credits will count as one upper-level course, and a maximum of four credits may be applied toward the major.
  • 31-954 Independent Study and Research
    Four credits will count as one upper-level course, and a maximum of four credits may be applied toward the major.
  • 31-964 Capstone in Economics
    Topics vary from year to year, but generally will involve group and/or individual research projects. Prerequisite: Senior standing and Economics 31-224, 31-234, and 31-314; or permission of instructor. (Spring) (WA)

VOICE AND MOVEMENT

This is a practical, activity-based course designed to help students speak and move with ease and freedom. Voice work will focus on improving resonance and enunciation and will include work on stage dialects. Movement work will focus on body alignment and spatial awareness.

FUNDAMENTALS OF ACTING

This course is designed to introduce students to the processes of acting, including developing clear characters, analyzing scripts, exploring dramatic action and conflict and making bold choices in the development of scenes and monologues. Students will work on basic acting skills including movement, voice, and improvisation. Substantial written and performance work is required.

THEATRE PERFORMANCE PRACTICUM

Main-stage productions are open to all University students. One credit is granted for each production. This course may be repeated for up to four credits. Prerequisite: Must be cast in a role in a main-stage production. For non-major students only.

ALEXANDER TECHNIQUE

The Alexander Technique is a body alignment and movement technique that focuses on alignment of the spine and skeleton. When the spine and skeleton come into alignment, muscles soften, tension releases, coordination improves, and the body works more efficiently. This activity-based course focuses on group and private work with the instructor and is particularly appropriate for Theatre and Music students. May be repeated for credit.

THEATRE DANCE

Preparation and execution of basic movement exercises, jazz, tap and modern dance and their application to choreography for musical theatre. Also Dance 79-414.

ACTING: REALISM

This course investigates the analysis and performance of scenes from realistic plays Students engage in activities designed to explore advanced techniques for personalizing and physicalizing characters, playing actions and objectives, and engaging in rigorous script analysis

DEPARTURES FROM REALISM

Study and practice of 20th and 21st-century acting techniques through research, analysis work and performance.

MUSICAL THEATRE WORKSHOP

This course focuses on the intensive practical aspects of scene-and-song work in the repertory of popular musical theatre genres, paying particular attention to the skills needed as an actor to interpret lyrics and text within the structure of a musical play. While this course focuses on the performative elements of acting in a musical, considerable reading and critical analysis will also be required. May be repeated for credit.

THEATRE FOR SOCIAL CHANGE: PRACTICE AND PERFORMANCE

This course explores theatre as a political, activist, problem solving, educational and aesthetic tool. Students will learn to develop interactive performances that can be used to effect social change in a wide variety of community settings.

FEMINISM AND PERFORMANCE

A course focusing on the ways culture has constructed the performance of gender on stage, in every-day life and in the media. Also Communication Studies 75-524 and Feminist Studies 04-724. (FAP) (WA)

ACTING: POETIC LANGUAGE

This course explores acting techniques for developing performances from texts that feature poetic language. Activities include voice and language, movement and manners and dialect work. Rigorous character and scene analysis and historical research are required.

DIRECTING FOR THE THEATRE

Principles and practices of directing. Includes detailed analysis of the playscript and directing of laboratory or workshop productions.

ADVANCED DIRECTING

This course will explore how a director transforms personal vision into social and aesthetic meaning in a theatrical event. Through lecture, discussion and in-class exercises, the course will examine how a director uses an in-depth approach to script analysis with a special emphasis on the directors use of theatrical space and conventions to project a point of view. Prerequisite: Theatre 73-894

