Academics

Notable Achievements

We are proud to celebrate the collective achievements of the Southwestern community.

Have something to share? Submit a Notable.


September 2021

  • Professor of Music Michael Cooperwrote the program note for the Philadelphia Orchestra’s performance of Florence B. Price’s Symphony No. 4 in D minor, to be released on the orchestra’s Digital Stage on October 13. The symphony was composed in 1945 but only recently discovered and published; it represents a substantially different approach to the genre of the symphony compared to Price’s previous symphonies and tenders perhaps her most overt musical commentary on the war. 





  • Professor of Music Michael Cooper  made his first (and probably last) foray into phrenological musicology, or perhaps musicological phrenology, with a virtual guest lecture for the University of North Carolina at Greensboro music program. Titled “Disorderly Inspiration: Hector Berlioz’s Idée Fixe, the Clash of Tradition and Modernity, and the Episode in the Life of an Artist,” the lecture showed how Berlioz, who studied medicine before his descent into music, appropriated the technique of using a specific musical theme to represent an extramusical fixation or monomania from the pseudoscientific phrenological research of F. J. Gall and J. G. Spuzheim, specifically the first two volumes of their Anatomie et Physiologie Système Nerveux en Général, et du Cerveau en Particulier.  Of this pseudopsychiatry was born great art: Berlioz used Gall’s and Spurzheim’s concept to invent the technique of the (musical) idée fixe in his Symphonie Fantastique  and other works, a technique that became foundational to later Romantic music. 





  • The lab of Assistant Professor of Physics Cody Crosby was recently featured in a KXAN News story, which was picked up by NBC affiliates in Denver, Colorado, and Albuquerque, New Mexico. 





  • Assistant Professor of English Rebecca Evans  published an article in the journal American Literature titled “ Geomemory and Genre Friction: Infrastructural Violence and Plantation Afterlives in Contemporary African American Novels .” The article is drawn from the fourth chapter of her current book project and is part of a joint special issue of American Literature and Resilience: A Journal of the Environmental Humanities  titled “The Infrastructure of Emergency.”





  • Professor of Psychology Fay Guarraci was recently awarded the American Psychological Foundations 2021 Division 1–Society for General Psychology Mary Whiton Calkins Grant. The grant will support research on the development of an animal model of puberty delay and gender-affirming hormone treatment to better understand the long-term outcomes of puberty suppression and adult hormone treatment in the context of gender transition. Mary Whiton Calkins was the first woman to preside as president of the American Psychological Association in 1905.





  • Associate Professor of French Francis Mathieu recently published a peer-reviewed article titled “An All-Divine Love: Conjugal Love Versus Romantic Love in Lafayette’s Princesse de Clèves” in the interdisciplinary French literature journal Cahiers du Dix-septième.





  • Professor of Psychology Fay Guarraci recently published an article that was a collaboration across three countries investigating the patterning of male sexual behavior in two strains of rats. The article, “Male Rat Sexual Behavior: Insights from Inter-Copulatory Intervals,” was published in Behavioral Processesthis month.





  • Associate Professor of History Melissa Byrnes published an article titled “Anti-Salazarism and Transnational Solidarity: Franco-Portuguese Student Activism in the 1960s” in French History and Civilization (vol. 10). Byrnes considers the role of migrants in the 1968 protests, early networks of transnational activism, connections between campus life and broader social inequities, and students’ shared strategies for opposing authoritarianism, fascism, and imperialism.





  • Associate Professor of History Jethro Hernández Berrones published the chapter “Mystic of Medicine, Modern Curandero, and ‘Médico Improvisado’: Francisco I. Madero and the Practice of Homeopathy in Rural Mexico at the Turn of the 20th Century” in the volume The Gray Zones of Medicine: Healers and History in Latin America, edited by Diego Armus and Pablo F. Gómez. Through biographies of marginalized historical actors, the volume demonstrates the power of challenging traditional analytical dichotomies in the history of health and disease to illuminate the nuances and intricacies of Latin America’s medical past. In his chapter, Hernández Berrones describes the health and healing cultures in which one of the future leaders of the Mexican Revolution operated. Madero adopted spiritism and homeopathy, two innovative European practices, to find meaning in the world that surrounded him and to act upon it, inadvertently aligning with local popular health beliefs and practices and challenging the modern medical institutions that the regime he would overturn a decade later shaped.





August 2021

  • Assistant Professor of Political Science Emily Sydnor published “Empowering and Engaging Students through Civically Engaged Research” in the journal PS: Political Science and Politics. The article, in which Sydnor argues that students gain valuable democratic skills from conducting research in conjunction with community partners, was coauthored with colleagues at Houston Community College and Queens College of Charlotte who have implemented civically engaged research projects in their classes. It is also part of a symposium in PSthat is the result of the American Political Science Association’s newly launched Institute for Civically Engaged Research. 





  • Associate Professor of Kinesiology Ed Merritt’s recent manuscript “Why Is It So Hard to Lose Fat? Because It Has to Get out through Your Nose! An Exercise Physiology Laboratory on Oxygen Consumption, Metabolism, and Weight Loss” will be published in the September issue of the journal Advances in Physiology Education.





  • Professor of Religion Laura Hobgood was interviewed and featured in an article in the September 2021 issue of The Atlantic. The article, “Why Millennials Are Obsessed With Dogs,” includes a reference to Hobgood’s book A Dog’s History of the World.





  • Assistant Professor of Communication Studies Raquel Moreira has won the 2021 Organization for the Study of Communication, Language, and Gender’s Anita Taylor Outstanding Award for her article “De-Whitening Intersectionality through Transfeminismo.”





  • Assistant Professor Rico Self has earned the Organization for the Study of Communication, Language, and Gender’s Cheris Kramarae Outstanding Dissertation Award for his work “Ties that Bind: Black Familyness and the Politics of Contingent Coalitions.” This brings Self’s awards for his dissertation up to four, and that’s not including the 2021 RSA Dissertation Award Honorable Mention he just received.





  • Assistant Professor of Mathematics Noelle Sawyer  was one of four mathematicians quoted in a Scientific American  article about the mathematics community titled “ Modern Mathematics Confronts Its White, Patriarchal Past .”





  • Vice President for Strategic Recruitment and Enrollment Tom Delahunt  has been named to the National Association for College Admission Counseling committee on affiliate relations. He will be collaborating with leaders in college admissions and among high-school counselors from around the country to reexamine the association and its strategic plan as we enter into a demographic decline.





  • Professor of Music Lois Ferrari  conducted and presided over the Austin Civic Orchestra’s (ACO’s) three-part summer concert series, the final installment of its The Beat Goes On  virtual season. These concert programs were designed to provide the orchestra’s musicians with a safe environment in which to rehearse and perform during the current pandemic. ACO members were assigned to small chamber groups or chose to form their own groups, all with social distancing and aerosol management at the forefront of consideration. The members rehearsed for four to five weeks and then recorded their performances as virtual compilations or in person at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center in Austin. The streamed events drew large appreciative virtual audiences on both the ACO Facebook page and YouTube channel. Ferrari and the ACO plan to return to the live stage for their 2021–2022 season, titled Reunited .





  • Katherine Holcomb  ’23 participated in the American Sociological Association’s 2021 Undergraduate Honors Program (held online) on August 7. She presented the paper “Fear of Crime as a Gendered Experience: Gender and Risk Perception in Public Spaces,” which was originally written for the fall 2020 sociology research methods class.





  • Professor of Sociology Reggie Byron served on a “Teaching in the Liberal Arts” remote panel for the sociology department at the Ohio State University on July 28, 2021. He also presented a paper remotely at the Annual Meetings of the American Sociological Association on August 7, 2021. The paper, titled “‘Get Rid of That Ghetto Element’: Race, Gender, Work Sector, and Employers’ Ideal Worker Pursuits” reflected key findings from chapter 2 of his forthcoming Rose Series in Sociologybook on employment discrimination across the U.S.





  • Christopher Adams ’16, a second-year pediatric dentistry resident at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Adams School of Dentistry, was selected by the NCAA Postgraduate Scholarship Committee to receive a $10,000 scholarship. Adams was a varsity lacrosse player and captain of his team at Southwestern University prior to him receiving his DDS from the University of Texas Health Sciences Center–San Antonio.





  • Associate Professor of Business Debika Sihi helps different organizations develop marketing campaigns to highlight the importance of budgeting and financial literacy, stemming from her days as a volunteer with Junior Achievement. Recently, she shared insights about budgeting for college students in U.S. News & World Report.





  • Associate Professor of Psychology Carin Perilloux  has accepted a position on the editorial board of the new Journal of Social Psychology Research ( JSPR ) . JSPR  is a fully open-access journal that functions as an outlet for pioneering integrative frameworks toward existing social psychology theories and concepts. This journal aims to deliver theoretical and empirical papers based on interpersonal relationships at the level of individuals and social groups. The editors encourage submissions on substantial interdisciplinary research on the theory, content, models, directions and problems of social psychology developments.





  • Head of Special Collections and Archives Megan Firestone presented a talk on making the case for digital preservation during the Society of American Archivist virtual annual meeting.





  • Head of Special Collections and Archives Megan Firestone presented a webinar titled “Bridging the Gap between Oral Historian and Archivist” with Jena Heath, associate dean of arts and humanities at St. Edward’s University, for the Texas Digital Library and Texas Oral History Association. 





July 2020

  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth presented a research paper and coorganized and comoderated a section of four panels for the XIV Congress of the International Association for German Studies (IVG), which met in hybrid form July 26–31, 2021, in Palermo, Italy. The IVG meets every five years with the aim of promoting international cooperation in the field of German studies. This year’s motto was “Wege der Germanistik in Transkulturellen Perspektiven.“ Berroth’s contribution addresses inclusion and diversity in representations of disabilities in contemporary German cinema. Her paper opened the section “B14: Behinderungen und Herausforderungen: Disability Studies in der Germanistik.”





  • Professor of Communication Studies Bob Bednar presented a paper titled “Communicating with the Dead: Roadside Car Crash Shrines as Platforms for Bridging Time, Distance, and Mortality” at the Distant Communications Virtual Conference, hosted by Midlands4Cities and the Royal Historical Society, on July 21, 2021. This interdisciplinary conference based in the U.K. brought together international scholars interested in contextualizing the remote communication practices necessitated by the pandemic through historical antecedents and material-culture analogues for communicating across spatial, temporal, and cultural distance.





  • Professor of Art and Art History Thomas Noble Howe  was invited to be a reviewer for the Oxford Classical Dictionary  (Oxford University Press) and to be a member of the advisory board of Architectural History , the journal of the Society of Architectural Historians of Great Britain. Architectural History has been published annually by Cambridge University Press since the journal’s founding in 1958.





  • Professor of Computer Science Barbara Anthony presented an article titled “Serving Rides of Equal Importance for Time-Limited Dial-a-Ride” at the July 2021 International Conference on Mathematical Optimization Theory and Operations Research in Irkutsk-Baikal, Russia. The work, coauthored with Ananya Christman, Christine Chung, and David Yuen, shows that in certain situations such as paratransit services, no polynomial-time algorithm can be guaranteed to serve the optimal number of requests; however, the paper then provides approximation algorithms with reasonable guarantees for many practical settings. 





  • Professor of Religion Laura Hobgood  will participate as an invited international panelist to discuss the recently released book Enter the Animal  (Sydney University Press) on Tuesday, July 13. For more information or to attend the panel, see the official website .





  • Assistant Professor of Psychology Carin Perilloux and her capstone students, Zack Bencal ’21, Erica Burley ’22, Alyssa Sucrese ’21, Sarah Woods ’21, and Michael Vitullo ’20, presented a poster titled “Just Friends? An Evolutionary Perspective on Jealousy and Extramarital Friendships” at the (virtual) annual meeting of the Human Behavior and Evolution Society on June 25, 2021. Their poster was selected as one of the 12 finalists in the conference poster competition. You can watch Perilloux’s three-minute poster talk here. A copy of the poster is available here.





