Academics

Notable Faculty & Student Achievements

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December 2018

  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Communication Studies Lamiyah Bahrainwala facilitated a panel titled “Talking about Race with your Child” through the Parent Advisory Committee at Child’s Day Child Development Center on Dec. 5, 2017. The panel featured experts from education, social work, and policy to provide specific strategies for parents to talk about race and racism with preschool-aged children.





  • Professor of Economics Dirk Early’s article on housing discrimination, “Racial Rent Differences in U.S. Housing Markets: Evidence from the Housing Voucher Program,” has been accepted for publication in the Journal of Regional Science. The article is coauthored with Edgar Olsen at the University of Virginia and Paul Carrillo at George Washington University.





  • Professor of Theatre Desiderio Roybal is the scenic designer for A Christmas Carol Classic Radiocast, produced by Penfold Theatre of Austin. The setting is the fictional KPNF radio station, where dozens of characters bring to life the Dickens masterpiece A Christmas Carol. A small company of virtuosic voice actors and live foley sound effects reminiscent of A Prairie Home Companion recreate the images and sounds of this Christmas classic.





  • Six music majors have prepared source-critical editions of unknown, unpublished, or little-known works by African American composer Florence B. Price (1887–1953) for the Music in the United States course offered by Professor of Music and Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts Michael Cooper. The editions were prepared from autographs held at the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, and include a scholarly preface, a source-critical score of the work, and a critical report. The students have gone through the entire process of preparing scholarly editions, including finding the sources, requesting reproductions and agreeing to the holding library’s terms, researching the poets and texts (where applicable), inputting the music using professional music-editing software, and assembling the final product. They hold the copyright on their editions. The students, works, and work-statuses are

    • Emily Barham ’20, Fantasy in Purple (new edition; text by Langston Hughes)
    • Katie Beth Brandt ’19, Bluebell (premiere edition; text by Mary Rolofson Gamble; recorded by the University of Texas at San Antonio choir and set for posthumous premiere in spring 2019)
    • Myles Kellerman ’20, Monologue for the Working Class (premiere edition; text by Langston Hughes)
    • Alex Slaid ’20, The Retort (new edition; text by Paul Dunbar)
    • Tabitha Thiemens ’19, God Gives Me You (new edition; text by unidentified author)
    • Ti Xin ’20, Presto (premiere edition; for piano solo)




  • Eleven Southwestern University faculty members have won Sam Taylor Fellowship grants to support their research, with award amounts ranging from $1,000 to $1,600. Sam Taylor Fellowships are selected through a competitive application process and are provided by the General Board of Higher Education and Ministry of the United Methodist Church. This year’s recipients are

    • Professor of Physics Steven Alexander, “Generating Energy from Hot Sidewalks” (awarded $1,200)
    • Assistant Professor of Communication Studies Lamiyah Bahrainwala, “The Politics of Stealth Halal: Re-Presenting the Islamic Origins of U.S. Meat Products” (awarded $1,600)
    • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth , “Nature Education in the German Classroom: Possibilities for Integration and Inclusion?” (awarded $1,400)
    • Professor of Biology Romi Burks, “Unravelling the Mystery: Genetic Differentiation of Chinese and Japanese Mysterysnails Using 16S” (awarded $1,400)
    • Assistant Professor of History Jethro Hernandez Berrones, “With Indigenist Spirit: Doctors on Spiritual Practices in Post-Revolutionary Mexico” (awarded $1,500)
    • Professor of Anthropology Melissa Johnson, “Human–Jaguar Becomings and Racial Capitalism in Belize” (awarded $1,000)
    • Associate Professor of French Francis Mathieu, “Research on Claire de Duras’s Avant-Garde Novella, Ourika” (awarded $1,400)
    • Associate Professor of French Aaron Prevots, “Gestures toward the Sacred: Guillevic, Vargaftig, Tellermann, Michel” (awarded $1,400)
    • Associate Professor of Communication Studies Valerie Renegar, “Contemporary Modes of Parenting: Disrupting the Representation of Stepmothers in Popular Culture” (awarded $1,500)
    • Associate Professor of Spanish Maria De Los Angeles Rodriguez Cadena, “Cultural Memory and Historical Fiction: Women of the Past on Television and Film by Four Contemporary Mexican Women Directors” (awarded $1,400)
    • Assistant Professor of Political Science Emily Sydnor, “Researching Attachments to American Political Institutions” (awarded $1,600)




  • Assistant Professor of Psychology Carin Perilloux was interviewed on the YouTube channel The Dissenter (Portugal) about her research on sexual-interest perception, physical attractiveness, and more. You can watch the interview here.





  • Associate Professor of French Francis Mathieu chaired a special session titled “Married Female Characters of French Women Authors” at the 2018 Pacific Ancient and Modern Languages Association annual conference, in Bellingham, WA. Until just a few decades ago, French women were expected to marry, be submissive, and not strive for much more. French women authors have reflected a range of responses to such social expectations through their married heroines by imagining alternative life choices, subverting oppressive societal norms, and disrupting paradigms. In the wake of the Me Too movement, Mathieu successfully proposed this special session to the conference organizers in order to allow fellow French literature scholars to share their recent research on this topic.





  • Meili Criezis ’17 published an article titled “Islam, Gender, and the Algerian Revolution for Independence” in Visions & Revisions: New Scholars, New Interpretations, vol. 11 (2018). Visions and Revisionsis an interdisciplinary journal for outstanding graduate and undergraduate essays, published annually by the History, Politics, Languages and Cultures Department at Edinboro University. The article was based on Criezis’s history capstone project and drew from her original archival work as part of a faculty–student research project with Associate Professor of History Melissa Byrnes in Paris during the summer of 2016.





November 2018

  • Assistant Professor of Communication Studies Lamiyah Bahrainwala facilitated a panel titled “How to Talk to Your Kids about Race”  on Nov. 28, 2018, at Russell Lee Elementary School in Austin. The panel brought together experts in child development and education, including licensed clinical social worker Katie Malinski, University of Texas Associate Professor Richard Reddick, and Head of Headwaters Middle School Roberto Germán. The panel was well attended by parents, and Bahrainwala envisions turning this into a workshop series for the future. View the transcript from the panel here.





  • Assistant Dean for Student Multicultural Affairs Terri Johnson served as a moderator for two separate panel presentations, “Struggles over Food and Water” and “Literary Approaches to Environmental Justice,” at the National Women’s Studies Association Conference in Atlanta, GA, Nov. 811.





  • President Edward Burgerand Professor of Art Victoria Star Varner presented an invited joint lecture in the Bridges Lecture Series at the University of Waterloo, Canada, on the connections between their original research in math and art on Nov. 21. The Bridges Lecture Series “aims to rediscover points of affinity among academic disciplines…and to bring them back into productive dialogue; to raise questions that are essential to scholars in Arts, Science, and Mathematics; and to provide specialists and non-specialists alike with compelling and enriching information that uncovers the possibilities and opportunities that exist on the bridge between disciplines. Our guiding goal is to coax audiences out of their intellectual comfort zones, and to transcend narrow discipline-specific avenues of academic inquiry.”





  • Artworks by 12 Southwestern students were selected by juror Mark Anderson, chair of the Art Department at Baylor University, for inclusion in the 39th annual Central Texas Art Competition at Temple College.

    • Ana Olvera , class of 2021, received an award of excellence ribbon and a cash prize for her painting.
    • The other artists were Miriam Arzoumanian, class of 2021, painting; Julia Canfield, class of 2020, painting; Ila Dannelley, class of 2022, drawing; Summer Elliott, class of 2021, painting; Lauren Muskara, class of 2020, painting; Dani Oskam, class of 2020, painting; Aiden Steinle, class of 2020, ceramics; Lauren Valentine, class of 2019, painting; Hal Webster, class of 2021, paintings (3); Aris Wells, class of 2020, ceramics; and Mattie Wesoloski, class of 2021, painting.
    • Of the 581 works submitted for the competition, 205 were selected and will be on display in the gallery of the Temple College Visual Arts Complex at 2105 South 5th St. in Temple, TX, through Dec. 3. Gallery hours are 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday–Thursday.




  • Professor of Economics Emily Northrop’s op-ed titled “Grasping Climate as a Bridge Issue Can Lead to Bipartisan Solutions” was published in the Austin American-Statesman on Nov. 24. The op-ed describes the impacts of climate change on US House District #31.





  • Professor of Theatre Desiderio Roybal was scenic designer for John Patrick Shanley’s play Doubt: A Parable, produced by City Theatre of Austin. The play was directed by Professor Emeritus Rick Roemer. Set in 1964, the play depicts a strict nun challenging the hierarchy of the Catholic Church and her faith when she accuses a popular priest of doing something inappropriate with a student in their school.





  • Associate Professor of Spanish Abby Dings presented a paper, “Teaching the Linguistic Landscape,” at the annual meeting of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages in New Orleans, LA, on Nov. 18.





  • Assistant Professor of Communication Studies Lamiyah Bahrainwala attended the 2018 National Communication Association in Salt Lake City, UT. She presented three papers that examined veiled discourses about halal meat, menstruation, and the Nike Pro Hijab.





  • Professor of Art and Art History and Coordinator General of the Restoring Ancient Stabiae Foundation Thomas Nobel Howe has been invited to give a seminar lecture titled “Les Villas Panoramique de Stabies, Découvertes et Interpretations Récentes” in the seminar series “Décor et Architecture Antiques d’Orient et d’Occident” at the École Normale Supérieure in Paris, France, Nov. 29, 2018. The session synthesizes his interpretations of his recent and ongoing excavations at Stabiae with his forthcoming chapter on Hellenistic architecture for the 21st edition of SirBanister Fletcher’s A History of Architecture (Royal Institute of British Architects). The lecture will be in French.





  • The student chapter of the American Chemical Society (ACS) at Southwestern was selected to receive an Honorable Mention award for its activities conducted during the 2017–2018 academic year. This award recognizes the students and faculty advisors for being exemplary chemistry ambassadors through their work in service and outreach to the community. Special congratulations go to ACS President Austin Baker, class of 2019, Vice President Saarah Cantu, class of 2019, Treasurer Lauren Gillespie, class of 2019, Secretary Renee Walker ’18, and Historian Jillian Bradley ’18. Director of General Chemistry Labs Willis Weigand and Assistant Professor of Chemistry Mike Gesinski serve as the faculty advisor and coadvisor, respectively.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Education Suzanne García-Mateus presented a paper titled “A Case Study of One Latinx and Bilingual Student: (Re)envisioning Bilingualism for Immigrant Children in a Gentrifying Two-Way Immersion Bilingual Program” on a panel she organized titled “Possibilities for Resistance and Change: Constructing Identities as Learners, Educators, Transfronterizos, and Intercultural Nations in Public Education” at the 117th American Anthropological Association conference in San Jose, CA, Nov. 1418, 2018.





  • Professor of Psychology Traci Giuliano recently had two papers published in the Handbook of Sexuality-Related Measures. The “Attitudes toward Polyamory Scale” was coauthored with alums Sarah Johnson ’13, Jordan Herselman ’13, and Kevin Hutzler ’13. The “Sexual Novelty Scale” was coauthored with alums Sarah Matthews ’17, Marissa Rosa ’18, Kayleigh Thomas ’18, and Brooke Swift ’18.





  • Professor of Theatre Desiderio Roybal received a nomination for Best Scenic Design of a Drama 2018 by Broadway World-Austin. His scenic design of Florian Zeller’s Molière Award-winning play The Father questioned the truth and the nature of reality as dementia disrupts the child-parent relationship.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Art Ron Geibel has a sculpture included in the 2018 CraftTexas exhibition at Houston Center for Contemporary Craft in Houston, TX. The exhibition was curated by Jennifer Scanlan, the curatorial and exhibitions director at Oklahoma Contemporary in Oklahoma City. CraftTexas 2018 is the tenth in a series of biennial juried exhibitions showcasing the best in Texas-made contemporary craft. The show features 50 works by 36 artists and includes a wide range of sculpture, jewelry, and furniture, with a strong emphasis on cutting-edge works. The exhibition is on view through Jan. 6, 2019.





  • Assistant Professor of Kinesiology Edward Merritt gave an invited talk titled “Traumatic Injury to Skeletal Muscle and Subsequent Regeneration” at the University of Florida Myology Institute, Nov. 15, 2018.





  • Professor Emeritus of Sociology and University Scholar Edward L. Kain is the lead editor of Conducting Effective Program Reviews: A Training Manual for the ASA Department Resources Group.This manual, published in November by the American Sociology Association (ASA) in Washington, DC, is used by members of the ASA’s Department Resources Group, a national group of consultants who serve as external program reviewers across the country. Kain served as the external program reviewer for the Anthropology and Sociology Program at Governors State University in Chicago, Nov. 67, 2018.





  • Facilities Management hosted the APPA Facilities Supervisors Toolkit the week of Nov. 5. The course hosted 38 individuals from 13 universities around the country. The course covered a host of topics to help participants further hone their skills as supervisors. Five Facilities Management team members, Supervisor of Maintenance Services Tom Williams, Assistant Supervisor of Maintenance Services Brandon Quintanilla, Central Plant Mechanic and Lead James Garcia, Supervisor of Custodial Services Anita Drake, and Supervisor of Logistical Services Juan Garza, completed the course.





  • Computer science majors Bobby Garza, class of 2019, and Sabin Oza and Matt Sanford, both class of 2020, competed in the 2018 ACM ICPC South Central USA Regional Programming Contest at Baylor University. In this competition, students work together in teams of three to solve challenging programming puzzles for five hours. Though the team did not advance to the World Finals, they are proud of their performance. Associate Professor of Computer Science Barbara Anthony was the coach for the team.





  • Professor of Biology Romi Burks presented a talk titled “The future of Genetic Engineering in the Chocolate Industry” on the Pro Series Stage of the Northwest Chocolate Festival in Seattle, WA, Nov. 10. The Festival represents one of the largest gatherings of professionals involved in fine chocolate. Burks sought to translate the latest research using CRISPR-Cas9 (a gene editing tool) that sought to increase disease resistance in Theobroma cacao (the tree from which chocolate comes). The talk developed from a case study that Burks taught in her First Year Seminar “Does Chocolate Have a Dark Side?”





  • Assistant Professor of History Jethro Hernández Berrones organized and moderated a panel titled “Contending Positions: Science, Medicine, and Religion in 19th- and 20th-century Mexico” for the 2018 History of Science Society annual meeting in Seattle, WA, Nov. 14. Gathering a diverse set of panelists at different career stages, the panel was one of three at the meeting discussing the history of science and medicine in Latin America. Dr. Hernández Berrones also presented a paper titled “Medicine in Revolution: Mapping Homeopathy in the Landscape of Mexican Medical Science, 18611934.” This paper argues that Mexican homeopaths used vitalism, a natural philosophy in tension with mechanicism, to promote an approach to medicine centered on the human being. In opposition to the model proposed by the National University, the homeopaths’ approach adapted to the economic and social needs of the rural and working-class population they served.





  • Associate Professor of History Melissa Byrnes presented a paper, “Using ‘Rights’ to Enshrine Discrimination and Disadvantage: Local Policymakers and North African Migrants in the French Suburbs after 1945,” at the annual meeting of the Social Science History Association in Phoenix, AZ, Nov. 10.





  • Psychology alumnae Sarah Matthews ’17 and Marissa Rosa ’18 had an article accepted for publication in the journal Frontiers in Psychology. Their paper, “Trials, Tribulations, and Triumphs: Research and Publishing from the Undergraduate Perspective,” was based on their work in the research lab of Professor of Psychology Traci Giuliano.





  • Associate Professor of Communication Studies Bob Bednar presented a paper titled “Broken Things: The Material Temporalities of Objects Placed at Roadside Crash Shrines” at the annual meeting of the American Anthropological Association, in San Jose, CA, on Nov. 18, 2018.





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth  presented two papers a the American Association of Teachers of German/American Council on Teaching Foreign Languages (AATG/ACTFL) conference, in New Orleans, LA, Nov. 16 –1 8. “German and the Environmental Humanities: Projects, Engagement, and Approaches” showcased the interdisciplinary connections of SU’s small German program. “Literacy through Performance: Poetry Slams, Song Contests, and Cabarets” shared best practices on planning, implementation, and assessment of project-based learning with public performances. Berroth served on the AATG Program Committee for this conference. As an appointed member, she contributed to the annual meetings of Alle lernen Deutsch–AATG’s committee for diversity and inclusion and to the special-interest group on small undergraduate German programs.





  • Professor of Anthropology Melissa Johnson presented a paper, “Becoming Creole: Racial Capitalism and Human Being Otherwise,” for the panel “In and Against Racial Capitalism” and served as a discussant for the panel “The Plantation and the Planet, Part 1” at the American Anthropological Association 118th Meeting, in San Jose, CA, Nov. 1518, 2018.