  • 76-101 Fundamentals of Solfege/Ear Training
    The development of proficiency in aural skills through dictation and sight singing. Qualified students may place out of this class by examination. To be taken concurrently with Music Theory 76-103. (Fall) (FAL)
  • 76-103 Fundamentals of Music Theory
    A foundational survey of the notation and analysis of Western musical practices of the 18th and 19th centuries, to include: clefs, key signatures, scales, meter, triads and seventh chords and their inversions, Roman numeral analysis, and an introduction to 4-part writing. Some ability to read musical notation is highly recommended prior to enrollment. This course is a prerequisite to Music Theory 76-113. Qualified students may place out of this class by examination. To be taken concurrently with Music Theory 76-101. (Fall) (FAL)
  • 76-111 Solfege/Ear Training I
    Continuation of Music Theory 76-101. To be taken concurrently with Music Theory 76-113. Prerequisite: Music Theory 76-101 or passage of a qualifying diagnostic examination. (Spring) (FAL)
  • 76-113 Music Theory I: Harmony in Practice
    A survey of the hierarchical relationships in 18th-19th century diatonic harmonic practice, studied through analysis and compositional exercises. Also introduced are: cadences, phrase/period structures, non-chord tones, diatonic seventh chords, applied harmony, and modulation. To be taken concurrently with Music Theory 76-111. Prerequisite: Music Theory 76-103 or passage of a qualifying diagnostic examination. (Spring) (FAL)
  • 76-211 Solfege/Ear Training II
    Continuation of Music Theory 76-111. To be taken concurrently with Music Theory 76-213. Prerequisite: Music Theory 76-111. (Fall) (FAL)
  • 76-213 Music Theory Ii: Form and Analysis
    A continuation of concepts introduced in Music Theory I. Small forms, sequences and diatonic sevenths will be reviewed before proceeding to study of chromatic harmony and modulation through analysis and compositional exercises. Formal designs (periods, binary and ternary forms, sonata, rondo and variation) will be surveyed and explored in late 18th- and 19th-century musical literature. To be taken concurrently with Music Theory 76-211. Prerequisite: Music Theory 76-113. (Fall) (FAL) (WA)
  • 76-223 Music Technology
    A survey of the fundamentals of music technology in the context of its historical and cultural use. Scientific foundations of acoustics, hearing, and digital audio as well as technical skills for music production will be addressed; students will work on practical applications of these concepts and techniques. Contributes to Design Thinking. (Spring of even-numbered years) (FAL)
  • 76-311 Solfege/Ear Training III
    Continuation of Music Theory 76-211. To be taken concurrently with Music Theory 76-313. Prerequisite: Music Theory 76-211. (Spring) (FAL)
  • 76-313 Music Theory III: Counterpoint
    A strongly composition-based course that provides an introduction to the contrapuntal styles of the Renaissance and Baroque eras. To be taken concurrently with Music Theory 76-311. Prerequisite: Music Theory 76-213. (Spring) (FAL)
  • 76-343 Orchestration
    A study of orchestral instrumentation and the art of transcription for orchestra, through score analysis and arranging projects. Prerequisite: Music Theory 76-213. (Spring of odd-numbered years) (FAL)
  • 76-413 Music Theory IV: 20th Century Music
    An analytical survey of the compositional languages, aesthetics and forms in the concert music of the 20th century. Prerequisite: Music Theory 76-313. (Fall) (FAL)
  • 76-532 Composition
    Individual instruction in the craft of musical composition. Students are introduced to the techniques and languages of contemporary concert music through original writing exercises and listening assignments. Continued study will ultimately lead to writing projects in larger forms. May be repeated for credit. Contributes to Design Thinking. Prerequisite: Music Theory 76-101 and 76-103, or consent of instructor. (Each semester) (FAP)
  • 76-534 Composition
    Individual instruction in the craft of musical composition. Students are introduced to the techniques and languages of contemporary concert music through original writing exercises and listening assignments. Continued study will ultimately lead to writing projects in larger forms. May be repeated for credit. Contributes to Design Thinking. Prerequisite: Music Theory 76-101 and 76-103, or consent of instructor. (Each semester) (FAP)
  • 47-011 Barre Above Fitness
    Course combines the disciplines of ballet, Pilates, and yoga for a total body workout. Must be taken Pass/D/F.
  • 47-021 Tennis
    Rules, fundamentals and/or appropriate level techniques, and recreational skills for all levels of skills for tennis players. Must be taken Pass/D/F.
  • 47-031 Bowling
    Rules, fundamentals and/or appropriate level techniques, and recreational skills for all levels of skills for bowlers. Lab fee required. Must be taken Pass/D/F.
  • 47-051 Golf
    Rules, fundamentals and/or appropriate level techniques, and skill development for all levels of skill. Lab fee required. Must be taken Pass/D/F
  • 47-091 Fencing
    Development of knowledge, skills, strategies and equipment used in the ancient art of sword play. Emphasis will be placed on foil fencing. Lab fee required. Must be taken Pass/D/F.
  • 47-101 Swim for Fitness
    Course is designed to enjoy the benefits of swimming as a means of obtaining aerobic fitness. Must be able to pass a basic swimming test to enroll. Must be taken Pass/D/F.
  • 47-121 Racquetball/Pickleball
    RACQUETBALL./PICKLEBALL: Rules, fundamentals and/or appropriate level techniques, and recreational skills for all levels of racquetball/pickleball players. Must be taken Pass/D/F.
  • 47-131 Mixed Martial Arts
    Basic mixed martial arts movements and skills. Must be taken Pass/D/F.
  • 47-141 Martial Arts
    Beginning Tae Kwon Do/Karate or Beginning Hapkido/Judo and/or advanced levels of either are offered on a rotating basis. Each is studied with regard to the history, customs, skills/techniques and unique features of the specific martial art. Must be taken Pass/D/F.
  • 47-151 Total Fitness
    Course designed to give the participant the basics for developing and maintaining a full workout regime. Must be taken Pass/D/F.
  • 47-161 Weight Training
    Teaches safe and effective techniques for weight training at all levels. Provides a background of information concerning techniques for muscle and strength development utilizing conventional free weight exercise coupled with exercise machines. Must be taken Pass/D/F.
  • 47-171 Zumba
    Course includes basic instruction of a Zumba workout. Participant will be required to participate in a cardio intensive workout. Must be taken Pass/D/F.
  • 47-181 Leisure Sports & Rec
    Course will expose participants to a wide variety of activities that will encourage life-long participation and wellness. Must be taken Pass/D/F.
  • 47-211 Adapted Recreation/Fitness Activities I
    A course for students who, for various reasons, need individual attention concerning physical activity. Consent of instructor is required. Must be taken Pass/D/F.
  • 47-221 Adapted Recreation/Fitness Activities II
    A course for students who, for various reasons, need individual attention concerning physical activity. Consent of instructor is required. Must be taken Pass/D/F.
  • 47-231 Cardio Core
    Course designed to give the participant the basics for developing and maintaining an intensive cardio and core workout. Must be taken Pass/D/F.
  • 47-241 Recess Sports
    Course designed to allow participants to be involved in activities that harken back to school recess or gym classes. Must be taken Pass/D/F.
  • 07-204 Greek and Roman Mythology
    A study of the traditional cycles of Classical Mythology and the essential role myths played in Greek and Roman culture, especially the ways myth was employed to reinforce contemporary socio-political ideologies. Students will encounter the myths through a variety of ancient evidence, including literature, artwork, and material culture and engage with the most important historical and contemporary theories of mythology. Particular attention is given to the formation of these myths in the Near Eastern world and the recrystallization of Classical myth in later literature and art. (Fall, Spring) (H))
  • 07-344 Topics in Classical Culture and Society
    An interdisciplinary examination of topics in Ancient Greek and Roman culture and society. Students will learn to analyze the heterogenous ancient evidence through a variety of methods and consider these topics in the context of intercultural exchange within the global history of the Ancient Mediterranean. Develops proficiency in academic research and writing. All texts and documentary evidence will be read in translation. May be repeated with content changed. The range of topics includes Classics and the cinema; public spectacle in the Greek and Roman world; Greek and Roman warfare and society; the study of social mobility among sub-elite Romans; and Classical sites and monuments. (Fall, Spring) (H)
  • 07-444 Adv Topics Classical Culture & Society
    An interdisciplinary examination of complex topics in Ancient Greek and Roman culture and society with a focus on critical analysis of the heterogenous ancient evidence and the most important current secondary scholarship and theoretical approaches in the field. Students will consider these topics in the context of intercultural exchange within the global history of the Ancient Mediterranean. Develops advanced proficiency in academic research and writing. All texts and documentary evidence will be read in translation. May be repeated with content changed. The range of topics includes the ancient novel; Greek and Roman ethnographic literature; Greek and Roman religion and society; and state formation in the Iron Age Aegean and Italy. (Fall, Spring) (H)
  • 07-964 Seminar
    An interdisciplinary study of various aspects of Greek and Roman antiquity. May be repeated with change of content.