  • Professor of Mathematics Fumiko Futamura cotaught a virtual minicourse for instructors along with her colleagues Annalisa Crannell (Franklin & Marshall College) and Marc Frantz (Indiana University). The minicourse, titled Gaining Perspective on Geometry: IBL Activities That Use Art in Projective Geometry, ran June 8, 15, 22, and 29 through the Mathematical Association of America virtual programming and covered perspective drawing, Desargues’s Theorem, the cross ratio, and perspective collineations.





  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Therese Shelton led a week-long virtual workshop, Model Instructors in Differential Equations (MINDE), with coleaders Rosemary Farley and Patrice Tiffany (Manhattan College) and Brian Winkel (SIMIODE). This work was supported by a grant (#1940532) from the National Science Foundation.





  • An article cowritten by Professor of Spanish Katy Ross and Lizzeth Cepeda Lozano ’20, “La Adopción China en El Alfabeto de los Pájarosde Nuria Barrios,” was recently published by ConSecuencias.





  • Assistant Professor of Psychology Karen Lara had an article titled “This Is Not What I Expected: The Impact of Prior Expectations on Children’s and Adults’ Preferences and Emotions” recently published in the journal Developmental Psychology.





  • Professor of Spanish Katy Ross presented a paper titled “La Ovodonación Dentro del Marco Neoliberal” at the ALCE SXXI virtual conference during the week of July 12–16.





  • Assistant Professor of Biology Kim McArthur presented her research at the annual meeting of the Society for Developmental Biology on July 14, 2021. In her virtual poster, titled “Behavioral Analysis of Respiratory Circuit Development in Larval Zebrafish,” McArthur presented evidence that neural circuits in the brainstem that drive breathing behaviors become functional very early in development, well before they are strictly necessary for oxygen uptake. The larval zebrafish provides a unique opportunity to study the earliest stages in neural circuit development as zebrafish develop outside of their mothers where brain cells can be observed under the microscope using noninvasive methods.





June 2021

  • Professor of Sociology Reggie Byron has been invited to serve on the board of directors of the Pease Park Conservancy in Austin, where he will work with the Vision Plan Implementation Committee as they strive to make the 84-acre park a more inclusive public space. Byron is hopeful that this service will open up opportunities for student-involved community engagement. Byron has also recently started diversity consulting work with a national finance firm and is hopeful that this will eventually open up the possibility for student internships. Finally, Byron has been invited to serve a three-year term (2021–2024) on the editorial board of the American Sociological Association’s peer-reviewed journal Socius.





  • Assistant Professor of Mathematics Noelle Sawyer published a post on the American Mathematical Society’s (AMS’s) inclusion/exclusion blog titled “Who Will Celebrate You?” In it, she calls for change in how the AMS chooses plenary speakers at its national conference and explains why it matters who is chosen to celebrate your career.





  • Dean of Admission and Enrollment Services Christine Bowman served on the faculty for the first Rural Opportunities for College Access New Mexico (ROCA NM) college camp. Drawing from high schools across the state, ROCA NM brings together a select group of rising high-school seniors and committed college counselors from around the country for four days of residential workshops at Northern New Mexico College’s El Rito campus. Whether writing essays, workshopping college lists, building camaraderie, or exploring their identity as rural students, participants in ROCA NM leave prepared to pursue their college dreams wherever they lead.





  • Associate Professor of History Jess Hower presented a paper, “The Lives and Afterlives of the Tudor Empire: Henry VII, the Cabot Voyages, and the Memory of England’s First Trans-Atlantic Encounters, 1496–1685,” at the British Scholar Society’s annual Britain and the World Conference, held virtually June 16–18, 2021. She also served as chair on two panels, “Global Networks of Goods and Knowledge, 1580–1700” and “Early Modern Royalty and Diplomacy.”





  • Southwestern University alumni Jose Melendez ’20 and Mikayla Miller ’19 graduated from the Rice University master of accounting program this May.





  • Assistant Professor of Political Science Emily Sydnor, Senior Director of Integrative & Community-Engaged Learning Sarah Brackmann, and students Antonio Esparza  ’22 and Eugenia Gabrielle Agobe  ’23 presented at the 2021 Civic Learning and Democratic Engagement Meeting. During their session, titled “Developing Skills and Breaking Down Barriers to Voter Engagement: Lessons Learned from the 2020 Election,” the group offered insights into their experiences encouraging student engagement through SU Votes in the lead-up to the 2020 election as well their goals for keeping the momentum going in 2021 and 2022.





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth presented the paper “Opening Language Learning to Social Justice: Designing an OER German Curriculum” at the virtual Language Education for Social Justice conference and the 37th Summer School of Applied Language Studies hosted by the University of Jyväskylä, Finland, June 1–3, 2021. An international group of scholars, educators, and artists answered central questions: What does social justice have to do with language education? Why do we need to talk about social justice as language teachers, teacher educators, and researchers? How can research look at and beyond language in education with the goal of being a catalyst for critical thinking, democracy, equity, and peace? Berroth’s contribution focused on the collaborative authoring and editing of an open educational resource, Grenzenlos Deutsch , an introductory German curriculum.





  • Assistant Professor of Kinesiology Jennifer Stokes presented a pedagogical research poster titled “Case-Based Critical-Thinking Exercises to Improve Student Learning and Engagement in a Hybrid A&P Course” at the Human Anatomy and Physiology Society’s annual conference on May 23–26, 2021 (virtual). This presentation shared data collected during the spring 2021 semester on student learning, course interaction and engagement, and collaborative learning through the use of case-based critical-thinking activities and assessments. Overall, the addition of these activities and assessments increased both in-person and remote student engagement in and out of the classroom, increased instances of peer-to-peer teaching, and increased the students’ ability to apply course material to a medical case study.





  • Professor of Art History Thomas Howe  and his collaborator Professor Ingrid Rowland (Notre Dame) have just published a monograph translation into Chinese of their Vitruvius: Ten Books on Architecture  (originally published by Cambridge  University Press, 1999), 维特鲁维亚 波利奥, 关于建筑的十本书 (Beijing University Press; first edition, November 1, 2017/released 2021).





  • Professor Emeritus of English David Gaines read his poem “Changing Course” at the Poets of the Northland reading on May 26, 2021. It received the grand prize in the Duluth Dylan Festival Poetry Contest, a celebration of Bob Dylan’s 80th birthday hosted by the Nobel laureate’s fans and scholars in his hometown.





  • Associate Professor of English Michael Saenger gave two invited talks recently. On April 15, he delivered the keynote, titled “Shakespeare’s Fathers,” at the distinguished lecture series Unravelling the Bard: Through Global Perspectives hosted by Goswami Ganesh Dutta Sanatan Dharma College, in Chandigarh, India. On May 25, he was an invited discussant responding to Alexa Alice Joubin, professor of English, theatre, international affairs, and East Asian languages and cultures at George Washington University. This event was hosted by Haun Saussy, university professor of comparative literature at the University of Chicago. The topic was Joubin’s recent book, Shakespeare and East Asia(Oxford University Press).





  • Assistant Professor of Communication Studies Rico Self had a new essay published in the most recent version of Women’s Studies in Communication. “‘If You Cared about the People, You Would Have Cared about Me’: Constructing Black Trans Allyship in Chasing: Atlanta” draws on Self’s ongoing commitment to coalition building and trans communities.





May 2021

  • Assistant Professor of Communication Studies Rico Self won the Louisiana State University Department of Women and Gender Studies Outstanding Dissertation Award for 2020–2021. His dissertation, “Ties That Bind: Black Familyness and the Politics of Contingent Coalitions,” explores a range of Black coalitions from rhetorical, queer, and gender dimensions. 





  • Senior Manager of Facilities Operations William “Shorty” Schwartz was inducted by Texas Association of Physical Plant Administrators (TAPPA) board members and officers as the 2021 president. TAPPA represents more than 175 Texas education organizations, including universities, community colleges, and four-year colleges, and its 400+ members are actively involved in the administration and operation of facilities at institutions whose main emphasis is education.





  • Assistant Professor of Psychology Carin Perilloux and several students recently published an article titled “Creative Casanovas: Mating Strategy Predicts Using—but Not Preferring—Atypical Flirting Tactics” in Evolutionary Psychological Science. This paper documents a series of studies conducted over a year and a half examining unexpectedness in flirting behaviors. Justin White ’18, Helena Lorenz ’18, and Aliehs Lee ’17 are co-authors.





  • Head of Research and Instruction Services Theresa Zelasko and Research and Instruction Librarian Katherine Hooker presented a Lightning Talk titled “Turning to Video during COVID-19: Asynchronous Library Instruction” on May 7, 2021, at the Greater Austin Area Information Literacy Symposium. Zelasko and Hooker described how when they were no longer able to meet first-year students in the library because of the COVID-19 lockdown, the librarians created three videos to cover library instruction basics and set up Google Meet sessions to follow up with students about specific library tools and resources.





  • Double major in Spanish and environmental studies Jasmine Herrera ’21 and history major Saul Zuñiga ’22 presented “Mapping the Past” at the ninth Phi Alpha Theta History Conference, held at Texas State University (TSU) on April 24, 2021. Their poster was awarded first place for undergraduate virtual presentations. The poster was selected from 19 submissions by students from TSU, Baylor, and UT Dallas, and the award included an honorarium and a certificate.





  • Associate Professor of History Jessica S. Hower presented the paper “Drawing an Empire: Elizabeth I, The Armada Portrait, and the Creation of a British Atlantic World” at the Dressing a Picture: Reimagining the Court Portrait 1500–1800 conference, held virtually May 6–7, 2021. The conference was organized, sponsored, and run by the University of Cambridge, where it was originally scheduled to take place.





  • Part-Time Assistant Professor of Economics Mohammad Khan had an article titled “Household Evacuation Planning and Preparation for Future Hurricanes: Role of Utility Service Disruptions” accepted for publication in the journal Transportation Research Record.





  • Emily Brown ’21 had two entries, “Robert Stone” and “N.M. Wilcox,” published in the Handbook of Texas. The two entries were part of her work as an I-CORPS student her junior year, when she worked on a grant-funded project to process the collections of the two local Georgetown photographers held in Southwestern’s Special Collections.





  • Head of Special Collections and Archives Megan Firestone was interviewed for a case study about developing a digital preservation layer for digital content using Preservica Starter. The case study can be found here. Firestone also delivered a presentation on getting started in digital preservation for the Starter User Community Workshop, the first in a new series of community workshops hosted by Preservica Starter.





  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Alison Marr and her 11 co-authors had a piece published in the May 2018 issue of the Notices of the American Mathematical Society about their experiences at the Workshop on Increasing Minority Participation in Undergraduate Mathematics this past summer in Park City, Utah. The piece is available here.





  • Elyssa Sliheet, Class of 2019, and Daniela Beckelhymer, Class of 2020, attended the Infinite Possibilities Conference for Women of Color in Mathematics and Statistics in Washington, D.C., April 14–15, 2018. Sliheet presented a poster on her REU (Research Experiences for Undergraduates) research “Shift Operators on Directed Infinite Graphs” and Beckelhymer presented a poster on her SCOPE research with Associate Professor of Mathematics Alison Marr “Choose Your Own Adventure: An Analysis of Interactive Gamebooks using Graph Theory.” Beckelhymer won a prize for Best Undergraduate Poster Presentation at the conference.





  • Professor of Psychology Carin Perilloux and her WOU collaborator, Jaime Cloud, presented a poster with two students at the Western Psychological Association annual convention in Portland, Ore., on April 28, 2018. The poster was titled “Mate-by-numbers: Budget, mating strategy, and sex determine preferences in partner’s facial and bodily traits.” Justin Whiteand Helena Lorenz,both class of 2018, co-authored the presentation.