  • Associate Professor of Anthropology Brenda Sendejo presented a paper titled “Spaces of Resistance: Chicana and Chicano Activism and Feminism in Austin since the Movement Era” in a special session organized by Associate Professor of Environmental Studies Joshua Longat the Race, Ethnicity, and Place Conference, Oct. 23–26, in Austin. Sendejo also presented at the Texas Book Festival on Nov. 4 on her essay “The Space in Between: Exploring the Development of Chicana Feminist Thought in Central Texas,” which was recently published in Chicana Movidas: New Narratives of Feminism and Activism in the Movement Era (UT Press). Sendejo and fellow contributor Martha P. Cotera spoke about their essays, putting them into historical and contemporary contexts.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Economics Lila Glaser attended the University of Texas Advanced Patent Law Institute, Nov. 12.  She talked with local patent attorneys about her Southwestern course The Economics of Patent Law.





  • Professor Emeritus and Holder of the Cullen Chair in Economics from 1996 until his 2013 retirement Ken Roberts was honored as a featured author at the Texas Book Festival. His book The Cedar Choppers: Life on the Edge of Nothing explores a legendary Texas subculture that migrated from Appalachia to the Texas Hill Country and carved out a livelihood in the cedar hills, subsisting by hunting, trapping, moonshining, and, by the early 20th century, chopping cedar for fence posts and charcoal. The emergence of Austin as a major metropolitan area brought the cedar choppers and their hillbilly lifestyle into direct confrontation with the gentrified urban population east of the Balcones Fault. This clash of cultures propels this first book-length treatment of the cedar choppers, their clans, their culture, and their longing for a way of life that was rapidly disappearing. In the last few months, Roberts has also made presentations at the Bullock Texas State History Museum, the Austin History Center, and in towns across the Hill Country.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of History  Joseph Hower  traveled to Phoenix, AZ, for the 43rd annual meeting of the Social Science History Association, Nov. 8 10. He participated in a roundtable discussion of Oscar-nominated, Emmy-winning documentary filmmaker Julia Riechert’s new work-in-progress,  The 9-to-5 Project , which explores the struggles of working women in the 1970s and 1980s. While in Phoenix, he also chaired and commented on a panel titled “Race, Inequality, and the Struggle for Workers’ Rights in Brazil, South Korea, and the United States.”





  • Assistant Professor of Mathematics John Ross participated in the professional-development program of the Texas New Experiences in Teaching (NExT) project, held at Stephen F. Austin State University, in Nacogdoches, TX, Nov. 23, 2018. Texas NExT is sponsored by the Texas section of the Mathematical Association of America.





  • Assistant Professor of Political Science Emily Sydnor was interviewed by KXAN to discuss the changing political landscape in Williamson County.





  • Dean of Enrollment Services Christine Bowman  presented twice at the Independent Educational Consultant Association conference in Los Angeles, CA. She led a preconference case study titled “How a University’s Financial Aid Committee Works: A Trek in Their Shoes” and served on a panel session titled “Generation Z Is Coming: Are We Ready.”





  • Part-Time Instructor of Applied Music Katherine Altobello was the guest mezzo-soprano soloist in Austin Chamber Ensemble’s production A Haunted Evening,featuring works by Brahms, Strauss, Verdi, Britten, Wildhorn, Schwartz, and Sondheim. Altobello performed alongside soprano June Julian, tenor Dr. Jeffrey Jones-Ragona, and pianists Dr. Stephen Burnaman and Martha Mortensen Ahern. Performances were on Oct. 19 at Huston–Tillotson University’s King Seabrook Chapel (celebrating their second season as an “all-Steinway” music school) and on Oct. 20 at the First Presbyterian Church in Austin. Performances included solos, duets, trios, and piano movements that fit the Halloween spirit.





  • Director of the Debby Ellis Writing Center Jennifer Marciniak presented original research titled  “Migratory Patterns of Cross-Institutional Tutor Training” at the National Conference on Peer Tutoring in Writing, hosted by the University of of TexasRio Grande Valley, at South Padre Island, Nov. 14. Here, she also began a curated visual art project titled “Art and Migration: A Collective Memory of Writing Center Conference Work,” which will be completed over the next year and presented as part of the International Writing Center Association/National Conference on Peer Tutoring in Writing conference The Art of It All in Columbus, OH, in October 2019.





  • Assistant Professor of Communication Studies Lamiyah Bahrainwala published the paper “Bad Archives, Bad Workers” in Flow Journal: A Critical Forum on Media and Culture. The theme of the issue was Media(ted) Archives: The Politics of Saving and Making Media Histories.





  • Professor of Music and Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts Michael Cooper  uncovered, edited, and arranged for the posthumous premiere of two unpublished songs by African-American composer and civil-rights activist Margaret A. Bonds (1913–1972). The songs are based on Edna St. Vincent Millay’s (1892–1950) sonnets “What Lips My Lips Have Kissed” and “I Know My Mind and I Have Made My Choice.” Millay’s poems, considered among the finest sonnets of the 20th century, are important for their use of feminist themes, which Bonds in turn engages in the works’ musical style. The works received their modern premiere at a recital by former Southwestwestern Instructor of Music Dana Long Zenobi at Butler University, Nov. 6, 2018.





  • Five math majors presented at the Texas Undergraduate Mathematics Conference (TUMC), held at Stephen F. Austin State University, in Nacogdoches, TX, Nov. 2 3, 2018.

    • Aiden Steinle, class of 2020, presented “Staying in Shape with Real-World Mappings.” Steinle’s work was supervised by Professor of Mathematics and Chair of Mathematics and Computer Science Fumiko Futamura.
    • Gillian Glover , class of 2019, presented “Make Money with Linear Algebra: A Model of Portfolio Analysis.” Glover’s math capstone is an extension of work supervised by Dr. Futamura.
    • Stan Kannegieter , class of 2019, presented “The Kissing Disease and Differential Equations.”
    • Will Price, class of 2019, presented “Ms. Pac-Man Eats AI for Breakfast.” Price’s math capstone is an extension of his SCOPE 2018 research under Assistant Professor of Computer Science Jacob Schrum.
    • Mercedes Gonzalez, class of 2021, presented “Restrictions on HOMFLYPT and Kauffman Polynomials Arising from Local Moves.” Gonzalez presented work from a National Science Foundation Research Experience for Undergraduates program, supervised by Dr. Sandy Ganzell from St. Mary’s College of Maryland.
    • Associate Professor of Mathematics Therese Shelton supervised the math capstone work of Glover, Kannegieter, and Price, and she moderated a session of presentations at the TUMC.  
    • Other attendees included Zariah Whyte, class of 2021, and Assistant Professor of Mathematics John Ross.
    • Student lodging, registration, and meals was provided by National Science Foundation award no. DMS-1834888 for 2018. Additional funding was provided by a Faculty–Student Project award, the Fleming Student Travel Fund, and the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science. Southwestern students accounted for five of the 57 presentations given by students representing 21 colleges and universities.




  • Professor of Mathematics Alison Marr presented a talk titled “Envisioning a New Calculus Sequence”  in the “Innovation/Ideation” session at the Association of American Colleges & Universities’ Transforming STEM Higher Education Conference, held Nov. 810, in Atlanta, GA. This talk was based on work that has taken place over the last year as part of an ACS grant titled “Supporting Diversity and Inclusion in Mathematics and the STEM Disciplines,” which is a joint project with Joel Kilty and Alex McAllister at Centre College.





  • Part-Time Assistant Professor of Philosophy Linda Cox presented the paper “How to Begin to Begin Again: Ricoeurian Innovation and Sedimentation in William Carlos Williams’s Paterson” at the Society for Ricoeur Studies Annual Conference in Los Angeles, CA, on Nov. 3, 2018.





  • Professor of Art Victoria Star Varner’s artwork was selected for the 7e Internationale Exposition Estampes Bisannuelle Miniature (the 7th International Miniature Print Biennial Exhibition) organized by the Ottawa School of Art, Ontario, Canada. The exhibition brought together 260 works by over 100 artists from 20 countries. In addition, she and Technical Assistant and Exhibitions Coordinator Seth Daulton were invited to participate in Our Indiana: M.F.A. Selections, curated by Professor Gail Panske, University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee, and Professor Ellen Price, Miami University, Ohio, for the Mid-America Print Council’s biennial conference held at the University of Wyoming.





  • Professor of Anthropology Melissa Johnson’s book Becoming Creole: Nature and Race in Belize was published by Rutgers University Press on Nov. 1 in their Critical Caribbean Studiesseries. Use code 02AAAA17 for a 30% discount here. You can also find it on Amazon.





  • Professor of Psychology Traci Giuliano, together with psychology alums Sarah Matthews ’17, Marissa Rosa ’18, Kayleigh Thomas ’18, Brooke Swift ’18, Nicki Ahearn ’16, Aaron Garcia ’17, Skylar Smith ’16, Casey Niblett ’16, and Maddie Mills ’17, published an article titled “The Battle against Bedroom Boredom: Development and Validation of a Brief Measure of Sexual Novelty in Relationships” in the Canadian Journal of Human Sexuality.





  • Professor of Music and Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts Michael Cooper discovered and edited an unpublished choral work by Florence B. Price (1887–1953) that will be performed by Visiting Assistant Professor of Music Beth Everett and the Southwestern University Chorale at their concert on Nov. 3, 2018. The composition, titled “Night,” is based on a poem first published in 1930 in the NAACP journal The Crisis by Harlem Renaissance author Bessie Mayle. Price, generally acclaimed as the doyenne of African-American concert music of the mid-20th century, set Mayle’s poem to music in 1945. After her setting was premiered in Chicago, the autograph was filed among Price’s other manuscripts. Cooper discovered it during his research in the summer of 2018.





  • Assistant Professor of Kinesiology Edward Merritt attended the Education Committee meeting of the American Physiological Society and was appointed chair of the Medical Physiology Refresher Course for the 2019 Experimental Biology meeting.





  • Assistant Professor of Kinesiology Edward Merritt coauthored a publication titled “Human Neuromuscular Aging: Sex Differences Revealed at the Myocellular Level” in the journal Experimental Gerontology.





  • Assistant Professor of Political Science Emily Sydnor was interviewed by Spectrum News’s In Focus program about civility in the midterm elections.





October 2018

  • Meili Criezis’17 was a panelist for a showing and discussion of Gillo Pontecorvos’s 1966 film The Battle of Algiersat the Southwestern Historical Association’s annual meeting in Orlando, FL, in October.





  • Associate Professor of Sociology Reggie Byron gave an invited presentation of his research in a graduate-level course titled “Educational Research and Design” at the University of Texas at Austin in October. In addition, on Oct. 24, he presented a paper titled “Colorblindness, Race, and Public Accommodations Discrimination” at the Race, Ethnicity, and Place Conference in Austin.





  • Professor of Sociology Maria Lowe presented a paper titled “Do They Belong Here? Race and Contested Public Spaces in an East Austin Neighborhood” in a special session organized by Associate Professor of Environmental Studies Joshua Long at the Race, Ethnicity, and Place Conference, Oct. 23–26. Her paper’s coauthors include sociology and feminist studies major Madeline Carrola, class of 2019; anthropology major Dakota Cortez, class of 2019; and sociology major Mary Jalufka ’18.





  • Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin was selected to present at the London School of Economics’s (LSE) inaugural 201819 International Relations Notable Scholar Colloquium. Selbin was also an invited guest at the 2018 Millennium Conference hosted annually by the LSE; this year’s theme was Revolution and Resistance in World Politics. Selbin was asked to be the final speaker on the conference’s concluding panel, “Revolution and Resistance in the 21st Century,” and served on an author-meets-critic panel discussing Alpha Shah’s Nightmarch about India’s Naxalite revolutionaries, the world’s longest revolutionary struggle.





  • Professor of Anthropology Melissa Johnson presented a paper titled “Human–Jaguar Becomings and Racial Capitalism in Belize” at the Race, Ethnicity, and Place IX Engaged Scholarship: Fostering Human and Civil Rights, in Austin, TX, Oct. 2326.





  • Associate Professor of Environmental Studies Joshua Long coorganized three special sessions on Austin with Eliot Tretter (University of Calgary) for the Race, Ethnicity, and Place Conference. Associate Professor of Sociology Reggie Byron, Professor of Sociology Maria Lowe, Associate Professor of Anthropology Brenda Sendejo, and Simone Yoxall, class of 2019, presented in these sessions. Long also presented a paper in this session titled “Austin in the Era of Climate Urbanism.”





  • Assistant Dean for Student Multicultural Affairs Terri Johnson presented “Sharing Stories without Feeling Vulnerable: Breaking Barriers and Building Strength and Courage” at the 2018 Biennial Conference in Hyattsville, MD, Oct. 18.





  • Professor of Political Science Shannon Mariotti coorganized a mini-conference on “The Politics of the Mindful Revolution” for the upcoming Western Political Science Association conference. Some panels explore how mindfulness and meditation can be coopted by neoliberal capitalism while other panels emphasize how Buddhist modernism contains countercultural strategies for progressive social change. Some panels assess the dangers of Buddhist modernism becoming a white-washed form of cultural appropriation while other panels analyze how meditation and mindfulness practices play vital roles in sustaining social movements generally and racial justice and abolitionist movements in particular. Some panels explore how mindfulness, meditation, and Buddhist modernism can be a valuable part of feminist theory and practice while other panels see these practices as less accessible and more exclusionary. The conference draws together over 30 scholars from interdisciplinary fields in the U.S. and internationally to consider these questions at the intersection of meditation, mindfulness, and politics.





  • Computer Science and Chemistry double major Lauren Gillespie, class of 2019, received a Student Presentation Award for her poster “Comparing Direct and Indirect Encodings Using Both Raw and Hand-Designed Features in Tetris” at the 2018 SACNAS National Diversity in STEM conference organized by the Society for Advancement of Chicanos/Hispanics and Native Americans in Science. The poster was based on SCOPE research with Gabriela Gonzalez ’16 and Assistant Professor of Computer Science Jacob Schrum.





  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Therese Shelton led two sessions at the Student Contest Using Differential Equations Modeling (SCUDEM) on Oct. 27, 2018, at the local host site for this international competition, the Highland Campus of Austin Community College. Shelton supervised all participants in inquiry-oriented learning with a modeling scenario that she recently had published in the repository at Systemic Initiative for Modeling Investigations and Opportunities with Differential Equations (SIMIODE). She gave a faculty development session for the coaches, sharing two more of her published modules.





  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Therese Shelton, Associate Professor of Education Sherry Adrian, and Emma Kathryn Groves’s ’17 coauthored paper, “A Model of the Transmission of Cholera in a Population with Contaminated Water,” has been accepted for publication in the special issue Linking Differential Equations to Social Justice and Environmental Concernsof the Journal of the Community of Differential Equations Educators(CODEE). Groves and Shelton worked on the mathematical model in SCOPE 2015. Adrian and Shelton worked on the connections with social justice.





  • Faculty members from the Department of Music were well represented at the annual meeting of the College Music Society, held in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, Oct. 10 13.

    • Professor of Music Kiyoshi Tamagawa presented his paper “Ragtime, Gamelan, and the Music of Claude Debussy: Exoticism vs. Cultural Appropriation.”
    • Associate Professors of Music David Asbury and Bruce Cain performed three songs composed by Associate Professor of Music Jason Hoogerhyde from the River of Words Project. The River of Wordsis a collection of songs the duo has commissioned from multiple composers, setting texts written by children on the topic of the environment.




  • Assistant Professor of History Jethro Hernández Berrones presented a paper titled “Teaching Medicine to the Working Class: Private Medical Schools in Revolutionary Mexico, 1910–1940” at the 15th International Reunion of Historians of Mexico in Guadalajara, Mexico, Oct. 1821. In this paper, he argues that “free schools” proposed a transitional model of medical training between the Porfiriato and the revolution. This model proposed to socialize the medical profession, keeping it free from state regulation before the revolutionary state decided to implement policies and programs aimed at regulating medical certification, geographic distribution, and labor.





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth organized a panel at the 43rd Annual Coalition of Women in German conference at Sewanee University of the South, in Sewanne, Tennessee, Oct. 1821. The panel, titled “The Forest Unseen: Feminism and Visibility of Connections in Bodies, Nature, Science, and Violence,” was inspired by Sewanee biology professor David G. Haskell’s book The Forest Unseen: A Year’s Work in Nature (2012). Panelists shared their feminist work in the environmental humanities in the field of German studies.





  • Professor of Biology Romi Burks participated in the first-ever Chocolate Conservatory, sponsored by the Fine Chocolate and Cacao Institute, held at Harvard University, Oct. 1112. The conference sought to link those academically interested in chocolate with industry professionals and producers from regions where they harvest cacao. Following the Conservatory, Burks gave an invited talk titled “Delicious Science” at the first New England Chocolate Festival. The First-Year Seminar Program provided support for these experiences, which Burks hopes will develop into case-study resources for teaching about chocolate across the liberal arts.





