Academics

Notable Achievements

We are proud to celebrate the collective achievements of the Southwestern community.

Faculty and staff, please continue to submit your notables via this form.


June 2024

  • Professor of History Melissa Byrnes reviewed Katharina Fritsch’s book, The Diaspora of the Comoros in France: Ethnicised Biopolitics and Communitarianism, for H-France. It can be read here.





  • Assistant Professor of Communication Studies Raquel Moreira presented two papers at the Rhetoric Society of America Conference, held in Denver, CO, May 23-27. Moreira presented the essay “The Place of Blackness in U.S. Constructions of Latinidad,” in which she investigates Anzaldúa’s legacy of mestizaje and hybridity as foundational for the absence of studies about Blackness and antiblackness in Latine Communication Studies. Additionally, she presented on the failures of media literacy and “informational bootstraps” approaches in the classroom in the face of growing monetized and organized disinformation campaigns.





  • Assistant Professor of Communication Studies Raquel Moreira was among 30 scholars invited to participate in the Viral Movements Symposium, hosted at Penn State on May 14 and 15. The symposium was organized by Lisa Flores, the Josephine Berry Weiss Chair of the Humanities, and featured scholars from the humanities and life sciences to discuss the topics of (im)mobility, (mis)information, and (mis)management.





  • Professor of Music Michael Cooper published the first edition of the complete four-movement version Florence B. Price’s valedictory opus, Dances in the Canebrakes, for Piano Solo, with ClarNan Editions (Fayetteville, AR). Price actually began work on the music that would become this suite in early 1929, and returned to the idea repeatedly over the next twenty-four years. Finally, in what was to be the last year of her life, she was ready to publish it and made preparations to do so – but died before the edition could come out (it was copyrighted five months to the day after her death and published shortly thereafter). That edition soon went out of print, however, and consequently the Dances in the Canebrakeshave been known mostly in the orchestral arrangement prepared by Price’s colleague William Grant Sill. Cooper’s edition makes her music newly available as she conceived it, also including an appendix that provides the original version of final movement (this titled Chicken Feathersinstead of Silk Hat and Walking Cane). Interested folk can hear three of the suite’s movements in the landmark recording on pianist Althea Waites’s 1987/1993 album Black Diamonds here.





  • Lord Chair and Professor of Computer Science Barbara Anthony co-authored a paper in the journal Optimization Methods and Software. “Maximizing the number of rides served for time-limited Dial-a-Ride” shows that for a particular variant of the offline Dial-a-Ride problem, no polynomial-time algorithm will serve the optimal number of requests, unless P = NP. It then describes k-Sequence, an approximation algorithm that repeatedly serves the fastest set of k remaining requests, and bounds its performance. The paper can be read here.





  • Professor of Environmental Studies Joshua Long published a paper titled “Reckoning Climate Apartheid” in the journal Political Geography. That paper, which examines global systematic climate injustice, can be found here.





  • Professor of Environmental Studies Joshua Long presented a paper titled “Avoiding Adaptation as Partition” on May 16 at the Human Geographies of Adaptation Conference at the University of Bergen in Bergen, Norway.





  • Professor of Environmental Studies Joshua Long presented a flash talk on May 13 titled “Reframing Existential Adaptation” at the Theory of Change Workshop hosted by Imagine Adaptation in Bergen, Norway.





  • Director of Study Abroad and International Student Services Monya Lemery has been nominated and elected to serve on the Forum Council beginning July 1, for a three-year term. The Forum Council serves as part of the shared leadership of The Forum on Education Abroad, along with the Board of Directors and the Forum staff. One of the primary roles of Council members is to represent the Forum membership and the greater field of Education Abroad and communicate the interests and needs of the field of Education Abroad to The Forum.





May 2024

  • Professor of Anthropology Melissa Johnson has just published “Lucy’s Story: The Surprising Tale of an Enslaved Black Woman in British Central America in the 1770s” in Anthropology Now. The article can be read here.





  • Assistant Professor of Feminist Studies Meagan Solomon participated on a panel entitled “Atravesades Igniting through Art, Community, and Place-Making” with co-panelists Anel Flores and T. Jackie Cuevas at El Mundo Zurdo Conference in San Antonio. She presented her paper, “Somos Lesbianas: Chicana Lesbian Place-Making and Place-Taking En Comunidad,” which examines how Chicana lesbians take up art and writing as vessels for challenging oppressive forces and building coalition in the 1991 anthology “Chicana Lesbians: The Girls Our Mothers Warned Us About.” edited by Carla Trujillo. In her paper, Solomon examines how Chicana lesbians integrate and redefine cultural customs in their creative expressions of self, spirituality, and familia that push back against the heteropatriarchal logics of Chicano nationalism. Underscoring the anthology form as a critical source of feminist coalition, she asserts that the voices featured in Chicana Lesbians intervene in dominant discourses on Chicana lesbian life toward a shared state of conocimiento - a spiritual and activist consciousness that tasks us with imagining and enacting new worlds.





  • Professor of Psychology Traci Giuliano has a chapter entitled, “Making Personal Connections with Social Psychology,” appearing in the forthcoming book (to be published in August), Teaching Social Psychology.





  • Professor of Communication Studies Valerie Renegar furthered her research agenda on the rhetoric surrounding stepmothers by presenting on Kamala Harris as an antidote to traditional stepmother stereotypes in Barcelona, Spain at the International Conference on Gender Research in late April.





  • Head of Distinctive Collections & Archives Megan Firestone was the featured speaker for the City of Georgetown’s Main Street Program Breakfast Bites meeting. She presented “From Storefronts to Stories: Preservation & Local Business History,” highlighting materials held in Distinctive Collections related to Georgetown businesses.





  • Head of Distinctive Collections & Archives Megan Firestone presented at First Friday for Preservation Georgetown on the impact of the Williamson County courthouse on the architecture of downtown, plus presented an overview of the new Historic Downtown Georgetown Walking Tour, a joint project between the City of Georgetown and Preservation Georgetown.





  • Professor of Art History and Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts Kimberly Smith published four “in-focus” essays in the exhibition catalogue, Expressionists: Kandinsky, Münter and the Blue Rider(Tate Publishing, in association with Yale University Press). The essays address specific collaborations and relationships in the Blue Rider movement, and are titled: “The French Connection,” “Else Lasker-Schüler and Franz Marc’s Mail Art,” “Reiterinnen: Women Riders,” and “Fritz Burger: The Art Historical Connection.” The catalogue was edited by Natalia Sidlina, and published in conjunction with the landmark exhibition, “Expressionists: Kandinsky, Münter and the Blue Rider” at the Tate Modern, London, on view until October 20, 2024.





  • Professor of Music Michael Cooper contributed an invited guest post to the Women’s Song Forum blog. Titled “Florence Price, Motherhood, and Loss,” the post draws on archival research and textual and musical analysis to explore the relationship between “Brown Arms (To Mother),” which Price composed (on her own poem) at the twentieth anniversary of her mother’s unimaginably painful decision to sever all ties to Price and renounce her race, spending the rest of her life passing as white, and “To My Little Son” (poem by Julia Johnson Davis), which she composed at the thirtieth anniversary of the death of her son Tommy, who died of malaria two days before his sixth birthday. Cooper discovered the manuscript for “Brown Arms (To Mother)” several years ago and released its first published edition this past January. Interested folk can read this post here.





April 2024

  • Head of Distinctive Collections & Archives Megan Firestone presented at two sessions, “Top Topaz Picks” and “Adult Book Pairings for Programming,” during the Texas Library Association Annual Meeting held April 16-19.





  • Professor of Education Michael Kamen and Assistant Professor of Curriculum Instruction and Learning Sciences at Texas A&M-Corpus Christi Debra Plowman published a chapter titled “Slide Rules: To the Moon and Back” in Collaboration to Advance Science & Mathematics Education: Panamá City, Panamá, published by the International Consortium for Research in Science and Mathematics Education. The publication can be read here.





  • Director of Advising and Retention Jennifer Leach served as a panelist for a NACADA: The Global Community for Academic Advising webinar on April 22. The panel was titled “The Advisors’ Role in Retention” and was hosted by the Small Colleges & Universities Advising Community & Probation/Dismissal/Reinstatement Issues Advising Community. The panel focused on the advisor’s role in retention and explored how advisors at small institutions can help students successfully navigate the processes of probation, dismissal, or reinstatement.





  • On April 25, Visiting Assistant Professor of Biology Kyle Wilhite and his Ph.D. advisor, Mike Ryan, published a paper in Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiologytitled “Condition dependence in the sexual communication system of the túngara frog.”





  • Assistant Professor of Mathematics Noelle Sawyer was the Keynote speaker at the inaugural Mid-Atlantic Regional Math Alliance Conference. Her talk was titled “I am not a Mathematician” and contained a guide to current issues in the field of mathematics, current issues in academia, recent student arrests on US campuses at protests, and some advice for faculty who want to do better. The talk was intended to guide some discussion and goals of the Mid-Atlantic Regional Math Alliance.





  • Part-time Assistant Professor of Applied Music Katherine Altobello’s voice student Will Mallick ’24 has been cast in leading roles with theater companies around the Georgetown and greater Austin area this year. At the Palace Theatre, Mallick performed the title role “Daniel” in Once on this Island, the title role “Chad” in Disaster, supporting roles “Lord Savage” and “Spider” in Jekyll and Hyde, and supporting role “Kodaly” in She Loves Me. He will soon perform the title role of “Jimmy Ray” in Bright Star. Mallick performed “Kenickie” in Greasewith Summer Stock Austin, and is soon to perform the title role “Emmett” in Legally Blondeat Zilker Hillside Theater. Please congratulate Will Mallick on his incredible success these past twelve months! Altobello has been Mallick’s voice teacher for four years.





  • Garey Chair and Professor of Chemistry & Biochemistry Maha Zewail-Foote co-authored a paper in a top journal, Briefings in Bioinformatics.She and her co-authors showed that DNA damage is localized within cancer-forming sequences across the human genome. This multidisciplinary research involved a unique collaboration with UT Austin professors in various disciplines.





  • Senior Research and Instruction Librarian Katherine Hooker presented a poster at the Texas Library Association’s annual conference on April 17. “Three Ring Library Circus (But in a Good Way): Leaning into the Theme with Creative Instruction for Creative Students” summarized three-part library instruction delivered to students in Associate Professor of Theatre Kerry Bechtel’s “Design Fundamentals” course. Students learned via an online escape game, a collaborative Padlet, and an InfoGuide, all highly customized around the course’s vibrant circus theme.





  • Sabrina Woodward ’25 presented the paper “Motocicleta lúdica/Playful motorcycle” at the Latin American and Latinx Studies Symposium held at Rollins College on March 22. Her presentation was based on the course “Leisure and Play in Latin America” (Fall 2023) that Sabrina took with Associate Professor of Spanish María de los Ángeles Rodriguez Cadena, who mentored her to present at the Symposium.





  • Assistant Professor of Anthropology Naomi Reed (panel organizer) and Professor of Anthropology Melissa Johnson (panel chair), along with two SCOPE undergraduate students, Rose Reed ’25 and Kalista Esquivel ’26, presented their panel “Unsilencing the Past: How Oral Histories Give Voice to Black and Latinx Students at Southwestern University” on April 18 at the Southwestern Social Science Association Conference in New Orleans, LA. Dr. Johnson discussed the foundational history of the University and the founding of The SU Racial History Project. Dr. Reed discussed the liberatory potential of oral histories and why this particular method is key to unsilencing the voices of the oppressed at a predominantly white institution. Rose presented the oral history of Lynette Philips, a Black woman who attended Southwestern University between 1980-1984, played basketball for the university, and was very active on campus. Kalista presented the oral history of Eva Mendiola, a Mexican-American woman who attended Southwestern University from 1972-1975 and founded the volleyball team, which was the first women’s sports team on campus. Future plans include submitting these student papers to a special issue of an oral history journal. The conference program can be viewed here.





  • Professor of Education Michael Kamen was elected to the position of second vice president (becoming the first vice president and president over the following two years) of The Association for the Study of Play (TASP). He will serve as conference chair for the 2026 TASP conference. TASP is the premier professional organization in academia dedicated to interdisciplinary research and theory construction concerning play throughout the world since 1973. The Association’s broad multidisciplinary focus includes the fields of anthropology, biology, communication studies, cultural studies, dance, ecology, education, ethnology, folklore, history, kinesiology, leisure studies, musicology, philosophy, psychology, recreation, sociology, and the arts.





  • Graduating senior education major Leora Ammerman ’24 has earned selection for the prestigious and nationally competitive Fulbright U.S. Student Program fellowship, to serve as an English Teaching Assistant (ETA) in Spain for 2024-2025. Leora will be able to leverage the elementary and special education certifications she’s earning at SU to be a highly prepared ETA. Congratulations to Leora and her faculty champions!





  • French and psychology double major Sarah Woods ’21 is now a Ph.D. student at the University of Utah, studying cognition and neural science in the department of psychology. She was recently selected as a recipient of the prestigious and nationally competitive National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship. Congratulations to Sarah and her SU faculty champions who prepared her for this next step!





  • At the GiveCampus Partner Success Days in San Antonio on April 16, Director of Annual Giving Lauren Strilich and Assistant Director of Annual Giving Jayden Hughes ’21 presented their work, entitled “Stop, Collaborate and Listen: Building Cross Campus Partnerships.” This presentation focuses on leveraging and collaborating with campus partners for successful fundraising.





  • University Chaplain and Director of Spiritual Life Ron Swain presented the Student Leadership for Racial Justice Award, which is named in his honor, at Duquesne University in Pittsburgh, PA on April 12. This Award was created at Swain’s alma mater in 2020, during the 50th anniversary of his graduation from Duquesne. The Award is presented annually to students who have demonstrated authentic passion for diversity, equity, and inclusion through education, engagement, and advocacy at the University or in the city of Pittsburgh. This year’s recipients are Lei’Asha Battle, a junior nursing major, and Jakobie Green, a junior Finance major, both from Sarasota, FL.





  • Professor of Communication Studies Bob Bednar presented a plenary talk titled “Bringing the Archives Out of the Archives: Mobilizing and Reframing University Archives in Critiques of Campus Commemorative Landscapes” at the Austin Archives Bazaar, held at Scholz Garten in Austin on April 14. The talk described the experience of developing the Placing Memory Interactive Story Map in Summer 2023 with Megan Firestone, Head of Distinctive Collections and Archives, and a team of 11 student researchers: Bettina Castillo ’24, Max Colley ’24, Adrianna Flores-Vivas ’24, Lainey Gutierrez ’25, Teddy Hoffman ’24, Hannah Jury ’24, Shawn Maganda ’24, Harper Randolph ’25, Andrea Stanescu ’24, Michelle Taing ’24, and Ava Zumpano ’25.