  • Thirteen students and four faculty traveled to Dallas, Texas, April 5 7 to attend and give talks at the 98th Annual Meeting of the Texas Section Mathematical Association of America held at El Centro College.

    • Associate Professor of Mathematics Alison Marr co-presented “Starting Inquiry-Based Learning Consortia”
    • Associate Professor of Mathematics Gary Richter presented “Revisiting a Limit as X approaches 0, the limit of sin(x)/x = 1”
    • D’Andre Adams, class of 2020, and Daniela Beckelhymer, class of 2018, presented their SCOPE 2017 research with Dr. Marr titled “Choosing Your Own Adventure: An Analysis of Interactive Gamebooks Using Graph Theory”
    • Morgan Engle, class of 2018, presented her SCOPE 2017 and capstone research supervised by Associate Professor of Mathematics Therese Shelton and Visiting Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies Becca Edwards titled “Influence of ENSO on United States Gulf Coast Ozone Using a Surface Ozone Climatology”
    • Sam Vardy, class 2018, presented a pedagogical talk supervised by Visiting Assistant Professor of Mathematics John Ross titled “Taking on Statistics with R(Our) Power”
    • Taylor Axtel, class of 2019, Alan Carr and Charlie Ellison, both class of 2020, presented research supervised by Associate Professor of Mathematics Fumiko Futamura, “3-D Matrices: How Do They Work?”
    • Music major Jacob Wilson, class of 2020, presented a musical composition from Dr. Futamura’s Explorations in Mathematics course “Frieze Patterns in Music”
    • Aiden Steinle,  class of 2020, presented research supervised by Dr. Futamura, “Staying in Shape with Real World Mappings.” Aiden won an award for Best Presentation in Geometry.
    • The other four student attendees were Keyshaan Castle, class of  2020, Katie Dyo and Elyssa Sliheet, both class of 2019, and Bonnie Henderson, class of 2018. Dr. Futamura and Dr. Ross also attended the meeting, with Dr. Ross participating in the Texas Section Project NeXT meeting.




  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Fumiko Futamura was invited to give two talks, one on April 13 at Texas State University in San Marcos, Texas, titled “How to Mathematically Immerse Yourself in Art,” and the other on April 17 at the Phi Beta Kappa event (En)Lightning Talks Houston titled “When Artists Become Mathematicians.” The (En)Lightning Talk was a 5-minute talk, complete with a countdown clock and an M.C. ready to hit a gong when time ran out. Futamura finished her talk in 4 minutes and 58 seconds.





  • Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin was invited to write a blog post for a forum inspired by George Lawson’s recent book, Anatomies of Revolution (2020). The Progress in Political Economy blog is hosted by the Department of Political Economy at the University of Sydney. Political economy is a rather storied field, perhaps most commonly associated with Adam Smith, David Ricardo, Karl Marx, and Max Weber in an era before the social sciences fragmented into fields such as politics, sociology, and economics. Selbin’s first attempt at a professional blogpost went predictably awry, with a grammatical error and his usual mishmash of words. C’est la vie or la guerre or somesuch; Mary Tyler Moore has a cameo. Those inclined may consider themselves warned and find it here





  • Part-Time Assistant Professor of Religion Andrea Gutiérrez  won the 2021 DK Award for Outstanding Doctoral Thesis on Sanskrit, an international prize given by the International Association of Sanskrit Studies once every three years to one candidate globally, for her 2020 Ph.D. dissertation “A Genre of Its Own: A History of Pākaśāstra and Other Culinary Writing of Early India.” Gutiérrez will also have a book chapter titled “Medieval Food as Deity Worship: The Elaboration of Food Offerings in Chola-Era Ritual Practice” in an upcoming volume, The Hindu Temple: Materiality, Social History, and Practice  (Routledge, forthcoming). She will also be presenting research virtually at this year’s Oxford Food Symposium at Oxford University in July 2021.





  • Please join us in congratulating the recipients of the following awards:

    • 2021 Teaching Awards
      • Tenured: Associate Professor of Education Alicia Moore
      • Tenure-track: Assistant Professor of Business Gabriela Flores
      • Visiting, part-time, and staff with faculty rank: Director of General Chemistry Labs Willis Weigand
    • 2021 Jesse E. Purdy Excellence in Scholarly and Creative Works Award
      • Tenured: Associate Professor of Communication Studies Bob Bednar
      • Tenure-track: Assistant Professor of History Joseph Hower
    • 2021 Excellence in Advising Award
      • Professor of Spanish Laura Senio Blair




  • Chemistry major Ethan Iverson ’21 presented his research project titled “Synthesis and Characterization of Three Schiff Base Constitutional Isomers and Their Respective Copper (II) Complexes” at the Spring 2021 American Chemical Society Virtual Convention. The poster presentation resulted from research that Iverson completed with Director of General Chemistry Labs Willis Weigand. Iverson was also awarded the Outstanding Senior Award by the American Chemical Society, which was presented at a virtual awards ceremony by the local Central Texas chapter.





  • Dean of the Faculty and Professor of Political Science Alisa Gaunder published an essay titled “Potential Positive Legacies of the Global Pandemic” in the April 2021 issue of the ACAD Leader, a publication produced by the American Conference of Academic Deans (ACAD). The idea for the essay was sparked by a discussion in Gaunder’s Women and Politics class in fall 2020 and further informed by a roundtable discussion Gaunder led at the ACAD conference in January 2021.





  • Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin, a faculty associate at Observatorio de la Relación Binacional México–Estados Unidos, Faculty of Political and Social Sciences of La Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, was part of a roundtable discussion “Entre las Promesas y las Acciones: Los 100 Días de Joseph Biden en la Casa Blanca.” Selbin was specifically asked to address the topic “America’s Society: Fall and Revindication.” This event was organized by La Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, La UNAM-Los Ángeles, and La Programa de Estudios de América del Norte de la Universidad Veracruzana.





April 2021

  • Senior Physics and Computational Math double-major Yash Gandhi, class of 2018, has been awarded an H. Y. Benedict Fellowship from Alpha Chi National Honor Society. Alpha Chi is a national honor society that was founded at Southwestern University in 1922, and is only open to the top 10% of juniors and seniors. Furthermore, only two Alpha Chi members from each university may be nominated to be awarded one of 10 fellowships awarded nationwide. The $3,000 in fellowship money will be used to help Yash attend graduate studies in Computer Science next year. Full press release here.





  • Assistant Dean for Student Multicultural Affairs Terri Johnson received a certificate of completion for participating in the professional development program Women in Education Leadership offered by the Harvard Graduate School of Education and held April 21–27, 2021.





  • Are antibias diversity trainings effective? Associate Professor of Sociology Reggie Byron and others weigh in on the efficacy of these widely used trainings and some of their limitations in this recent Acorns–CNBC Grownews article.





  • Assistant Professor of Kinesiology Jennifer Stokes  is the first author on a publication in Advances in Physiology Education  titled “ Updating Anatomy and Physiology Lab Delivery: Shifting from a Paper-Based to an Online Lab Instruction Platform, Just in Time for a Global Pandemic .” Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, a yearlong Anatomy and Physiology course was transitioning from paper-based lab activities to an online learning platform that included more small-group collaborative activities and peer teaching. The paper presents data on student perception, learning, and assessment performance during the transition.





  • Business and biology major Andrew Vergote ’21 gave a talk titled “Novel Bioinks: The Gateway to Bioprinting Complex Biological Tissues” at the 2021 BBB South Central Virtual Regional Convention. The talk resulted from research that Vergote completed with Assistant Professor of Physics Cody Crosby in spring 2021. They plan to continue this research as a funded Faculty–Student Project this summer.





  • Associate Professor of Psychology Erin Crockett ’05, Tyler Norman ’20, and Monique Pollmann (Tilburg University) published the article “Reading between the Lines: The Effects of Texting on Relationship Satisfaction and Understanding in Romantic Couples” in Computers in Human Behavior Reports.





  • Assistant Professor of Political Science Emily Sydnor was a panelist, presenter, chair, and discussant for several sessions at the (virtual) Midwest Political Science Association Annual Meeting. The highlights included presenting her work on students’ physiological reactions to controversial speech on campus, a collaborative project with Emily Tesmer ’20 and Associate Professor of Psychology Erin Crockett ’05, and participating in a roundtable on “Polarization, Animosity, and Violence in American Politics.” Senior political science major Emily Gilby ’21 also presented her honors thesis, “Institutional Barriers to Youth Voter Turnout,” at the conference.





  • Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin has been reappointed to the scientific advisory board for a major international initiative on revolutionary mass mobilizations. The initiative is based in Sweden (University of Gothenburg) and the U.S. (University of Massachusetts, Amherst) under the auspices of the Resistance Studies Network, the Nonviolence and Peace Movements Commission of the International Peace Research Association, and the Nordic Nonviolence Study Group.





  • Double major in Spanish and environmental studies Jasmine Herrera ’21 and history major Saul Zuñiga ’22 presented a paper titled “Mapping the Past: A Look into the Distribution of Midwives from Escuela Libre de Obstetricia y Enfermeria in Mexico City during the 1920s and 30s” at the 9th Phi Alpha Theta History Conference organized by Texas State University and held virtually on April 24, 2021. Herrera and Zuñiga undertook their research, wrote the paper, and prepared the presentation under the mentorship of Associate Professor of History Jethro Hernández Berrones during the 2020–2021 academic year. You can see their presentation here.





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth presented a paper at the 74th KFLC: The Languages, Literatures, and Cultures Conference at the University of Kentucky, Lexington, April 22–24, 2021. Her paper “STEM, German, and Dürrenmatt: Interdisciplinary Connections” contributed to the panel “Friedrich Dürrenmatt at 100,” commemorating the Swiss author and public intellectual.





  • Part-Time Instructor of Applied Music and flute instructor Adrienne Inglis’s composition “Santo” for treble chorus and folk percussion from her Latin American folk mass “Misa Trinitaria” was featured in Chorus Austin’s Southwest Voices: She Sings concert on April 24, 2021 (the recording is streaming until May 8, 2021). The world premiere of a commission by Inglis, “Shelter in Place” with poetry by Kim Stafford and a nature soundtrack, will be featured during the Lewis & Clark College Choirs spring concert on April 28, 2021. The Aaron Copland School of Music at Queens College of the City University of New York will present Inglis’s “How Dare You” for mixed chorus, flute, and nature soundtrack with text by Greta Thunberg as part of its concert on May 13, 2021;  Inglis will perform with the QC Vocal Ensemble during the livestreamed event.





  • Assistant Professor of Physics Cody Crosby presented “Phototunable Interpenetrating Polymer Network Hydrogels Stimulate iPSC-EP Vasculogenesis” during two Rapid-Fire Sessions, which feature 10-minute talks, at the Rock Stars of Regenerative Engineering Conference and the Annual Meeting of the Society for Biomaterials, which were held virtually April 19–23, 2021.





  • Associate Professor of Environmental Studies Joshua Long served as a presenter, panelist, moderator, and chair for several sessions at the (virtual) Annual Association of American Geographers Conference this month. Most notably, he served as moderator and discussant for the “Urban Climate Justice Futures” panel and also presented a paper titled “Crisis Capitalism and Coloniality: Funding Climate Action Projects in the 21st Century.”





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth earned a materials grant from the German Academic Exchange Service, or DAAD. The German program curriculum and interdisciplinary programs will be enriched through a curated collection of diverse materials on German myths and legends. Berroth is eligible to compete for those grants as she serves as a DAAD Ortslektorin, connecting and coordinating outreach to educators at all levels of instruction.