  • Professor of English David Gaines delivered the keynote address at the 14th annual National Symposium of Theater and Performing Arts at Washington and Lee University on Oct. 26. The topic of the symposium was Race and Gender in Theater, Poetry, and Rock ‘n Roll, and the title of Gaines’s address was “‘I Felt Like I Was One of Them or All of Them Put Together’: Reflections on Race, Gender, and Bob Dylan’s Multitudes.” His presentation was greatly enhanced by the expertise of Audiovisual Services Coordinator Luke Allen and Research and Instruction Librarian Katherine Hooker.





  • Associate Professor of Communication Studies Bob Bednar presented a paper titled “Colliding Authorities: The Cultural Politics of Roadside Memorialization in the Contemporary American Southwest” at the Western History Association’s annual national conference in San Antonio, Oct. 20, 2018.





  • The Professional Grounds Management Society (PGMS) recognized Southwestern University with an Honor Award in the Society’s 2018 Green Star Awards® competition. The award was given in the University and College Grounds category for exceptional grounds maintenance. Winners were honored during the Society’s 2018 Awards Dinner held Oct. 18 in conjunction with the School of Grounds Management & GIE+EXPO in Louisville, KY, Oct. 1519. Manager of Facilities Services Randy Erben accepted the award on behalf of the University.





  • Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin helped lead a workshop “Writing and Reviewing for US-Based Peer-Reviewed Journals” at the Asociación Mexicana de Estudios Internacionales and was also part of a roundtable titled “Collaborations between Global North Journals and Global South Scholars and Teachers.”





  • Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin was interviewed on KUT-FM’s Texas Standard about the Honduran caravan. You can listen to the interview here.





  • Associate Professor of Computer Science Barbara Anthony presented a paper coauthored with Valentin Cantu Jr. ’18 at the 27th Annual Rocky Mountain Conference of the Consortium for Computing Sciences in Colleges held Oct. 12–13, 2018, in Socorro, NM. The paper, “Modernizing the Mythical Man-Month,” provides an alternative way of presenting concepts from a classical reading in the field: while the software engineering ideas are still relevant, the authors suggest using language that is more inclusive and examples that are more relatable to students in the 21st century. It will be published in the December 2018 issue of the Journal of Computing Sciences in Colleges.





  • Associate Professor of Spanish Angeles Rodriguez Cadena published the chapter “Heroínas de la Revolución Mexicana y la Construcción de la Memoria Cultural en el Cuento Histórico Contemporáneo” in the book Representaciones en la Cultura Visual y las Letras Acerca de la Revolución Mexicana y la Guerra Cristera, edited by Ute Seydel and published by Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México/Bonilla Artigas.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of History Joseph Hower presented two papers at the 40th Annual North American Labor History Conference at Wayne State University in Detroit, MI. The first, “Forty Years after Prop 13: The Past, Present, and Future of Public Sector Anti-Unionism,” explored the connection between antitax conservative politics in the 1970s and the recent wave of legal and legislative challenges to government employee unions. The second, “The Memory of Memphis and the (Un)Making of the Modern Public Sector Labor Movement,” examined the way that union activists have used instrumental commemorations of a strike by 1,300 sanitation workers that culminated with the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. over the past half century. Both papers drew on portions of his current book project about public-sector unions in the postwar United States.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Environmental Engineering Rebecca Edwards attended the 2018 Teaching Computation in the Sciences Using MATLAB workshop at Carleton College in Northfield, MN, Oct. 14–16. While there, she served on a committee who peer-reviewed a collection of curricular activities featuring MATLAB.





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth presented an invited lecture and led a workshop at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Oct. 16–17. The lecture, “Looking Daring–Daring to Look: Annemarie Schwarzenbach’s Journeys of Discovery,” connected to an interdisciplinary exhibit at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, titled “Mapping ‘Knoxville’ across Time, Media, and Cultures: Tracing Unexplored Connections between the Wok or Cormac McCarthy, Annemarie Schwarzenbach, and Buddy and the Huddle.” The workshop, Intercultural Knowledge and Competence–Exploring Connections: Making Meaning of Foreign and Familiar Matters, contributed to the University of Tennessee’s Ready for the World program. Audiences and participants explored connections between their own personal and cultural identities and identity narratives emerging from the biographies, literary works, photographs, and travel journal articles of Annemarie Schwarzenbach (1908–1942).





  • Professor of Music Lois Ferrari celebrated her 16th consecutive appointment as music director of the Austin Civic Orchestra (ACO) by opening the 2018–19 season on Oct. 6 with a concert titled Bella Italia! Guest trumpeter and Part-Time Assistant Professor of Applied Music Kyle Koronka joined the ACO in a concert that featured music by Italian composers Vivaldi, Puccini, Verdi, Rossini, and Respighi.





  • Technical Assistant and Exhibitions Coordinator Seth Daulton exhibited his work in a group exhibition titled “Our Indiana: M.F.A. Selections” during the Mid-America Printmaking Conference in Laramie, WY, Oct. 3–6. “Our Indiana, M.F.A. Selections” showcases recent work by Indiana University M.F.A. Printmaking alumni. The exhibition features prints and print-related artwork by graduates of the program spanning multiple years from the 1970s to the present.





  • Associate Professor of Education Sherry Adrian was invited by the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies to present a nationally sponsored webinar, “Diversity Is Nature’s Greatest Asset: Including All Children in Project WILD.” Adrian’s presentation addressed how educators can enhance Project WILD learning experiences by differentiating instructional content and procedures that foster more successful inclusion of all students.  Project WILD Coordinators and Facilitators from universities and organizations throughout the U.S. participated in the webinar.





  • Professor of Psychology Traci Giuliano recently coauthored a paper with Alan Swinkels (St. Edwards University) titled “An Effective Project for Teaching Repeated-Measures Designs” in the journal Teaching of Psychology.





  • Professor of Religion Elaine Craddock  presented the paper “Caste, Class, and Religion among Tamil Thirunangais” for the Queer Symposium at the annual Conference on South Asia in Madison, Wis., Oct. 11.





  • Computer Science major Adina Friedman, class of 2019, attended the Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC) Symposium for Texas Researchers (TACCSTER) at the Pickle Research Campus in Austin, Texas, Sept 20–21. TACC is home to four supercomputer clusters, including Stampede2m, the most powerful supercomputer at any U.S. university. TACC collaborates with thousands of researchers across the country using applied high-performance computing to enable scientific discovery. Friedman was exposed to talks, panels, and posters from researchers currently using TACC resources in the areas of machine learning, cloud computing, and others.





  • Professor of English Eileen Cleere delivered a paper and chaired a panel at the North American Victorian Studies Association conference in St. Petersburg, Fla., Oct. 1114. Her paper “Sacrificing Iphigenia: Recognizing Sexual Assault in Charlotte Mary Yonge’s 1856 The Daisy Chain was part of a panel about the re-evaluation of rape in Victorian fiction in the contemporary context of #MeToo.





  • Amiel Padayhag, class of 2019; Grace Gnasigamany, class of 2020; Administrative Assistant to Faculty Kelly Lessard; and Mellon Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow in the Feminist Studies Program Sequoia Manerparticipated in Riding the Freedom Trail, a tour of Civil Rights memorials and monuments in Selma and Montgomery, Ala. They experienced a profound weekend of reckoning with the nation’s racial past. They accompanied a group that included local residents of Georgetown, Austin, and greater Williamson County. A member of the group was the daughter of a man lynched in nearby Taylor, Texas. Some of the highlights of their trip included walking over the Edmund Pettus Bridge and talking with Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee member and civil rights leader Annie Pearl Avery in Selma. In Montgomery, they participated in a special reflection session with the staff of the Equal Justice Initiative (EJI) following the tour of the new National Memorial for Peace and Justice, which is dedicated to the memory of lynching victims. The group also toured sites such as the Southern Poverty Law Center, the Legacy Museum, the Freedom Riders Museum, and the Rosa Parks Museum. Memorably, the group attended a special Sunday service at Dexter King Memorial Church, where, from the church’s basement, pastor Martin Luther King Jr. organized the Montgomery Bus Boycott. A documentary is being made about this experience in conjunction with film students from The University of Texas at Austin.





  • Associate Professor of English Michael Saenger delivered a talk titled “Shakespeare in a Moment of Madness” at the Dallas Shakespeare Conference at the University of Dallas on Oct. 6.





  • Institutional Research Analyst Grace Mineta presented “Make Your Data Tell a Story: The Dos and Don’ts of Creating Graphics and Increasing Readability without Sacrificing Information” at the Southern Association for Institutional Research Annual Conference in Norfolk, Va. on Oct. 8.





  • Associate Professor of Art History Patrick Hajovsky was the commentator for a panel titled “For Now We See through a Glass, Darkly: European Tropes through a Native Lens” at the American Society for Ethnohistory’s 2018 annual meeting in Oaxaca, Mexico, Oct. 1113.





  • Vice President for Strategic Recruitment and Enrollment Tom Delahunt served as a college essay writing reviewer at Fort Worth Country Day School helping seniors craft and refine their college essays.





  • Professor of Art and Art History, Chair of Art History, and Coordinator General of the Restoring Ancient Stabiae Foundation Thomas Noble Howe recently published a book chapter titled “The Social Status of the Villas of Stabiae” in Roman Villas in the Mediterranean Basin: Late Republic to Late Antiquity (eds. G. Métraux and A. Marzano; Cambridge University Press, 2018; pp. 97–119). Howe and Uri Dromi, director general of the Mishkenot Sha’ananim Convention Center in Jerusalem and spokesman of the Rabin and Peres governments (1992–1996), were co-organizers. The publication and conference are the first comprehensive Mediterranean-wide study on the topic involving all national scholarly communities in the Mediterranean. The paper lays out the broad questions of the history of the Stabiae villas in order to guide the research questions at the time of the outset of excavation in 2007.





  • President Edward Burger was invited to spend a day at Fordham University to consult with faculty, staff, and students as well as share curricular and pedagogical ideas with colleagues from a number of their schools on Oct. 3. That evening, he delivered a public address, sponsored by the Provost’s Office, the Graduate School of Education, the Fordham College, and the Mathematics Department, in which he introduced the aspects of effective thinking highlighted in his forthcoming book. Read more about his public address.





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth presented a research paper titled “Ecocide and Genocide in Marica Bodrožić’s Short Story ‘Der Lilienliebhaber: Lover of Lilies’” at the 8th Biennial Conference of the European Association for the Study of Literature, Culture, and Environment (EASLCE) Sept. 2629 at the University of Würzburg, Germany. Scholars from 32 countries presented and discussed their ecocritical work on the conference theme The Garden: Ecological Paradigms of Space, History, and Community. Berroth’s paper integrates summer research completed at the Deutsches Literaturarchiv Marbach, Germany, and is part of the introductory chapter of her current monograph on Marica Bodrožić’s work.





  • Associate Dean of Enrollment Services James Gaeta and Dean of Enrollment Services Christine Bowman were featured speakers at the Georgetown ISD senior parent workshop on financial aid and selecting a college.





  • Professors of Biology Maria Cuevas and Maria Todd received a $12,000 grant from the Joe and Jessie Crump Foundation for Medical Research. The funds will support their current research project titled “Simultaneous Analysis of 84 Tight Junction Genes Involved in Uterine Cancer Progression.” This grant will enable them to expand the scope of their studies and increase the clinical relevance of their research endeavors.





  • Dean of Enrollment Services Christine Bowman was a part of a panel focusing on athletics in the college search process at St. Andrew’s Episcopal School in Austin, Texas.  She addressed questions on the role that athletics plays in admission and how students can collaborate with coaches and admission officers to create a smooth college search process.





  • Mellon Teaching Fellow of Feminist Studies Sequoia Maner published the article “The Ethics of Interiority in the Fiction of Zora Neale Hurston, Alice Walker, and Beyoncé” in volume 17.1 of the journal Meridians: Feminism, Race, Transnationalism.





  • Director of Transfer Recruitment Scott Sandoval presented at the Austin Community College All Things College workshop hosted by the Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society on Sept. 28, 2018. The presentation covered Paideia, admission requirements, essay writing, scholarships, and financial aid.





  • Assistant Director of Admission Rebecca Rother presented a workshop for teachers at Anderson High School on writing letters of recommendation. Over 20 teachers attended the workshop to learn how to make their letters the best possible for incoming students.





  • Professor of English David Gaines presented “Dylan’s Literary Fans, The Economy of Prestige, and Reading With One Hand Waving Free” at the New Approaches to Bob Dylan conference in Odense, Denmark, on Oct. 4, 2018. The presentation not only extended aspects of Gaines’s book In Dylan Town: A Fan’s Life but also grew out of the Spring 2018 English capstone course on literary prizes and canon formation.





  • Professor of Art History Kimberly Smith  gave a conference talk titled “Invisible Labor: German Modernist Art and Women’s Work” at the Feminist Art History Conference held at American University in Washington, D.C., Sept. 28 30, 2018.





  • Professor of Spanish Laura Senio Blair presented her current research, “Defining Silence and Silence Defining: Nona Fernández’s Literature of Resistance,” on Aug. 26, 2018, at the Asociación de Género y Sexualidades conference in Chicago, Ill.





  • Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers published a review of the novel Not Our Kindin the Washington Independent Review of Books.





  • Associate Professor of Art History Allison Miller published the chapter “The Han Hybrid Style: Sculpting an Imperial Utopia” in Dialogue with the Ancients: 100 Bronzes of the Shang, Zhou, and Han Dynasties: The Shen Zhai Collection, edited by Patrick K.M. Kwok. Other contributors to the catalogue include Tianlong Jiao (Denver Art Museum), Wang Tao (Art Institute of Chicago), Eugene Y. Wang (Harvard University), Li Feng (Columbia University), and Sarah Wong (Eskenazi Limited).





  • Professor of Philosophy Phil Hopkins’ chapter, “…As He Says in His Poetical Way: Empedocles and Anaxagoras on the Motive Forces of the Kosmos,” appears in the newly published Companion to Ancient Philosophy, by Northwestern University Press, edited by Sean Kirkland and Eric Sanday. This volume is a major new guide to the field of ancient Greek philosophy from internationally known contributors who are the top experts in their fields. Hopkins’ chapter argues that early thinkers did not view the kosmos as a machine, but rather as motivated by the same psychic forces at work in humans and human societies.





  • Part-time Instructor of Applied Music Adrienne Inglis’ composition “Innocent Blood” will soon enjoy its world première performance by Inversion Ensemble. Mary Esty, the composer’s eighth-great-grandmother, was falsely accused of witchcraft and hanged September 22, 1692, in Salem, Massachusetts. Using poetry, court records, Mary’s petition from prison, and Puritan hymns, “Innocent Blood” tells her tragic story in this work for mezzo-soprano soloist, chorus, flute and bass flute, and organ. The performance will be hosted Oct. 6, 2018, at 7 p.m. at St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church in Austin, Texas, and Oct. 7, 2018, at 3 p.m. at Redeemer Presbyterian Church in Austin, Texas.





  • Part-time Instructor of Applied Music Katherine Altobello was the featured mezzo-soprano vocalist for Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur services at Congregation Beth Israel in Austin, Texas, led by Dr. Jeffrey Jones-Ragona of Saint Mary Cathedral and accompanied by Dr. Maimy Fong, an independent music director.





  • Professor of Art and Art History and Coordinator General of the Restoring Ancient Stabiae Foundation in Italy Thomas Noble Howe gave an invitational plenary session keynote lecture, “The Development of Panoramic Sensibilities in Art, Literature, Architecture and Gardens in the Villas in the Bay of Naples in the Late Republic and Early Empire: the Perspective from Stabiae,” at the conference Actual Problems of Theory and History of Art (Актуальные проблемы теории и истории искусства), organized by the Lomonosov Moscow State University, Saint Petersburg State University, State Tretyakov Gallery, and State Hermitage Museum, at the Moscow State University, Moscow on Oct. 2, 2018. The lecture points out that a coincidence of innovations in developing a “panoramic” sensibility and cross-axial views uniting architecture to nature in Roman painting, architecture, landscape design, and poetry all occurred simultaneously between c. 30 B.C and A.D. 30 at the end of the Civil Wars and beginning of the Empire.





  • Professor of Education Michael Kamen along with Southwestern students Sarah Buchanan, class of 2020, Abby Earle, class of 2019, Abigail Luna, class of 2020, alumna Kelli Mclaughlin ’18, and NYC-based playwright Adaire Kamen and Dr. Alys Mendus of the University of Hull, United Kingdom, performed and discussed their collaboratively written original play “They Call Teachers by Their First Names!”: An Ethno-Drama of Pre-Service Teachers Visiting Schools at the Performing the World 2018 conference in New York City. The conference brings together professionals, artists, and scholars who share an interest in the role of performance and play for activism, education, and healthcare.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Education Suzanne García-Mateus was interviewed by Austin’s Community Impactnewspaper. The article “Austin ISD’s Bilingual Program Aims to Narrow Achievement Gap” provides a brief history of bilingual education in the U.S. and offers multiple perspectives focused on becoming bilingual, bi-literate, and bicultural in Austin public schools.