  • Two East Asian Studies faculty members, Associate Professor of Art History Allison Miller and Visiting Professor of Economics Maorui Yang, and two students attended the ASIANetwork conference in Atlanta, Georgia from April 12-14. Natalie Davis ’27 presented her poster titled, “Dueling Depictions: Zhang Zhixin and the Politics of Femininity in Chinese Scar Art.” Kate Medlock ’26 presented her poster titled, “Reviving the Past: A Mid-Western Zhou Jade Pendant and its Neolithic References.” Maorui presented on the panel, “Teaching and Research in the Liberal Arts: ASIANetwork-Luce Postdoctoral Fellows.”





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth’s engagement with the German speaking community was instrumental in securing a gift to Southwestern University’s Distinctive Collections: Uwe Lemke’s extensive Perry Rhodan collection, donated by his widow Mary Duffy. The many volumes of this epic narrative represent Germany’s most successful and longest running science fiction series that started in 1961, arguably the most successful science fiction novel series in the world. This gift makes Distinctive Collections and Archives currently the only library in the USA that can provide access to a German language collection of the Perry Rhodan series.





  • Natalie Davis ’27 was named as runner-up for ASIANetwork’s McJimsey student essay award for her paper, “Dueling Depictions: Zhang Zhixin and the Politics of Femininity in Chinese Scar Art.” Natalie received funding to present her work at the ASIANetwork annual conference in Atlanta.





  • Four art history students presented their research at the virtual SUNY New Paltz Undergraduate Art History Symposium from April 11-14. David Salvania ’27 presented his paper titled, “Feng Zikai’s Advocation of Unity within Shanghai through the Subtlety of Cartoons.” Natalie Davis ’27 presented her paper titled, “Dueling Depictions: Zhang Zhixin and the Politics of Femininity in Chinese Scar Art.” Ceridwen Grady ’24 presented her paper titled, “Accessibility Archive: Finding Sensory Equity in Olafur Eliasson’s Installations.” Hannah Chock ’24 presented her paper titled, “Invitation and Alienation: Semiotic Constructions of Holy Bodies in Caravaggio’s Madonna di Loreto.”





  • Sociology major Elena Clark ’24 was selected as the first place winner in the prestigious Alpha Kappa Delta national undergraduate paper competition for her capstone project titled “‘Freedom of the streets’ or ‘Barriers to success?’ Factors that Predict Attitudes About Homelessness In The United States.” Elena competed against sociology majors from R1s, liberal arts universities, and other schools across the country. Her award comes with a cash prize and travel money to the August 2024 American Sociological Association (ASA) meeting in Montreal, Quebec, where she will participate in the ASA Honors Program, present her paper, and receive her award at the AKD Awards Ceremony. Professor of Sociology Maria Lowe served as Elena’s faculty mentor for this project.





  • Recent political science grad and newly elected Phi Beta Kappa member Sierra Rupp ’23 has earned one of the State Department’s prestigious Critical Language Scholarships to study Russian this summer in Kyrgyzstan. Sierra is also one of SU’s two winners of the State Department’s 2024-2025 Fulbright U.S. Student Program fellowship for an English Teaching Assistantship to Spain. Previously, she was also the winner of a CLS Spark award for Summer 2024 to study beginning Russian. Congratulations to Sierra for such outstanding accomplishments!





  • From a pool of more than 5,000 applicants, biochemistry/mathematics junior and Dixon Scholar Brian Armijo ’25 was selected as a 2024 Goldwater scholar - SU’s first ever! The Goldwater Scholarship Program, one of the oldest and most prestigious national scholarships in the natural sciences, engineering, and mathematics in the United States, seeks to identify, encourage, and financially support college sophomores and juniors who show exceptional promise of becoming this nation’s next generation of research leaders in these fields.





  • Olivia Bakke ’25, Logan LeBlanc ’25, and Abby Ryan ’25 competed in the National Collegiate Digital Marketing Championships hosted by Baylor University on April 10-11. They competed in all the events and demonstrated outstanding team camaraderie. Logan won the Viral Competition on YouTube marketing.





  • Associate Professor of Communication Studies Lamiyah Bahrainwala (LB) published an article along with co-author Dr. Jaishikha Nautiyal in the journal QED: A Journal in GLBTQ Worldmaking. The article, “Queer Desi Kinships: Reaching across Partition,” offers ethnographic accounts of how casteism, anti-Muslim sentiment, and anti desi-queerness diminish desi solidarities in white and western contexts, including academia. They argue that the 1947 Partition of Pakistan and India is still ongoing, and worldwide. Dr. Nautiyal is also joining the Communication Studies Department in Fall 2024, and we are very lucky to have her. The article can be read here.





  • At the American Physiological Society’s Annual Meeting in Long Beach, CA from April 3-7, Assistant Professor of Kinesiology Jennifer Stokes presented her work, entitled “Collaborative Critical Thinking Problem Sets Enhance Student Perceived Learning and Promote Student Practice Outside of the Classroom.” This pedagogical research focuses on student collaborative learning and engagement in the Anatomy and Physiology classroom.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Political Science Katie Aha presented a paper at the Midwest Political Science Association Annual Conference, held from April 4-7 in Chicago. The paper, “Gestational Surrogacy and Party Politics in Europe,” was part of a panel on “European Political Parties.” She also served as a discussant for a panel on “European Executive and Parliamentary Politics.”





  • Associate Professor of Political Science Emily Sydnor, Gerald Jones ’25, and Adrian Gonzalez ’25 presented their collaborative project, “Unraveling State Identity in the United States,” at the Midwest Political Science Association’s Annual Meeting April 3-5 in Chicago, IL. They were joined at the conference by SU alumna Alesha Lewis ’21, a current PhD student at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, who presented her first-year graduate paper “Does Racial Trauma Influence Political Behavior in Marginalized People?”





  • Associate Professor of History Joseph Hower found time, between beignets, to chair and comment on a panel on “Environmental Justice in Postwar America” at the Organization of American Historians Conference on American History in New Orleans.





  • Computer Science majors Caleb Highsmith ’24, Alejandro Medina ’24, Travis Rafferty ’24, and Noah Zamarripa ’24 presented a poster on “SNITCH: Southwestern’s Newest Innovation to Cultivate Honor” which earned 3rd place at the 34th Annual Conference of the Consortium for Computing Sciences in Colleges: South Central Region on April 5 in Nacogdoches, TX. Their work, done in Professor of Computer Science Barbara Anthony’s capstone course, develops a web-based tool allowing a person to upload assignments and make judgments about the likelihood of the result having been generated by AI, with machine learning models that are constantly being evaluated and are automatically configured based on their performance. Travis also presented a poster on “Using Multi-Objective Quality Diversity to Evolve Complex Machines in Minecraft” that was joint work with Joanna Lewis ’24 done through a SCOPE project with Associate Professor of Computer Science Jacob Schrum.





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth presented an invited talk on “Die Zukunft des Sprachenlernens in den USA: Visionen und Innovationen” (The Future of Studying Languages in the USA: Visions and Innovations) at the Goethe-Institut in Washington DC. The joint conference sponsored by the American Association of Teachers of German (AATG) and the Goethe-Institut brought together invited expert voices in education, administration, and professional organizations to collaborate on future oriented visions for the continued success of learning and teaching German across institutions, proficiency levels, and global networks.





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth earned two DAAD materials grants to support teaching and learning in German Studies. The grants from Deutsche Akademische Austauschdienst (German Academic Exchange Service) and the German Foreign Office provide two curated collections of German language titles: a collection of literary works published in 2023, and a collection of literature commenting on and reflecting current salient issues in German culture. Students will use the collections to study representations of diversity, inclusion, and anti-racism in German literature. Success with DAAD materials grants is made possible through Berroth’s work in community engagement as a DAAD Ortslektorin, serving to amplify and multiply the DAAD mission and motto “Change by Exchange.”





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth mentored two students who presented their research projects at the 13th Undergraduate Research Conference in German Studies, organized by Moravian and Lafayette Colleges in Pennsylvania on April 6, 2024. This national conference brought together young scholars and their mentors for presentations and discussions of a range of interdisciplinary topics representative of German Studies. Isabella Moore ’25, double major in German and Environmental Studies, presented her comparative study on developments in the use of solar energy in Germany and the United States. Kendyl Feuerbacher ’27, double major in German and Studio Art with a minor in Design Thinking, presented her research on the increase of motivation for learning new languages through the use of video games.





  • Professor of Spanish Carlos de Oro presented the paper “Revelando el impacto y el trauma del conflicto armado: La espectralidad como estrategia cinematográfica en el cine colombiano del nuevo milenio” at the 2024 Southwest Council on Latin American Studies in Panama City, Panama.





  • Professor of Environmental Studies Joshua Long attended the Political Ecology Society and Society for Applied Anthropology conference in Santa Fe, NM from March 25-30. He served on a panel and presented a flash talk titled, “Extractivism and Climate Justice: Fueling the New Climate Colonialism.”





  • Professor of Sociology Maria Lowe and four sociology seniors attended the Southern Sociological Society annual meeting in New Orleans, LA from April 3-6. Each student also presented their capstone research. Elena Clark ’24 presented her paper titled, “‘Freedom of the streets’ or ‘Barriers to success?’ Factors that Predict Attitudes About Homelessness In The United States.” Liana Collins ’24 presented her paper titled, “Americans’ Attitudes About Second Language Learning in the U.S.” Carson Maxfield ’24 presented his paper titled, “Who is More Likely to Support Conspiracy Theories? Examining the Connections between Education, Gender, and Beliefs in Conspiracy Theory.” Brigit Reese ’24 presented her paper titled, “Hope, Nope, or Cope: Americans’ Perceptions about Climate Change in the 2020s.” In addition, Lowe, Reese, and Maxfield presented the preliminary findings from their faculty-student collaborative project titled, “Racialized Fears in White Spaces: The Frequency with Which Residents Worry About Being Perceived As Suspicious in Their Neighborhood.”





  • Professor of English Michael Saenger published an essay that was featured on the Times of Israel website, titled “Keeping the light on, in my campus office.” The essay advocates activism to combat rising antisemitism at American universities. He was nominated to join the Steering Committee of the new initiative he has helped to launch, discussed in the essay, Faculty Against Antisemitism Movement. The essay can be read here.





  • Professor of Psychology Traci Giuliano published an article entitled “Successfully publishing with undergraduate coauthors in psychology: Insights from faculty with top track records.” Coauthors are former students Will Hebl ’23 and Jennifer Howell ’09. The article can be read here.





  • Several Psychology faculty members and students presented papers at the annual meeting of the Southwestern Psychological Association in San Antonio. Professor of Psychology Traci Giuliano and student Megan Muskara ’24, presented a poster titled “Identifying predictors of the psychological benefits of travel.” Associate Professor of Psychology Carin Perilloux and students Lainey Gutierrez ’25, Jaxson Haynes ’25, Maryn Medlock ’25, Cassidy Reynolds ’24, and Lauren Sanders ’24 presented a poster titled “Developing the Self-Perceived Parental Effort Scale (SPES).” Assistant Professor of Psychology Karen Lara and students Mara Strohl ’25, Paige Chapman ’25, Tessa Elizondo ’24, Jessica Metcalf ’25, Hailey Brisco ’25, and Ashten Wheeler ’25 presented a poster titled “Children’s and Adults’ Reasoning About How Expected Wait Time Influences Preferences and Emotions.”





  • Gabriela Nicole Hislop Gomez ’26, Angel Rodriguez ’24, and Sabrina Woodward ’25 gave platform presentations at the Capitol of Texas Undergraduate Research Conference (CTURC) hosted at UT Austin. Their presentations were the result of work conducted in the bioprinting laboratory of Assistant Professor of Physics Cody Crosby.





  • Professor of Biochemistry and Garey Chair of Chemistry Maha Zewail-Foote presented “Biological and molecular consequences of oxidative damage on non-B DNA-induced genetic instability” at the 2024 American Society of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology National Meeting.





  • Professor of Biochemistry and Garey Chair of Chemistry Maha Zewail-Foote delivered a presentation on effective strategies for improving diversity, inclusion, and belonging within undergraduate research laboratories at the 2024 American Society of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology National Meeting. Her abstract was selected for the coveted spotlight talk for a special session on challenges and best practices in running a research program primarily with undergraduate students.





  • Professor of Anthropology Melissa Johnson presented the paper “The Crawford Family Line: Subaltern Socio-Ecological Formations on the British Coast of Central America in the 1700s” at the Political Ecology Society/Society for Applied Anthropology 84th Annual Meeting on March 27 in Santa Fe, NM.





  • Visual Content Producer Todd White and Head of Distinctive Collections & Archives Megan Firestone won a Texas Library Association Branding Iron Award in the digital communications category for an academic library for their work on the Behind the Artifactseries.





  • The A. Frank Smith, Jr. Library Center (SLC) has been named a winner of the Texas Library Association’s “Branding Iron” awards, recognizing outstanding library marketing. Senior Research and Instruction Librarian Katherine Hooker created a pirate-themed interactive library treasure hunt to orient students to the spaces and resources of SLC. Head of Distinctive Collections and Archives Megan Firestone designed a temporary tattoo of the first SU Pirates logo and provided these as prizes for completing the treasure hunt activity. The project won for “Best External Communication” from an academic library.





  • Head of Distinctive Collections & Archives Megan Firestone was added to the acquisition board for the Williamson Museum.





  • Head of Distinctive Collections & Archives Megan Firestone presented on women’s education at Southwestern University and creation of the Ladies Annex for Preservation Georgetown’s First Friday on March 1.





  • Professor of English Michael Saenger was invited to contribute to the Antisemitism Studies program at Gratz College. In pioneering its new Masters program in Antisemitism Studies, Gratz College joins the expertise of its own faculty with experts from around the world.





  • Assistant Professor of Anthropology Naomi Reed and investigative journalist Brittney Martin received a 2024 Gracie Award for Best Investigative Feature [Radio ‐ Nationally Syndicated Non‐Commercial] for their podcast series “Sugar Land.” The Gracie Awards celebrate women in media. More info can be found here.





  • In 2023, Professor of Biology Romi Burks contributed to a United States Department of Agriculture - Agriculture Research Services (USDA-ARS) effort to communicate the latest science on the invasive apple snail that occurs across the southeastern region of the United States. The content of that Apple Snail Workshop, entitled “Apple Snails: Discussion of past problems and future solutions for an emerging pest in the United States agriculture/aquaculture,” now appears published in World Aquaculture, the magazine for the World Aquaculture Society. Recent Burks’ Lab researcher, now professional scientific illustrator, Lauren Muskara ’21 provided the photograph of an apple snail laying eggs on a pylon that the authors chose for the cover of the article. The full article can be read on page 46 here.





  • Four Mathematics faculty and five students participated in the 2024 Meeting of the Texas Section of the Mathematical Association of America (MAA), held March 22-23 in San Marcos, TX. Associate Professor of Mathematics Therese Shelton presented “Mathematical Modeling Projects.” Shelton also performed administrative duties as past Representative of the Texas MAA to the association level MAA Congress, and she served as the Department Liaison. Assistant Professor of Mathematics John Ross participated in Project NeXT sessions. Professor and Garey Chair of Mathematics Alison Marr and Professor and Lord Chair of Mathematics Fumiko Futamura attended. Alley Koenig ’24 presented “Subtractive Edge Magic Labelings” resulting from the capstone project supervised by Marr, and Kathryn Altman ’24 presented “​​Difference Distance Magic Oriented Graphs,” also supervised by Marr. ​​Amanda Mejia ’27, Camille James ’27, and Kate Dennis ’27 participated in the Calculus Bowl. 