  • Physics and mathematics major Gerardo Gonzalez ’22 gave a talk at the 2021 spring meeting of the American Physical Society (Texas Section) titled “Transition Probabilities for a Relativistic One-Electron Atom.” Most of the research presented during this talk resulted from a 2019 SCOPE project that Gonzalez completed with Professor of Physics Steven Alexander. They are currently working on a paper that will describe their calculations.





  • Shawn Pipkin-West ’94 was first assistant director for A West Wing Special to Benefit When We All Vote. She was part of the team that won the Directors Guild of America (DGA) Award for Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Variety/Talk/News/Sports—Specials for 2020. This is Pipkin-West’s second DGA win.





  • Katelyn Watkins ’13 is director of operations at TELEPHONE, which was mentioned in the New York Times: “Explore a grand-scale game of telephone in the form of an interactive art exhibit. Each artist involved received a work in the form of poetry, music, film or a visual from another artist and translated that piece into one of their own before continuing the chain. Created with contributions from 950 artists from 479 cities in 70 countries, this game began on March 23 of last year, and after running for more than a year, will be on display as a web of interconnected artworks.”





  • Nereida Zarco ’16 and Associate Professor of Economics and Business Debika Sihi were selected as members of the inaugural Marketing EDGE Ambassador program, a select group of corporate professionals, students, and academics that help connect students to opportunities in the field of marketing.





  • Associate Professor of Economics and Business Debika Sihi  was invited to join the editorial review board for the Journal of Business Research  under the Big Data and Analytics track.





  • Several Psychology faculty members and students presented papers at the annual meeting of the Southwestern Psychological Association in Houston April 7–8. Students presenting with Professor of Psychology Traci Giuliano included:

    • Kirk Zanetti, Taylor Torres, both class of 2020, and Athena Pinero, class of 2019: “Now that’s aggressive: Examining the relationship between political orientation and political flaming.”
    • Sarah Butterworth, Justin White, Kyle Fraser, all class of 2018, and Lizette Cantu, class of 2019: “Is he flirting with me? How sender gender influences emoji interpretation.”
    • Allison Cook, Rachel Allen, Winston Cook, all class of 2018, and Daniella Orces, class of 2019: Emoji manners: Perceptions of students’ and teachers’ emoji use in emails.”
    • Kate Davis, Dean Neubek,class of 2019, and Emily Olson, class of 2020:Fake smiles, faker accounts: The relationship between life satisfaction and Finstagram use.”
    • Sarah Butterworth, Rachel Allen, and Allison Cook, all class of 2018: Blogging a way out: A study of depression and Tumblr usage.”

    Students presenting with Associate Professor of Psychology Bryan Neighborsincluded:

    • Rachel Allen, Matthew Gonzales, both class of 2018, Kaylyn Evans ’16, and Purna Bajekal ’16: “Attachment Insecurity and Cognitive Distortions Among Offenders in Substance Treatment.”

    Students presenting with Assistant Professor of Psychology Carin Perillouxincluded:

    • Helena Lorenz and Justin White, both class of 2018: Creative Casanovas: Mating strategy predicts using — but not preferring — unusual flirting tactics.”




  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Therese Shelton has a peer-reviewed paper, “Mathematical Modeling Projects: Success For All Students,” published in the journal PRIMUS: Problems, Resources, and Issues in Mathematics Undergraduate Studies. DOI: 10.1080/10511970.2016.124932. The paper appeared online in February 2017 and will appear in the April 2018 print issue (Volume 28, Number 4).





  • Southwestern Psychologist Kylin Lee was featured on episode 14 of the podcast The Art of Groups, in which she was interviewed regarding her expertise facilitating interpersonal process groups as well as training graduate students in this type of group.





  • Director of Study Abroad and International Student Services Monya Lemery conducted an external review of the Office of International Education at Texas Lutheran University in March 2021.





  • At last week’s annual meeting of the International Studies Association (ISA), Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin served as chair and discussant for the panel “The Evolution of Revolution,” was a panelist on a roundtable on “Anatomies of Revolution,” and, at the request of the ISA’s Committee on Professional Development, was honored to cochair a roundtable for young scholars on encountering and countering privilege (in an array of senses) in academia titled “(En)countering Privilege in Academia.”





  • Assistant Professor of History Joseph Hower presented a paper titled “Solidarity for Some, Solidarity for Later? Prison Guards, Police, and the (Labor) Politics of Mass Incarceration in the United States, 1960s–1990s” at “While There Is a Soul in Prison, I Am Not Free”: The History of Solidarity in Social and Economic Justice, a special conference jointly convened by the Eugene V. Debs Foundation, the Cunningham Memorial Library, Indiana State University (ISU), and ISU’s Department of History on April 10, 2021.





  • Associate Professor of Spanish Ángeles Rodriguez Cadena moderated the panel “Music and Social Movements” at the Latin American and Latinx Studies Symposium, an annual undergraduate event organized by Rollins College, which was held virtually on April 9 this year.





  • Jasmine Herrera  ’21, double major in Spanish and environmental studies, presented a paper in Spanish titled “La Revolución de Testimonios en el Gran Abismo de Chile” as part of the panel “Reexamining Historical Events” at the Latin American and Latinx Studies Symposium, an annual undergraduate event organized by Rollins College, which was held virtually on April 9 this year. Herrera wrote that paper for Associate Professor of Spanish Ángeles Rodriguez Cadena’s class Cultural Memory in Latin America.





  • Megan Piel  ’20 presented her sociology capstone paper titled “Watching Horror Films: A Qualitative Sociological Study of Fear” at the Southern Sociological Society on April 8.  The conference was held online.





  • Professor of Music Michael Cooper participated in a virtual panel discussion titled “The Mastery of Florence Price.” Hosted by the Heritage Signature Chorale (Washington, DC) founder and director Stanley Thurston, the panel also featured pianist Karen Walwyn (Howard University), who made the world-premiere recording of Price’s First Piano Concerto  in 2011 and is known as a foremost interpreter of Price’s music.





  • Professor of Music Michael Cooper presented a virtual lecture for the Royal Irish Academy of Music (Dublin) titled “Black Feminism, Margaret Bonds, and the Credo of W. E. B. Du Bois.” The lecture included the first performances (via Zoom) since 1972 of three excerpts from the “Credo,” featuring Washington National Opera Cafritz fellow soprano Katerina Burton and the Grand Chorus of Georgetown University, conducted by Frederick Binkholder. Cooper published the piano/vocal and orchestral/choral versions of the “Credo” with Hildegard Publishing Company in 2020. Music-loving readers of this notable can hear Burton’s stunning rendition of “Especially Do I Believe in the Negro Race” (No. 2 of the “Credo”) here and the opening and closing choruses here.





  • Professor of Political Science Shannon Mariotti was invited to present a paper at a roundtable at the recent virtual meeting of the Western Political Science Association conference. The panel was titled “WPSA’s Experiment with Virtual Communities: Successes, Failings, and Future Prospects,” and the participants spoke about their experiences chairing virtual communities over the past year. Mariotti cochairs the virtual community on Embodied Social Change and Healing Justice. Other panelists spoke about their work with virtual communities in other areas of study that have tended to be marginalized in mainstream political science, such as planetary justice, critical disability studies, critical whiteness studies, decolonizing political science, and inclusive teaching and pedagogy. You can read more about all the virtual communities here, and you can read about the Embodied Social Change and Healing Justice community here. The good news: at this meeting, we also learned that the WPSA executive council decided to make the virtual communities a permanent, staffed, and funded part of the association.





  • Madeline Yu Carrola (’19) had a peer-reviewed article titled “Activists in Red Capes: Women’s Use of The Handmaid’s Taleto Fight for Reproductive Justice” published in The Journal for Undergraduate Ethnography. The article is based on her 2018 sociology capstone project.





  • Ethan Iverson  ’21, a research student of Director of General Chemistry Labs Willis Weigand , has been invited to present his poster, “Synthesis and Characterization of Three Schiff Base Constitutional Isomers and Their Respective Copper (II) Complexes,” at the Spring American Chemical Society National Meeting. He was selected to present his poster during a live, online Inorganic Technical Division session on April 21, 2021.





  • Dean of the Faculty and Professor of Political Science Alisa Gaunder received a book contract for the second edition of Japanese Politics and Government  (Routledge, 2017). The second edition will address recent developments in Japanese politics, especially related to the global pandemic, domestic political party realignment, the legacies of Prime Minister Abe’s long tenure in office, and the changing dynamics of Japan’s foreign relations. The manuscript is scheduled for delivery to the press in summer 2022.





  • Associate Professor of Math and Computer Science Jacob Schrum has had two peer-reviewed submissions accepted to the Genetic and Evolutionary Computation Conference, which will be held virtually in July 2021. Both submissions were written by undergraduate coauthors who participated in SCOPE during the summer of 2020: Benjamin Capps ’23 had a full paper, titled “Using Multiple Generative Adversarial Networks to Build Better-Connected Levels for Mega Man,” accepted for publication in the proceedings and will present the paper orally at the conference. Kirby Steckel ’21 had a poster paper accepted to the conference. A two-page extended abstract of his paper, “Illuminating the Space of Beatable Lode Runner Levels Produced by Various Generative Adversarial Networks,” will appear in the companion to the proceedings and will be presented at the conference’s virtual poster session.





March 2020

  • Sean Calvert ’22, in collaboration with Associate Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry Mike Gesinski, received the prestigious American Chemical Society Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship (SURF). As a fellow, Calvert will receive funding to study gold catalysis over the summer under Gesinski’s mentorship. Additionally, Calvert has been invited to attend an awards ceremony, present his research at a poster session, and tour Pfizer Research and Development Labs in Groton, CT.





  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Therese Shelton and Visiting Assistant Professor of Mathematics John Ross had a peer-reviewed paper, “Supermarkets, Highways, and Natural Gas Production: Statistics and Social Justice,” published in the journal PRIMUS: Problems, Resources, and Issues in Mathematics Undergraduate Studies. This work began with a 2016 ACS Workshop on Math for Social Justice.





  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Therese Shelton is a co-principal investigator with a newly awarded three-year grant from the National Science Foundation. This will support the mission of the mathematical community SIMIODE to encourage and support faculty in using modeling to motivate learning of differential equations in context. The award will fund faculty development, practitioner workshops, and more.





  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Fumiko Futamura organized students and faculty to create a hyperbolic crochet coral reef for a table at the Hot Science Cool Talks event on coral reefs at the University of Texas on Feb.16. To prepare for the event, she gave talks on hyperbolic geometry and crochet at SU for the 107 Lecture in Mathematics and for the Art Association, and taught students, faculty and staff how to crochet hyperbolic planes that incidentally look like coral. Nine students, faculty and alumni contributed: Kari Darr ’19, Visiting Assistant Professor of Mathematics Linda DiLullo, Christi Ho ’18, Abigail Jendrusch ’19, Jacob Jimerson ’19, Chris Nissen ’18, Aiden Steinle ’18, Natalie Young ’19. Christi, Jacob and Aiden attended the event, teaching the public about hyperbolic geometry and how to crochet. The coral reef will be on display in the entrance to the Smith Library from March 20 to the end of the semester.





  • Associate Professor of History Jessica S. Hower presented the paper “‘To Her Whose Virtues and Kingdoms He Inherits’: The Politics and Practice of Tudor Imperial Queenship” at the annual South Central Renaissance Conference, which was held virtually March 25–27, 2021. The conference was sponsored by Penn State University and included the Queen Elizabeth I Society (QEIS). The paper, which stemmed from a chapter Hower wrote for a two-volume edited collection of 20 essays on Mary I that she is coediting in Palgrave Macmillan’s Queenship and Power  series, won the QEIS’s Brandie Siegfried Memorial Prize for best paper by a senior scholar. The prize honors the paper “whose rigor, clarity, and elegant delivery embodied the scholarly principles Brandie demanded of herself and others.”