  • Associate Vice President for Information Technology Todd Watson was recently appointed to serve on the board of the Consortium of Liberal Arts Colleges (CLAC). Per their bylaws, CLAC is a not-for-profit organization of duly accredited private liberal arts colleges which explores and promotes the use of information technology and serves as a forum for the exchange of ideas among its members. CLAC membership consists of 70 of the most prestigious and recognizable private liberal arts colleges in the United States. Watson will serve a three-year appointment that will require his attending a Fall and Spring board meeting in addition to an annual summer meeting. Watson’s board service will be in the role as Webmaster, adding the Southwestern University name to CLAC board leadership hailing from institutions such as Allegheny College, Bryn Mawr College, Colgate University,Denison University, Franklin & Marshall College, and Wheaton College (Ill.).





September 2018

  • Professor of Art Victoria Star Varner presented four works from her Crossed Paths series in the 38th Mini Print Internacional de Cadaques in Spain, which exhibited selected artists from 53 countries June 30Sept. 30 at Taller Galleria Fort in Cadaques. The exhibition is traveling to Galeri L’Etange d’Art in Bages, France, next.





  • Elyssa Sliheet, class of 2019, and Sara Boyd, class of 2020, attended the Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing in Houston, Texas, Sept. 2628. The Grace Hopper Conference is the largest meeting of women technologists in the world. The program included inspiring talks by female leaders in industry as well as talks by academic researchers and educators. There was also a massive Career Fair allowing women to seek jobs with tech companies, including some of the biggest names in industry (e.g., Google, Microsoft, and Amazon). Both students had all travel expenses funded by competitive travel scholarships. Assistant Professor of Computer Science Jacob Schrum also attended the conference, as did alumna Kathryn Reagan ’16.





  • Assistant Professor of Communication Studies Lamiyah Bahrainwala gave a talk on precarity, preservation, and praxis in academia at the Flow Conference at The University of Texas at Austin on Sept. 27, 2018. Her talk was titled “Media(ted) Archives: The Politics of Saving and Making Media Histories.”





  • Professor of Art Victoria Star Varner’s engraving from her Crossed Paths series was selected for the 2018 International Contemporary Miniprint of Kazanlak exhibition at the Kazanlak Art Gallery in Bulgaria, Europe. There were 450 works from 152 artists representing 40 countries. The international jury comprised Kouki Tsuritani (Japan), Renee Chevalier (Canada), and Peter Boyadjieff (Bulgaria).





  • Professor of Spanish Katy Ross presented a paper titled “Left Behind: Cultural Assimilation and the Mother/Daughter Relationship in Najat El Hachmi’s La Hija Extranjera” at the Women in Transition Conference at Oxford University, Sept. 2022.





  • Professor of Art and Art History and Coordinator General of the Restoring Ancient Stabiae Foundation Thomas Noble Howe just published an invitational lecture “Прогулка с властью: новый свет на контроль движения и просмотра в элитных римских вилл Стабии” (“Strolling with Power: New Light on Movement and Viewing in the Elite Villas of Stabiae”), originally delivered at the Gasparow Readings: Literature and Politics in Classical Antiquity conference, organized jointly by the Russian State University for the Humanities (RSUH) and by the Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration (RANEPA), at the RSUH in Moscow, April 1922, 2017, in volume 3, issue 4 of Shagi/Steps(2018; pp. 234–250; in Russian). Howe has been working with a team from the State Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg, Russia, since 2010 at Stabiae. The article presents interpretations on how guests actually moved around the garden of the Villa Arianna, Stabiae, based on results of recent excavations and publications from 2007 to 2017.





  • Associate Professor of Spanish Angeles Rodriguez Cadena presented a research paper titled “Cultural Memory and the Optical Unconscious: Women of the Past in Historical Audiovisual Texts by Women Directors in Latin America” at the 42nd International Academic Conference in Rome, Italy, Sept. 1013. She also chaired the panel on Humanities and the Law.





  • Assistant Professor of History Jethro Hernandez Berrones was invited to participate in a workshop of precirculated papers titled The Gray Zones of Medicine(s): Towards a History of Healers and Healing in Colonial and Modern Latin America and the Caribbeanat the University of Wisconsin in Madison. He presented the article “Mystic of Medicine, Modern Curandero, and ‘Improvised Doctor’: Francisco I. Madero and the Practice of Homeopathy in Rural Mexico at the Turn of the Twentieth Century.”





  • Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin’s book series, New Millennium Books in International Studies,published by Rowman & Littlefield, released the fourth edition of Laura Neack’s Studying Foreign Policy Comparatively: Cases and Analysisand the second edition of Sheila Croucher’s Globalization and Belonging: The Politics of Identity in a Changing World. Mary Durfee and Rachael Lorna Johnstone’s forthcoming volume, Arctic Governance in a Changing World, will be the 20th book published in the series.





  • President Edward Burger delivered the keynote address at 3M’s Austin Tech Forum, on Sept. 24, honoring all those individuals whose work led to patentable ideas over the past year.





  • Current Math and Computer Science double-major Elyssa Sliheet, class of 2019, attended the Richard Tapia Celebration of Diversity in Computing in Orlando, Fla., Sept. 1922. Sliheet attended several sessions on topics such as the importance of diversity and inclusion in the field of computer science and ethics in the applications of machine learning and artificial intelligence. Sliheet’s travel was funded by a competitive travel scholarship.





  • Associate Professor of Anthropology Brenda Sendejo published “‘The Space in Between’: Exploring the Development of Chicana Feminist Thought in Central Texas” in Chicana Movidas: New Narratives of Activism and Feminism in the Movement Era (UT Press 2018).





  • Professor of Art and Art History and Coordinator General of the Restoring Ancient Stabiae Foundation in Italy Thomas Howe just published an invitational lecture titled “A Most Fragile Art Object: Interpreting and Presenting the Strolling Garden of the Villa Arianna, Stabia,” which he gave at the 7th Actual Problems of Theory and History of Art (Актуальные проблемы теории и истории искусства) international research conference, organized by Saint Petersburg State University, Lomonosov Moscow State University, and the State Hermitage Museum, at the State Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg, Russia, October 11–15, 2016. The article appears on pages 691–700 of volume 8 of the conference proceedings.





  • Computer Science and Chemistry major Lauren Gillespie,  class of 2019, was awarded a $2500 Upsilon Pi Epsilon (UPE) Executive Council Award. UPE is a computer-science honor society. Applications are considered based on the member’s long-term plans in the computing profession, their contributions to their respective UPE chapters, and related student activities at their college.





  • Associate Professor of Environmental Studies Joshua Long published an article titled “From Sustainable Urbanism to Climate Urbanism” in the journal Urban Studies with Dr. Jennifer L. Rice at the University of Georgia.





  • Professor of Economics Emily Northrop, who also serves on the Environmental Studies Program Committee, authored a lengthy commentary, “University Faculty Passes Resolution to Urge Climate Legislation,” that was published in the June issue of the peer-reviewed journal Sustainability: The Journal of Record.​





  • Part-Time Instructor of Applied Music Katherine Altobello was a featured mezzo-soprano soloist and ensemble member with the Texas Bach Festival under the direction of Barry Williamson and collaborative pianists Rick Rowley and Andrew Brownell. Featured works included J. S. Bach’s motets, “Jesu, Meine Freude” (BWV 227), “Singet dem Herrn ein Neues Lied” (BWV 225), Brahms’s “Liebeslieder Walzer, Op. 52,” and Vaughan Williams’s “Serenade to Music.”





  • Assistant Professor of Business Debika Sihi had a project titled “Home Sweet Virtual Home: The Use of Virtual and Augmented Reality Technologies in High Involvement Purchase Decisions” recently accepted in the Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing. This research explores the various ways digital technologies, specifically virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) features, impact different stages of consumer decision-making in a high-involvement purchase decision context (i.e., the purchase of a home). In addition, the use of such technologies is examined as a competitive advantage for sales agents.





  • Professor of Chemistry Emily Niemeyer and Maxime Boneza ’16 published an article titled “Cultivar Affects the Phenolic Composition and Antioxidant Properties of Commercially Available Lemon Balm (Melissa officinalisL.) Varieties” in the journal Industrial Crops and Products. The article is based on Boneza’s chemistry capstone project. The research was supported by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the Welch Foundation, and Southwestern’s Faculty–Student Projects Fund.





  • Professor of Biology Romi Burksgave an invited presentation at the Dallas Chocolate Festival titled “The Scientific Future of Chocolate: Genetics” as part of the educational lineup associated with the event that took place on Sept. 8, 2018. The presentation builds on her development of a First-Year Seminar focused on chocolate.





  • Associate Professor of Chinese Carl Robertson was featured in Avant Assessment, which provides “the world’s first online proficiency test.” The article is titled “Carl Robertson, The Mad Scientist of Texas.” The “madness” refers to Robertson’s combination of scientific data-driven assessment (from the test) with his humanist teaching approaches (as a PhD in comparative literature). Avantsolicited Robertson as an early adopter of the test, and the article showcases the Chinese Program as an example of how the STAMP test can be used to guide regular curricular change.  





  • Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry Maha Zewail-Foote was invited to give two oral presentations at the American Chemical Society national meeting in Boston. One presentation focused on using a computer simulation to teach chemical kinetics to undergraduate students. The other presentation highlighted her research on unique DNA structures and their biological functions.





  • Professor of Biology and Lillian Nelson Pratt Chair Ben Pierce published an article titled “Within-Spring Movement of the Georgetown Salamander (Eurycea naufragia)” in the August 2018 issue of Herpetological Conservation and Biology. The article was coauthored with former Southwestern students Areli Gutierrez ’15 and Samuel Guess ’17.





  • Associate Professor of Music Jason Hoogerhyde’s work “Ebullient Echoes” was chosen as part of the 52 Weeks of Flute Project, spearheaded by Chicago-based flutist Robin Meiksins. Meiksins prepared the composition in consultation with Hoogerhyde and presented it on the Project’s YouTube channel. The performance may be viewed here.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies Rebecca Edwards published a paper in the peer-reviewed journal Atmospheric Environment titled “Evaluation of El Niño–Southern Oscillation Influence on 30 years of Tropospheric Ozone Concentrations in Houston.” This work began as the SCOPE project of physics student Oliver Sale ’16 and is also coauthored by Dr. Gary Morris of St. Edward’s University. This work describes the impact of the El Nino–Southern Oscillation phenomenon on tropospheric ozone, an air pollutant and respiratory irritant, in Houston.





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth, serving as President of the South Texas Chapter of the American Association of Teachers of German, hosted the Association’s annual convention at Southwestern University on Saturday, Sept. 15, 2018. Collaborating with Assistant Professor of Computer Science Jacob Schrum, she taught hands-on workshops on integrating STEM and German. Welcoming high school and college German teachers from the region to SU’s campus is a community outreach initiative that supports articulated curricular development, mentoring, and resource sharing while increasing the visibility of our campus and our programs in Modern Languages and Literatures. Recognized for her outreach initiatives and appointed as an Ortslektorin (local lecturer) for Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst (DAAD, German Academic Exchange Service), a professional network of 850 members worldwide, Berroth recently received a $600 resource grant from the DAAD and the German government to build a collection of contemporary German literature.





  • Mellon Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow in the Feminist Studies Program Sequoia Maner performed poetry at the Six Square District Cultural Arts Festival, an event that celebrates art and brings awareness to Austin’s historically black Eastside, on Sept. 1, 2018.





  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Therese Shelton published three peer-reviewed classroom modules with coauthors Theresa Laurent of St. Louis College of Pharmacy and Beulah Agyemang-Barimah ’17. The modeling scenarios are differential equations models of absorption and elimination of aspirin, caffeine, and digoxin in the human body. Systemic Initiative for Modeling Investigations and Opportunities with Differential Equations (SIMIODE) published teacher and student versions for each of the three models.





  • Professor of Kinesiology Scott McLean presented a keynote address titled “Effectively Performing Competitive Swim Starts: Managing Body Rotation (and Some Other Things)” at the International Swim Coaches Association’s 9th Annual Hall of Fame Coaches Summit in Clearwater, Fla. This talk focused on recent SCOPE work completed with kinesiology major Peter Robinson, class of 2019, who attended the meeting, and kinesiology majors Alek Argueta and Dylan Neumann, both class of 2021.





  • Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin’s book Modern Latin American Revolutions (first edition 1993; second edition 1999) was recently purchased by Routledge and had a Kindle edition added. This fall marks 25 years in print.





  • Sara Boyd, class of 2020, Bobby Garza, class of 2019, Alexander Hoffman, class of 2020, Stan Kannegieter, class of 2019, Daniel Merritt, class of 2020, and faculty sponsor Associate Professor of Computer Science Barbara Anthony participated in the Binance Dexathon decentralized exchange coding competition to improve on Binance’s current blockchain implementation this summer. Along with learning more about the blockchain and practicing their software skills, the students also gained valuable experience in project management and working with teammates in remote locations. For their submission, Binance awarded the team a 10,000 BNB grant.





August 2018

  • Professor of Art Mary Visser and Studio Art majors Marissa Shipp, class of 2019, and Angelina Palacio, class of 2019, created animated artworks that were selected for an international art exhibition that opened the 19th convention of the Salon Culture et Jeux Mathématiques (Culture and Math Games Exposition), which took place at the Place Saint-Sulpice in Paris the week of May 24, 2018. The exhibition was sponsored by the International Committee of Mathematical Games, and the theme was “Mathematics and Movement.” Shipp’s Sneak Peakand Palacios’s Radarwere selected to be shown along with Professor Visser’s animated film A Different Way to Be. Also selected for this exhibition was the animated artwork Enter, Engage, and Eject, created by Alex Essex-Carmona’12.





  • Associate Professor of Communication Studies Valerie Renegar published a book chapter titled “Feminist Transgressions: Vulnerability, Bravery, and the Need for a More Imperfect Feminism” in Transgressing Feminist Theory and Discourse: Advancing Conversations Across Disciplines.The chapter is coauthored by Stacey K. Sowards.





  • Associate Professor of Spanish Carlos de Oro published a chapter titled “Between Armed Conflict, Social Awareness and the Neoliberal Market: The Case of Alias María” in Contemporary Latin American Cinema: Resisting Neoliberalism?, eds. Claudia Sandberg and Carolina Rocha (Palgrave Macmillan). He also presented a paper about the same topic at the 2018 annual Southeastern Council of Latin American Studies (SECOLAS) conference at Vanderbilt University.





  • Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry Mike Gesinski published a paper in the peer-reviewed journal Synletttitled “Synthesis of 1,4-Diketones via Titanium-Mediated Reductive Homocoupling of a-Haloketones.” This work describes research conducted in collaboration with three undergraduate students: Nathan Le, class of 2019, who is listed as the first author; Aimee Rodriguez, class of 2019; and James Alleyn ’15. In this publication, they describe a novel method to synthesize chemical compounds that serve as building blocks in the development of new pharmaceutical drugs.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Art Ron Geibel’s work is featured in the summer issue of ArtMaze Magazine. Based in London, ArtMaze Magazine is an international artist-run publication dedicated to showcasing and promoting experimental and progressive contemporary art. Sara Maria Salamone and Tyler Lafreniere, founders and head curators of Mrs. Gallery in New York City, curated issue no. 8/





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Education Suzanne Garcia-Mateus has been selected to be one of the 20182019 Council of Anthropology and Education (CAE) Concha Delgado Gaitán Presidential Fellows. As a Fellow, she will participate in a professional learning community with the new cohort and previous presidential fellows and mentors. She will also be paired with a senior CAE mentor, who will meet with her in person at the American Anthropological Association (AAA) Conference in San Jose, Cali., Nov. 1418, 2019.





  • Visiting Professor of Environmental Studies Rebecca Edwards presented a talk titled “El Nino-Southern Oscillation Influence on Tropospheric Ozone Concentrations in Houston” to the Engineering Group at the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality on Aug. 15. The talk was about her research with alumna Oliver Sale ’17 in which the warm phase of the El Nino Southern Oscillation was found to influence tropospheric ozone concentrations in the Houston metropolitan area. This research began as part of the SCOPE summer research program.