  • Professor and Garey Chair of Mathematics Alison Marr and Associate Professor at the University of Minnesota-Duluth Bryan Freyberg published the paper “Neighborhood Balanced Colorings of Graphs” in Graphs and Combinatorics. The article can be read here.





  • Professor of Biochemistry and Garey Chair of Chemistry Maha Zewail-Foote co-organized and led a well-attended 90-min workshop titled “Unlocking Your Career Success Through Networking and Mentorship” at the 2024 American Society of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology National Meeting. Workshops were selected based on proposal submissions. 





  • Assistant Professor of History Soojung Han was invited to give a talk in the “Asia in Depth” series at Georgetown University. Her talk was titled “The Rise of the Shatuo Turks: Identity Formation in Medieval China.”





March 2024

  • Professor and Austin Term Chair in English Eileen Cleere presided over the 39th meeting of INCS (Interdisciplinary Nineteenth-Century Studies) in Cincinnati, OH, March 21-24, under the theme of “Trans-Turns in the Nineteenth Century.” In addition to whipping Board votes for a successful overhaul of the organization’s bylaws and constitution and announcing prizes and initiatives at the membership banquet, Cleere chaired a panel on “Theorizing Trans-historically.”





  • Professor of Computer Science Barbara Anthony co-presented “BA versus BS Degrees in Computer Science” at the Innovations and Opportunities in Liberal Arts Computing Education-affiliated event at SIGCSE 2024, the ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education in Portland, OR. The working group considered the computer major requirements of 100+ liberal arts colleges, highlighting commonalities and differences in the BA and BS offerings as well as some of the implications for programs and students.





  • Associate Professor of Business Debika Sihi and Student Researcher Abigail (Abby) Ryan ’25 presented their research project, “Proactively Leveraging Generative AI Tools in Marketing Courses: A Process for Prompt Engineering Assignments” at the Marketing Management Association’s Spring Educators Conference on March 21-22.





  • The cello studio of Part-Time Assistant Professor of Music and Artist in Residence Hai Zheng Olefsky participated in a masterclass led by guest artist Joshua Gindele on March 21 at the Caldwell-Carvey Foyer. Professor Gindele, a cello professor at the Butler School of Music at the University of Texas at Austin and a founding member of the prestigious Miro Quartet, conducted the session and provided valuable insights to the performers. During the masterclass, Anna Martens ’24, the first cellist of the SU Orchestra, performed a cello solo piece by Bach and the first movement of the Elgar Concerto, accompanied by Part-Time Instructor of Music David Utterback. Additionally, the Sarofim Piano Trio, a student trio coached by Professor of Music Kiyoshi Tamagawa, also performed a rendition of Shostakovich’s Trio Op. No. 2 in E minor at the event.





  • Professor of History Melissa Byrnes presented as part of “New Directions in the Historiography of Post/Colonial France: A Book Panel,” at the Society for French Historical Studies annual meeting at Hofstra University.





  • Professor of Music Michael Cooper presented a keynote lecture titled “The Cost of Being Fanny Mendelssohn” at each of two concerts offered as part of a Fanny Mendelssohn Hensel festival given by the Capitol Hill Chorale in Washington, D.C., under the direction of Frederick Binkholder of Georgetown University.





  • Associate Professor of Theatre Kerry Bechtel worked as a costume buyer for Amazon Pictures’ new series “Fallout.” Alumnus Jonathan Knipscher ’03 was the Associate Costume Designer on the project. The show premieres on April 11, 2024. The series trailer can be seen here.





  • Professor of Education Michael Kamen and Assistant Professor of Curriculum Instruction and Learning Sciences at Texas A&M-Corpus Christi Debra Plowman published “It’s Done with Mirrors” in the Winter 2024 newsletter of the International Consortium for Research in Science and Mathematics Education. Their quarterly column tells the ongoing story of the fictional character, Ian Quiry, as he studies and struggles to learn how to be an effective elementary school STEM teacher.





  • Assistant Professor of Physics Cody Crosby co-authored “Fabrication and Characterization of Quad-Component Bioinspired Hydrogels to Model Elevated Fibrin Levels in Central Nervous Tissue Scaffolds” in the journal Gels with Dr. Dany Munoz-Pinto and his undergraduate laboratory at Trinity University. The work was published open-access and can be downloaded here.





  • Professor of Spanish Katy Ross and Andrea Stanescu ’24 presented their paper “La doble alteridad en Carmen & Lola” at the Northeastern Modern Languages Conference in Boston, MA, March 8-10.





  • Professor of Religion Elaine Craddock published the article “Divine Power and Fluid Bodies: Tirunaṅkai Communities in Tamil Nadu” in the International Journal of Hindu Studies this March. The article can be read here.





  • Professor of Religion and Environmental Studies Laura Hobgood spent part of spring break in Los Angeles being interviewed and filmed for a documentary focusing on women as leaders and healers in early and medieval Christianity. The documentary, tentatively titled “Immortality Key,” will be a feature length motion picture when it is completed.





  • Associate Professor of Art History Allison Miller gave an invited presentation on February 26 in a webinar organized by the Association for Chinese Art History titled “Chinese Art History in the Undergraduate Curriculum.”





  • Assistant Professor of Mathematics Noelle Sawyer recently published a review in Nature of the documentary Journeys of Black Mathematicians: Forging Resilience. The review can be read here.





  • Associate Professor of Spanish Abby Dings and coauthor Tammy Jandrey Hertel of the University of Lynchburg presented a talk titled “The study abroad experiences of heritage Spanish speakers” at the Georgetown University Round Table on Languages and Linguistics (GURT) in Washington, D.C., March 1-3, 2024. This year’s theme was “Education Abroad: Language, Learners, and Communities.”





  • Professor and Austin Term Chair of English Eileen Cleere published an article in the most recent issue of the Children’s Literature Association Quarterly. The essay, “Girls on Fire: Mary Elizabeth Braddon’s Lady Audley’s Secret (1861), Maud Hart Lovelace’s Betsy and Tacy Go Downtown (1943), and the Adolescent Sublimation of Victorian Sensation” was reworked from a Paideia Lecture, and can be read here.





  • Professor of Music Michael Cooper led a virtual seminar on the subject of the politics of the CREDO of W.E.B. Du Bois and Margaret Bonds with the combined choirs of the University of California, Berkeley. Attended by about eighty singers and several community members, the seminar was offered in preparation for the choirs’ upcoming performance of the Bonds/Du Bois CREDO.





  • Associate Professor of Communication Studies Lamiyah Bahrainwala and SU students R’Yani Vaughn ’24 and Sydney Wahl ’24 attended the 2024 Western States Communication Association (WSCA) Undergraduate Scholars Research Conference in Reno, NV. Lamiyah supervised R’Yani and Sydney’s senior projects, which were anonymously reviewed and competitively selected for presentation: “Exploring Depictions of Black Motherhood in the Music Industry,” R’Yani Sydnee-LeChe’ Vaugn, and “From Samoan Warrior to American Traitor: The Media Framing Creations plus Exceptionalism, Nationalism, and Masculine Perfectionism Reactions that hanger the Course of Football Star Manti Te’o’s Life,” Sydney Lee Wahl. Senior scholars as well as the WSCA President themself spoke with these students and attempted to recruit them to their graduate programs. Congratulations to these impressive students!





  • Assistant Professor of Music Ruben Balboa served as a jury member for the 2024 Primrose International Viola Competition. As one of the most renowned string instrument competitions in the world, the Primrose International Viola Competition features the world’s best and most promising young violists.





  • Lerchen Zhong, a sophomore at Westwood High School in Austin and a piano student of Professor of Music Kiyoshi Tamagawa since 2019, has been awarded one of fifteen Texas Young Masters arts awards for 2024-2025. Texas Young Masters is a joint program of the Texas Cultural Trust and the Texas Commission on the Arts that focuses on talented young artists in grades 8-11. Recipients, selected through competitive application and audition, receive the title of Young Master and are awarded renewable grants of $5,000 per year for further study in their chosen arts disciplines. In addition to his piano studies, Lerchen was selected as Assistant Concertmaster of the Texas All-State Symphony, the top All-State orchestra, in February.





  • Gabriela Nicole Hislop Gomez ’26, Noor Nazeer ’24, and Angel Rodriguez ’24 presented their research talks at the Texas Academy of Science (TAS) 2024 Annual Meeting hosted at UT Permian Basin in Odessa. Noor and Angel were awarded first place in the chemistry/biochemistry and physics/engineering sections, respectively. Their presentations were the result of work conducted in the bioprinting laboratory of Assistant Professor of Physics Cody Crosby.





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth served as an Evaluator for the National German Exam, administered through the American Association of Teachers of German. The National German Exam is administered each year to over 15,000 high school students of German. The exam, now in its 64th year, provides individual diagnostic feedback, rewards students through an extensive regional and national prize program, and creates a sense of accomplishment. Exam results provide teachers a means of comparing students in all regions of the country, as well as programmatic data to help inform curricular decisions. For over 60 years, the Federal Republic of Germany, through the German Foreign Office and its Pedagogical Exchange Service, has provided the AATG/PAD National German Exam Scholarship, a three-week trip to Germany. Berroth’s outreach and support for teachers and learners of German facilitates transitions from high school to college level German curricula and the enjoyment of lifelong learning.





  • Head of Distinctive Collections and Archives Megan Firestone presented on the development of downtown Georgetown prior to 1915 and the use of Sanborn Maps to the Georgetown Sertoma Club.





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth hosted a campus exploration day for 15 students from Germany and their teachers on February 29. The students from Paul-Klee-Gymnasium in Augsburg participate in the German American Partnership Program, GAPP, with Westwood High School in Round Rock. Established in 1972, the German American Partnership Program facilitates bilateral transatlantic exchanges between schools in the U.S. and Germany. With a substantial network of participating schools and over 400,000 participants over the years, GAPP is the largest bilateral exchange program between the U.S. and another country. Berroth’s sustained engagement in this form of community outreach connects and supports German educators across institutions and increases guidance for students of languages, who are encouraged to integrate experiences abroad into their educational paths. Southwestern students and GAPP participants enjoyed opportunities for increasing their intercultural knowledge and competence.





  • Associate Professor of Political Science Emily Sydnor and former Senior Director of Integrative Learning Sarah Brackmann recently published a piece in Inside Higher Ed Jobs  about how to engage in nonpartisan voter engagement efforts in today’s polarized political climate. They were invited to write the piece based on their presentation on the SU Votes coalition’s strategies for increasing voter registration and engagement at the AAC&U conference in January 2023. It can be found here.





  • Assistant Professor of Economics Chandrayee Chatterjee presented her co-authored paper titled “Spillover Effects of Advertising: Do TV Advertisements for Non-Food Health Products Promote Healthy Food Choices?” at the American Marketing Association Winter Academic Conference at St. Pete’s Beach, FL, on February 25. The paper was accepted for a session in the competitive paper category.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Theatre Amy King wrote, directed, and produced a staged reading of her new play Finger Lickin’ Goodat the Jones Theatre in February. The cast included students Jason Bui ’27 as Raymond, Kyle Bussone-Peterson ’24 as Kevin, and Connor Bustos ’26 on stage directions. They were joined by guest Gina Houston in the leading role of Alice and Director of Business Internships and Assistant Professor of Business Andy Ross as Jim, etc., in his acting debut! The reading was also performed at Austin Community College in Highland Park.





February 2024

  • Assistant Professor of Physics Cody Crosby published a review titled “Open-source extrusion 3D bioprinters: Trends and recommendations” in the journal Bioprinting. The publication evaluates the latest syringe extruders that have been designed to extrude bio-inks and offers concrete recommendations to ensure that this technology remains inexpensive and open-source. The process involved building and testing the five most popular designs available in the literature, as seen in Figure 2. The paper can be accessed for free for 50 days here.





  • The violin studio of Part-Time Assistant Professor of Applied Music Jessica Mathaes performed in a masterclass by guest artist Sandy Yamamoto on Saturday, February 24, at Caldwell-Carvey Foyer. Professor Yamamoto is a violin professor at the University of Texas at Austin and a founding member of the renowned Miro quartet. Mathaes’ students performed violin solo works in front of a live audience, with a real-time critique by the guest artist. The Sarofim String Quartet (a student quartet coached by Mathaes) concluded the masterclass with a Beethoven Op. 18 No. 4 performance.





  • Professor of Mathematics Alison Marr attended the Joint Mathematics Meetings in January in San Francisco, where she spoke about the Enhancing Diversity in Graduate Education (EDGE) Summer program as an invited panelist in the AMS Committee on Equity, Diversity and Inclusion Panel Discussion: Successful Programs that Support Equity, Diversity and Inclusion.





  • Professor of Mathematics Alison Marr gave the keynote address titled “The Edges of my Mathematical Life” at the Yellowhammer Network of Women in the Mathematical Sciences Workshop at the University of Alabama.





  • Professor of History Melissa Byrnes gave a guest lecture at the University of Maryland-College Park on “Race and Activism in France: From the Algerian War to #BLM.” While in the DC area, she also gave invited talks at American University and Georgetown University about her recent book, Making Space: Neighbors, Officials, and North African Migrants in the Suburbs of Paris and Lyon





  • Assistant Professor of Mathematics Noelle Sawyer gave two invited talks in February. On February 7th, she spoke at the University of Illinois Chicago about geodesic currents and how to use them as a tool. On February 12, she spoke at the University of Wisconsin-Madison about a work in progress with her collaborators on statistical properties of CAT(0) spaces.





  • Assistant Professor of Feminist Studies Meagan Solomon participated in the Association for Jotería Arts, Activism, and Scholarship Conference in Los Angeles, CA, from February 15-18. With co-discussants X’andrí and Alexandra Salazar, she presented on a roundtable entitled “The Pleasures and Intimacies of Jotería Spacemaking Within and Beyond the University.” Their roundtable focused on the necessity of cultivating spaces to exist and commune as jotería (queer Latinxs) against continued assaults on our humanity. As politicians and their constituents continue to target and alienate LGBTQ+ folks, this roundtable asserted that jotería spacemaking is an act of survival.





  • Kathryn Altman ’24 and Alleen Koenig ’24 gave a poster presentation at the Nebraska Conference for Undergraduate Women in Mathematics (NCUWM). Their poster was on the summer research they performed in which they used mathematical modeling to study the effects of gravitropism on the structure of tomato plant root system architectures.





  • Associate Professor of Education Alicia Moore, Visiting Professor of Education Deborah Shepherd, and Rebecca M. Giles (University of South Alabama) published the article, “Preparing Early Childhood Teachers to Create Inclusive Literacy,’” in English in Texas: A Journal of the Texas Council of Teachers of English Language Arts. The essay highlights the importance of “mirror” texts for young children, which allow students to see their identities highlighted through books and analysis.