  • Associate Professor of Spanish Abby Dings presented a poster titled “On Becoming Bilingual: Students’ Language Ideologies in a (Second) Language Acquisition Course” with her collaborator Suzanne García-Mateus (California State University, Monterey Bay) at the American Association for Applied Linguistics annual conference, which was held virtually March 20–23, 2021.





  • Professor of Education Michael Kamen and Alys Mendus, instructor at the University of Melbourne Graduate School of Education, presented “That Could Work in My Class! Adapting STEM Pedagogy from Non-Traditional Approaches” at a roundtable session at the 2021 Virtual Conference of the International Consortium for Research in Science and Mathematics Education.





  • Professor of Education Michael Kamen and junior education majors Antonia Renfroe ’22 and Gracie Huber ’22 presented “Well, I Guess I Am Teaching Remotely: Challenges and Lessons Learned from an Online Elementary Science Methods Course” at a roundtable session at the 2021 Virtual Conference of the International Consortium for Research in Science and Mathematics Education.





  • Professor of English and Holder of McManis University Chair Helene Meyers was an invited participant on the panel “Helping Humanities Majors Tackle a Tough Job Market from a Position of Strength” at the annual meeting of the National Humanities Alliance.





  • Associate Professor of Environmental Studies Joshua Long  published an article with Jenn Rice (University of Georgia) and Anthony Levenda (University of Oklahoma) in the journal Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space  titled “ Against Climate Apartheid: Confronting the Persistent Legacies of Expendability for Climate Justice .”





  • Assistant Professor of Political Science Emily Sydnor  and SU alumna Madison Flores  ’20, Megan Nair  ’20, and Meredith Rasmussen  ’19 recently published a chapter titled “Civility through the Comparative Lens: Challenges and Achievements” in the book Political Incivility in the Parliamentary, Electoral, and Media Arena  (Routledge, 2021). The authors particularly enjoyed learning about what counts as civil and uncivil behavior in other countries; for example, Taiwanese parliamentarians see brawls and throwing chairs at each other as acceptable ways to show their constituents they are (literally) fighting for their cause.





  • Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin  was invited by the Manchester, UK–based Rethink Rebuild Society to speak on the 10th anniversary of the Syrian Revolution. The invitation grew out of a book group which read the Arabic edition of Selbin’s book Revolution, Rebellion, and Resistance: The Power of a Story  ( الثورة والتمرد والمقاومة: قوة الحكاية ). Over 700 people from around the world attended on Zoom and Facebook Live, and it has since been viewed by several hundred more people. The Rethink Rebuild Society is primarily focused on Great Britain’s Syrian exile community and provides assistance and support to improve lives; promote the aspirations of refugees, asylum seekers, and immigrants in the UK; and raise awareness on issues related to refugees and other immigrants within the UK through policy and media work. The talk, “ Revolution in the Real World ,” is available on Facebook. It begins at about the 12-minute mark, runs for 30 minutes, and is followed by about an hour of Q&A.





  • Technical Assistant and Exhibitions Coordinator Seth Daulton  has artwork on view as part of the  Teachable Moment  exhibition at Stove Works in Chattanooga, TN. The exhibition is on view December 18, 2020–March 27, 2021, by appointment. His work, Antiviral Community Pamphlet , is a collaborative book that collects contributions from all the exhibiting artists in the exhibition. The exhibition is accompanied by a curatorial statement: “Teachable moments aren’t real. Although, for professional pedagogical purposes they are real enough; to formulate methodologies, to establish fixed instances of productive interruption, to name and consecrate improvisation as an ethic. That doesn’t sound all that bad. Does it?” More information and images of the exhibition can be seen here and on Seth Daulton’s website .





  • Assistant Professor of Chemistry Sara Massey coauthored an article titled “Photosynthesis Tunes Quantum-Mechanical Mixing of Electronic and Vibrational States to Steer Exciton Energy Transfer” in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. The peer-reviewed paper shows evidence that photosynthetic bacteria use quantum-mechanical mechanisms to protect themselves from oxidative damage. The paper was coauthored with scientists at the University of Chicago and Washington University in St. Louis.





  • Chief Marketing and Communications Officer Scarlett J. Moss ’86 has been named to the advisory board for the Next Generation Leadership Lab for Young LGBTQ+ Professionals (NextGen Leaders). The organization is designed to provide the skills, network, and inspiration to young leaders who want to expand their contributions to their team, organization, and community.





  • Assistant Professor of Political Science Emily Sydnor gave a talk as part of American University’s Government Department Speaker Series on March 12, 2021. The lecture focused on Americans’ identification with their states (for example, how Texan do you feel?), the factors that influence people to hold stronger state identities, and the impact of this identification on trust in state government.





  • Professor of Music Lois Ferrari  appeared as a special guest on KMFA’s Classical Austin  show, an hour-long broadcast which aired on March 7 and March 10, 2021. Hosted by Dianne Donovan, the show “takes you behind the curtain of greater Austin’s dynamic classical music stage [and features] in-depth interviews with conductors, composers, choreographers, instrumentalists, and more.” The interview is archived on KMFA’s website.





  • Professor of Music Michael Cooper , whose regular blog Journeys   has almost 600 “regular, unique readers,” contributed a guest post to the blog of the Women’s Song Forum titled “Kindred Spirits: Margaret Bonds and Edna St. Vincent Millay (Part I).” The post is available here . Cooper argues that despite the color line that separated them in their lives and contemporary and posthumous receptions, Millay and Bonds were kindred spirits—and that their staunchly feminist affinities manifested themselves in these songs, which Cooper recently published. The post includes world-premiere recordings of two of Bonds’s Millay settings.





  • Professor of Music Michael Cooper  published the preantepenultimate and antepenultimate editions in his series of 64 world-premiere source-critical editions of music by Florence B. Price with G. Schirmer (New York). The first edition, submitted with deliberate irony during Snowcalypse 2021, is a brilliant lyrical waltz for piano solo titled “Waltz of the Spring Maid” (because when better than during housebound Snowcalypse …?). The second, a major contribution by any measure, is Price’s only known song cycle—a set of four songs all taken from Langston Hughes’s iconic collection of poems that articulated the vision of the Harlem Renaissance, The Weary Blues . Price chose four poems centered on the subject of dreams in the sense of longings, desires, and aspirations. The four songs have been known individually before, but Cooper’s research into the manuscripts reveals their identity as a cycle; characteristically for cycles, the cycle as a whole is greater than the sum of its parts. (Another “notable”:  Cooper has never written the word preantepenultimate  in a Notable before.)





  • Director of the Deborah S. Ellis Writing Center Jennifer Marciniak cohosted the South Central Writing Centers 2021 Virtual Conference, Collaboration, Confidence, and Compromise: The Inter-Relational Work of Writing Centers, with Cole Bennett, director of the University Writing Center at Abilene Christian University. The regional conference, held March 5–7, 2021, highlighted ways writing centers collaborate and compromise with faculty and staff departments within their own institutions, as well as other writing centers, businesses, and organizations in their communities, states, and regions. In true collaborative form, Debby Ellis Writing Center consultants Ayala Porat ’21, Gabrielle Cano ’22, Bailey Barlow ’23, Erin Flessner ’21, and Kay Teekell ’21 cochaired all conference presentation sessions with Abilene Christian writing center consultants, creating a seamless and valuable conference experience for all attendees, according to a majority of postconference surveys. The keynote address and discussion “Course-Embedded Consulting and Writing Centers: Collaboration, Creativity, and Sustaining Community in a Time of Crisis” by Scott Whiddon (Transylvania University) and Rusty Carpenter (Eastern Kentucky University) and comoderated by Marciniak and Bennett will be published as a podcast in the peer-reviewed digital journal Southern Discourse in the Center: A Journal of Multiliteracy and Innovation. The conference attracted more than 150 attendees from across the U.S.





  • Mosaic Ambassadors Coleen Roche ’23 and Erica Burley ’22 presented at the annual Leading & Learning Student Educator Forum at the University of Texas at Austin, which was held virtually on March 6, 2021. Their presentation, “Pandemics and Polemics: Fostering Student Engagement during Turbulent Times,” explored ways to empower students to actively engage while navigating the social, political, and virtual challenges of the past year.





  • Professor of Computer Science Barbara Anthony was a faculty scholar at the National Science Foundation RESET (Re-Enter STEM through Emerging Technology) 2021 Conference March 46, 2021. The conference focused on supporting the re-entry of women in STEM, especially in emerging technology fields, such as cybersecurity, data science, mobile development, and cloud computing.





  • Professor of Political Science Shannon Mariotti  was invited to review Thomas Dumm’s recent Home In America: On Loss and Retrieval  (Harvard University Press, 2019). Theorizing the spaces and places of “home,” Dumm explores environmental apocalypse and the Anthropocene, slavery and racial injustice, settler colonialism, mass incarceration, and the ideology of the patriarchal family. Mariotti turned the book review into an article-length essay that explores how these meditations on home in the “before times” have changed in the “after times” of the coronavirus pandemic. Her essay focuses on how the pandemic has newly illuminated a long-standing crisis of caretaking and spotlighted the undervalued work of social reproduction that is still primarily the work of women in ways that are raced and classed, giving dramatically different meanings to what it means to be “at home” in this country. Her essay is forthcoming in the journal American Political Thought .





February 2021

  • Miryam Galvez ’23 presented at the 124th annual meeting of the Texas Academy of Sciences, which was held virtually February 26–27, 2021. The poster in the Mathematics and Computer Science section, titled “Using Python to Question Sincerity in Doodle Polls,” is the result of collaborative work with Professor of Computer Science Barbara Anthony and Chris Ojonta ’23 and was made possible by Southwestern’s Research Assistant funds and Sam Taylor Fellowship funds. A video describing the poster can be found here.





  • Associate Professor of English Michael Saenger  published an entry in the Palgrave Encyclopedia of Global Shakespeare  on “ Scotland, PA  (dir. Billy Morrissette, USA, 2001),” which can be viewed here .





  • Associate Professor of Environmental Studies Joshua Long  published an article in the journal Politics and Governance  titled “Crisis Capitalism and Climate Finance: The Framing, Monetizing, and Orchestration of Resilience-Amidst-Crisis.”





  • Elyssa Sliheet , class of 2019, won an award for an Outstanding Poster in the Student Poster Session of the Mathematical Association of America (MAA) Joint Mathematics Meeting (JMM) in San Diego, Calif. Jan. 9–13, 2018. Her work, “Shift Operators on Directed Infinite Graphs,” was conducted at an NSF-funded summer Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) with several other undergraduates under advisor Ruben Martinez-Avendao of Universidad Autónoma Del Estado De Hidalgo. There were over 500 posters in 16 topical categories at the JMM poster session. Awards were given for the top 15% in each category. Her travel was funded by the Southwestern Student Travel Fund, the MAA Student Travel Fund, and the NSF.





  • Professor of Music Lois Ferrari  conducted and presided over the Austin Civic Orchestra’s (ACO’s) third and fourth virtual concerts of their The Beat Goes On!  season on December 12, 2020, and February 13, 2021. These concert programs were designed to provide the orchestra’s musicians with a safe environment in which to rehearse and perform during the current pandemic. ACO members were assigned to small chamber groups or chose to form their own groups, all with social distancing and aerosol management at the forefront of consideration. The members rehearsed for four to five weeks and then recorded their performances as virtual compilations or in person at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center in Austin. The streamed events drew large appreciative virtual audiences on both the ACO Facebook page and YouTube channel . Ferrari and the ACO plan to present the next virtual concert on April 17, 2021.