  • Professor of Art and Art History and Chair of Art History Thomas Noble Howe coordinated about fifty people from several teams on the site of the ancient Roman villas of Stabiae near Pompeii in June and July 2018. They included conservators and excavators from the State Hermitage Museum, Saint Petersburg, Russia, and the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, München; conservators from the Warsaw Academy of Fine Arts; architects from the University of Maryland and other schools (including four from Southwestern: Jake Stagner ’20, Haley Druart ’21, Kyle Leon ’20, and Abigail Jendrusch ’19); LiDAR from the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee; and coordination with a team of garden archaeologists from Cornell working in Pompeii. This was Howe’s tenth field season, and November will mark the twentieth year since the start of the project and Howe’s initiation of the Master Plan 2001. Howe is scientific director of the Restoring Ancient Stabiae Foundation.





  • Though not in attendance, Southwestern faculty and students won two awards at the 2018 Conference on Computational Intelligence and Games held August 14 17 in Maastricht, The Netherlands.

    • Computer Science and Math double-major Will Price, class of 2019, won 1st place in the Ms. Pac-Man track of the Ms. Pac-Man Vs. Ghost Team Competition. This competition allows individuals to program controllers for both Ms. Pac-Man and the Ghosts in a challenging, partially observable version of the classic video game. Price’s winning Ms. Pac-Man entry was developed as part of SCOPE 2018 under the supervision of Assistant Professor of Computer Science Jacob Schrum, and is an extension of Dr. Schrum’s own dissertation research on Ms. Pac-Man.
    • Schrum and collaborators from around the world won 1st place in the Short Video Competition for their video describing work on their recent paper, “Evolving Mario Levels in the Latent Space of a Deep Convolutional Generative Adversarial Network.” The purpose of the competition is to describe interesting research relevant to the conference in an informative and watchable manner.




  • Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers published “When an Accused Sexual Harasser is an Academic Superstar” in Lilith Magazine’s Blog.





  • Part-Time Assistant Professor of Music Alisha Gabriel is celebrating the release of two more nonfiction children’s books titled The Triangle Shirtwaist Fire Triggers Reform and Escaping an Animal Attack, both published by The Child’s World.





  • Associate Professor of Sociology Reggie Byron presented a paper titled “Race and Public Accommodations Discrimination in an Era of Colorblindness” at the Annual Meetings of the American Sociological Association (ASA) on Aug. 11. He also presided over undergraduate student presentations for the ASA Honors Program, served on an ASA panel for first generation faculty of color, and served as a faculty member on a focus group for Pearson Textbooks.





  • Professor of Art Victoria Star Varner’s engraving from the “Crossed Paths” series of prints was selected for the Awagami Prize in the Footprint International Competition at the Center for Contemporary Printmaking in Norwalk, Connecticut, by juror Susan Tallman from 319 prints by 166 artists representing 22 states and 18 countries. Tallman has written extensively on the history and culture of the print, as well as on issues of authenticity, reproduction and multiplicity. Her books include The Contemporary Print: from Pre-Pop to Postmodern (Thames and Hudson) and The Collections of Barbara Bloom(Steidl). Most recently she coauthored the catalogue for the British Museum exhibition, The American Dream: Pop to the Present, and is Editor-in-Chief of the journal and website Art in Print. Tallman’s writing has appeared in Art in America, Parkett, Print Quarterly, Arts Magazine and numerous books and museum catalogues. She currently teaches in the Department of Art History, Theory and Criticism at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.





  • Professor Emeritus of Sociology and University Scholar Edward L. Kain received the Carla B. Howery Award for Developing Teacher-Scholars at the annual meetings of the American Sociological Association in Philadelphia on Aug. 13, 2018. This national mentoring award recognized his publications on training graduate students and TA’s, a series of publications and national workshops on getting a job at a teaching-oriented institution, and nearly 25 years of organizing and leading the New Faculty Orientation program at Southwestern. Along with former SU faculty Jan Dawson (History) and Suzanne Chamier (French), he expanded this orientation program from a half-day workshop to a year-long program. He and his colleagues in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology developed an undergraduate program that became nationally recognized for training students in research and sending them to top graduate programs in multiple fields. Kain also inaugurated the monthly First Thursday receptions that recognize professional achievements on the Southwestern campus.





  • Professor and Chair of Biology Romi Burks presented a five-minute “INSPIRE” talk (20 slides timed for 15 seconds each) at a special session titled “Students as Ecologists: Collaborating With Undergraduates From Scientific Question to Publication” at the Ecological Society of America meeting in New Orleans, LA. The talk, “’Wait, You Can’t Leave Me!?’ How to Maintain Writing Productivity With Undergraduate Students Post-Graduation,” drew on her experience publishing peer-reviewed scientific papers with many Southwestern students. The text and slides have been archived (doi:10.7490/f1000research.1115925.1) on the F1000 Research site.





  • Associate Director of Grants Niki Bertrand won first place for best poster at the 2018 American Society of Primatologists Meeting in San Antonio, Texas. Her poster, titled “Effects of Crop Guarding on the Behavior of Wild, Habituated Groups of Macaca Nigra,” discussed one aspect of her dissertation research.





  • Assistant Professor of Business Debika Sihi was invited to participate as a judge for the Marketing EDGE Collegiate ECHO Marketing Challenge, cosponsored by Fossil Group, Inc. Public and private universities from around the U.S. participated in the competition





  • The Department of Mathematics and Computer Science was active at MathFest, a national meeting of the Mathematical Association of America (MAA) in Denver, Colo., Aug. 1 4, 2018.

    • President and Professor of Mathematics Edward Burger gave the invited plenary talk, “Think. Create. Connect: To Make Meaning and Make a Difference” to Project NExT, New Experiences in Teaching, a professional-development program for new or recent Ph.D.s in the mathematical sciences.
    • Professor of Mathematics Fumiko Futamura and Robert Lehr ’15 received the Carl B. Allendoerfer Award for expository excellence for their article “A New Perspective on Finding the Viewpoint,” published in the October 2017 issue of Mathematics Magazine.
    • Lehr won an award for his presentation “Perspective Drawing: How to Find the Immersion Point,” in the Pi Mu Epsilon (PME) student session.  He will begin his first year at the University of Texas School of Architecture this August. PME funded his attendance at the meeting.
    • Futamura copresented an expert class, the MAA Minicourse “Visualizing Projective Geometry Through Photographs and Perspective Drawings,” with Annalisa Crannell of Franklin & Marshall College.
    • Futamura was a panelist for the Project NExT panel discussion on “Building a Diverse and Inclusive Mathematics Major.” She discussed the EQUIP program and shared her experiences in cobuilding and coteaching in the program.
    • Professor of Mathematics Alison Marr presented “Hidden No More Lecture Series,” based on her minigrant from the National Science Foundation.
    • Marr coauthored “Re-Envisioning the Calculus Sequence,” based on her grant from the Associated Colleges of the South with Alex M. McAllister, of Centre College, and Joel Kilty, of Centre College.
    • Marr served as a moderator for the Town Hall “Shaping and Fostering an Equitable Community in Our Departments.” The results of this Town Hall discussion will be published in the Association for Women in Mathematics NewsletterMAA FOCUS, and Notices of the American Mathematical Society.
    • Associate Professor of Mathematics Therese Shelton and Emma Kathryn Groves ’17  copresented “Incorporating Biology Topics Into Mathematics Undergraduate Experiences.” Groves just completed her first year in the Mathematics graduate program at North Carolina State University. She began work on mathematical models of cholera during her HHMI-funded SCOPE in 2016 with Yinlin Dai ’16, supervised by Shelton. Shelton also shared some of her work funded under the W. M. Keck grant at Southwestern.
    • Shelton participated in a Data Science Workshop and joined a focus group of the MAA Committee on Faculty and Departments by invitation.
    • Shelton participated in events for SIMIODE, including a meeting of the coprincipal investigators of their grant from the National Science Foundation, which partly funded Shelton’s attendance.
    • Assistant Professor of Mathematics John Ross presented “Implementing Mastery-Based Quizzes and Tests in a Calculus Course.”




  • Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers published a review of the documentary film 93Queenin the Jewish Women’s Archive Blog.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Art Ron Geibel’s work was selected to be part of a group exhibition titled “Defining Form” at The Untitled Space in New York, N.Y. The exhibition explores how sculpture has evolved with the impact of contemporary culture: The art form has transcended from the conventional portrait to works that challenge the status quo; that address gender identity, racial stereotypes, LGBTQ ideologies, and queer constructs; and that explore themes of the resistance movement as well as progressive feminist narratives and activism. The exhibition was on view July 11 through Aug. 8, 2018.





  • Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin was invited to speak to a small, international workshop on “Doing IR Differently,” hosted by the Departamento de Relaciones Internacionales y Ciencia Política in the Colegio de Ciencias Sociales y Humanidades at the Universidad San Francisco de Quito on San Cristóbal Island, Galapagos, Ecuador. He was specifically asked to address how he identifies himself and engages with life, how he got to the point of wanting to engage his academic work differently, what he experienced or observed that made him question the discipline, his focus now in contrast to what previous knowledge and where he thinks that will take him, and what other kind(s) of “knowing” he might be able to share. Following that, Selbin was on a roundtable titled “Collaborations between Global North Journals and Global South Scholars and Teachers” at the Facultad Latinoamericana de Ciencias Sociales (FLACSO)International Studies Association Joint International Conference in Quito, Ecuador.





July 2018

  • Eight faculty members in the natural sciences published a letter to the editor in the Williamson County Sunin the July 29th edition. “SU Scientists Refute ‘Hoax’ Climate Claim” was in reference to the Sun’s July 22 account of a community forum on the science of climate change. The letter was written by Professor of Biology Max Taub and co-signed by Professor of Chemistry Kerry Bruns, Professor of Biology Romi Burks, Professor of Biology Maria Cuevas, Assistant Professor of Chemistry Mike Gesinski, Associate Professor of Biology Martín Gonzalez, Professor of Kinesiology Scott McLean, and Professor of Biology Ben Pierce.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Art Ron Geibel is featured in the 2018 Contemporary Austin’s Crit Group Exhibition at grayDUCK Gallery in Austin. The exhibition features the work of eight local artists selected to participate in The Contemporary Austin’s nine-month program, which aims to build a network for artists and their practice. The opening reception is Saturday, August 4 from 2 to 4 p.m. at grayDUCK Gallery located on East Cesar Chavez in Austin. Artist talks will be on Saturday, August 25 at 2 p.m.





  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Therese Shelton was active in two workshops under the grant through the National Science Foundation for which she is a co-principal investigator. The workshops were held at Manhattan College in the Bronx, N.Y., July 1528, 2018.





  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Therese Shelton presented “An Undergraduate Mathematical Modeling Capstone” at the SIAM Conference on Applied Mathematics Education (ED18), July 911, 2018, in Portland, Ore.





  • Professor of Mathematics Fumiko Futamura gave an invited talk titled “Perspectives of a Mathematician Artist” to around 90 high school students at the Mathworks Honors Summer Math Camp at Texas State University on July 13, 2018.





  • Associate Professor of Education Sherry Adrian, Professor of Education Michael Kamen, and Associate Professor of Education Alicia Moore, together with staff from Texas Parks & Wildlife, hosted the Texas WILD Forum over three days for 40+ participants in Mood-Bridwell. The Forum was an opportunity to demonstrate how to share conservation with young children with the intent to build a child’s sense of wonder with arts and crafts, music, reading, math, and conservation activities. Presenters demonstrated the importance of enhanced learning and development in all areas within the social, emotional, physical, linguistic, and cognitive domains,correlated with TEKS, Head Start, and National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) standards.

    • Dr. Adrian spoke of differentiating instructional content and procedures to foster more successful inclusion of all students in her presentation “Diversity Is Nature’s Greatest Asset: Including All Children in Project WILD.”
    • Professor of Biology Romi Burks presented the “ABCs of Apple Snails and eDNA.” She spoke about the basic ecology, diversity, and distribution of apple snails and how future monitoring efforts may incorporate environmental DNA.
    • Dr. Kamen delivered a session titled “WILD Play and the International Play Crisis.” His session touched on the importance of play in development and learning for children and animals.
    • Dr. Moore presented “The WILD Ones: Working to Identify Learning Pathways through Diversity,” which provided opportunities for participants to examine personal and cultural identities to enhance their teaching and learning.




  • Professor of Theatre John Ore served as director of the 10th annual Tal Lostracco Theatre Camp at Southwestern. This year, 83 campers and 29 staff participated in the two-week residential summer camp from July 8 to 22, culminating in one-act productions of Diramuid and GrainneThe Miracle WorkerGrub-Street OperaMr. Burns: A Post-Electric Playand Equus.





  • Heather Rice ’17, Roanne Schoubaki ’17, Paige Womble ’18, Chantal Gonzalez, class of 2019, Devon Lucero, class of 2019, and Professor of Psychology Fay Guarraci published a manuscript titled “Recreational Dose of Methylphenidate, but Not Methamphetamine, Decreases Anxiety-Like Behavior in Female Rats” in Neuroscience Lettersthis July.





  • Professor of Economics and Environmental Studies Emily Northrop joined Dr. Kerry Cook of UT’s Department of Geological Sciences to make the case for climate science and for legislation to incentivize CO2 reductions in a Georgetown Community Forum titled “Climate Science: Fact or Fiction.” Speaking against the science were Henry Savage, a retired chemical engineer, and Bob Parmelee, a retired computer and business executive. Approximately 160 attended and witnessed the fact-based arguments prevail. The forum was held on July 17 in the Georgetown Public Library. Learn more about the debate through this Williamson County Sun article





  • Isabel Tweraser (Computer Science and Music double major) and Lauren Gillespie (Computer Science and Chemistry double major), both class 2019, travelled to Kyoto, Japan, with Assistant Professor of Computer Science Jacob Schrum to attend the Genetic and Evolutionary Computation Conference. Several notable events occurred at the conference:

    • Dr. Schrum and coauthors from other institutions won the best paper award in the Digital Entertainment Technologies and Arts track for their paper “Evolving Mario Levels in the Latent Space of a Deep Convolutional Generative Adversarial Network.” This paper has also garnered much attention from several media outlets, such as The Register, Science Magazine, and Fast Company.
    • Tweraser presented the paper “Querying Across Time to Interactively Evolve Animations,” co-authored with Gillespie and Dr. Schrum.
    • Dr. Schrum presented the paper “Evolving Indirectly Encoded Convolutional Neural Networks to Play Tetris with Low-Level Features.”
    • Dr. Schrum addressed the entire conference as a representative of SparkCognition, Inc., in a short talk titled “AI Is Not Just Evolution; It’s Revolution.”
    • Tweraser was recognized at a recipient of an ACM-W scholarship, which provided her with free registration and paid for a portion of her travel costs to the conference.




  • Associate Professor of Computer Science Barbara Anthony had a publication accepted for the 17th International Conference on Autonomous Agents and MultiAgent Systems, which was presented in Stockholm, Sweden, in July 2018. The extended abstract on “How Bad is Selfish Doodle Voting?” was co-authored with Christine Chung of Connecticut College.





  • Associate Professor of Art History Allison Miller presented the paper “Purple Pigments and Dyes in Han China” at the Eighth Worldwide Conference of the Society for East Asian Archaeology at Nanjing University in Nanjing, China, on Sunday, June 10. Her paper was presented on a panel that she organized and chaired titled “New Research on Technology and Cross-Cultural Exchange in Han China.”





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies Rebecca Edwards gave an invited talk titled “Where Does Our Wind Come From?” to a group of campers at the Boothbay Sea and Science Center in East Boothbay, Maine. The talk covered influences on the wind along the southern Maine seacoast, from the global to the local scale, and emphasized how regional and global wind patterns have historically influenced trade and sailing ship design and how improved sail technology allowed ships more flexibility in their routes. The Boothbay Sea and Science Center is a nonprofit science education center where experts teach sailing, rowing, and marine science to K–12 students.





  • Associate Professor of Theatre Sergio Costola presented a paper titled “‘Lucrezia Borgia’s Performances at the Este Court” at the seventh Kings and Queens Conference, “Ruling Sexualities: Sexuality, Gender, and the Crown,” at the University of Winchester in the United Kingdom, July 913, 2018.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of History Joseph Hower published a chapter titled “‘A Threshold Moment’: Public-Sector Organizing and Civil Rights Unionism in the Postwar South” in Reconsidering Southern Labor History: Race, Class, and Power, eds. Matthew Hild and Keri Leigh Merritt (Gainesville: University of Florida Press).





  • President Edward Burger delivered the keynote address “Helping Students Make Up Their Own Minds” at the 2018 Conference for the Advancement of Mathematics Teaching in the General Assembly of the George Brown Convention Center in Houston on July 17. He also was invited to write an op-ed for the Williamson County Sun. His piece, titled “A Playful Paideia Moment for July 4,” was published in their July 8 edition.





  • Professor of Political Science and Dean of the Faculty Alisa Gaunder presented a paper titled “Cracking the Glass Ceiling in Japan: The Constraints of Party Strength and Organization” at the Asian Studies Association of Australia Conference July 35, 2018, in Sydney, Australia. She also was one of four scholars invited to participate in a featured roundtable on “Asia’s Democracies” at the same conference.