  • Part-Time Assistant Professor of Applied Music Jessica Mathaes was selected to lead the Grand Teton Music Festival Orchestra as concertmaster this summer. Hailed as “one of the top 10 classical music festivals in the US” (Financial Times), the Grand Teton Music Festival takes place in Jackson, Wyoming. In its 63rd season, the festival is eight weeks long and is a destination for top orchestral players from world-renowned orchestras. Mathaes will lead the orchestra in July, with Sir Donald Runnicles conducting.





  • Assistant Professor of Economics Chandrayee Chatterjee was invited to present her work in the Economics Seminar Series at the Department of Economics and Decision Sciences at Western Illinois University. She presented her paper titled “Spillover Effects of Advertising on Health Behavior and Nutritional Choices” virtually on February 16th.





  • Professor of English Michael Saenger co-authored an op-ed in the Times of Israel with David Mikics, Moores Distinguished Professor in the Department of English and the Honors College, University of Houston. The article “Trouble at the Modern Language Association” opposes academic antisemitism and extremism and advocates for dialog and diversity in American campus life.





  • Part-Time Assistant Professor of Communication Studies Katharine Hodgdon has been appointed as a contributor for The Wall Street Journal’s Critical Thinking Resources publication. This resource summarizes articles appearing in the Journal and provides thought-provoking, free-response questions to be used for class discussions. Katharine’s contributions will focus on informative and persuasive communication techniques utilized by reporters and journalists to explain current events.





  • Professor of Theatre Desiderio Roybal was invited to join the Board of Directors for the Palace Theatre, Georgetown, TX.





  • Assistant Professor of Physics Cody Crosby, alongside three outstanding Southwestern alumni and current students (Domenic Cordova ’23, Angel Rodriguez ’24, and Nina Woodward ’24), published an article in HardwareX that demonstrated the development of an open-source bioprinting extruder for Ender-series 3D printers. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ohx.2024.e00510





  • Associate Professor of Communication Studies Lamiyah Bahrainwala gave an invited lecture at Arizona State University on January 16, 2023. The virtual talk discussed the role of the critic and public scholarship to graduate students in a Research Methods seminar.





  • Assistant Professor of Math Noelle Sawyer is a Mathematically Gifted and Black 2024 Black History Month honoree. You can find the profile here.





  • Assistant Professor of Anthropology Naomi Reed was invited to present at the Yale Center for the Study of Race, Indigeneity, and Transnational Migration Historical Studies of Texas Symposium on February 9th and 10th in Austin, Texas. On the roundtable “Community-Based Scholarship,” she explored who gets to be “community” when decisions are being made about forgotten Black cemeteries such as The Bullhead Camp Cemetery (the current resting place of the Sugar Land 95). She discussed how the Texas Antiquities Code requires community input when remains are discovered and how the broader Black descendant community of the 95 has been ignored, thus resulting in subpar memorialization efforts by the local school district that owns the land the bodies are buried on.





  • Chair & Associate Professor of Kinesiology Ed Merritt presented a talk, “Simple Strategies to Incorporate Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion into Existing Kinesiology Lessons and Curriculum,” at the American Kinesiology Association Leadership Workshop on January 25 in Albuquerque, NM.





  • Part-Time Assistant Professor of Applied Music and Concertmaster of the Austin Symphony Jessica Mathaes’ student Seth Sagen ’26, a violin performance major, performed in the violin section of the Austin Symphony on their Masterworks concerts February 9-10 at the Long Center.





  • Assistant Professor of English Sonia Del Hierro gave a public talk in a Modern Language Association webinar where she co-presented her recent collaborative publication, “Radical Collegiality and Joy in Graduate Education,” included in the edited collection Graduate Education for a Thriving Humanities Ecosystem.





  • Assistant Professor of Communication Studies Raquel Moreira published the article, “Rhetorics of authentic hybridity and the racially mobile mestiça in ‘Girl from Rio,’” in the Quarterly Journal of Speech. The essay challenges common readings of Latinidad’s racial hybridity as a transgressive in-betweenness against the Black/white racial binary, focusing instead on how this rhetorical construction produces racial mobility, specifically toward whiteness. The Quarterly Journal of Speech is the field’s most prestigious journal, a peer-reviewed publication of the National Communication Association.





  • Professor of Music Michael Cooper wrote the program note for the first performance of Florence Price’s Symphony No. 3 by the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra. The performance is another milestone in the ongoing Florence Price movement, as a major orchestra that, even just ten years ago, had never even considered performing any of her music finally elected to recognize her significance by granting her a place in its repertoire.





  • Part-Time Faculty Member in the English Department Chelsey Clammer ’05 and had her recent lyric essay, “The Ruins of What Never Was,” published in Volume 4 of iO Literary Journal, available here.





  • Professor of Anthropology Melissa Johnson’s work on Belize was featured in the January 19, 202, JSTOR Daily.





  • Professor of Religion and Environmental Studies Laura Hobgood had three chapters published in edited volumes in January and February. “Blessings of Pets in Jewish and Christian Traditions” and “Companion Animals” in Animals and Religion, Routledge Press (ed. D. Aftandilian, B Ambros, and A. Gross) and “Animals and Religion” in Religion and Nature in North America, Bloomsbury Press (ed. L. Kearns and W. Bauman).





  • Professor of English Michael Saenger published “The University after October 7” in TELOSscope, which is part of Telos: Cultural Theory of the Contemporary.





  • Professor of Education Michael Kamen presented a roundtable session, “Polishing the Gems, Professional Development for Project WILD facilitators Through Lesson Study,” at the Association for Science Teacher Education in New Orleans annual conference. He discussed the results of a pilot project he conducted with Kiki Corry, former Project WILD coordinator for the state of Texas.





  • Professor of History Melissa Byrnes gave a public talk on the history behind the book and recent Netflix series, All the Light We Cannot See, at Lark & Owl Booksellers in Georgetown.





  • Assistant Professor of Kinesiology Jennifer Stokes and current SU student Mila Fisher ’24 published an article entitled A Single 10-Minute E-cigarette Vapor Exposure Reduces Tidal Volume and Minute Ventilation in Normoxia and Normobaric Hypoxia in Adult Rats in Cureus, an open-access journal for medical sciences.





  • Assistant Professor of Kinesiology Jennifer Stokes, current SU student Mila Fisher ’24, and alumni Alicia Peters ’23 published an article entitled Fourteen-day E-Cigarette Exposure Disrupts Ventilation Patterns and Serum IL-1B Levels in Adolescent Rats in the Journal of Student Research.





  • Assistant Professor of History Bryan Kauma presented a paper titled, ‘‘Agriculture is a scam!’: Modified seeds, fertilizers and the agrarian fallacy among African grain farmers in colonial Zimbabwe, the 1950s to 1979, at the European University Institute, Knowing the planet: Environment, technology, and development in the 19th and 20th centuries workshop.





  • Assistant Professor of History Bryan Kauma published an article in the journal Critical African Studies, ‘Our stomachs are still hungry’: The colonial state, African Nutrition and small grains in Southern Rhodesia (Zimbabwe), c.1950 to 1970s.





  • Professor of Religion Elaine Craddock published an article titled “Un/Desirable Encounters at the Intersections of Caste, Class and Religion” in the journal Feminist Review in December.





  • Assistant Professor of Sociology Adriana Ponce participated in the Sociologist for Women in Society (SWS) 2024 winter meeting in Santa Ana Pueblo, New Mexico, from January 25 to 28. She presented her project, “The Intersectional Landscape of Stepparents in the U.S.: What’s Next?,” which advocates for an intersectional, feminist approach to stepparenting research, in preparation for a Faculty-Student Project (FSP).





  • Professor of History Melissa Byrnes was part of a roundtable on “Difficult Conversations in the Liberal Arts Classroom” that followed a workshop by the same name at the American Historical Association’s annual meeting in San Francisco, CA. Mercedes Chervony ’23 presented her research, “From the Chicago Freedom Movement to Cabrini-Greene: The Limitations of Legal Activism and the Foresaking of the Projects,” at an undergraduate lightening round, also at the American Historical Association’s annual meeting in San Francisco, CA.





  • Director of Organic Chemistry Labs Carmen Velez and Assistant Professor of Physics Cody Crosby, alongside several outstanding Southwestern undergraduate alumni and students (Kristie Cheng, Nina Woodward, Noor Nazeer, and Gabriela Nicole Hislop Gomez) published an article in the Journal of Chemical Education that describes the adaptation of gelatin methacryoyl (GelMA) hydrogels to the undergraduate laboratory. The authors found that their methods reinforced chemistry laboratory skills introduced students to a new discipline (biomaterials), and increased student interest in the medicinal applications of materials. The article was additionally featured by ACS as a supplementary journal cover designed by Lauren Muskara, a Southwestern alumnus.





January 2024

  • Assistant Dean of Strategic Initiatives and Professor of Spanish Laura Senio Blair had her article titled “Unlocking the Door to Shadow and Substance: Nona Fernández’s La dimensión desconocida” published in the 50th issue of the journal Ciberletras: Revista de crítica literaria y de cultura. Learn more here.





  • Professor of English and Austin Term Chair Eileen Cleere has been elected to the Presidency of INCS, the Interdisciplinary Nineteenth-Century Studies Association. Effective January 1, 2024, Cleere will lead the international organization for a two-year period, convening the annual convention in Cincinnati, OH, in 2024 and Genoa, Italy, in 2025. The organization has hundreds of active members who write and publish in multiple languages, ranging from English, History, and Art History to Environmental Studies, Feminist Studies, and Gender and Sexuality Studies. Learn more about the organization here.





  • Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin presented a paper at the most recent International Studies Association-Global South Caucus Conference in Bangkok entitled “Global South Stories of IR: An Entangled Anarchival Prosopographic Approach.” He also served as Chair for a panel titled Exploring Synergies: Revealing the Dynamics and Impact of South-South Cooperation.





  • Assistant Professor of Kinesiology Tatiana Zhuravleva, along with her colleagues from New Mexico State University, the University of Texas-Austin, and the University of Nebraska-Kearney, published an article titled ‘The Effects of PETTLEP Imagery and Action Observation on Strength Performance of a Leg Extension and Flexion Task’ in the Journal of Imagery Research in Sport and Physical Activity (JIRSPA).





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Philosophy Gwen Daugs presented a paper at the 2024 Eastern Division meeting of the American Philosophical Association titled “Moral Panic and Gender: Michel Foucault, Toby Beauchamp, and the Safety of Children.”





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Biology Kyle Wilhite published a paper titled “Ripple effects in a communication network: anti-eavesdropper defense elicits elaborated sexual signals in rival males” in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B on December 20, 2023. This research was a multi-national collaboration with Purdue University, The University of Texas at Austin, VU University in the Netherlands, the University of Tennessee Knoxville, the University of Antioquia in Colombia, and The Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute.





  • Professor of Music Michael Cooper published two new volumes of previously unknown compositions by Florence Price: Seven Songs on Texts of African American Poets and 12 Pieces for Piano Solo (both Fayetteville, AK: ClarNan Editions) and released these in tandem with sixteen videos performed and produced by African American artists; four of these videos were produced with assistance from Southwestern. The volume of songs was released in both the original settings for medium voice and a separate edition for high voice (because we all want to keep the sopranos happy). Totaling about 54 minutes worth of music, the 19 pieces in these volumes reveal the breadth and richness of Price’s musical imagination and span her active composing career from 1929 to the early 1950s. Those interested in hearing the Seven Songs on Texts of African American Poets can check out this YouTube playlist, and those interested in hearing the 12 Pieces for Piano Solo can check out this YouTube playlist. Listeners should, however, be forewarned that after listening to either or both of these playlists, they might experience what one listener dubbed #ThePriceEffect: a highly emotional state that mingles joy at this music’s entry into public life with a wide range of other emotions triggered by the music itself and sorrow that such genius that the political economy of the music industry and higher education allowed these works to remain unknown for decades – depriving audiences, teachers, and (most of all) students of their beauties.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Political Science Katie Aha attended the Southern Political Science Association Annual Conference in New Orleans. Her paper with Linsey Jensen ’23, “Patterns of Radical Right Support in Czechoslovakia’s Successor States,” was part of a panel titled Left, Right, and Center, and she also served as chair and discussant for the panel European Political Institutions.





  • Professor of English Michael Saenger presented a paper at the Modern Language Association Convention in Philadelphia. His paper, “Double Tongue: Multiple Languages in Shakespeare,” examines the theoretical status of linguistic mixture in the early modern period. At the convention, Saenger also advocated for social justice and academic freedom at the Delegate Assembly of the Modern Language Association, and his activism was covered in the national press. Saenger published an op-ed on the struggles of the organization, which was presented as a Featured Post in the Times of Israel. He then presented an invited talk on Academic Engagement Network’s Short Course in Phoenix, “A Break in Discourse after October 7.”





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Classics Jeffrey Easton presented a paper at the Fourth North American Congress of Greek and Latin Epigraphy in Chicago on January 8-9. The paper “An (Almost) Unspeakable Office,” explored a textual crux in a public Latin inscription of the early Roman Empire to reconsider the nebulous world of administration and distribution of civic and military authority in the early and middle Roman Republic.





  • Professor of History Melissa Byrnes published her book Making Space: Neighbors, Officials, and North African Migrants in the Suburbs of Paris and Lyon as part of the France Overseas: Studies in Empire and Decolonization Series at the University of Nebraska Press.





  • Assistant Professor of Mathematics Noelle Sawyer was featured in a video interview in the Meet a Mathematician series on December 30th, 2023. The mission of Meet a Mathematician is to share stories of mathematicians from different backgrounds, especially from historically excluded groups, with the aim of introducing students to role models and fostering a sense of community. Watch the video here.





  • Professor of Spanish Katy Ross had an article, “Las técnicas de reproducción asistida y la donación: el caso de Samanta Villar,” published in the Revista de ALCE SXXI, Journal of Contemporary Spanish Literature and Film.





  • Professor of Computer Science Barbara Anthony and her co-authors, Christine Chung of Connecticut College, Ananya Das of Middlebury College, and David Yuen, published their article “Earliest Deadline First is a 2-approximation for DARP with Time Windows” in the proceedings of the International Conference on Combinatorial Optimization and Applications.





  • Assistant Professor of Biology Kim McArthur presented a virtual poster at the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience in November 2023. Her poster, titled “Mapping the dendrite topography of facial motor neurons in larval zebrafish,” presented preliminary results from her sabbatical research, gathering evidence to test the hypothesis that the relative positioning of a neuron’s dendrites can determine which synaptic inputs that neuron receives– thereby determining its functional role in a neural circuit.





  • Professor of Education Michael Kamen and Assistant Professor Debra Plowman (A&M -Corpus Christi) published “Solving Word Problems with Understanding” in the Fall 2023 newsletter of the International Consortium for Research in Science and Mathematics Education. Their quarterly column tells the ongoing story of the fictional character, Ian Quiry, as he studies and struggles to learn how to be an effective elementary school STEM teacher.