  • Associate Professor of History Jethro Hernández Berrones presented his research project “Birthing the Children of the Revolution: Midwifery in 20th-Century Mexico” to the Rice University Medical Humanities working group on February 12, 2021. He showcased the contributions of his former and current research assistants. His current research assistants, Eugenia Agobe ’23, Jasmine Herrera ’21, and Saul Zuñiga ’22, attended the event and learned about similar initiatives alongside graduate students at Rice.





  • Professor of Music Michael Cooper  published the premiere edition of Florence B. Price’s Six Pieces for Piano Solo  (1947) with G. Schirmer/Associated Music Publishers (New York), his 59th world-premiere edition of Price’s music since September 2019. This edition was  particularly challenging because the autograph is notated in pencil and severely water damaged, resembling some of the papers found at the bottom of the stacks on Cooper’s home-office desk, some of which may well date from the Carter administration. Price’s music, though, is deliciously spontaneous and veritably glistens with the wit, charm, and inventiveness for which she is rightly celebrated.





  • Assistant Professor of Business and Director of Business Internships Andy Ross presented “Designing a Study Abroad Program for Business Students” at the 13th annual Virginia Tech Conference on Higher Education Pedagogy on February 5, 2021.





  • Part-Time Instructor of Applied Music Adrienne Inglis’s mixed chorus version of her composition “La Ciudad Sumergida” was performed by C4 and Inversion Ensembles February 4, 2021, under the direction of Perry Townsend. The nature soundtrack combines with an excerpt of the poem “Río de La Plata en lluvia” (1938) by Alfonsina Storni. The “Where Water Meets Sky” live-streamed concert may be viewed here.





  • Adjunct faculty member Jamie O’Quinn presented at the 2021 Sociologists for Women in Society annual meeting, co-organizing and speaking on the panel “Interviewing during the Pandemic: Feminist Approaches to Difficult Conversations in Lockdown.”





  • Professor of Sociology Sandi Nenga  has been appointed to a three-year term on the editorial board of Sociological Studies of Children and Youth  (UK: Emerald).





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth received a grant from the German Academic Exchange Service, DAAD. The grant enriches the teaching and learning of German at SU through a curated collection of prominent publications in German literature in 2019 and 2020.





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth participated in a roundtable at the 2021 virtual conference of the Modern Language Association in Toronto, Canada. Berroth was one of four speakers invited to present on the topic “How to Survive as a Small German Program.” The session was sponsored by the American Association of Teachers of German.





  • President Edward Burger was an invited speaker at an American Mathematical Society Special Session on Diophantine Approximation and Analytic Number Theory in Honor of Jeffrey Vaaler on Jan. 12 at the national Joint Mathematics Meetings held in San Diego, Calif. There he spoke on “Applications of orthogonality within non-archimedean and human contexts.” On Jan. 23, he delivered a public address on the future of undergraduate education at Johns Hopkins University as well as met with their president and engaged with their Commission on Education to assess their plans for the future.





January 2021

  • Mellon Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow Erika Denisse Grajeda coauthored an article titled “Organized Labor, Organized Home: Domestic Worker Organizing and the Contradictory Politics of Care in the Nonprofit Industrial Complex” in Boom California.





  • Professor of Philosophy Phil Hopkins has completed an eight-month process as part of a community panel reviewing materials used at the Austin Police Department (APD) Training Academy. The panel was the longest-serving component of the Austin City Council’s Resolution 66 (December 2019), which initiated an investigation into bias and racism in the APD.  The final report has been presented to the community and to the Reimagining Public Safety Task Force and is being covered by a number of media sources, such as KXAN, whose coverage can be found here.





  • Dean of the Faculty and Professor of Political Science Alisa Gaunder led a roundtable titled “Some Potential Positive Effects of the Global Pandemic on Higher Ed” at the annual Dean’s Institute sponsored by the American Conference of Academic Deans on January 20, 2021. The discussion highlighted how some recent responses to the pandemic, including new ways of community building, a renewed commitment to student learning, and the value of incorporating technology, are likely to have a lasting impact on higher education.





  • Paloma Mayorga  10 is among the artists selected by Annette DiMeo Carlozzi, former curator of contemporary art at the Blanton Art Museum and one of the directors of the Austin Contemporary’s Crit Group, for an exhibition at Artpace San Antonio. The exhibit, After Carolee: Tender and Fierce , was conceived for Artpace’s 25th anniversary to give tribute to one of its most iconic former residents, Carolee Schneemann, and to welcome to Artpace more than a dozen women artists with Texas ties whose works can be seen in dialog with Schneemann’s artistic legacy in striking and dynamic ways. The exhibit will be on view virtually on the Artpace website and on site sporadically through April 25 (before visiting, see their website for COVID-19 accommodations and hours). Mayorga is an interdisciplinary artist and independent curator based in Austin, Texas. She received the Emerging Artist Award from the Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center in 2015, earned Best Visual Artist recognition in the Austin Chronicle  2017 Reader’s Poll, and is among Southwestern University’s 18 under 40 for 2020. As a former participant in The Contemporary Austin’s 2019 Crit Group, Mayorga was subsequently selected for the #BBATX 2020 Residency. Paloma’s work is also being exhibited virtually on artsy.net through grayDUCK Gallery. 





  • Assistant Professor of Psychology Carin Perilloux, along with collaborator Jaime Cloud of Western Oregon University, had two articles recently accepted for publication in the journal Evolutionary Behavioral SciencesThe Relationship between Mating Context and Women’s Appearance Enhancement Strategies and This Old Thing? Responding to Compliments Depends on Sex and Relative Status.” 





  • Associate Professor of English Michael Saenger organized and hosted a webinar titled “Terms, Language, and Translation: Palestine and Israel.” The event featured Jessica Emami, adjunct professor of sociology at Marymount University in Arlington, Virginia, and Ghaith al-Omari, a senior fellow in The Washington Institute’s Irwin Levy Family Program on the U.S.–Israel Strategic Relationship and former executive director of the American Task Force on Palestine.





  • Associate Professor of Education Alicia Moore was recently selected as a faculty success program coach for the National Center for Faculty Development and Diversity. The Faculty Success Program is an online program designed to teach tenure-track and tenured faculty the skills needed to increase both their research and writing productivity while maintaining a healthy work–life balance. As a trained faculty coach, she is charged with providing personalized support to the diverse group of participants.





  • Members of the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science joined the virtual 2021 Joint Mathematics Meetings, with national meetings of the Mathematical Association of America (MAA), the American Mathematical Society (AMS), the Association for Women in Mathematics (AWM), and more:

      • Zariah Whyte ’21 and Evan Alexander ’22 presented the poster “Isoperimetric Problems on the Real Number Line with Prescribed Density” in the MAA Student Poster Session on Geometry. The presentation was based on work with Assistant Professor of Mathematics John D. Ross in SCOPE 2020.  
      • Assistant Professor of Mathematics John D. Ross presented “On Curves That Generate Symmetric Lambda-Hypersurfaces” in the AMS Special Session on Analysis and Differential Equations at Undergraduate Institutions. 
      • Assistant Professor of Mathematics Noelle Sawyer presented “Marked Length Spectrum Rigidity with Partial Data” in the AMS–AWM Special Session on Women of Color in Topology and Algebra.
      • Associate Professor of Mathematics Therese Shelton presented “Student Engagement in Modeling Drugs, Disease, and More.” 
      • Shelton co-organized the AMS Special Session on Adopt, Adapt, Assign Modeling Activities in Differential Equations.
      • Professor of Mathematics Alison Marr also attended.




  • Associate Professor of Art History Allison Miller gave a lecture titled “Purple in Early China” to an art history class at Georgetown University on January 17, 2021.





  • Meili Crizis  ’17 published two peer-reviewed articles in fall 2020: “‘Many Sisters Wish They Were Men’: Gendered Discourse and Themes in Pro-ISIS Online Communities” appeared in the Journal for Deradicalization  (winter 2020–2021, no. 25), and “Intersections of Extremisms: White Nationalist/Salafi-Jihadi Propaganda Overlaps and Essentialist Narratives about Muslims” appeared in the Journal of Education in Muslim Societies  (fall 2020, vol. 2, no. 1).





  • Associate Vice President for Information Technology Todd K. Watson coauthored a paper titled “A Search for Pulsation in 21 White Dwarfs” in the October 2020 issue of the journal Revista Mexicana de Astronomía y Astrofísica. The research described in the paper was based on astronomical observations performed by the coauthors that spanned 18 years and included data collected by Watson in 2008 using the 2.1-meter telescope at the University of Texas’s McDonald Observatory.





  • Professor of Chemistry and the Herbert and Kate Dishman Chair in Science Emily Niemeyer published an article titled “Hands-on Experiences for Remotely Taught Analytical Chemistry Laboratories” in the journal Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry. The article is a contribution to the “ABCs of Education and Professional Development in Analytical Science” portion of the journal and is part of a series on teaching analytical chemistry during the pandemic. Coauthored with Joel Destino and Erin Gross from Creighton University and Steven Petrovic from Southern Oregon University, the peer-reviewed pedagogical article provides an overview of different methodologies that provide hands-on laboratory experiences to students in remote and hybrid analytical chemistry courses. The collaborative article stemmed from Niemeyer’s role as a facilitator at regional and national active-learning workshops for analytical chemistry faculty. Find the article here.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Anthropology Naomi Reed was invited to submit an article produced from her research on the Sugar Land 95 to the food edition of Anthropology News. The piece, titled “The Darker the History, the Sweeter the Truth: How a White-Identified City Struggles to Commemorate the Black Lives and Deaths That Produced Its Sugar and Built Its Wealth,” can be found here.





  • Associate Professor of History Jessica S. Hower published a book with Palgrave Macmillan’s scholarly monographs division in December 2020. The book, titled Tudor Empire: The Making of Britain and the British Atlantic World, 1485–1603, is part of the field-leading Britain and the Worldseries. Find the book here.





  • Associate Professor of Business Debika Sihi provided insights about Netflix’s audio-only version of its content in an article for Lifewire, a technology information website (ranked a top-10 tech information site in 2017). Read the article here.





  • Professor of Political Science Shannon Mariotti was invited to participate in a roundtable on the theme of “Embodying Your Curriculum,” on January 8, 2021. The panel explored how embodied and trauma-informed practices can be useful in the classroom, even (especially?) for distance learning, in an era marked by pandemic, protests, and political crisis.





  • Professor of Spanish Katy Ross and Bailey Barlow ’23 presented a paper titled “The Commercialization of Infertility: Quien Quiere Ser Madre (2017) by Silvia Nanclares” at the 2021 MLA Annual Convention on January 8. The talk was part of the panel “Politics as Usual: Women Writers in Contemporary Spain Confronting a Bias System,” and the paper is the result of a faculty–student research project that began in the summer of 2020 and was made possible by funding from the Wilhelmina Cullen Robertson endowed professorship held by Ross.





  • Assistant Professor of English Rebecca Evans presented twice at the 2021 Modern Language Association Annual Convention, speaking as part of the roundtable “Infrastructures of Emergency” on January 7 and giving a talk titled “Apocalypse Now, Then, Ongoing: Genre Friction and Anthropocene Literature” as part of the panel “Post-Apocalypse Now” on January 9.





  • Associate Professor of History Melissa K. Byrnes published a piece on the lessons learned from the Paris riot of February 6, 1934, in relation to what could possibly happen and what should come after the attack on the U.S. Capitol on January 6, 2021. Find the piece here.





  • Professor of Art and Art History Thomas Noble Howe  was one of the few authors to contribute two chapters—“Hellenistic” and “Christian Roman Empire”—to the book Sir Banister Fletcher’s Global History of Architecture  (21st edition, Bloomsbury, 2020), which has just been awarded the prestigious Colvin Prize for 2020 by the Society of Architectural Historians of Great Britain.