  • Assistant Professor of History Jessica Hower presented a paper titled “‘Partners Both’ in Gender and Empire: Mary I, Elizabeth I, and the Construction of Female Imperial Kingship, ca. 1550-1570” at the seventh Kings and Queens conference, “Ruling Sexualities: Sexuality, Gender and the Crown,” at the University of Winchester and Hampton Court Palace, United Kingdom, July 913, 2018. Her attendance was funded by a grant from the conference, which was sponsored by the Royal Studies Journal, Royal Studies Network, University of Winchester, Society for Renaissance Studies, and Historic Royal Palaces.





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth is co-authoring Grenzenlos Deutschan Inclusive Curriculum for the German Classroom with colleagues in Vienna, Austria, during the month of July. This project is sponsored by a National Endowment for the Humanities grant to advance the Digital Humanities. Earlier this summer Berroth completed research at Deutsches Literatur Archiv Marbach, Germany, as well as a project supported by a Sam Taylor Fellowship at Al Akhawayn University in Ifrane, Morocco.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of History Joseph Hower delivered a paper titled “The Politics of Work and the Work of Politics: Public Sector Labor and the Tax Revolt at Forty” on July 4 at a special one-day conference on “The American Moment: Past, Present, and Future” at the University of Reading, United Kingdom.





  • Associate Professor of Theatre Sergio Costola was an NEH Summer Scholar, having participated in the 2018 Summer Seminars and Institutes Program: Digital Technologies in Theatre and Performance Studies at the University of Georgia in Athens, June 1729.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of History Joseph Hower published an op-ed column titled “With Janus, the Supreme Court Guts the Modern Labor Movement” in the Washington Post’s Made by History digital feature.





  • Latin American and Border Studies senior and Mellon Undergraduate Fellow Esther Ramos ’19 presented “The Shadow Beast Within: La Quinceañera as a Means of Cultural Resistance” on a panel titled “Cultural Expressions, Cultural Resistance” at the 2018 meeting of “El Mundo Zurdo,” hosted by the Society for the Study of Gloria Anzaldúa at Trinity University on May 18, 2018. Associate Professor of Anthropology Brenda Sendejo served as moderator for the panel and presented a paper on her own research at the conference as well. Her paper was titled “Cultural Politics in the Borderlands: Exploring the Embodiment of Religion and Spiritual Activism as Resistance.”





  • Associate Professor of Anthropology Brenda Sendejo published “The Space In Between: Exploring the Emergence of Chicana Feminist Thought in Central Texas” in Chicana Movidas: New Narratives of Activism and Feminism in the Movement Era (UT Press 2018). Through archival and ethnographic research, Sendejo traced the emergence of Chicana feminism to the Chicana Research and Learning Center, The University of Texas at Austin, and Gloria E. Anzaldúa, uncovering a previously unknown feminist intellectual legacy.





  • Associate Professor of Computer Science Barbara Anthony was a panelist at the Google Faculty Institute held at Google’s Sunnyvale, Calif., campus in June 2018. The institute brought together approximately 200 faculty members and numerous Googlers to learn about changing cloud technology and discuss its incorporation into the classroom. This year’s institute had a particular focus on Machine Learning, including considerations about fairness in machine learning.





  • Dean of Enrollment Christine Bowman, with colleagues from the University of Houston and Texas State University, presented on Navigating the Texas Enrollment Process at the annual conference of the Higher Education Consultants Association (HECA) in Dallas. HECA counselors from around the country also visited the Southwestern campus, meeting with students, faculty and staff.  HECA is a group of independent counselors providing guidance to high school students in the college search process.





  • Associate Professor of English Michael Saenger published a review of Booth’s Richard III, a historical production of Shakespeare’s play as staged by John Wilkes Booth.





June 2018

  • Professor of Political Science and Dean of the Faculty Alisa Gaunder participated on a panel titled “Curriculum Reform: General Education” at the Annapolis Group Annual Meeting for Presidents and Chief Academic Officers, June 1820, 2018, in Annapolis, Md. She will serve as a program co-chair for the 2019 Annapolis Group meeting.





  • Professor of Psychology Traci Giuliano, together with psychology alums Sarah Matthews’17, Kayleigh Thomas ’18, Maddie Straup ’18, and Martin Martinez ’18 published an article titled “Not cool dude: Perceptions of solicited vs. unsolicited sext messages from men and women” in the journal Computers and Human Behavior. A summary of the study can be found here.





  • Assistant Professor of History Jessica Hower presented a paper titled “‘Bloody’ or ‘Most Serene and Potent’?: Mary I, The British Empire, and the Making of the Early Modern Atlantic World,” at the British Scholar Society’s annual Britain and the World Conference at Exeter University, Exeter, UK, June 21–23, 2018. She also chaired a panel on “Relations and Perceptions in the Early Modern Caribbean.”





  • CASE, the Council for Advancement and Support of Education, has named Southwestern University a gold award winner in its 2018 Circle of Excellence Awards for the Office of Marketing and Communications’ redesign of the SU website. A panel of experts selected Southwestern’s entry in the institutional websites category from a field of 64 competing schools.





  • Professor of Psychology Fay Guarraci, together with current Psychology and Animal Behavior students Chantal Gonzalez, class of 2020, Devon Lucero,Morgan Stinnett, both class of 2019, alumni Paige Womble ’18, Heba Abdel-Rahim ’17, Jennie DeVore ’17, Emma Quadlander ’17,  and a collaborator from St. Edward’s University, Associate Professor of Psychology and Behavioral Neuroscience Jessica Boyette-Davis, published an article in Pharmacology, Biochemistry and Behavior,“The Effects of Ketamine on Sexual Behavior, Anxiety, and Locomotion in Female Rats,” investigating the effects of ketamine on sexual behavior. They found that a dose and protocol used for treating human depressive symptoms not only had no disruptive side-effects on sexual function, but actually improved sexual motivation in an animal model.





  • Two Southwestern students will present posters at SACNAS 2018, the national diversity in STEM conference organized by the Society for Advancement of Chicanos/Hispanics and Native Americans in Science. Computer Science and Chemistry double major Lauren Gillespie ’19, who has been awarded a travel scholarship to attend the conference, will present her poster “Comparing Direct and Indirect Encodings Using Both Raw and Hand-Designed Features in Tetris,” based on SCOPE research with Gabriela Gonzalez ’16 and Assistant Professor of Computer Science Jacob SchrumIan Orantes-Orellana ’19 will present a poster titled “Photobleaching Lifetimes of Cy5-Alkyne and Cy-5 Alkyne Fluorescence” co-authored by Gillespie, Mauro Garcia ’18 and Visiting Professor of Chemistry David Cooper.





  • Associate Professor of Communication Studies Valerie Renegar and Visiting Assistant Professor of Communication Studies Lamiyah Bahrainwala attended the 50th anniversary of the Rhetoric Society of America Conference in Minneapolis, Minn., May 31–June 3. They each presented peer reviewed papers. Renegar’s “‘Evil is Part of the Territory’: Inventing the Stepmother in Self-Help Texts” drew from research funded by a 2016–2017 Sam Taylor grant. Bahrainwala presented a paper titled “‘Free Muslim Hugs’ and Offering Vulnerable Bodies for State Security.” They each also participated in well-attended round table talks on issues related to their teaching, research, and activism.





  • Part-time Instructor of Applied Music Adrienne Inglis’ composition “El sol” for SATB chorus, harp, and Venezuelan cuatro enjoyed its world première performance June 2, 2018, in Austin, Texas, with Inversion Ensemble and harpist Shana Norton. “El sol” (The Sun), sets Sonnet XXXIII by Luis Martín de la Plaza to a Venezuelan joropo for SATB chorus, harp, and cuatro. Luis Martín de la Plaza (1577–1625) grew up in the small southern Spanish town of Antequera. A gifted poet as well as a priest, he wrote this Petrarchan sonnet in classical style. The octave (the first eight lines) presents a violent thunderstorm with dark clouds that hide the sun, fierce winds that fight with the sea, waves that batter the rocky coastline, and hail that blankets the fields. The sestet (the final six lines) turns the narrative to the sun’s breaking through the clouds, calming the sea, hushing the wind and thunder, painting the clouds gold, and adorning the fields with fragrant flowers. One is left to wonder whose eyes are so beautiful as to make the sun’s dawn envy their colors. The sonnet’s rhythmic and vivid imagery lends itself to a Venezuelan joropo, a creole dance and musical style derived from Spanish, African, and indigenous sources. The SATB choral parts indulge in some cross rhythms and playful polyphony over a typical joropo rhythm on the harp and Venezuelan cuatro.





  • Assistant Professor of Computer Science Chad Stolper co-authored a state of the art report (STAR) “State of the Art of Sports Data Visualization” with researchers from around the globe which he presented at EuroVis 2018 in Brno, Czech Republic. The report will be published in the journal Computer Graphics Forum. The survey covers past work in sports visualization in both research and journalism categorized by the type of data (box score data, tracking data, and meta-data) and addresses future research in sports visualization research including new forms of sports data, the growth in volume of sports data, the rise of non-competitive sports data, and the ethics of studying sports data.





  • Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin presented a paper titled “The Legacies of 1968: Social Movements & Revolution in the Austerity-Security State Era and Age of Authoritarian Revanchism” at the conference “1968-2018, Fifty Years After: Where is the Social Movement Field Going?” in Florence, Italy, May 23–25, 2018. The conference was sponsored by the Centre on Social Movement Studies (Scuola Normale Superiore), the European Consortium for Political Research Standing Group on Participation & Mobilization, and the European Sociological Association Research Network 25. He also attended the annual Latin American Studies Association meeting to meet with young faculty and graduate students about small liberal arts colleges (SLACs) and conducted research related to the 1939 Retirada (the flight from Spanish fascism across the border) and the 1940 death of Walter Benjamin.





  • Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers published “Putting the Jew Back in the Queer,” a review of Harvey Milk: His Lives and Death, in Tablet.





May 2018

  • Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers published “Why Did I Cry for Philip Roth?” in Lilith Magazine’s Blog.





  • Professor of Art Mary Visser and senior studio art majors Marissa Shipp ’19 and Angelina Palacios ’19 had animated artworks accepted for the International Mathematical Games Committee’s 19th Salon Culture et Jeux Mathématiques (Culture and Math Games Exhibition)  which took place at Place Saint-Sulpice in Paris, France, May 2427, 2018. This year’s exhibition, “Mathematics and Movement,” was organized by Jean-Philippe Uzan, CNRS Research Director at the Paris Institute of Astrophysics. Shipp’s work “Sneak Peak,” Palacios’ work “Radar,” and Visser’s animated film “A Different Way to Be” were shown.





  • Professor of Art Victoria Star Varner was invited by the Texas Commission of the Arts to serve on the jury panel for the Texas Young Masters Awards in Austin this past December.  In April 2018, she attended the Awards Ceremony at the Zachary Scott Theatre. The Texas Young Masters is a joint program of the Texas Cultural Trust (TCT) and the Texas Commission on the Arts (TCA). The Young Masters program was established to support talented young people and advance the creative economy by investing the future of the arts. The ceremony was attended by Texas’ First Lady Cecilia Abbott who serves as honorary chair. Since the program’s inception in 2002, the TCT and TCA have given 313 grants to 139 Young Masters and awarded $857,500 to aspiring artists from across the state.  

    Varner was also a juror for the Imagine exhibition at Texas State University’s Round Rock campus held March–May 2018.





  • Head Softball Coach Angela Froboese has been selected to represent Division III colleges at a prominent, selective softball camp with 30 Division I coaches, seven of which just competed at the D1 regional championships!





  • Associate Professor of Theatre Desiderio Roybal was nominated for an Austin Critics Table Award for Best Scenic Design for his design of Trinity Theatre’s production of Florian Zeller’s The Father, directed by Professor Emeritus of Theatre Rick Roemer and produced by David Jarrott Productions. The Father is a tragi-comedy mystery, which takes a sobering and realistic look at family dynamics using unsentimental and emotionally charged scenes. The audience experiences the confusion of dementia as seen through the eyes of a man living through the physical and psychological loss of self. The incremental vanishing and reappearing scenic elements provided a poignant commentary on what is and is not real.





  • Associate Professor of History Melissa Byrnes was featured in a podcast on the legacies of 1968. Listen here: Part I, Part II.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of History Joseph Hower was the featured guest for Union City Radio’s “Labor History Today” podcast for the week of May 13. He discussed the life of labor leader Jerry Wurf and the upcoming Supreme Court case of Janus v. AFSCME. The full podcast is available here. The discussion begins at the 18:00 minute mark.





  • Assistant Professor of Psychology Carin Perilloux and several students recently published an article titled “Creative Casanovas: Mating Strategy Predicts Using—but Not Preferring—Atypical Flirting Tactics” in Evolutionary Psychological Science. This paper documents a series of studies conducted over a year and a half examining unexpectedness in flirting behaviors. Justin White ’18, Helena Lorenz ’18, and Aliehs Lee ’17 are co-authors.





  • Music and Computer Science double-major Isabel Tweraser, class of 2019, has been awarded a $1,200 ACM-W scholarship to help her travel to Kyoto, Japan, to present her peer-reviewed conference paper “Querying Across Time to Interactively Evolve Animations” at the upcoming Genetic and Evolutionary Computation Conference. The paper was co-authored with Lauren Gillespie, class of 2019, and Assistant Professor of Computer Science Jacob Schrum. ACM is the Association for Computing Machinery, and ACM-W scholarships are specifically aimed at helping female students attend research conferences in hopes of encouraging them to pursue further research opportunities in the future.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Communication Studies Lamiyah Bahrainwala facilitated a panel titled “Talking about Race with your Child” at Russell Lee Elementary School in Austin on May 8, 2018. The panel featured experts in education, education policy, social work, and critical race theory, and provided specific strategies for talking about race with elementary school-aged children.





  • Caleb Martin ’17, a Music Education major and former student of Part-time Instructor of Applied Music Anna Carney, has been accepted to the Buffet Crampon Summer Clarinet Academy in Jacksonville, Fla. This is an honor offered to only 20 clarinetists across North America. Caleb will have the opportunity to work closely with internationally acclaimed artist faculty, including Philippe Cuper, Pierre Génisson, Alides Rodriguez, Victoria Luperi, and Inn-Hyuck Cho. There will be a hands-on seminar on instrument maintenance and adjustment as well as several lectures given by the artist faculty. Caleb is currently teaching music in the Georgetown public schools and also serves as assistant principal clarinet in the Austin Civic Orchestra, conducted by Professor of Music Lois Ferrari.





  • Professor of Music Lois Ferrari  conducted the Austin Civic Orchestra (ACO) in their 5th concert of the season, Texas Rising Stars, in Bates Recital Hall at the University of Texas Butler School of Music on March 25, 2018. In addition to showcasing the winners of UT’s string concerto contest, the ACO also performed Aaron Copland’s “Appalachian Spring” ballet suite for 13 instruments and Pulitzer Prize winning composer Jennifer Higdon’s “Blue Cathedral.” This concert was performed as part of the larger 2017–2018 season theme, Made in America, for which Ferrari and the ACO are committed to performing music written by American composers.





  • President Edward Burger was interviewed by the Austin American-Statesman in April about the future of higher education and Southwestern University. A portion of that interview appeared in their Sunday, May 13, 2018, edition. The piece is also available online.





  • Professor of Art and Art History Thomas Noble Howe has been invited to present a lecture titled “The Birth and Death of Modern Architecture in America, 1930–1970” in the conference After and Beyond the Crisis: The USA in the 1930s at the University of Perugia, Italy, on May 15, 2018. The conference is part of the lecture series “American Voices in Italy” sponsored by the American Embassy in Rome.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Art Ron Geibel’s artwork is featured in Issue IX of Create! Magazine, an independent, contemporary art magazine highlighting the work of artists, makers, and creative entrepreneurs from around the world. He also has artwork published in A Ceramic Guide: The Art of Creating and Teaching Wheel-Thrown Ceramics by Trent Berning. The book offers a detailed approach to the ceramic medium and highlights the use of the potter’s wheel as a mode of artistic expression.





  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Alison Marr and her 11 co-authors had a piece published in the May 2018 issue of the Notices of the American Mathematical Society about their experiences at the Workshop on Increasing Minority Participation in Undergraduate Mathematics this past summer in Park City, Utah. The piece is available here.





  • Elyssa Sliheet, Class of 2019, and Daniela Beckelhymer, Class of 2020, attended the Infinite Possibilities Conference for Women of Color in Mathematics and Statistics in Washington, D.C., April 14–15, 2018. Sliheet presented a poster on her REU (Research Experiences for Undergraduates) research “Shift Operators on Directed Infinite Graphs” and Beckelhymer presented a poster on her SCOPE research with Associate Professor of Mathematics Alison Marr “Choose Your Own Adventure: An Analysis of Interactive Gamebooks using Graph Theory.” Beckelhymer won a prize for Best Undergraduate Poster Presentation at the conference.