December 2022

  • Assistant Professor of Mathematics Noelle Sawyer and Benjamin Call (University of Illinois Chicago) applied for and won funding from the American Institute of Mathematics to organize a research community called Big Ideas in Dynamics in 2023. They will have 3-5 experts in dynamical systems give talks on one of the “big ideas” that underlies one of their papers. These talks will serve as jumping-off points for graduate student reading groups centered on the associated papers. Each paper will have an assigned mentor for graduate students to reach out to. Sawyer and Call hope to have the reading groups culminate in graduate students giving expository talks at a conference on the details of the paper and discussing related open problems.





  • Associate Professor of Feminist Studies Brenda Sendejo and Assistant Professor of Communication Studies Lamiyah Bahrainwala attended the El Mundo Zurdo conference for the Society for the Study of Gloria Anzaldúa at the University of Texas at San Antonio from November 4-5. The roundtable that Bahrainwala and Sendejo co-organized was titled “Reflections on Radical Love, Care, and Consent: How Anzaldúa Informs Our Liberatory Praxis.” Bahrainwala presented “Pandemic lessons: Consent as anti-Racism,” and Sendejo presented “Movidas of Healing: The Spirit Work of Movement Era Chicanas.” The roundtable was well attended by lead scholars in the field of Anzaldúan Thought.





  • Associate Professor of Feminist Studies Brenda Sendejo attended the National Women’s Studies Association annual meeting in Minneapolis, Minnesota, from November 10-13. This year’s conference theme was “Killing Rage: Resistance on the Other Side of Freedom.” Sendejo presented a paper titled “The Spirit Work of bell hooks and Gloria Anzaldúa: Lessons on Radical Love as Resistance,” which drew from her book manuscript in progress.





  • Assistant Professor of Mathematics Noelle Sawyer and Benjamin Call (University of Illinois Chicago) applied for and won funding from the American Institute of Mathematics to organize a research community called Big Ideas in Dynamics in 2023. They will have 3-5 experts in dynamical systems give talks on one of the “big ideas” that underlies one of their papers. These talks will serve as jumping-off points for graduate student reading groups centered on the associated papers. Each paper will have an assigned mentor for graduate students to reach out to. Sawyer and Call hope to have the reading groups culminate in graduate students giving expository talks at a conference on the details of the paper and discussing related open problems.





  • Associate Professor of History Jethro Hernández Berrones was invited to participate in the seminar Itinerante of History and Historiography of Sciences and Technologies jointly hosted by UNAM, CINVESTAV, and COLMEX. He responded to and commented on the presentation “El genérico espectacular: los medicamentos y la simipolítica en México,” The Spectacular Generic: Pharmaceuticals and theSimipolitical in Mexico by Cori Hayden. The seminar was broadcasted on YouTube and Facebook.





  • Professor of Spanish Katy Ross, Visiting Assistant Professor of Political Science Katie Aha, and Catherine Hiebel ’22 published an article in Women’s Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal. Their article, “Populism and Surrogacy in Spain,” can be found here.





  • Assistant Professor of Communication Studies Lamiyah Bahrainwala was an invited virtual speaker at the University of Nevada, Reno in an undergraduate seminar on New Media. The talk focused on feminist surveillance studies and surveillance ecosystems in public spaces built for children.





  • Assistant Professor of Communication Studies Lamiyah Bahrainwala attended the National Communication Association Convention in New Orleans from November 16-19, during which time she received a Distinguished Scholarship Award for Top Article from the International and Intercultural Communication Division. Bahrainwala organized, chaired, and presented on a panel titled Queer Desi Kinship, exploring how queering the 1947 Partition of India and Pakistan offers non-Western lessons towards queer scholarship, and fulfilled her commitments as Second Vice-Chair of the Feminist and Women Studies Division.





  • Assistant Professor of Communication Studies Lamiyah Bahrainwala was an invited virtual speaker at Arizona State University in the graduate seminar Rhetorical Methods. Students read two of Bahrainwala’s publications on equity work in the academy, and her talk focused on the role of critic in rhetorical criticism and maintaining energy while doing the difficult labor of critiquing inequitable structures.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Art Ana Esteve Llorens was awarded the Grupo Radio Gandia Prize, in its XII Edition, in the category of Art. This annual event recognizes the work and contributions of people, entities, groups, or companies from Valencia, Spain, from different professional fields. An interview and online publication of the news can be found here.





  • In June of this year, Associate Professors of Music Bruce Cain and David Asbury made video recordings of works written for them. They are releasing them as the editing process is completed. The next video in this series, Luz, is the fourth song from the cycle Sobre La Naturaleza by Diego Luzuriaga. The composer, originating from Ecuador, has a special affinity for writing music derived from traditional sources and connects deeply with themes from the natural world. The video can be viewed here.





  • Professor of Political Science Bob Snyder had his paper titled “An American Tragedy: The Fall of Afghanistan” accepted for publication in the journal Small Wars & Insurgencies.





  • Several compositions by Part-Time Instructor of Applied Music Adrienne Inglis are enjoying their premieres. “Oure Light in Oure Night” (2020) for voices and nature soundtrack gets its in-person premiere in Seattle on December 1 and 7, 2022, by the University of Washington combined choirs and in San Francisco on December 9 by the San Francisco State University choir. Portia Hansen and David Utterback recently premiered “Ma’iingan” for flute and piano at Southwestern. On January 21, Inversion Da Capo premieres “Julian’s Hazelnut” for treble choir and clarinet, using the original pronunciation of Julian of Norwich’s Middle English text. See more information here.





  • A wonderful interdisciplinary group from Southwestern participated in the 17th Annual Texas Undergraduate Mathematics Conference (TUMC), held this year at the University of Texas at Austin on October 29. Carson Vogel ’23 presented “Modeling Heat Transfer.” This project is a continuation of the 2021 and 2022 SCOPE projects under the supervision of Professor of Physics Steven Alexander and Associate Professor of Physics Mark Bottorf. This work is part of ongoing efforts for the eventual development of a solar energy storage cell; a problem brought to Southwestern by Coordinator of Science Facilities and Equipment Oscar Lee Fellows. Melanie Richey ’23 presented “Rats on the Run: Modeling of Hippocampal Cell Activity Using Plasticity.” Her project is a continuation of a 2022 Research Experience for Undergraduates at Southern Methodist University under the supervision of Dr. Katie Hedrick in collaboration with Dr. Brad E. Pfeiffer, Department of Neuroscience, UT Southwestern Medical Center. Professor of Mathematics Alison Marr and Associate Professor of Mathematics Therese Shelton also attended the conference. Marr chaired a student presentation session. Shelton supervised Vogel’s and Richey’s current work, preliminary results for their mathematics capstone projects. Jillian Reese ’23 and Emma Lewis ’23 joined with their counterparts from the University of North Texas-Denton in research with Shelton and Dr. Joe Iaia, funded through the Council for Undergraduate Research in Mathematics. Other students also attended: Oliver Johnson ’23, Jess Kazmir ’23, Lauren Calzado ’23, Rowan Via ’23, Kathryn Altman ’24, and Aidan Bujanda-Moore ’23. Majors and minors among our student attendees included Mathematics, Computational Mathematics, Physics, Economics, Education, Spanish, and Political Science.





  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Therese Shelton, with co-authors Bonnie Henderson ’18 and Michael Gebhardt ’16, published a chapter, “Acrobatics in a Parametric Arena,” in Mathematics Research for the Beginning Student. The volume is part of the book series, Foundation for Undergraduate Research in Mathematics (FURM), which is devoted to increasing access to undergraduate research opportunities. Parts of Gebhardt’s and Henderson’s Mathematics capstone projects supervised by Shelton were included in this chapter. Professor of Kinesiology Scott McLean aided in data collection from video capture software generated by Henderson’s juggling of flower sticks in the fall of 2017. Research Assistants for this project included E. Wilson Cook ’22, Audrey Schumacher ’23, and Emily Thompson ’22.





November 2023

  • Assistant Professor of Economics Chandrayee Chatterjee jointly organized a session called “The Economics of Risky Behavior” and presented her paper titled “Vaping Regulations and Mental Health of Teenagers” at the 2023 Annual Conference of the Southern Economic Association in New Orleans from November 18th to 20th.





  • Professor of Music Michael Cooper published the first monograph on Margaret Bonds and her music. Titled “Margaret Bonds: The Montgomery Variations and Du Bois Credo,” the book was published by Cambridge University Press as part of the New Cambridge Music Handbooks series. It was born during the tumultuous year 2020 and draws on dozens of previously unpublished archival documents and takes a deeply interdisciplinary dive into the complex and powerful cultural, intellectual, political, social, and musical cross-currents that produced these twin summits of Margaret Bonds’s career-long quest to put her talent and her art into the service of the quest for racial justice and global equality. It is available here.





  • Assistant Professor of History Soojung Han was invited to give a talk in the China Humanities Seminar (CHS) series at Harvard University. Her talk was titled, “Forging a New Sino-Inner Asian Order: The Brotherly Relations Between the Shatuo Turks and Kitans (907–979).”





  • Professor of Anthropology Melissa Johnson was part of a collaborative team of nearly 50 social scientists whose publication “Governance and Conservation Effectiveness in Protected Areas and Indigenous and Locally Managed Areas” Annual Review of Environment and Resources.48: 559-588 has just come out. It is available here.





  • Five students presented four talks at the Texas Undergraduate Mathematics Conference (TUMC), and four more students attended. The conference was held at Stephen F. Austin State University in Nacogdoches, Texas, on October 27-28, 2023. Adrianna Flores-Vivas ’24 presented “Wolf Reintegration in Yellowstone National Park.” Ashley Odell ’24 and Madison Williams ’24 presented “Does Money Really Buy Happiness?”. Blue Goodson ’24 presented “The Mathematical Artistry of Portrait Making.” Johanna Campbell ’24 presented “To the Heart of the Milky Way.” The speakers gave preliminary presentations of their mathematics capstone projects under the supervision of Associate Professor of Mathematics Therese Shelton. Associate Professor of Physics Mark Bottorf co-supervised Cambell’s. Shelton also moderated two sessions of student talks. Zoe Kincaid ’24 attended, and first-year S-STEM/EQUIP students Amanda Mejia ’27, Juliana Elizondo ’27, and Alyanna Martinez ’27 also attended. The TUMC is partially supported by the National Science Foundation grant DMS-2226539. The Atkin Junior Professorship in Mathematics for Assistant Professor of Mathematics Noelle Sawyer provided funding.





  • Assistant Professor of Kinesiology Ed Merritt presented “Unexpected Results in Muscle Hypertrophy and Regeneration Research” at the University of Wisconsin, Department of Kinesiology Lecture Series. The talk discussed the importance of inclusive practices in science research and education.





  • Professor of Education Michael Kamen and education majors Hailey Arrington ’25, Alexiz Quintanilla ’25, and Terri Ray ’25, presented “Hands-on Science Lessons Presented by Preservice Teachers” at the Science Teachers Association of Texas annual Conference for the Advancement of Science Teaching (CAST) in Houston, Texas.





  • In her role as co-director of the EDGE summer program, Professor and Garey Chair of Mathematics Alison Marr attended and co-organized EDGE25: Mobilizing the Power of Diversity at Bryn Mawr College from October 12-14. She co-MCed the Thursday night reunion of over 150 EDGE alumna. One of the tasks involved in this role was creating a slideshow of 25 years of EDGE photos and a 20-minute video compilation of 25 years of EDGE talent shows. She also MC-ed the closing session on Saturday, introducing the final three talks of the conference. SU and EDGE alumna Elyssa Sliheet ’19 and Daniela Beckelhymer ’20 were also in attendance. The full schedule of dynamic speakers across multiple disciplines can be found here.





  • Professor of Chemistry Emily Niemeyer, Bailey Meyer ’20, Haley White ’20, and Jared McCormack ’22 published an article titled “Catechin composition, phenolic content, and antioxidant properties of commercially-available bagged, gunpowder, and matcha green teas” in the Springer Nature journal Plant Foods for Human Nutrition. Interestingly, results showed that the lowest-cost teas in the study (such as a loose-leaf gunpowder tea made by Pure Leaf and bagged green teas produced by Allegro, Twinings, and Lipton) had significantly higher phenolic contents and antioxidant capacities than more expensive matcha green teas. The research was supported by the Robert A. Welch Foundation and Southwestern’s Herbert and Kate Dishman endowment. The article is available here.





  • Noor Nazeer ’24 and Nicole Hislop ’26 presented their work with Assistant Professor of Physics Cody Crosby October 20-21 at the Gulf Coast Undergraduate Research Symposium (GCURS), hosted on Rice University’s campus. Both platform presentations, entitled “Synthesizing Biomaterial Inks to Determine Significant Printing Parameters,” earned complimentary reviews from the graduate student judging panel.





  • Meghana Nittala ’24 and Sanjana Nittala ’24 each gave an oral presentation on their research on how photosynthetic diatoms adapt their light-harvesting under light and iron stress at the Gulf Coast Undergraduate Research Symposium (GCURS) hosted by Rice University in October. Both of their talks were recognized with “Outstanding Presentation in Physical Chemistry” awards. Their presentations resulted from research done with Assistant Professor of Chemistry Sara Massey.





  • Associate Professor of Political Science Emily Sydnor and her co-author, Lauren Santoro of the University of Texas at Dallas, published their article “Blind Trust, Blind Skepticism: Liberals’ & Conservatives’ Response to Academic Research” in American Politics Research. The article shows that individuals make assumptions about the ideological position of different major U.S. universities, and their likelihood of believing political (or politicized) research produced at those universities is dependent on whether their own ideological positions “match” those of the institution.





  • Part-time Assistant Instructor of Applied Music Katherine Altobello was a featured guest soloist at New Music On the Bayou’s International Summer Music Festival located in Monroe and Ruston, Louisiana, in June of this year. Altobello performed “Evocations” by Steven Landis alongside soprano Claire Vangelisti. “Evocations” was composed in 2021 for soprano and mezzo-soprano and is entirely acapella (unaccompanied). The work is comprised of a set of nine site-specific nocturnes in mobile form. Each song explores aspects of the night: astronomy, astrology, mythology, and some of the associations humanity makes with the night (fear of the unknown, death, and sex). The work integrates the use of space and lighting (moonlight, fire, starlight) to further enhance the atmosphere. Altobello premiered the piece “Everything is Tiny,” composed by Astrid Hubbard Flynn alongside Benjamin Cold (alto saxophone), Justin Kujawski (bass), and Diana Thacher (piano). The title is a quote from Tomoe-san Katagiri, a Japanese Zen elder living in Minneapolis. The work is about giving time and space to everything and having nothing to prove. New Music On the Bayou’s International Summer Music Festival allows composers and performers from around the world to intersect during an intense multi-day, multi-city, multi-venue series of rehearsals, presentations, and concerts to enliven the region with new ideas about music and to inspire composers with the unique landscapes and cultural offerings scattered among the cities of Monroe and Ruston, Louisiana. Learn more here.