  • Professor of Art and Art History Thomas Noble Howe contributed four drawings and a short chapter in the recently published book The Artemis Temple at Sardis, by Fikret Yegül (Harvard University Press, 2020). Yegül arrived independently at the same conclusion about the chronology proposed circa 1985 by Howe.





  • Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers published “7 Jewish Feminist Highlights of 2020” in Lilith Magazine’s blog.





  • Assistant Professor of Physics Cody Crosby  had his article “ Phototunable Interpenetrating Polymer Network Hydrogels to Stimulate the Vasculogenesis of Stem Cell–Derived Endothelial Progenitors ” accepted for publication in Acta Biomaterialia  (with an impact factor of 7.242). The preprint can be accessed at bioRxiv .





  • The Communication Studies Department was well represented at this year’s (virtual) National Communication Association Conference. Assistant Professor Rico Self gave several talks about Black femininity and anti-Black stereotyping in addition to chairing two panels and receiving a Top Paper Award in the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Communication Studies Division (woot!) for his coauthored paper “BbyMutha’s Readings as Black Queer Feminine Refusal.” Assistant Professor Lamiyah Bahrainwala (LB) gave two talks about rock-star fascism and menstrual surveillance in nonwhite contexts. Associate Professor Valerie Renegar gave a talk on coauthoring and collaborative scholarship in rhetorical studies. Overall, much knowledge was dropped.





  • Assistant Professor of English Rebecca Evans  was elected to a five-year term on the executive committee of the Modern Language Association’s Science and Literature forum. Her coedited volume The Palgrave Handbook of 20th- and 21st-Century Literature and Science   was released at the end of 2020.





  • Professor of Music Michael Cooper  published the world-premiere edition of Margaret Bonds’s Six Songs on Poems of Edna St. Vincent Millay  as the inaugural issue of Hildegard Publishing Company’s Margaret Bonds Signature Series . Bonds, who stands as the only African-American woman ever to have had an entire day dedicated to her in a major U.S. metropolis (legendary Chicago mayor Richard J. Daley declared January 31, 1967, as that city’s official Margaret Bonds Day), was one of the 20th century’s most outspoken social-justice activists in the world of classical music. The series is currently slated to present world-premiere editions of 37 works by Bonds over the next two years; all works have been discovered and edited by Cooper over the last two years. The last two of these six songs were premiered by former SU voice instructor Dana Zenobi at Butler University in November 2018.





  • Part-Time Assistant Professor of Economics Mohammad Khan presented a paper titled “The Deadly Connection between Hurricanes and Sinkholes: Analyzing Market Responses to Multiple Environmental Risks” at the virtual Allied Social Science Association 2021 Annual Meeting on January 3.





  • Associate Professor of Art History Allison Miller was invited to put her book Kingly Splendor: Court Art and Materiality in Han China  to the Page 99 Test. The Page 99 Testis a blog edited by American screenwriter Marshal Zeringue that asks authors to test their books and analyze the content based on the following idea expressed by Ford Madox Ford: “Open the book to page 99 and read, and the quality of the whole will be revealed to you.” You can read Miller’s January 2nd entry here.





December 2020

  • Professor of Art History Kimberly Smith gave a talk in December 2020 titled “Modeling and Modernism: Charlotte Berend-Corinth’s Work” at the virtually held annual Southeastern College Art Conference (SECAC) hosted by Virginia Commonwealth University School of the Arts.





  • Part-Time Instructor of Applied Music Adrienne Inglis received an American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers Plus Award for concert performances in 2020. In addition, her composition “La Ciudad Sumergida” premiered on November 2, 2020, performed by the commissioning choir, Ramona M. Wis and the North Central College Women’s Chorale of Naperville, Illinois. Under the direction of Adrienne Pedrotti Bingamon, Inversion Da Capo recorded “La Ciudad Sumergida” for a December 19, 2020, release on Inversion’s YouTube channel.





  • Senior Graphic Designer Matt Madsen,  of the Office of Marketing and Communications, was interviewed for the digital publication VoyageAustin.  Read the piece here .





  • Assistant Professor of History Joseph Hower published the article “‘You’ve Come a Long Way—Maybe’: Working Women, Comparable Worth, and the Transformation of the American Labor Movement, 1964–1989” in the December 2020 issue of the Journal of American History, the leading scholarly publication in the field of U.S. history. Read the article here.





  • Associate Professor of Sociology Reggie Byron was invited to offer feedback on an equal employment opportunity policy memo written by the leadership at the Center for Employment Equity after being solicited by incoming U.S. President Biden and his campaign. Byron’s name (and Southwestern’s) is listed in the acknowledgments along with those of seven other scholars from research universities who are noted for having a “deep knowledge of the enforcement process and EEOC [Equal Employment Opportunity Commission] data quality.”





  • Associate Professor of Environmental Studies Joshua Long was the lead author on a published chapter in the 2020 Palgrave Macmillan book Climate Urbanism: Towards a Critical Research Agenda. The chapter, titled “Climate Urbanism and the Implications for Climate Apartheid,” was coauthored with Jennifer L. Rice (University of Georgia) and Anthony Levenda (University of Oklahoma). Find more information here.





  • Garey Chair and Professor of Chemistry Maha Zewail-Foote published an article “Using Student-Centered Approaches to Teach the Biochemistry of SARS-CoV-2” in the journal Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education.The article discusses pedagogical approaches to enhance science literacy and model authentic science inquiry in biochemistry. This same learning framework was used when the class quickly shifted to learning about the biochemistry of SARS-CoV-2 last spring.





  • Associate Professor of Environmental Studies Joshua Long and coauthors Keara Hudler ’18, Nataley Ford ’18, Lilly Dennis ’18, Joanna Mendez ’18, and Muriel DiNella ’18 received the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE) Campus Research Award on December 3, 2020, for a paper titled “Intersectional Sustainability and Student Activism.” The paper appeared earlier this year in the journal Education, Citizenship, and Social Justice. Find the paper here.





  • Associate Professor of Art History Allison Miller ’s book Kingly Splendor: Court Art and Materiality in Han China  was published by Columbia University Press.





  • Associate Professor of Environmental Studies Joshua Long  coauthored a paper with former SU students Keara Hudler  ’18, Nataley Ford  ’18, Lilly Dennis  ’18, Joanna Mendez  ’18, and Muriel DiNella  ’18 that was recently nominated for the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE) Campus Research Award. That paper, titled “ Intersectional Sustainability and Student Activism ,” appeared earlier this year in the journal Education, Citizenship, and Social Justice. 





  • Associate Professor of Environmental Studies Joshua Long published an article titled ““Climate Urbanism: Crisis, Capitalism, and Intervention” with Jennifer L. Rice (Department of Geography, University of Georgia). This article appears in the latest issue of Urban Geography.





  • Assistant Professor of Political Science Emily Sydnor has shared her expertise in American political behavior through a wide range of outlets in the past few weeks, including a pre-election interview with KUT and postelection discussions with Bloomberg News and the Georgetown edition of Community Impact. She was also a contributor to U.S. Election Analysis 2020, a report capturing the immediate thoughts, reflections, and early insights on the 2020 presidential election by more than 115 leading U.S. and international academics. In her entry, Sydnor discussed the narratives of civility and incivility throughout the presidential campaign and argued that Biden’s call for a return to civility may gloss over real systemic and nationwide concerns. Sydnor also published a post on the American Political Science Association’s RAISE the Vote site, a blog dedicated to amplifying and increasing students’ civic engagement and voting. The post outlined Southwestern’s university-wide collaboration around voter education and turnout, as well as our on-campus polling place, as an example for other schools who are also interested in increasing their student engagement.





  • Associate Professor of English Michael Saenger  published a featured post on the Times of Israel  website titled “Texas Saves Progressivism.” See the article here .





November 2020

  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth contributed to the joined virtual conference of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) and the American Association of Teachers of German (AATG) November 2022, 2020. Berroth offered a session for German educators on developing connections in German instruction to topics in sustainable development with a focus on climate-science information and disinformation literacy. Berroth participated in annual meetings as a member of AATG’s regional and national leadership teams and committees.





  • Director of Study Abroad and International Student Services Monya Lemery and Assistant Director of Study Abroad and International Student Services Meaghan Bellande attended the Virtual International Student Exchange Program (ISEP) Coordinator Workshop, November 1719, 2020. Southwestern’s membership in ISEP, an international exchange network, allows SU students to study abroad at 295 institutions in 55 countries worldwide and SU to receive international exchange students from these institutions, enriching the cultural diversity of our classrooms.





  • Part-Time Assistant Professor of Classics Jeffrey Easton  has had an article accepted for publication in an upcoming issue of the classics peer-reviewed journal Historia: Zeitschrift für Alte Geschichte.  The article, titled “Mostly Work and Some Play: The Roman Municipal Familia Publica  as a ‘Professional Association,’” examines how groups of freed Roman slaves formed their own private associations as a response to their lack of access to the existing associative framework in their towns. This phenomenon is observed among the freedmen and freedwomen of many towns throughout Italy. Through these local organizations, members staged social activities and banquets, forged social and economic networks, managed funerary arrangements, and found a venue for meaningful interaction with their wider communities.





  • Part-Time Instructor of Applied Music Adrienne Inglis virtually rehearsed two of her recent compositions, “La ciudad sumergida” (The Submerged City; 2020) and  “Oure Light in Oure Night” (2020), which were both composed for remote online choir performance, with North Central College’s Concert Choir and Women’s Chorale. Commissioned by Ramona M. Wis and the North Central College Women’s Chorale of NapervilleIllinois, “La ciudad sumergida” for four-part treble chorus with nature soundtrack captures the mood of a river, a city, the cloudy sky, and the poet’s own profound melancholy. The text is an excerpt of “Río de La Plata en lluvia” (1938) by Alfonsina Storni. The sound of rain creates the ambiance of a misty day on the river and the sensation of cathartic crying from great sadness and pain. The city’s reflection on the river’s surface gives the illusion that the city is submerged in the water, and the reflection of the clouds hovering low over Río de La Plata looks like gray heliotrope flowers. The apocalyptic images of a submerged city and of tears overflowing from the chalice-sky eerily foreshadow rising sea levels due to anthropogenic global warming.





  • Associate Professor of Psychology Erin Crockett published an article with colleagues in the Netherlands titled “Does Attachment Style Moderate the Effect of Computer-Mediated versus Face-to-Face Conflict Discussions?” The article was published in the journal Personal Relationships.  For more information, click here .





  • Professor of Education Michael Kamen  coauthored a chapter in the textbook Affective Movements, Methods, and Pedagogies  (Routledge, ebook 2020, print 2021) along with Alys Mendus (first author) of the University of Hull, U.K. ; New York City–based playwright Adaire Kamen’ and SU alumni Sarah Buchanan  ’20, Abigail Luna  ’20, Abigail Earle Downs  19, and Kelli McLaughlin  18. The chapter—titled “They Call Teachers by Their First Names!”—is an ethnodrama of preservice teachers visiting innovative schools. 





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth delivered a workshop for German educators, invited by the Goethe-Institut in Washington, DC, in collaboration with Goethe-Institut Mexico. The workshop on integrating authentic resources into education for sustainable development was part of the virtual conference Unsere Nachhaltige Zukunft  (Our Sustainable Future), November 13 15, 2020. Using resources available at www.klimafakten.de, Berroth introduced an international audience to models for integrating principles of climate-science communication into teaching German language and culture.





  • Preservation Georgetown held its first virtual Home Tour on November 14, chaired by Rachel Hancock ’14 and the current Preservation Georgetown board president Austin Painchaud ’13, who is the internship and employment developer at SU’s Center for Career & Professional Development. This event highlighted three historic homes in Georgetown’s Old Town district, including the San Gabriel House Bed & Breakfast on University Avenue and another home once occupied by former SU physics professor and president Robert Hyer (1860–1929). Learn more about the Home Tour and watch the video here.