FUNDAMENTALS OF PHYSICS I & II (53-154, 164) (3-3). A calculus-based treatment of mechanics, wave motion, electromagnetism, optics. Prerequisites: Concurrent registration or credit in Mathematics 52-154. (Physics 53-154 is prerequisite for Physics 53-164.) (NSL)
ELECTRONICS (53-204) (3-3). Introduction to digital and analog circuits, with applications to modern instrumentation. Prerequisites: Mathematics 52-154, 254 and Physics 53-154, 164. Mathematics 52-353 is a pre- or co-requisite for this course. (NSL)
ELEMENTARY MODERN PHYSICS (53-214) (3-3). An introduction to the physics of the 20th century that surveys relativity theory, wave-particle duality, atomic structure, wave mechanics, nuclear theory and particle physics. Prerequisites: Mathematics 52-154, 254 and Physics 53-154, 164. Mathematics 53-353 is a pre- or co-requisite for this course. (NSL)
CLASSICAL MECHANICS I (53-334) (3-3). An advanced treatment of Newtonian mechanics with applications to kinematics, forced oscillations, central force motion and systems of particles. Prerequisites: Mathematics 52-353 and Physics 53-154, 164. Mathematics 53-753 is a pre- or co-requisite for this course. (NSL)

Our Sociology courses focus on topics germane to our current global society and issues of race/class/gender across the curriculum. Below you will find a list of our current or recent offerings. See the course catalog for descriptions and updated information.