  • Professor of Political Science Bob Snyder had his paper titled “Realist or Just Anti-Liberal? Trump’s Foreign Policy in Retrospect” accepted for publication in the journal International Journal. It demonstrates that the Trump administration’s foreign policy of retrenchment was motivated less by the purported goal of reducing costs than by the desire to weaken liberal international practices, which had similar domestic ramifications.





  • Assistant Professor of Feminist Studies Meagan Solomon attended the American Studies Association Conference in Montreal last week, where she chaired and participated in a roundtable entitled “Community Knowledge and Solidarity Work as Public Scholarship and Collective Healing.” She presented her collaborative zine project with Ruba Akkad (TCU), situating zines and zinemaking as forms of community-accountable scholarship and healing.





  • Professor of Music Michael Cooper was interviewed by the Hong Kong-based online magazine Interlude about his forthcoming Cambridge University Press book on Margaret Bonds’s “Montgomery Variations” and “Credo” (https://tinyurl.com/y3drvdkb) and his ongoing projects concerning Bonds and Florence Price in general. The book is due out this month. Those who missed their extra hour of sleep this past weekend can quickly recapture it by reading the interview here.





  • Professor of Music Michael Cooper was interviewed by the Hong Kong-based online magazine Interlude about his forthcoming Cambridge University Press book on Margaret Bonds’s “Montgomery Variations” and “Credo” (https://tinyurl.com/y3drvdkb) and his ongoing projects concerning Bonds and Florence Price in general. The book is due out this month. Those who missed their extra hour of sleep this past weekend can quickly recapture it by reading the interview here: https://tinyurl.com/3w7dtb73.





  • Professor of Music Michael Cooper gave the keynote address “Margaret Bonds: A Life in Music” and two pre-concert lectures at the first-ever three-day Margaret Bonds symposium on November 3-5. Hosted by Queens University (Charlotte, North Carolina), the symposium included a salon recital of Bonds’s art songs, popular songs, and spirituals and a choral concert that included Bonds’s choral lullaby “Sleep Song” and a performance of her magisterial setting of W.E.B. Du Bois’s iconic civil-rights manifesto “Credo” (both works recently edited and published by Cooper as part of the Margaret Bonds Signature Series of Hildegard Publishing Company).





  • Professor of Theatre Desiderio Roybal designed the staging and was a scenic artist of scenery and stage properties for Penfold Theatre’s production of Yasmina Reza’s play, Art. The comedy is playing at the Ground Floor Theatre in Austin, TX. from Nov. 2 through Nov. 18. Glenda Wolfe, SU Costume Shop Manager, designed costumes, and the production was directed by Stephen Pounders, Professor of Theatre at Baylor University. The production explores the meaning of art and the meaning of friendship. When Serge purchases an all-white painting for $200,000.00, his longtime friendship with good friends Marc and Yvonne is tested. Arguments quickly go from theoretical to personal to confrontational, and friendships hang in the balance. Yasmina Reza’s sometimes heartbreaking play asks poignant questions about the meaning of art and friendship. The play has won the Moliere Awards for Best Play, Best Author, Best Production, the Lawrence Olivier Award for Best Comedy, and the Tony Award for Best Play. Penfold website: https://tinyurl.com/art-penfold Production stills: https://tinyurl.com/ytafq9dr Trailer: https://youtu.be/7Mn5xqSNMK8.





  • Associate Dean of the Faculty & Associate Professor of History Jessica Hower’s book, Mary I in Writing: Letters, Literature, and Representation (Palgrave Macmillan, 2022), co-edited with Valerie Schutte, won the best collaborative project award from the Society for the Study of Early Modern Women. Hower co-wrote the introduction and single-authored a chapter in the volume, the first of three books on the queen that she has written in the past two years.





  • Assistant Professor of Education Raquel Sáenz Ortiz, along with Rebecca Ramirez ’24 and Aminadab Corral Arras ’24, presented a paper titled “Towards a LatCrit Youth Program Evaluation: Tensions and New Directions” at the annual Critical Race Studies in Education Association (CRSEA) conference in Chicago on October 26-27. This paper emerged from FSP research conducted in the summer of 2023 to evaluate an after-school music program in Santa Fe, NM.





  • Associate Professor of Spanish María de los Ángeles Rodríguez Cadena presented “Ecofeminismo y poesía indígena Latinoamericana” at the Asociación de Estudios de Género y Sexualidades Conference at the Universidad Autonóma de Querétaro. Querétaro, Mexico. October 5-7, 2023.





  • Staff Instructor of Spanish Noelia Cigarroa-Cooke and Associate Professor of Spanish María de los Ángeles Rodríguez Cadena presented research papers at the annual Canadian Association of Hispanic Studies Conference in Ottawa, Ontario, June 3-5, 2023. Cigarroa-Cooke presented “En las entretelas del corazón guatemalteco: tradición y justicia en la película La Llorona de Jayro Bustamante (Guatemala, 2020).” Rodríguez Cadena presented “Mujeres del pasado en las series históricas de televisión en México.”





  • On October 26th and 27th, Assistant Professor of English Sonia Del Hierro participated in the U.S. Latino Digital Humanities’ Mellon Grants-in-Aid Showcase, a public presentation by 2023 recipients of a digital humanities grant, funded by the Mellon Foundation and supported by Recovering the US Hispanic Literary Heritage/Arte Público Press and the University of Houston. She co-presented “Señora Power: Updates and Challenges” with her research collaborators, Gaby Barrios of the University of California-Los Angeles and Sophia Martinez-Abbud of Rice University.





October 2023

  • Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin presented a paper entitled “The Grenadian Revolution: The Paris Commune of the West Indies” at a conference, “Grenada, 1973-1983: Beginnings of a Revolution, Invasion and After.” The Eccles Centre for American Studies at the British Library convened the conference on the 40th anniversary of the United States invasion of Grenada and the destruction of the Grenadian Revolution.





  • Professor of Music Kiyoshi Tamagawa performed as harpsichord soloist on October 23 with Jessica Mathaes, Austin Symphony Orchestra concertmaster and Adjunct Instructor of Music at SU, and Rachel Lopez, ASO flutist, in J.S. Bach’s Fifth Brandenburg Concerto with the Austin Youth Orchestra. The “Bachtoberfest” concert was part of the Youth Orchestra’s 30th anniversary season.





  • This past weekend (Oct 19-22), Assistant Professor of Sociology Amanda Hernandez attended the Society for the Scientific Study of Religion and convened a session entitled “Feminist Approaches to the Sociology of Religion.” Additionally, she presented her paper “The Sacred & The Secular: Examining the Intersection of Feminist Christian Identification and Progressive Social Issues” with collaborator Tess Starman of Howard University and served as a guest panelist for “Religion And…How to Bring the Study of Religion into Conversation Across Disciplines.”





  • Professor of English and Austin Term Chair Eileen Cleere gave a talk entitled “Grooming Habits: Revisiting Victorian (Child) Marriage in the Age of #MeToo” at the annual meeting of VISAWUS (Victorian Interdisciplinary Studies Association of the Western United States) at the Seattle Public Library on October 19-21. She also participated in a pedagogy workshop dedicated to “Bringing the Climate Crisis into the Classroom.”





  • Will Mallick ’24 performed the lead role of Daniel in “Once On This Island” by Lynn Arenas and Stephen Flaherty at The Georgetown Palace Theatre on May 19-June 18 in Georgetown, TX. Mallick performed the role of Kienickie in “Grease” by Jim Jacobs and Warren Casey at Summer Stock Austin July 28-August 7 in Austin, TX. Cayden Couchman ’23 performed in the ensemble of “Matilda” by Dennis Kelly and Tim Minchin with Zilker Theatre Productions on July 7-August 12 in Austin, TX. Couchman and Mallick are currently performing in Jekyll & Hyde at The Georgetown Palace Theatre in Georgetown, TX. Couchman performs the title role of Jekyll and Mallick plays Lord Savage and Spider. The show runs October 6-November 5th. For more information:georgetownpalace.com





  • Assistant Professor of Communication Studies Raquel Moreira has published the chapter, “Dragging White Femininity: Race and Gender Inauthenticity on Instagram,” in The Routledge Handbook of Ethnicity and Race in Communication, published in October 2023. The link to the full table of contents can be found here.





  • Professor of Biology Romi Burks continues “chocolating” her way through her sabbatical. On October 6th, she gave an invited talk at the Northwest Chocolate Festival in Seattle, the largest professional gathering of fine chocolate professionals. Taken place on the Fine Chocolate Industry Association’s stage, the talk “you say cacao, I say cocoa” chronicles her work on and vision for the Fine Chocolate Glossary project. Burks left for 3 weeks in London, where she will judge within the UK’s premier organization, The Academy of Chocolate. All of this travel and networking will contribute to her book project “Journey into Chocolate,” coauthored by Indi Chocolate owner and entrepreneur Erin Andrews.





  • Professor of Psychology Traci Giuliano presented a poster titled, “Using ‘Personal Connections’ Writing Assignments in Introductory Psychology,” at the annual meeting of the Society for Teaching of Psychology in Portland, Oregon, Oct 6-8.





  • Associate Professors of Music Bruce Cain and David Asbury were invited to perform at the Just Festival in Edinburgh, Scotland, August 7th-9th. A social justice and human rights festival, the Just Festival is part of Edinburgh’s Fringe Festival whose events aim to challenge perceptions, celebrate differences, and encourage dialogue on the key issues of our time. The duo was also invited to perform at the Hispanic Heritage Festival at Palm Beach Atlantic University on October 14th. The program for the concerts in Scotland featured works on environmental themes written for the duo by composers Matthew Dunne, Jason Hoogerhyde, Diego Luzuriaga, Eduardo Martin, Julio Cesar Oliva, and Diego Vega, while the concert for the HHF was comprised of works based upon Spanish texts.





  • Assistant Professor of Physics Cody Crosby and four of his FSP research students— Nicole Hislop ’26, Noor Nazeer ’25, Angel Rodriguez ’24, and Nina Woodward ’25 — attended the 2023 Biomedical Engineering Society (BMES) Annual Meeting, held October 11-14 in Seattle, Washington. They presented two posters focused on the development of a novel biomaterial ink for simulating brain parenchyma tissue and the fabrication of a syringe extruder for Ender series 3D printers (the “Enderstruder”). Both posters were well-attended and generated some fascinating discussions.





  • Professor of Music Michael Cooper published the second, enlarged edition of his Historical Dictionary of Romantic Music Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield. The first edition of this book (2013) was the most diverse and inclusive single-volume study of music of the long nineteenth century (ca. 1780-ca. 1914) to date. But the 600+ entries of the new edition double down on the challenge of dismantling the widespread and historically false portrayal of Romantic music as an imaginary museum of works by dead White folk, most of them German, French, or Italian, and most of those male. It includes more women, more Black musicians and other musicians of color, and more musicians from Central and South America as well as Central and Eastern Europe than any other single-volume study of Romantic music. It features entries on topics such as anti-Semitism, sexism and misogyny, and racism that were pervasive and defining to the worlds of musical Romanticism but are rarely addressed in general studies of that subject, as well as (another first) dedicated entries on spirituals and ragtime and genre-determinative topics such as the Haitian Revolution, the U.S. Civil War, Reconstruction, the National Peace Jubilee, the World Peace Jubilee, and the Second Great Awakening. The result is an expansive, inclusive, diverse, and more richly textured portrayal of “Romantic music” than is elsewhere available. A bonus is that a dozen or so of the book’s entries were written by SU alumna Megan Marie McCarty’10.





  • Professor of Anthropology Melissa Johnson was an invited speaker for the 26th Meeting of the United Kingdom-Belize Association (UKBA) at University College London on October 13, 2023. She presented a revised and longer version of her paper “Lucy’s Story: A Window into the Shore and the Bay in the late 1700s” via Zoom, and it was very well received.





  • Assistant Professor of Anthropology Naomi Reed was invited to discuss her podcast “Sugar Land” on the panel “Can you hear us now? Storytelling in podcasting” at the 2023 Mayborn Literary Nonfiction Conference hosted by The University of North Texas in Dallas, Texas, this past weekend October 13-14th. (https://www.themayborn.com/schedule). Dr. Reed and her co-host, investigative journalist Brittney Martin discussed their process of writing and editing “Sugar Land” and the benefit of interdisciplinary collaboration in storytelling and producing public scholarship.





  • Professor of Art History Thomas Noble Howe co-published a peer-reviewed online monograph with Prof. Joseph C. Williams (Univ. of Maryland), Adan Ramos (UMd), and Gabriel Maslen (UMd and Tecnico di Milano), “The Role of the Field Architect in the Digital Age: Integrating Human and Electronic Recording at the Villa Arianna in Roman Stabiae”, The Journal for Field Archaeology, Received 17 Apr 2023, Accepted 04 Sep 2023, Published online: 11 Oct 2023. Howe is the overall director of the project and began to develop the technique of using conventional digital survey commands in the then-nascent digital laser EMD (Electronic Measuring Distance) surveying instruments to develop an efficient means of using surveying line commands to create a precise 3D “line wire cage drawing” to guide the completion of on-site hand drawings. He was the chief field architect and associate director of the American Academy in Rome Palatine Excavation project (1988-1994) and has been the director general of the Restoring Ancient Stabiae project since 1998.





  • Professor of English Michael Saenger co-authored with Professor of American Studies and Humanities Nancy Koppelman at The Evergreen State College an essay entitled “Before the War: Educators in Israel / Palestine” for the Times of Israel. Their essay relates their experiences leading a group of American university professionals through encounters with different perspectives in the Middle East.





  • Assistant Professor of Mathematics Noelle Sawyer accepted an invitation to join the Human Resources Board of the American Institute of Mathematics (AIM). The board advises AIM in supporting its goals of increasing the participation of traditionally under-represented groups in mathematics and junior researchers and researchers at primarily undergraduate institutions in AIM programming.





  • Part-Time Assistant Professor of Applied Music Julia Taylor and Part-Time Instructor of Music David Utterback were invited to perform a recital for the South Texas Chapter of the National Association of Teachers of Singing Fall Conference. The program included works by William Grant Still, H.T. Burleigh, Amy Beach, Dominick Argento, Reynaldo Hahn, and Rachmaninoff.





  • Assistant Professor of Feminist Studies Meagan Solomon published an essay entitled “Ana Castillo: A Multigenre Author” in the collection Chicana Portraits: Critical Biographies of Twelve Chicana Writers, edited by Dr. Norma E. Cantú and published by the University of Arizona Press. Dr. Solomon’s essay examines the central themes of feminist friendship, queer intimacy, and women’s spirituality in a selection of Ana Castillo’s essays and novels, including Massacre of the Dreamers: Essays on Xicanisma (1994), The Mixquiahuala Letters (1986), Sapogonia (1990), and So Far From God (1993). Released this month, you can find the collection here.





  • Professor of Art History Kimberly Smith gave a talk entitled “Beyond Japonisme: Charlotte Berend-Corinth’s Wartime Watercolors” at the 2023 Feminist Art History Conference, held online and in-person, hosted and organized by American University, Washington DC, September 30 - October 1.