  • Assistant Professor of Music Hai Zheng Olefskywill be honored by Austin Mayor Steve Adler and the Austin City Council with a special proclamation on Thursday, May 10, 2018 at 5:30 p.m. at City Hall for her contribution to the community as the Artistic Director for the Young Musicians Festival Competition at the Asian American Cultural Center for the past 18 years. She will also perform at the Austin City Council Chamber on that day. The performance will be aired live on ATXN.





  • Professor of Political Science Shannon Mariotti was invited to serve as a Guest Editor for the journal Political Theory: An International Journal of Political Philosophy. She will edit the journal’s new “Guide to the Archives” on the topic of political theory and American literature.





  • Madison Vardeman, class of 2018, will present her communication studies capstone research “U2 and Nostalgia: Running to Stand Still or the Start of a Beautiful Day?” at The U2 Conference on June 15, 2018. Vardeman’s research analyzes U2’s Joshua Tree Tour 2017concert in Dallas, Texas, to prove that a nostalgic framework can be used in a way that does not solely glorify the past. She argues that this can be accomplished by applying the principles of Affect Theory and Aristotle’s emotional appeals to place focus on the emotional reactions that nostalgia elicits rather than focusing on the memories of the past events that are associated with the original JoshuaTreealbum and tour.





  • Professor of Psychology Carin Perilloux and her WOU collaborator, Jaime Cloud, presented a poster with two students at the Western Psychological Association annual convention in Portland, Ore., on April 28, 2018. The poster was titled “Mate-by-numbers: Budget, mating strategy, and sex determine preferences in partner’s facial and bodily traits.” Justin Whiteand Helena Lorenz,both class of 2018, co-authored the presentation.





  • Associate Professor of English Michael Saenger published a new blog for the Times of Israel titled “Liberal Zionism, Renewed.”





  • Thirteen students and four faculty traveled to Dallas, Texas, April 5 7 to attend and give talks at the 98th Annual Meeting of the Texas Section Mathematical Association of America held at El Centro College.

    • Associate Professor of Mathematics Alison Marr co-presented “Starting Inquiry-Based Learning Consortia”
    • Associate Professor of Mathematics Gary Richter presented “Revisiting a Limit as X approaches 0, the limit of sin(x)/x = 1”
    • D’Andre Adams, class of 2020, and Daniela Beckelhymer, class of 2018, presented their SCOPE 2017 research with Dr. Marr titled “Choosing Your Own Adventure: An Analysis of Interactive Gamebooks Using Graph Theory”
    • Morgan Engle, class of 2018, presented her SCOPE 2017 and capstone research supervised by Associate Professor of Mathematics Therese Shelton and Visiting Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies Becca Edwards titled “Influence of ENSO on United States Gulf Coast Ozone Using a Surface Ozone Climatology”
    • Sam Vardy, class 2018, presented a pedagogical talk supervised by Visiting Assistant Professor of Mathematics John Ross titled “Taking on Statistics with R(Our) Power”
    • Taylor Axtel, class of 2019, Alan Carr and Charlie Ellison, both class of 2020, presented research supervised by Associate Professor of Mathematics Fumiko Futamura, “3-D Matrices: How Do They Work?”
    • Music major Jacob Wilson, class of 2020, presented a musical composition from Dr. Futamura’s Explorations in Mathematics course “Frieze Patterns in Music”
    • Aiden Steinle,  class of 2020, presented research supervised by Dr. Futamura, “Staying in Shape with Real World Mappings.” Aiden won an award for Best Presentation in Geometry.
    • The other four student attendees were Keyshaan Castle, class of  2020, Katie Dyo and Elyssa Sliheet, both class of 2019, and Bonnie Henderson, class of 2018. Dr. Futamura and Dr. Ross also attended the meeting, with Dr. Ross participating in the Texas Section Project NeXT meeting.




  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Fumiko Futamura was invited to give two talks, one on April 13 at Texas State University in San Marcos, Texas, titled “How to Mathematically Immerse Yourself in Art,” and the other on April 17 at the Phi Beta Kappa event (En)Lightning Talks Houston titled “When Artists Become Mathematicians.” The (En)Lightning Talk was a 5-minute talk, complete with a countdown clock and an M.C. ready to hit a gong when time ran out. Futamura finished her talk in 4 minutes and 58 seconds.





  • Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry Maha Zewail-Foote was invited to give a seminar at the University of Houston on her research involving genetic instability and cancer. She also met with faculty and students from the chemistry and biochemistry departments.





  • Professor of Art and Art History and Chair of Art History Thomas Noble Howe just published a conference paper titled “Bold Imitator: Greek ‘Orders,’ the Autodidact Polymath Architect and the Apollonion of Syracuse” in “The Many Faces of Mimesis, Selected Essays from the 2017 Symposium on the Hellenic Heritage of Western Greece, Siracusa, Sicily, May, 2017,” eds. Heather Reid, Jeremy DeLong, (Parnassos Press, Sioux City, IA, 2018) 1-20. The paper was written from a keynote address he delivered at a conference in Siracusa, Sicily, in May 2017. The paper returns to Howe’s much-referenced dissertation “The Invention of the Doric Order” (Harvard, 1985) and exploits recent scholarship to strengthen his argument that the complex Doric order of architecture was (incredibly) created all at once in one project (the Apollonionthe Apollo Temple), and was nearly complete on its first appearance because it was an adaptive imitation of a type of Egyptian colonnade, by arguing that the first Greek architects were the same type of well-travelled polymaths and masters of rule-and-compass geometry as the first so-called Greek “physiological” philosophers (the ‘Milesians’). The first true ‘liberal arts’-trained (i.e. self-trained) professionals were therefore not philosophers, but architects, who were the first Greeks to write actual prose treatises. Then, as throughout history, what constituted an ‘architect’ was very fluid. The underlying theoretical basis of the paper is that adaptive inheritance is essential to successful innovation and that fluid borders between creative professions are too.





  • Professor of Economics Dirk Early had his research proposal “Effective Homeless Interventions and the Importance of Local Housing Market Conditions” accepted for funding through a partnership between the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and the U.S. Bureau of the Census. The research grant funds his analysis of data from the Family Options Study, a randomized evaluation of housing interventions targeted toward homeless families. He will examine which interventions available to homeless families are the most effective in reducing homelessness and whether their effectiveness varies with local housing market conditions. The primary goal of the research is to guide policymakers in developing homeless prevention strategies that are the most effective for their area.





  • Associate Professor of Communication Studies Bob Bednar presented a keynote address titled “Melancholy Remains: Encountering Images, Objects, and Spaces of Trauma” at the 26th Annual Symposium About Language and Society, Austin (SALSA), “Language in Society: Culture, Space & Identity” at the University of Texas at Austin, on April 20, 2018.





  • Associate Professor of Art History Patrick Hajovsky was invited to a conference on “Sacrifice and Conversion,” held at Harvard University’s Villa I Tatti, outside of Florence, Italy, April 1920, 2018. He presented on Aztec concepts of blood and heart sacrifice and their conversion into Christian idioms through ideas of the body and excess. While there, he was interviewed by a reporter for Arqueología mexicanato respond on the recent theory that the central face of the Aztec Calendar Stone is a portrait of the king Moteuczoma (r. 1502-20).





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth organized a community outreach event which welcomed 20 students and their teachers from Paul Klee Gymnasium in Gersthofen (close to Augsburg), Germany to Southwestern. On a German American Partnership Program, GAPP, those students took a campus tour and interacted with student of German in classes and during lunch. Since 1972, GAPP has been funded by the German Foreign Office and is the only short-term exchange program that receives an assistance award from the U.S. Department of State. The SU German Program regularly collaborates with German teachers at McNeil and Westwood High Schools, inspiring intercultural understanding, promoting German language instruction, and motivating personal friendships across cultures. This marks the 5th bi-annual partnership collaboration. The German program thanks Director of Community-Engaged Learning Sarah Brackmann and Faculty Administrative Assistant Susie Bullock for their support.





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth participated in the Northeast Modern Language Association Conference in Pittsburgh, Pa., April 1215, 2018. She presented two papers. One introduced SU’s innovative experience abroad for student-athletes on a round table titled “Outreach Strategies and Innovative Teaching in Small German Program Building.” The other, titled “Slow Violence in Marica Bodrožić’s Memory Narratives,” introduced eco-critical perspectives on Bodrožić’s trilogy, which is part of Berroth’s monograph project.





  • German majors Melina Boutris, class of 2021, and Martin Lopez, class of 2018, presented their research projects at the University of North Texas Undergraduate German Studies Conference in Denton on April 15, 2018. Boutris presented her analysis of German Hip-Hop artist and rapper Samy Delux’s representation of his relationship to German identifications in “Dis wo ich herkomm.” Lopez presented his analysis of German chancellor Merkel’s position during the 2015 European solidarity crisis in response to refugees fleeing war and persecution. Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth mentored both students.





  • Political Science major Elizabeth Wright, class of 2018, published her fall 2017 Senior Capstone project, “I Always Feel Like Somebody’s Watching Me. Understanding the Authoritarian Tendencies of the U.S. National Security State,” in Politikon, the peer-reviewed, flagship publication of the International Association for Political Science Students. Wright is currently a Fellow at the Muslim Public Affairs Council and will remain there while starting an MA in Security Policy Studies at George Washington University’s Elliott School in the fall.





  • Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin spoke on “Nicaragua’s Crisis and/in the Regional Political Landscape” as part of a Foro Urgente Nicaragua at the Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies at the University of Texas at Austin.





  • President Edward Burger delivered the closing Keynote Address at the 2018 Fulbright Foundation Educational Forum on April 27, 2018, in Athens, Greece. The theme of the Forum was “Redesigning Educational Systems: From Theory to Praxis,” and the opening keynote speaker was Allan Goodman, President of the Institute of International Education, who oversees all Fulbright Foundation programs.





April 2018

  • Visiting Assistant Professorof Education Suzanne Garcia-Mateusand Cristina Costas,class of 2019, presented a paper titled “Bilinguals Raising Bilingual Children: Institutional, Societal, and Familial Influence on Bilingual Parents’ Family Language Policy.” This new study examines how community members are making sense of the way local institutions and society support or influence family language policy decisions. The presentation was part of a panel titled “Language Planning and Language Policy” at The Symposium about Language and Society Austin (SALSA XXVI) at The University of Texas at Austin, April 20–21, 2018.





  • Associate Professor of Sociology Reggie Byron, Professor of Sociology Maria Lowe, Professor of Sociology Sandi Nenga, and five students attended the annual meeting of the Southern Sociological Society in New Orleans, La., April 4–7.  

    • Madeline Carrola, class of 2019, presented “’We’re Not Wasting Coffee Grounds’: How College Students Respond to Peers’ Resource Consumption and Waste Disposal by Social Class.”
    • Sophia Galewsky, class of 2018, presented “Abortion Provision as High Risk Activism: What Motivates Providers?”
    • Mary Jalufka, class of 2018, presented “White Female Elementary School Teachers and Campus Safety in the Wake of Sandy Hook.”
    • Esteffany Luna, class of 2018, presented “Am I Still Latino Enough? The Construction of a Latino Identity among Hispanics who do not Speak Spanish.” Luna’s paper was also the recipient of the 2018 Odum Undergraduate Paper Award. This marks the 9th time in 13 years that a Southwestern sociology senior has won this award.
    • Dr. Byron co-organized a panel titled “Innovative Uses of Data in the Study of Workplace Discrimination” and presented a co-authored paper titled “Bureaucratic Legitimation, Discrimination, and the Racialized Character of Organizational Life.”
    • Dr. Nenga served as a presider for multiple sessions at the meeting.
    • Dr. Lowe and Dakota Cortez,class of 2019, presented “Race and Contested Public Spaces in a Liberal Predominantly White Planned Urban Community.”




  • Assistant Professor of History Jessica Hower presented a paper titled “‘Thy bright sphere’: Elizabeth I, the Armada, and the Atlantic World, ca. 1570–1600” at the “Elizabeth I: The Armada and Beyond, 1588 to 2018” Conference, sponsored by Royal Museums Greenwich and the Society for Court Studies, at Queen’s House and National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, United Kingdom, April 19–21, 2018.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Art Ron Geibel’s work was chosen for The 22nd San Angelo National Ceramic Competition. The juror for the exhibition, Peter Held, is an award winning artist, academic, writer and former curator at the Ceramics Research Center at Arizona State University. The exhibition celebrates both functional and sculptural ceramics from the United States, Canada, and Mexico. The exhibition is on view April 20–June 24 at the San Angelo Museum of Fine Arts in San Angelo, Texas.





  • Senior Physics and Computational Math double-major Yash Gandhi, class of 2018, has been awarded an H. Y. Benedict Fellowship from Alpha Chi National Honor Society. Alpha Chi is a national honor society that was founded at Southwestern University in 1922, and is only open to the top 10% of juniors and seniors. Furthermore, only two Alpha Chi members from each university may be nominated to be awarded one of 10 fellowships awarded nationwide. The $3,000 in fellowship money will be used to help Yash attend graduate studies in Computer Science next year. Full press release here.





  • Emma Walsh,  class of 2018, presented a paper based on her history honors research, “The Nuremberg War Trials and the Legacy of the Armenians,” at the 9th Annual Texas A&M History Conference, “Conflicts and Resolutions.”





  • Part-time Instructor of Applied Music Katherine Altobello ’99 performed the mezzo-soprano solos of Mack Wilberg’s “Requiem” with St. Edward’s University Masterworks Singers and Orchestra, under the baton of Dr. Morris Stevens. This was the Texas premiere of the work, performed on March 4 and 8, 2018, at St. Edward’s University Ballroom and St. Theresa’s Catholic Church in Austin.





  • Director of Special Collections and Archives Jason W. Dean’s article “The Manuscript Works of S. Fred Prince (1857–1949),” co-authored with Sarah B. Cahalan, director of the Marian Library at the University of Dayton, appeared in the most recent issue of the journal Archives of Natural History.The article is the first academic examination of the significant (and unknown) botanical and scientific illustrator S. Fred Prince. The article is the product of a seven-year collaboration and effort between Dean and Cahalan





  • Associate Professor of Theatre Kerry Bechtel recently designed the costumes for Unity Theatre’s production of Becky’s New Car in Brenham, Texas. Bechtel has been working with Unity Theatre, a professional theatre company located in historic Brenham, for the past 8 years. This production runs through May 6, 2018.





  • Professor of Anthropology Melissa Johnson presented a paper, “Human Being otherwise: Commoning, Blackness and Freedom in Belize,” for the panel series “The Commons, Commoning and Co-Becoming” at the American Association of Geographers Annual Meeting in New Orleans, La., April 13, 2018.





  • Associate Professor of Education Alicia Moore serves as the Educational Consultant for Bela’s Children’s Books. Most recently, she provided her expertise to the author of the wonderful book The Silent Surprisewhich shares the playground adventure of a young boy who is autistic and nonverbal. The Bela’s Children’s Books Collection was created with the hope of helping children and parents become more aware of current and prevalent social issues using the collection to foster teachable moments that explore self-awareness. Leslie A. Turner ’11, an Austin-based illustrator, theatrical designer, and fabricator, beautifully illustrated the book, while Nekia Becerra ’12, Technology Design Coach in Austin ISD, and Nichole Aguirre ’12, Director of Early Childhood in Manor ISD, wrote the complementary lesson plans for The Silent Surpriseunder the supervision of Dr. Moore.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Education Suzanne García-Mateus presented a paper titled “‘Envisioning and Understanding Two-Way Dual Language Bilingual Education for Transnational Emergent Bilingual Learners” as part of the symposium “Dual Language Education and Neoliberal Reforms: When a Bilingual School Becomes a School of Choice” at the American Educational Research Association (AERA) conference in New York City, NY, April 13–17, 2018.





  • Several Psychology faculty members and students presented papers at the annual meeting of the Southwestern Psychological Association in Houston April 7–8. Students presenting with Professor of Psychology Traci Giuliano included:

    • Kirk Zanetti, Taylor Torres, both class of 2020, and Athena Pinero, class of 2019: “Now that’s aggressive: Examining the relationship between political orientation and political flaming.”
    • Sarah Butterworth, Justin White, Kyle Fraser, all class of 2018, and Lizette Cantu, class of 2019: “Is he flirting with me? How sender gender influences emoji interpretation.”
    • Allison Cook, Rachel Allen, Winston Cook, all class of 2018, and Daniella Orces, class of 2019: Emoji manners: Perceptions of students’ and teachers’ emoji use in emails.”
    • Kate Davis, Dean Neubek,class of 2019, and Emily Olson, class of 2020:Fake smiles, faker accounts: The relationship between life satisfaction and Finstagram use.”
    • Sarah Butterworth, Rachel Allen, and Allison Cook, all class of 2018: Blogging a way out: A study of depression and Tumblr usage.”