  • 34-114 Introduction to Sociology
    This course serves as an introduction to the discipline of sociology that uses sociological theories, empirical research, and the sociological imagination to explore features of contemporary American life. Particular attention will be paid to the ways in which characteristics such as race, class, and gender are socially constructed in the American context and influence people's worldviews and life chances (Each semester) (ScS) (SJ)
  • 34-124 Social Problems
    This course focuses on the sociological imagination and fosters an understanding of how individuals' lives are shaped by larger social and historical forces through an examination of specific social problems that may include welfare policy, crime and delinquency, and stratification by race, class, gender and sexual orientation. Some time will also be devoted to constructive solutions that have been advanced. (Each semester) (ScS) (SJ)
  • 34-214 Criminology
    This course examines the sociological foundations of crime including factors such as residential segregation, economic inequality, and masculinity. Some attention will also be devoted to American and international perspectives on criminal justice. Contributes to Data Science. (ScS) (SJ)
  • 34-234 The Sociology of Gender
    This course examines the social construction of gender. Specifically, what are the processes and consequences of having some gender categories constructed as normative and others deemed to be deviant? How are these patterns affected by cultural, biographical, and historical contexts? Particular attention is paid to the ways that power, race, ethnicity, and class influence these patterns. Contributes to Feminist Studies, and Race and Ethnicity Studies. Prerequisite: Sociology 34-114 or 34-124, or Feminist Studies 04-104. (ScS) (SJ)
  • 34-264 Race and Ethnicity
    This course examines how race and ethnicity are constructed, maintained and challenged in the United States at the individual, interactional, and institutional levels. Some time will also be devoted to the ways that American citizenship as well as life chances are influenced by ethnic and racial group membership. Contributes to Feminist Studies, and Race and Ethnicity Studies. Prerequisite: Sociology 34-114 or 34-124. (ScS) (SJ)
  • 34-274 Childhood and Youth
    This course examines the social worlds of children and youth. It analyzes the ways that young people's peer cultures intersect with gender, race, class and major social institutions. Students are encouraged to complete 20 hours of community-based learning and write an ethnographic paper. Contributes to Feminist Studies. Prerequisite: Sociology 34-114 or 34-124. (Fall) (ScS)
  • 34-314 Research Methods
    This course acquaints majors and minors in sociology with the procedures for gathering and analyzing sociological data. Students are required to participate in lab sessions as a part of the course. Contributes to Data Science. Prerequisite: Sociology 34-114 or 34-124, Mathematics 52-114, and sociology major or permission of the instructor. (Fall) (WA) (ScS)
  • 34-324 Social Class in the U.S.
    This course explores the study of the construction, maintenance and consequences of social inequalities in the United States, based on the review of classical and contemporary theories, empirical research and biographical accounts. Training in in-depth interview methods. Contributes to Feminist Studies. Prerequisite: Sociology 34-114 or 34-124. (Every other Spring) (ScS)
  • 34-344 Sociological Theory
    Contributions made to sociological theory beginning in the mid-19th century to the present. This course will survey select classical theorists and contemporary theorists with an emphasis on how their theories can be applied to understanding human behavior through a sociological lens. Prerequisites: Sociology 34-114 or 34-124, and sociology major or permission of the instructor. (Spring)
  • 34-364 Sociology of Work
    This course investigates the institution of work from a sociological perspective. Topics include: a brief history of the evolution of work, work patterns prevalent in the United States, and modern-day concerns with employment inequality by race, gender, class, sexual orientation and the work-life balance. Students are required to attend SPSS lab sessions (during normal class time). They will perform quantitative analyses using employment discrimination complaint data and write a paper based on the results. Contributes to Business, Data Science, and Race and Ethnicity Studies. (ScS)
  • 34-394 Qualitative Methods Seminar
    Students in this course are introduced to qualitative methods and develop individual capstone research projects within an intellectual community of their peers. Students are expected to design a research project grounded in sociological literature, apply for IRB approval and collect their data for the sociology capstone seminar. Prerequisite: Sociology 34-314. (Spring)
  • 34-964 Sociology Capstone Seminar Movements and Activism
    The Sociology capstone requires students to develop a major empirical paper. Students will analyze data they collected in the qualitative methods seminar, apply sociological literature to their findings and present their findings to the campus community. campus community. Students will discuss common readings and constructively critique one another's work. Peer review is a core component of this course. Prerequisite: Sociology 34-314, 34-344 and 34-394; or permission of instructor. (Fall) (WA) (ScS)