  • Sanjana Nittala ’24 gave a talk titled “The Emergence of the F710 State Due to Iron Stress on Diatom P. tricornutum Light-harvesting Complexes” at the Fall Undergraduate Research Symposium (FURS) at UT-Austin in September. She was awarded the Best Presentation Award in Chemistry. Her talk resulted from research done with Assistant Professor of Chemistry Sara Massey.





  • Professor of English Michael Saenger delivered an invited keynote lecture at Waseda University in Tokyo at an international conference entitled “Translation of Shakespeare as Cultural Exchange.” Also presenting was Nick Baylor ’25, who traveled to Japan with Dr. Saenger.





  • Professor of Religion and Environmental Studies Laura Hobgood was interviewed for U.S. Catholic magazine’s podcast “Glad You Asked.” Each episode of GYA is centered around a question about Catholicism/Christianity that may seem simple at first but requires a good deal of nuance to address well. The question posed to Laura is, “Do dogs go to heaven?” The episode will be released on November 10, 2023.





  • Director of Institutional Research and Effectiveness Kimberly Faris presented a session on “Student Achievement on our Minds: Measuring and Demonstrating Student Success” at the Texas Association of Higher Education Assessment Conference on September 27.





  • Part-time Assistant Instructor of Applied Music Katherine Altobello ’99 performed the world premiere of Chris Prosser’s hilarious piece spoofing Facebook entitled “Meta Anthem” (an eleven-minute duet for mezzo-soprano, baritone, and piano) at Tetractys New Music’s sold out event HERE BE MONSTERS! on Saturday May 27th at The Butterfly Bar in Austin, TX. The event featured five hours of new music on two stages, was sponsored by KMFA Classical 89.5, and featured outstanding local artists such as The Kraken Quartet, Convergence, Invoke, and Graham Reynolds. You can watch the live performance of “Meta Anthem” here.





  • Associate Professor of History Jessica Hower published the book Mid-Tudor Queenship and Memory: The Making and Re-making of Lady Jane Grey and Mary I. It is part of Palgrave Macmillan’s internationally renowned “Queenship and Power” series and features 11 original, peer-reviewed scholarly articles. Hower coedited the book with Valerie Schutte and also single-authored both the introduction as well as the chapter, “’As the Kinges of this Realme her Most Noble Progenitours’: Historical (Self-)Fashioning at the Accession Moment.” The volume is available on the publisher’s website here and on Amazon.





  • Associate Professor of History Jethro Hernández Berrones was invited to present his work in the seminar “Itinerante” of History and Historiography of Sciences and Technologies jointly hosted by UNAM, CINVESTAV, and COLMEX. In his talk titled “Homeopathy in the light of biology: The Limits of Medical Science after the Mexican Revolution,” he discussed how MDs used the emerging paradigm of experimental physiology to establish the limits between what counted as legitimate medicine and not in the 1920s, 30s and 40s. Given their professional differences, homeopaths and its detractors adopted and adapted the paradigm to criticize each other´s curriculum and practices. While the different interpretations created a boundary between both types of practitioners, patients and authorities regarded both approaches as scientific and, therefore, susceptible to consumption and support. You can see the entire session (in Spanish) on YouTube or Facebook.





  • Three works by Margaret Bonds, discovered and edited by Professor of Music Michael Cooper, were featured on the new album “Reflections in Time” by trailblazing pianist Althea Waites. Waites – who will perform at Southwestern at 7:30 p.m. on February 24, 2024, as part of the Sarofim Music Series – made history with her first album, “Black Diamonds,” in 1993 by presenting the first commercially released album devoted exclusively to piano music by African American composers (a proposition that had previously been considered not commercially viable) – including the world-premiere recordings of Margaret Bonds’s “Troubled Water” and Florence Price’s Piano Sonata. This latest album includes the second recording of Bonds’s sensual “Tangamerican” and the world-premiere recordings of her evocative “Flamenco” and masterpiece sui generis, Fugal Dance. Cooper published the first and third of these pieces in 2021, and his edition of the “Flamenco” is to appear in 2024. He also wrote the liner notes for these works.





  • Professor of Psychology Fay Guarraci was invited to give a talk at the symposium titled Gender Incongruence at the 63rd annual meeting of the European Society of Pediatric Endocrinology in den Hague, Netherlands, in September. The talk “Animal Models of Transgender Care: Advantages and Drawbacks” was well received by a mostly clinical audience.





  • Part-time Assistant Instructor of Applied Music Katherine Altobello’s voice student, Abigail Bensman ’25 was cast as Brenda in the National Broadway Tour of the hit musical “Hairspray”! After five grueling days of callbacks in New York City, Bensman was offered a year-long contract touring the United States and living her dream performing musical theatre. Altobello has been Bensman’s voice teacher for three years and has witnessed her incredible growth, talent, and work ethic. For more information: www.hairspraytour.com.





  • Assistant Professor of Mathematics Noelle Sawyer co-led a virtual workshop titled “A Word Problem: The Hows and Whys of Mathematical Communication” at the National Association of Science Writers’ annual conference on Wednesday, September 27.





  • Access Services Assistant in the Smith Library Center Lindsay Howard was a co-writer for a short film titled “ICK,” produced earlier this year through UT Austin. This week, the team received word that the film has been accepted into three festivals, including the Austin Film Festival (“AFF”) and the Bolton Film Festival (Manchester, UK). Because of acceptance to those festivals, the film can now be nominated for both the Academy Awards and the BIFF Awards (the UK version of the Academy Awards). The North American premiere date has yet to be announced, but it will be at AFF this fall.





  • Alejandro Medina ’24 recently presented at the 2023 CMD-IT/ACM Richard Tapia Celebration of Diversity in Computing Conference in Dallas. The poster on “Evaluating an Earliest Deadline First Algorithm for a Dial-a-Ride Problem” resulted from research done with Professor of Computer Science Barbara Anthony.





September 2023

  • Associate Professor of Music Jason Hoogerhyde’s student Brayden Carr ’23 was an invited participant to the Valencia International Performing Arts Festival, Valencia, Spain, this summer. While there, they participated in composition masterclasses and received a performance of their commissioned work for the Mivos String Quartet. Carr was the winner of an international call for scores from the Rock Mountain Chamber Choir. The choir’s performance of Carr’s work, The Elysian Fields, may be heard here.





  • Professor of Communication Studies Bob Bednar has published an article titled “Roadside Media: Roadside Crash Shrines as Platforms for Communicating Across Time, Space, and Mortality in the Early 2000s United States” in Cultural and Social History, The Journal of the Social History Society. The article traces the recent history of roadside shrines to show that they are not only entangled with other contemporary media forms but have also developed into miniaturized and materialized social media platforms. The article officially comes out in print later this winter and is now available here.





  • Chair and Associate Professor of Communication Studies Lamiyah Bahrainwala (LB) published a new article titled “De-whitening consent amidst COVID-19 rhetoric” with her co-author Dr. Kate Lockwood Harris (UMN). This article appears in the Quarterly Journal of Speech, the #1 ranked journal in rhetoric. It discusses how existing consent rhetorics are constituted against the specter of Black Muslim women and calls for a de-whitening of consent norms by building on lessons learned from COVID-19. You can read more here.





  • Access Services Assistant at the Smith Library Center Lindsay Howard was a voiceover production intern on the video game Starfield, which has been nominated three times (different years/competitions) for Most Anticipated Game of the Year prior to its release. You can learn more about the game here.





  • Professor of Psychology Traci Giuliano published an article entitled, “How common is undergraduate publication in psychology? An examination of faculty vitae from top colleges and universities.”Coauthors are former students Will Hebl ’23 and Jennifer Howell ’09.





  • Professor of Education Michael Kamen and Assistant Professor Debra Plowman (A&M -Corpus Christi) had their column, “Learning to Teach Math and Science: Thoughts from an Emerging Elementary Teacher,” accepted as an ongoing column in the quarterly newsletter of the International Consortium for Research in Science and Mathematics Education. It tells the ongoing story of fictional character, Ian Quiry, as he studies and struggles to learn how to be an effective elementary school STEM teacher. The first column is published in the Summer 2023 newsletter.





  • A nonfiction book titled Funky Fungi: 30 Activities for Exploring Molds, Mushrooms, Lichens, and More was co-authored by Adjunct Professor of Music Education Alisha Gabriel. In March, the book won the 2023 AAAS/Subaru Book Prize for Excellence in Science Books in the hands-on category, and Gabriel spoke about the book at the AAAS Conference in Washington, DC.





  • Professor of Anthropology Melissa Johnson presented work from her current book project on the social and environmental history of Belize and the Mosquito Shore, “Lucy’s Story: A Window into the Shore and the Bay in the late 1700s.” for the 3rd Annual Belize Kulcha Symposium, run by the Belize Heritage Education Network. September 7, 2023. The network keeps these permanently available to make scholarships more accessible. See more here.





  • Associate Professor and Chair of Communication Studies Lamiyah Bahrainwala (LB) published an invited chapter titled “Critical surveillance studies: Living ethically in a surveillant world.” It appears in the textbook “Introduction to Communication Studies: Translating Communication Scholarship into Meaningful Practice” published by Kendall Hunt. Read more here





  • Professor of Biology Romi Burks and chocolate pedagogy enthusiast gave two invited presentations this past weekend at the Dallas Chocolate Festival, which featured a theme of “The Dream of Chocolate.” On Saturday, Burks spoke about her work as the Chair of the Fine Chocolate Glossary project within the Fine Chocolate Industry Association with a title - Chocolate “Definitions” - the dream of developing a common language. On Sunday, Burks stepped 48 guests through “How to Taste Chocolate like a Competition Judge” talk where participants learned about criteria for fine chocolate. When not giving presentations, Burks staffed a booth to talk to the attendees about the Fine Chocolate Glossary. Pictures can be found on her ProfRomi Instagram and other social media platforms.





  • Assistant Professor of Feminist Studies Meagan Solomon published an article, “Beyond Sexual Deviance: Elevating the Expansive Intimacies of Chicana Lesbian Life in Chicana Lesbians: The Girls Our Mothers Warned Us About” in the Journal of Lesbian Studies. In this article, she expands popular readings of Chicana lesbianism focused on sexuality by tending more deeply to the affective terrains of love and kinship represented in the 1991 anthology Chicana Lesbians: The Girls Our Mothers Warned Us About,edited by Carla Trujillo. Countering the (il)logics of white supremacy and Chicano nationalism, which reduce Chicana lesbians to symbols of sexual deviance, she argues that Chicana Lesbiansembodies an expansive matrix of intimacies that reconstruct the Chicana lesbian figure from a one-dimensional symbol of sexual deviance to a multi-faceted figure who redefines what it means to love one’s people and culture beyond colonial paradigms that privilege heterosexuality. The article can be read here.





  • Assistant Professor of Sociology Adriana Ponce published her article, entitled “Invested Mothering: An Intersectional Analysis of Mothers’ Feminized Breadwinning Strategies Under State-Mandated Child Support Arrangements,” in the Journal of Family and Economic Issues as part of a special issue, “The Political and Economic Contexts of Families’ Financial Lives.” The paper can be read here.





  • A choral composition by Margaret Bonds, “Joy,” discovered and edited by Professor of Music Michael Cooper, was included on GRAMMY-winning choral ensemble Conspirare’s new album, “House of Belonging,” along with Cooper’s program note for the piece. Based on a parable-poem written by Langston Hughes after he had abandoned the racism and stifling conformism of Columbia University for a job as a “saloon messman” aboard a decommissioned freighter (where he discovered that his rough, ne’er-do-well shipmates where “the finest gentlemen [he] ever met”), the work teaches that joy is not the province of the exalted halls of universities and churches, but rather something that can be found in the humblest of human quarters and need only be embraced wherever we find it. Margaret Bonds’s musical interpretation is, aptly enough, suffused with joy as well as genius in its brief 2’14”. Those who wish to hear it can stream it on YouTube here.





  • Feminist Studies faculty and students presented their research at the national Mujeres Activas en Letras y Cambio Social (MALCS) summer institute. This year’s conference, “40 years of MALCS, Centuries of Activism: La Lucha Sigue for Racial, Reproductive and Decolonial Justice,” took place on July 13-15, 2023, at UC Davis. Assistant Professor of Feminist Studies Meagan Solomon presented “Reflections on Chicana/Latina Lesbian Feminism from This Bridge to the Digital Dyke Age.” Associate Professor of Feminist Studies Brenda Sendejo, MALCS chair and conference co-chair, presented on a roundtable titled “Chicana Movidas: Reflections on 50 years of Chicana Knowledge-Making” with her co-contributors to the Chicana Movidas anthology. The following students presented papers under the guidance of Sendejo: Myla Benally “Restoring the Meaning of Hózhó Within a Decolonial Framework: A Return to Balance and Beauty” and sof varnis “Weaving as a Decolonial Practice: Reconciliation, Transformation, and Spiritual Activism Among the Mampujan Weavers.”





  • Assistant Professor of Mathematics John Ross has had a paper accepted for publication in the Annals of Global Analysis and Geometry. The paper, “Solution to the n-bubble problem on R with log-concave density,” extends the results of his work with his SCOPE students (mentioned above) in two meaningful ways: it allows for configurations of any number of bubbles (not just 3 or 4), and it relaxes the restrictions on the density function being considered





  • Assistant Professor of Mathematics John Ross, in collaboration with students Emily Burns ’21, Zariah Whyte ’21, Jesse Stovall ’22, and Evan Alexander ’22, now Coordinator of Student Activities, published an article titled “Isoperimetric 3- and 4-Bubble Results on R With Density |x|.” The paper looks at a mathematical space called a dense number line and explores the geometry of 3- or 4-bubble configurations in this space. The results presented in this article are the result of SCOPE summer research in the summers of 2020 and 2021 and is published in the PUMP Journal of Undergraduate Research.





  • Professor of Mathematics and Garey Chair of Mathematics Alison Marr published an article, “Collaboratively Re-envisioning Calculus for the Modern Student,” with co-authors Joel Kilty and Alex McAllister from Centre College in the MAA Notes series “Justice Through the Lens of Calculus: Framing New Possibilities for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion.” The article discusses the collaborative work Southwestern and Centre’s mathematics faculty did in creating our new Modern Calculus sequence. Read the article here.





  • Professor of Sociology Maria Lowe, Luis Romero (2018-19 SU Mellon Teaching Fellow), and Madeline Carrola ’19 published an article titled “‘Racism Masked as Safety Concerns’: The Experiences of Residents of Color With Racialized Coveillance in a Predominantly White Neighborhood” in the journal Sociology of Race and Ethnicity. In their article, the authors coin the term racialized coveillance and discuss ways that residents of color navigate and are negatively impacted by such resident-initiated monitoring practices.





  • Professor of Religion and Environmental Studies Laura Hobgood was invited to give the Inaugural Animal History Lecture at the University of Dayton. The lecture will be held in February 2024.





August 2023

  • In June, Visiting Assistant Professor of Theatre Amy King completed the teacher certification program at The Meisner Institute and is now a Designated Meisner Teacher (DMT). King also led and organized the panel “What Are You? Amplifying Mixed-Asian Voices in Acting Pedagogy,” which she presented at the ATHE (Association of Theatre in Higher Education) 2023 conference. She was able to bring student Bronwyn Fogarty to attend the four-day conference, which featured panels by several theatre scholars from around the world.