  • Professor of Music Michael Cooper published the first-ever edition of what is arguably the most important of many collaborations between Florence B. Price and Langston Hughes: “Monologue for the Working Class” (New York: G. Schirmer). Hughes wrote this poem in October 1941 or earlier to boost the morale of the “poor and unemployed” in the face of the apathy of the rich in Depression-era America, and in that guise, the poem inspired Price to write an extraordinary song, which was recently given its world premiere (in Cooper’s edition) in a music video produced by the Antwerp-based #SongsofComfort team, featuring bass-baritone Justin Hopkins and pianist Jeanne-Minette Cilliers. After the bombing of Pearl Harbor and the U.S.’s entry into World War II in December 1941, Hughes recast the poem as a morale booster in wartime, replacing the words “show ’em what the working class can do” with “show ’em what free men can really do” and making other similar changes. Hughes never published the “working-class” version of his poem, and Price never published her setting thereof—but now both are out. Because the full story is much richer than space permitted in the Schirmer edition, Cooper also blogged about it here to help brave and sleep-deprived readers learn more about the poem and music while also nodding off for a good night’s rest. 





  • At the 2020 Virtual Lt Brain Trust Conference, Assistant Professor of Kinesiology Jennifer Stokes presented “Using Lt to Create an Interactive, Data-Driven Endocrinology Activity.” The Lt Brain Trust is an annual international conference for science educators who are selected to showcase new and innovative educational practices that use Lt, an online learning platform for anatomy content, physiological recording, and data analysis.





  • Professor of Music Michael Cooper gave a virtual masterclass for the University of Memphis titled “Paying the Price: Race and Gender, Imperatives and Opportunities for the Great White Spaces of Classical Music in the Year 2020.” The presentation integrated Cooper’s work in reviving the previously unheard music of Florence B. Price into larger issues of antiracist and inclusive pedagogies in the “last water fountain” of Western classical music, as developed in his current course on Freedom, Movement, and Migration in Music.





  • Assistant Professor of Mathematics Noelle Sawyer co-organized Black in Math Week, November 813, a social-media event to promote visibility and community among Black mathematicians. In one of the events for the week, Sawyer cohosted an episode of the podcast Relatively Prime about Black math educators. Black in Math Week is a part of a series of ‘Black in X’ weeks, which began with Black Birders Week to normalize Black people as a part of science communities after someone called 911 to report a Black birdwatcher in Central Park. You can find the Twitter account here and the podcast episode here.





  • Associate Professor of Business Debika Sihi presented a coauthored project titled “The Use of Social Media and Social Interaction in Crowdsourcing in the FFE (fuzzy front end) of NPD” at the Society of Marketing Advances Annual Conference November 4–7, 2020. This project examines the impact of online versus offline mechanisms of crowdsourcing on idea generation during the new product development process.





  • Associate Professor of Sociology Reggie Byron published a review of the book Should Schools be Colorblind? by Laurie Cooper Stoll in the sociology journal Social Forces.  The review can be found here .





  • Associate Professor of Sociology Reggie Byron published a peer-reviewed teaching exercise titled “Teaching Criminology during a Pandemic” in the American Sociological Association’s Teaching Resources and Innovations Library for Sociology (TRAILS). The resource can be found here.





  • Director of Study Abroad and International Student Services Monya Lemery and Assistant Director of Study Abroad and International Student Services Meaghan Bellande presented “Roundtable: How Can We Market Education Abroad in a Virtual World?” at the 2020 NAFSA Region III Virtual Conference. The theme of the conference was Vision 20/20: Seize the Present; Shape the Future. The conference was held over several days in September and October.





  • Part-Time Instructor of Applied Music Katherine Altobello 99 was the mezzo-soprano soloist in Howard Goodall’s Eternal Light: A Requiem  on November 1, 2020, at St. Martin’s Lutheran Church in Austin, Texas. Featured musicians included Part-Time Instructor of Applied Music Jameson James  (tenor), Jeffery Jones-Ragona (tenor), Maimy Fong (piano), Elaine Martin Barber (Austin Symphony Orchestra’s principal harpist), as well as Grammy-winning musicians Austin Haller (organ), Shari Wilson (soprano), and John Proft (baritone). Tim O’Brien conducted. The service was prerecorded and is available on YouTube.





October 2020

  • Associate Professor of Business Debika Sihi presented and chaired a panel titled “Calm during Crisis: Creating Classroom Environments that Foster Learning and Collaboration” at the Marketing Management Association Conference October 28–30, 2020. She and two colleagues (from a private and public university) led a discussion on different initiatives to support and engage students during a challenging academic year.





  • Professor of Music Michael Cooper gave a virtual lecture titled “The Music of Florence B. Price” for the Music for Life  series of the New Horizons Band’s Toronto chapter. Although the title of the talk was as bland as old corrugated cardboard, the presentation itself focused on the issues and opportunities that Cooper’s ongoing series of editions of Price’s music pose for the current Price renaissance in a musical world hungry for new and socially relevant ideas and sounds in the world of music history. 





  • Professor of Music Lois Ferrari conducted and presided over the Austin Civic Orchestra’s (ACO’s) second virtual concert on October 24. This concert program was designed to provide the orchestra’s musicians with a safe environment in which to rehearse and perform during the current pandemic. ACO members were assigned to small chamber groups or chose to form their own groups, all with social distancing and aerosol management at the forefront of consideration. The members rehearsed for four weeks and then recorded their performances at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center in Austin. The streamed event drew a large appreciative virtual audience on both the ACO Facebook page and YouTube channel. Ferrari and the ACO plan to continue this practice through the spring semester.





  • Associate Professor of English Michael Saenger presented “Interlinguistic Shakespeare in East Asia” at the virtual 49th Southwest Conference on Asian Studies, October 23, 2020.





  • Associate Professor of Business Hazel Nguyen and economics graduate Diana Trevino ’20 presented their research titled “They’ve Figured It out! Gender Differences in Executive Language Styles through Shareholders’ Letters” at the virtual Financial Management Association Annual Meeting on October 23. The presentation was based on work conducted as part of SCOPE 2019. In their project, Nguyen and Trevino  ask whether there are differences in language and communication styles used by female versus male CEOs and how these language differences represent differences in leadership styles. They find that there are significant differences in thematic tones between female and male CEOs. Female CEOs’ languages are more comprehensible and emphasize transformational changes, optimism, mutual understanding, and rapport more than those of male CEOs while also being more resolute and authoritative.





  • Professor of Chemistry Emily Niemeyer published an article titled “Instituting a Group Component to a Final Exam” in Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry. The article is a contribution to the “ABCs of Education and Professional Development in Analytical Science” portion of the journal and was coauthored with Tom Wenzel from Bates College. The peer-reviewed pedagogical article provides an overview of considerations for adding a collaborative group element to final exams in upper-level analytical chemistry courses. The work stemmed from Niemeyer and Wenzel’s ongoing collaboration as facilitators at regional and national active-learning workshops for analytical chemistry faculty.





  • Professor of Chemistry Emily Niemeyer and Derrica McDowell ’20 published a chapter titled “Factors Influencing the Production of Phenolic Compounds within Basil ( Ocimum basilicum L. )” in the forthcoming book Ocimum: An Overview.  Their chapter discusses the phenolic compounds found within basil and their associated health benefits, explains various strategies to increase phytochemical levels in basil, and offers conclusions about methods that can be used to maximize basil phenolic content. The book is part of the Herbs and Herbalism  series published by Nova Science Publishers. Research for the chapter was supported by the Herbert and Kate Dishman fund at Southwestern University.





  • Professor of Art Mary Visser and Charles Morris ’15 have had their digital sculptures accepted into the international Digital Sculpture Exhibition, which will be held at the Galerie Maître Albert in Paris, France, in December 2020. View their digital sculptures: Visser and Morris.





  • Professor of Anthropology Mel Johnson, Associate Professor of Education Alicia Moore , and Professor of Philosophy Phil Hopkins  were panelists for the Georgetown Public Library event “Confronting Racism: A Community Conversation.” The event offered three sessions centered around three selected texts aimed at children, young adults, and adults. Moore participated in the panel discussing New Kid by Jerry Craft, a graphic novel about the struggle to fit in with a world that doesn’t look like you. Hopkins participated in the panel discussing The Hate U Give  by Angie Thomas, which details the impact of police violence on communities of color. Johnson participated in the panel on Ibram X. Kendi’s How to Be an Antiracist,  a best-selling book on how to fight racism and inequality.





  • Professor of Computer Science Barbara Anthony and Professor of Mathematics Alison Marr presented their paper “Directed Zagreb Indices” at the (virtual) 18th Cologne–Twente Workshop on Graphs and Combinatorial Optimization (CTW 2020). The presentation and slides are available here . Their paper will be published in the AIRO Springer Series  CTW 2020 Proceedings  in March. 





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth gave a presentation on “Syllabus Design and Universal Design for Learning (UDL)” at the 45th Annual Women in German Conference, which was hosted virtually at Sewanee, University of the South, Tennessee, October 15–18, 2020. The presentation contributed to a pedagogy panel on “Universal Design for Learning as Feminist Practice.” Berroth serves on the Women in German Dissertation Prize Committee and was delighted to meet and mentor the candidates and the award winner, who participated from Germany. 





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth  participated in a three-day faculty seminar convened in the context of the 44th annual meeting of the German Studies Association. Via Zoom, the Beyond Umweltschutz:  Narrative and Visual Responses to Environmental Threats seminar brought together 18 environmental humanities scholars from three continents to discuss the research papers they shared with this group earlier this year. Berroth’s contribution, “From Apathy to Empathy: Approaches to Inviting Activism at the Intersections of Science and Storytelling in Werner Herzog’s Documentaries and Ilija Trojanow’s EisTau  (2011)/ The Lamentations of Zeno  (2016),” relates to texts and contexts she teaches in her first-year and advanced-entry  seminar on International Climate Fiction. 





  • Kate Davis ’20 and Hannah Hanson ’22 conducted a SCOPE project under the supervision of Professor of Psychology Fay Guarraci, which was recently published in Physiology & Behavior. This collaboration also involved Jessica Bolton ’10, who will soon begin a tenure-track position at Georgia State University. Davis, a current graduate student in the Department of Neuroscience at The University of Texas at Austin, designed the project, and together, the team found that using an animal model of poverty caused long-term deleterious effects on reproductive physiology and behavior. Neonatal poverty disrupted maternal behavior, which accelerated physiological maturation in females but delayed sexual maturation in males. However, both male and female rats displayed enhanced sexual motivation. These results have implications for precocious sexual behavior and disrupted puberty in children who are born into poverty. This research was also supported by a Sam Taylor Award. 





  • Part-Time Professor of Economics Jim Christianson was one of three Austin certified public accountants selected via a random drawing to serve on the the City of Austin Applicant Review Panel. This panel will select 60 applicants for the City of Austin Independent Citizens Redistricting  Commission, which is charged with redrawing the 10 City of Austin Council districts after the 2020 census is complete. Christianson teaches Accounting and Business Law at Southwestern. 





  • Recent alumni Maryam Ali ’20, Michael Broyle  ’20, Kate Davis  ’20, Chantal Gonzalez  ’19, Devon Lucero  ’19, and Lainey Stary  ’19 and Professor of Psychology Fay Guarraci  published a new research project investigating the long-term effects of neonatal exposure to a component of soy (genistein) on male and female reproductive physiology and behavior in the journal Behavioural Pharmacology.  Although this research was conducted in rats, it suggests that there may be some consequences of feeding neonates soy-based formula.





  • Associate Director of Admission Rebecca Rother and Associate Professor of Economics and Business Debika Sihi presented a session about business degrees in the liberal arts through the Colleges that Change Lives virtual program.