  • Professor of Music Michael Cooper discovered an art song by Margaret Bonds that was given its world premiere by acclaimed soprano Nicole Cabell and pianist Lara Downes at the Ravinia Festival in Chicago on 22 August. The song “Sunset” is Bonds’s only known setting of the poetry of Paul Laurence Dunbar and reflects the ideals of the mid-twentieth-century Black renaissance in its portrayal of daylight passing into the beauties of the night. Bonds’s music emphatically celebrates the rich splendors of night’s Blackness by vividly portraying twinkling stars and using exceptionally evocative harmonies during the portion of the song devoted to darkness. Cooper discovered this song quite by accident during his archival research: the manuscript for the first half of the song is in the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library at Yale University, while that for the second half is in the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture in New York. Cooper’s edition is being published as part of the Margaret Bonds Signature Series of Hildegard Publishing Company (proofs are already awaiting his review as soon as he returns from his next appointment with his ophthalmologist).





  • Assistant Professor of Education Raquel Sáenz Ortiz attended and presented her research at the International Migration Research Network (IMISCOE) annual conference at the University of Warsaw in Poland. The conference took place from July 3-5 this year. Sáenz Ortiz presented a paper titled “Ethnic Studies and the fight for educational equity for immigrant-origin youth in an era of censorship in the United States,” focusing on the impact of censorship legislation in Texas, on a panel about institutions, educational opportunities and in/exclusion in an international context.





  • Associate Professor of Communication Studies Lamiyah Bahrainwala has been selected to present on a “Top Paper Panel” at the 2023 National Communication Association conference. Her paper, co-authored with Dr. Kate Lockwood Harris, is titled “De-Whitening Consent Amidst COVID-19 Rhetoric” and examines how the r/ejection of Black Muslim women foundationalizes discourse on bodily autonomy and social distancing.





  • Associate Professor of Political Science Emily Sydnor and her coauthor, Emily Pears (Associate Professor, Claremont McKenna College), received the 2023 John Kincaid Best Article Award from the Federalism and Intergovernmental Relations Section of the American Political Science Association for their article “The Correlates and Characteristics of American State Identity.” They are currently extending the arguments made in the article into a book-length manuscript.





  • Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin’s chapter “Revolution” was published in Mlada Bukovansky et al., eds. The Oxford Handbook on History and International Relations Oxford University Press. This is the middle of three pieces (the first came out last year, and the next is due out next spring) where Selbin is trying to resituate revolution in some sort of modernist formulation fundamentally predicated on the marriage of macro-, even meta-level thinking—how can we change the world—with a profoundly micro approach: the granularity of actions people take to change their world. This essay considers how and where current academic thinking about revolution might be situated and where, if anywhere, it might be going, and recasts it as an entangled, figurative zone of awkward engagement(s) both (deeply) ingrained in a (still) useful ‘generational’ analysis as well as how our analyses might be evolving outside of that or beyond definitions at all.





  • Assistant Professor of Biology Jennie DeMarco attended and presented her research on using compost and native seeding to restore ski slopes and sequester soil carbon at the 2023 Ski Conservation Summit held at Copper Mountain Ski Resort in Frisco, Colorado. Also in attendance were Southwestern University students Logan Antone ’24, Cooper Phillips ’24, Blaine Ten Wolde ’25, Hailey Vickich ’25, and Olivia Johnson ’26. The summit and our research were covered in several media outlets: 5280 Denver’s Mile High Magazine, CBS Colorado, Summit Daily, and SAM Magazine.





  • Three faculty members presented at MathFest, the national meeting of the Mathematical Association of America, on August 2-7, 2023, in Tampa, FL. Assistant Professor of Mathematics John Ross presented “Using R Projects to Explore Regression” in the Contributed Paper Session on Activities in Statistics and Data Science. Professor of Mathematics Fumiko Futamura co-led a four-hour Professional Enhancement Program, “Visualizing Projective Geometry Through Photographs and Perspective Drawings,” with Annalisa Crannell of Franklin & Marshall College. Associate Professor of Mathematics Therese Shelton presented “Resources for Faculty and Students” in the Contributed Paper Session on Teaching and Learning of Differential Equations.





  • Associate Professor and Chair of the Theatre Department Kerry Bechtel has accepted an invitation to serve on The United States Institute of Theatre Technology (USITT) Costume Commission Leadership Board and as the International Organization of Scenographers, Theatre Architects and Technicians (OISTAT) representative for a three-year term. OISTAT organizes the Prague Quadrennial and World Stage Design Event and is a collective of theatre creatives working worldwide. The USITT Costume Commission develops and oversees national and regional programming and events for professionals, academics, and students involved in the fields of design and technical theatre.





  • Assistant Vice President for Admission Christine Bowman participated in ROCA, Rural Opportunities for College Admission as a faculty member in July. Working with 30 first-generation students from Northern New Mexico, students learned from admission professionals for five days and started their common application, worked on their essays, completed their resumes, and developed skills to speak to colleges about their college journey. This is her third year on the ROCA faculty.





  • Associate Professor of Computer Science Jacob Schrum attended the Genetic and Evolutionary Computation Conference in Lisbon, Portugal, from July 15-19 with his former SCOPE students, Melanie Richey ’23 and Mark Mueller ’24. Melanie and Mark jointly presented their paper, “Evolving Flying Machines in Minecraft Using Quality Diversity,” co-authored with Dr. Schrum and fellow student Alejandro Medina ’24, based on their SCOPE research experience in Summer 2022.





  • On August 3rd, Gabriel Peña presented at the American Theatre in Higher Education conference. He spoke on the panel “Spotlight on New Works LIA (Latinx Indigenous and the Americas) and ATDS (American Theatre and Drama Society). Only two books were selected by LIA to highlight this year, and he presented on behalf of one of them, Marissa Chibás’ work “Mythic Imagination and the Actor: Exercises, Inspiration, and Guidance for the 21 Century Actor”.





  • Director of Organic Chemistry Labs Carmen Velez attended the NSF-sponsored Chemistry for the Community Workshop at St. Joseph’s College of Maine. She presented her work on community-engaged learning that she did last spring in the Chemistry Capstone course.





  • Associate Professor of Education Alicia Moore has been invited to serve on the College of Education Advisory Council based on her expertise and commitment to positively impact their education program. Dr. Moore has humbly accepted.





  • Assistant Professor of Chemistry Sara Massey presented a poster titled “The light-harvesting response of the diatom P. tricornutum to external stressors varies by native environment” at the Photosynthesis Gordon Research Conference, held July 23-28 in Newry, Maine. She conducted the research with Yusuf Buhari ’23, Sanjana Nittala ’24, Meghana Nittala ’24, and Noor Nazeer ’24.





  • Associate Professor of Psychology Carin Perilloux has accepted an invitation to join the Editorial Board of the interdisciplinary journal Evolutionary Studies in Imaginative Culture. This biannual publication focuses on evolutionary approaches to sociocultural aspects of life such as the arts, humanities, philosophy, history, and pop culture.





  • Senior Research and Instruction Services Librarian Katherine Hooker has been elected to serve on the board of directors for Preservation Georgetown.





  • Former Associate Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry Mike Gesinski and five of his research students—Richard Rodriguez ’23, Natalie Zequeira ’24, Sophia Karim ’24, Luca Cipleu ’25, and Zachary Logan ’26—attended the 48th National Organic Chemistry Symposium, held July 9-13 at Notre Dame University. They met with scientific leaders from academia and the pharmaceutical industry and sang karaoke with Nobel laureates. Together, they presented three posters on the “Titanium-Mediated Synthesis of Cyclobutanones” and the “Gold(I)-Catalyzed Synthesis of Heterocycles.”





  • Professor of Music Kiyoshi Tamagawa performed two solo recitals in July, one for the Central Presbyterian Church Noonday Concerts series in Austin and the second on the Sunday Concert Series presented by the city of Lakeway.





  • Professor of Communication Studies Valerie Renegar visited Queens University, a liberal arts school in Charlotte, North Carolina, to conduct an academic program review of the undergraduate programs in the Knight School of Communication.





  • Professor of Philosophy Michael Bray published an essay, “Ernesto Laclau and Chantal Mouffe’s Post-Marxism Can’t Give Us a Political Strategy,” on the Jacobin website. A Spanish translation, “Laclau, Mouffe y la estrategia política,” was also published on Jacobinlat.com.





  • Assistant Professor of Applied Music Ruben Balboa’s research has been published by The Journal of the American Viola Society and is a featured article. The title of the publication is The Loeffler-Verlaine Connection.





July 2023

  • In July, Assistant Professor of Philosophy Jorge Lizarzaburu presented the paper “An Extended Evolutionary Account of Human Nature” at the International Society for the History Philosophy and Social Studies of Biology at the University of Toronto.





  • Part-time Instructor of Applied Music Sarah Oliver presented “Less Pain, More Gain: Looking Beyond Technique for Longevity” at American String Teachers Association’s 2023 Summit and the Greater Austin Suzuki Institute.





  • Vice President and Dean for Student Life Brit Katz provided a keynote presentation for the 2023 Interfraternity Institute on Tuesday, June 12, 2023. Titled “Expected Changes in American Higher Education for Student Affairs,” Katz educated a national gathering of student affairs and fraternity-sorority leaders.





  • Professor of Theatre Desiderio Roybal designed scenery and was Scenic Charge Artist for Magnolia Musical Theatre’s inaugural production of the musical, “Beauty and the Beast,” running July 19 through August 13 at the Galleria Pavillion in Bee Cave, TX. This professional production is directed by SU theatre faculty Emeritus, Rick Roemer, with technical direction by SU theatre scene shop manager, Monroe Oxley. Bella Morrow ’25 and Piper Swisher ’26 collaborated with Roybal as academic interns in scenic fabrication and scenic art. Kyle Bussone-Peterson ’24, Alex Canatta ’24, and Ashlyn Zunker ’25 were scenic carpenters.





  • Professor of Political Science Bob Snyder presented “The Fall of Afghanistan: An American Tragedy” at the International Studies Association’s conference at Al Akhawayn University in Ifrane, Morocco, in June.





  • Director of Admission Rebecca Rother served as a Faculty Co-Chair for the Admission College Counseling Institute (ACCI) through the Texas Association of College Admission Counseling (TACAC). This was an opportunity for over 100 new counselors on the higher education and secondary side of college counseling to learn and engage about how to serve our students best. The faculty also consisted of 19 seasoned professionals on both the secondary and higher education side who were there to share their wisdom. The institute was held on the campus of Texas Christian University from July 10-July 13.





  • Professor of Environmental Studies Joshua Long consulted on the new NPR / KUT 90.5 podcast “Growth Machine” and was interviewed for multiple episodes.





  • Professor of Biology Max Taub and Marcelo Salazar-Barragan ’23 published the paper “The Effects of Elexacaftor, Tezacaftor, and Ivacaftor (ETI) on Blood Glucose in Patients With Cystic Fibrosis: A Systematic Review” in the Cureus Journal of Medical Science.





  • Professor of Biology Romi Burks attended the Fine Chocolate Industry Association meeting in New York City on Saturday, June 24th. She led a “Lunch and Learn” interactive presentation on the Fine Chocolate Glossary project during that time. Visual art major Ryan Tanner ’25 designed the new logo for the glossary and helped craft two display posters as part of her summer internship. The FCIA session titled “Chocolate: I do not think it means what you think it means” plays off the famous quote about the inconceivable from The Princess Bride. Drawing on that, Burks wrote a blog post about her thoughts on taking over the leadership of the Glossary project. This open-access resource recruits professionals in the chocolate industry to author entries based on their experience and research, and each entry can then receive feedback and revision. The project seeks to establish a common language within the world of fine chocolate. Being part of the project and networking within the chocolate industry contributes directly to Burks’ sabbatical plans to write a mainstream book on chocolate.





  • Two chapters published by Professor of Art and Architecture Thomas Noble Howe in Jan. 2020 for the 21st Edition of Sir Banister Fletcher’s A History of Architecture (see Jan. 2020, by Royal Institute of British Architects, Bloomsbury Press, Jan. 2020): “Hellenistic Architecture” (17,000 words) and “The Christian Roman Empire, A.D. 306-c. A.D. 500,” (11,000 words), pp. 284-331; 409-43 was awarded the prestigious Colvin Prize for 2020 by the Society of Architectural Historians of Great Britain. It was recently awarded the Special Prize in the 2023 Architectural Book of the Year Awards at the World Architecture Festival (WAF), which was open to all books published over the last three years. Bloomsbury tells us that the book’s online version is currently licensed by 253 institutions worldwide. Altogether, this amounts to an astonishingly high level of online readership for the new Banister Fletcher, which far surpasses the previous book-based editions. The 21st Edition seems easily to exceed the readership figures for any previous global architectural history survey. Altogether, this amounts to an astonishingly high level of online readership for the new Banister Fletcher, which far surpasses the book-based previous editions (for comparison’s sake, the print-only 20th Edition managed to sell 25,000 hard copies over the 25-year period following its 1996 publication).





  • Director of Admission Rebecca Rother was selected for The Friend of Pflugerville High School award for her commitment to their college counseling office and making sure that all students at PHS and in the PfISD are knowledgeable about their post-secondary options, whether they include SU or not.





  • Assistant Professor of Communication Studies Raquel Moreira published the essay, “‘Didn’t She Used to Sell That WAP?’: Cardi B, Clashing Femininities, and Citizenship,” in Women’s Studies in Communication. The article argues that conservative reactions to Cardi B’s performances of racialized and classed femininity on Twitter, especially from right-wing cisgender women, aimed to put the rapper “in her place,” which is outside of politics and in opposition to (white) American values. Even though Cardi B’s working-class Black femininity places her outside of discourses of normative U.S. citizenship and meritocracy, the rapper “makes herself at home” by engaging in civic practices regardless of the classist misogynoir directed at her. The article is available here.





  • Professor of History Melissa Byrnes published a discussion of police violence, anti-racist activism, and the current French protests on the Lawyers, Guns & Money blog.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Political Science Katie Aha presented on “Gestational Surrogacy and Party Politics in Europe” at the Southern Political Science Association Summer Conference in June.





  • Assistant Professor of Anthropology Naomi Reed collaborated with investigative journalist Brittney Martin to write and produce an 8-episode podcast, “Sugar Land,” that explores the discovery of and the fight to memorialize the Sugar Land 95–the 95 Black men who died in the convict lease system in Sugar Land Texas in the early 20th century. The Texas Newsroom (Austin’s NPR station) produces and distributes “Sugar Land” and launched the podcast on June 16, 2023. New episodes are being released every Thursday.





  • Professor of Theatre and Dean of the Faculty Sergio Costola, JaimeLynn Hotaling ’23, and Maisie Jones ’23 presented a paper titled “Undergraduate Research and Theatre: Lessons Learned during the Pandemic” at the 2023 ConnectUR Annual Conference, held June 26-28 at Duquesne University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.