    Students presenting with Associate Professor of Psychology Bryan Neighborsincluded:

    • Rachel Allen, Matthew Gonzales, both class of 2018, Kaylyn Evans ’16, and Purna Bajekal ’16: “Attachment Insecurity and Cognitive Distortions Among Offenders in Substance Treatment.”

    Students presenting with Assistant Professor of Psychology Carin Perillouxincluded:

    • Helena Lorenz and Justin White, both class of 2018: Creative Casanovas: Mating strategy predicts using — but not preferring — unusual flirting tactics.”




  • Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin was a participant on a roundtable organized by Cynthia Enloe titled “Diversifying the Discipline: Problems, Policies, and Prescriptions” and served as a mentor for ISA’s Taskforce on the Global South’s “Mentoring Café: Strategies and Support for Global South Scholars” at the 2018 International Studies Association meeting. In addition, as associate editor he co-convened the 2018 International Studies Perspective’s Editorial Board Meeting and chaired the annual meeting of the New Millennium Books in International Studies series of which he is co-editor. Finally, as part of the ISA’s Taskforce on the Global South as well as the nascent South-South Educational Scholarly Collaboration and Knowledge Interchange Initiative, Selbin was invited to attend conferences in the coming year in Quito, Ecuador, and Guadalejara, Mexico.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of History Joseph Hower presented a paper titled “Betty the Bureaucrat?: Public Workers and Comparable Worth in the Long 1970s” at the annual meeting of the Organization of American Historians in Sacramento, Calif., April 13.





  • Associate Director of Grants Niki Bertrand won the Patricia Whitten prize for best primatology poster/presentation at the 2018 American Association of Physical Anthropologists Meeting in Austin, Texas. Her poster, titled “Effects of tourism on the behavior of wild, habituated groups of Macaca nigra,” discussed one aspect of her dissertation research. Her attendance at the conference was generously supported by the Asian Studies Small Research Grant from the Asian Studies Program at the University at Buffalo.





  • Professor of Art and Art History Thomas Noble Howe has been invited to speak to the University of Texas community and the public about his recent publication of the ten-year project to excavate, study, reconstruct and interpret the 108 m. long garden of the ancient Roman Villa Arianna at Stabiae near Pompeii. The lecture will take place Friday, April 20, at 4:00 p.m. in the Department of Classics on the University of Texas campus. The findings have been presented in the last two years at lectures in St. Petersburg, Moscow, Hong Kong, San Antonio, Seattle, the Pompeii area, Rome, and the Representations series on the SU campus, and other preliminary publications. Howe has been lead excavation director, editor and author.





  • Associate Professor of English Michael Saenger was invited to deliver a keynote lecture at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi. His talk, titled “Shakespeare in a Time of Madness,” will be part of Shakespeare’s Birthday Celebration on April 23.





  • Associate Professor of English Michael Saenger wrote a review, available here, of a performance of Ben Jonson’s Volpone.





  • Assistant Professor of Computer Science Chad Stolper, along with co-authors at Microsoft Research and Georgia Tech, had a book chapter titled “Data-Driven Storytelling Techniques: Analysis of a Curated Collection of Visual Stories” published in the edited volume Data-Driven Storytelling published by AK Peters/CRC Press. The chapter details design patterns that data-driven journalists have been using to present their work.





  • Associate Professor of Art History Allison Miller gave an invited lecture titled “Terracotta Warriors after the First Emperor: Re-evaluating the Qin Legacy in the Han” at Saint Mary’s University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, April 5. Her lecture was sponsored by the departments of Modern Languages and Classics, History, and Asian Studies. On April 6, Miller flew to Fredericton, New Brunswick, to give an invited lecture on the same topic for the New Brunswick Society of the Archaeological Institute of America. This lecture, held at New Pavilion Beaverbrook Art Gallery, was organized by faculty from the University of New Brunswick-Fredericton and delivered as part of the Archaeological Institute of America’s 2017–2018 lecture program.





  • Spanish and Latin American and Border Studies students Karla Pérez, class of 2019, Alexandra Vásquez, Stephanie García, and Marie Nugpo, all class of 2018, presented research papers at the XXVI Latin American Studies Symposium at Rollins College April 6, 2018, under the supervision of Associate Professor of Spanish Angeles Rodríguez Cadena.





  • Director of Special Collections and Archives Jason W. Dean was invited by the Grace Museum of Abilene and the Old Jail Art Center of Albany to give two presentations at those institutions. His presentation at the Grace focused on Hertzog’s work with noted Texas authors including John Graves, J. Frank Dobie, and Tom Lea. His presentation in Albany focused on the 1958 Hertzog reprinting of the foundational book “Interwoven,” written by Albany resident Sallie Reynolds Matthews. Descendants of the author attended the talk.





  • Technical Assistant and Exhibitions Coordinator Seth Daulton participated in a conference-sponsored, themed printmaking portfolio, “PLACE: Meaningful Space,” at the annual Southern Graphics Council International (SGCI) conference in Las Vegas, Nev., April 4–7. The portfolio included prints from 20 national and international artists that speak to how places are meaningful to us. An excerpt from the portfolio abstract: “There are places where we achieve epiphany, a maximum synchronization of a place and our heartbeat — a meaningful space. This experience is defined as ‘Topophilia’ — a strong perception of place, the affective bond with environment, mental, emotional, and cognitive ties to a place.”





  • Five Economics majors traveled to present their research at the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas Undergraduate Research conference held April 6.

    • Maranda Kahl, class of 2018, presented “Wellbeing and Marriage: Does Marriage Improve Mental Health?”
    • Manuela Figueroa-Casaand Aresha Davwa, both class of 2018, presented “A Cost-Benefit Analysis of Federal Housing Assistance Programs.”  
    • Stan Kannegieter, class of 2019, presented “Does Higher Education Decrease Hypertension Death Rates?”
    • Penny Phan, class of 2018, presented a poster related to her work on “The Effect of H-1B Visas on Economic Growth.”  




  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Political Science Emily Sydnor presented two papers at the Midwest Political Science Association’s Annual Meeting. The first, “What’s your excuse? The Effects of Personal and Political Justifications for Flip-Flopping,” demonstrated that constituents are more effectively persuaded by explanations for a Congressman’s position shift when they are grounded in public opinion or personal experience, rather than party politics. The second, “Creating Trust in Government,” investigated whether local governments could increase citizen trust by emphasizing the participatory nature or policy successes of the government. Two current political science students, Emily Tesmer,class of 2020, and Camille Martin, class of 2019, presented posters analyzing survey experiments they are conducting on the SU campus.





  • Professor of English David Gaines published “The Old and the New,” a review of Why Bob Dylan Matters, in “The Bridge,” the leading Dylan fanzine in Europe.





  • Nine Computer Science and Computational Math majors traveled to present research posters at the South Central Regional Conference of the Consortium for Computing Sciences in Colleges held April 6 at Texas Christian University in Fort Worth, Texas.

    • Valentine Cantu, Yash Gandhi, Marissa Madrid-Ortega,and Kolton Noreen,all class of 2018, won 2nd place in the poster competition for their research “Looking AHEAD: Developing an Advising Hub for EQUIP And DRAFT,” which was done as part of their senior capstone in software engineering along with students Kristen McCrary and Angus Strickland,both class of 2018, under the supervision of Associate Professor of Computer Science Barbara Anthony.
    • Will Price,class of 2019, and Matt Sanford,class of 2020, won 3rd place in the poster competition for their research “Dynamic Graph-Level Operations (DGLOs),” which was done as part of SCOPE 2017 under the supervision of Assistant Professor of Computer Science Chad Stolper.
    • Bobby Garza,class of 2019, presented “Encryption Using Nonlinear Dynamics,” which was also done as part of SCOPE 2017 under the supervision Dr. Chris Curry, former Coordinator of FIrst-Year Physics Labs.
    • Sarah “Darwin” Johnson,class of 2020, presented “Evolution of Board Game Playing Agents,” which was done as part of SCOPE 2017 under the supervision of Assistant Professor of Computer Science Jacob Schrum.
    • Alice Quintanilla , class of 2020, presented “Evolving Artificial Intelligences to Compete in Real-Time Strategy Games,” which was done as part of SCOPE 2017 under the supervision of Dr. Schrum.
    • Assistant Professors of Computer Science Jacob Schrum and Chad Stolper also attended the conference.




  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Art Ron Geibel served on a panel titled “New Queers Eve: LGBT Clay” at the 52nd annual National Council on Education for the Ceramic Arts (NCECA) conference in Pittsburgh, Pa., March 14–17. The panel featured four LGBT artists who make choices about the legibility of their queer experience in overt and coded ways in their work. For Queer Theorist José Esteban Muñoz, living a queer experience in or out of the public eye is an act of artwork and activism, filled with poignancy, pleasure, beauty, and urgent work. Panelists discussed ways in which they navigate issues of exposure and vulnerability by making this aspect of their experience public through depictions, metaphors, and objects.





  • Assistant Professor of Business Debika Sihi was invited to participate in the “Survey of Digital Governance in Municipalities Worldwide” conducted by the E-Governance Institute at the Institute for Public Service at Suffolk University. This study represents a continued effort to evaluate digital governance in large municipalities throughout the world. Invited participants, who work/research in the domain of digital innovation, contribute by evaluating online citizen participation opportunities of various municipalities.





  • Professor of Economics Emily Northrop’s blog Southwestern University faculty collectively endorse climate legislation” was published by the Citizens’ Climate Lobby (CCL) on April 4, 2018. CCL has nearly 100,000 members worldwide, organized into 475 chapters. It is a grassroots organization that lobbies for a carbon tax with proceeds distributed to US households on an equal basis.  





  • Alumni Nathan Townsend ‘17 and Shelby Hall ‘17 have had their capstone research project “How Changes in Block Design Affect Swimming Relay Start Performance” based on their research with Professor of Kinesiology Scott McLean and Professor of Kinesiology Jimmy Smith accepted for presentation at the 23rd Annual Congress of the European College of Sport Science in July of 2018.  This is the largest sports science conference in Europe.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Physics and Environmental Studies Rebecca Edwards launched two ozonesonde instruments on weather balloons from the SU campus on March 30 and 31. She was assisted by mathematics student Morgan Engle, class of 2018, environmental studies students Lucas Evans, class of 2018, and Daniella De Souza, class of 2019, and alumnus Amy McKee ’96 and her family.  The launches are part of an experiment designed to evaluate the impact of the growing Austin Metro area on the air quality in Georgetown. Instrumentation carried by the balloons measures ozone, an air pollutant at the surface, as well as temperature and relative humidity. Each balloon reached an altitude of 30 km before bursting and provided valuable insight into the vertical structure of the atmosphere over the City of Georgetown.  Three more launches are planned for the month of April and all launches are open to all. This research was generously supported by a Green Fund grant.





  • Professor of Political Science Shannon Mariotti presented a paper titled “Zen and the Art of Democracy: Sensory Perception, Aesthetics, and the Political Value of Buddhist Modernism” on the panel “Mindfulness and Politics: Embodied Social Change” at the Western Political Science Association conference in San Francisco, Calif., on March 30, 2018. She also presented a paper on her experiments with mindfulness and meditation as pedagogical practices in the political science classroom at a roundtable titled “Staying Centered with Too Much To Do: The Possibilities and Dangers of Mindfulness in the Neoliberal University.”





  • Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers published “Manicotti, Anyone?: A Kosher for Passover Easter Dinner” in Tablet. Read it here.





  • Assistant Professor of History Jessica Hower published an article titled “‘All Good Stories’: Historical Fiction in Pedagogy, Theory, and Scholarship” in Rethinking History: The Journal of Theory and Practice 23, no. 1 (January 2019, online publication March 28, 2018): 1–48. She was also appointed to the Journal’s editorial board.





  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Therese Shelton has a peer-reviewed paper, “Mathematical Modeling Projects: Success For All Students,” published in the journal PRIMUS: Problems, Resources, and Issues in Mathematics Undergraduate Studies. DOI: 10.1080/10511970.2016.124932. The paper appeared online in February 2017 and will appear in the April 2018 print issue (Volume 28, Number 4).





  • English Professor David Gaines was interviewed by BBC Radio 4 on March 25, 2018 regarding “Trouble No More,” a new documentary film about Bob Dylan’s Born-Again music and views. Listen here (begins at 22:30).





March 2018

  • Professor of Political Science Shannon Mariotti was invited to give a lecture at The University of Texas at San Antonio on Feb. 22, 2018. Her talk to the department of Political Science and Geography drew from her current book project and was titled “The Experience of Democracy and the Politics of Buddhist Modernism.”





  • Director of General Chemistry Labs Willis Weigand and Professor of Chemistry Emily Niemeyer went with six Southwestern students to the American Chemical Society National Meeting in New Orleans, La., on March 19, 2018. The following students presented their research:

      • Tyler Adams , class of 2018, presented a poster on his research with Weigand titled “Synthesis and characterization of a copper (II) ethylene amine complex by an improved reaction methodology.”
      • Ryan Peraino , class of 2018, presented a poster on his research with Weigand titled “Synthesis and characterization of new thiadiazole sulfonamide ligands reacted with copper (II) salts.”
      • Margaret Rowand , class of 2018, presented a poster on her research with Weigand titled “Synthesis and characterization of a novel copper (II) thiosemicarbazone complex.”
      • Triston Beadle , class of 2018, presented a poster on his research with Niemeyer titled “Anthocyanin concentrations, antioxidant properties, and phenolic contents among commercially available acai berry supplements.”
      • Jillian Bradley , class of 2018, presented her poster “Surface functionalization of silicone films using click chemistry: synthetic strategies for designing mechanically tunable surfaces” based on her Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.
      • Alison Riggs, class of 2018, presented a poster, “Effects of oxidative stress on non-B DNA structures in a yeast model system,” based on her research with Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry Maha Zewail-Foote and Part-time Assistant Professor of Chemistry Michael Douglas.




  • Southwestern University has been awarded TreeCampus USA designation by the Arbor Day Foundation. Earning this distinction was a joint effort by the 2017 Spring Environmental Studies Capstone Group, Physical Plant, the SU Business Office, the Sustainability Committee, and the Environmental Studies Program. Students involved in the project include SU alumni Vallery Rusu ’17, Alex Morris ‘17, Olivia Ruane ’17, Colleen Nair ’17, and Rebecca Huteson ’17.





  • Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies Joshua Long served as an invited panelist at the Society for the Study of Southern Literature Conference in February where he presented on a chapter he published last year in the UNC Press volume The Bohemian South titled “Liminality and the Search for the New Austin Bohemianism.”





  • Music majors Melanie Lim, class of 2021, and Chloe Easterling, class of 2020, participated in the South Texas District Auditions of the National Association of Teachers of Singing. The students performed art songs and arias before a panel of judges and received written critiques. The event was held at The University of Mary Hardin Baylor in Belton, Texas on March 24. Visiting Assistant Professor of Music Dana Zenobi served as an adjudicator and concluded her term as Secretary of the South Texas NATS chapter.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Education Suzanne García-Mateus presented a paper titled “‘They are mostly like Spanish-speakers. We are Pro- Spanish speakers.’ The Power of Hegemony in a Two-Way Bilingual Education Classroom” as part of the colloquium, “Bilingualism for all?: Challenges and opportunities in two-way immersion” at the American Association of Applied Linguistics (AAAL) conference, Chicago, Ill., March 24–27, 2018.





  • Professor of Music and Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts Michael Cooper channeled the percussionist skeleton in his academic closet to publish a review of The Cambridge Companion to Percussion (ed. Russell Hartenberger; Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2016) in Performance Practice Review 22 (2017): 1-5.





  • Assistant Professor of Computer Science Jacob Schrum has had four full-length peer-reviewed papers accepted to appear in the proceedings of, and be presented at, the 2018 Genetic and Evolutionary Computation Conference (GECCO), to take place July 15-19 in Kyoto, Japan. The four papers are:

      • “Querying Across Time to Interactively Evolve Animations,” written with Music major and Computer Science minor Isabel Tweraser, and Computer Science/Chemistry double-major Lauren Gillespie, both class of 2019. This work deals with the simulated evolution of artistic animations, and includes the results of a human-subject study conducted at SU. The various pieces of art generated by users can be seen on here. This research will also be presented at this year’s Research and Creative Works Symposium.
      • “Evolving Indirectly Encoded Convolutional Neural Networks to Play Tetris With Raw Features,” written solely by Schrum, but extends previous research conducted as part of SCOPE 2016 with students Lauren Gillespie, class of 2019, and Gabriela Gonzalez ’16. This previous work was presented at GECCO last year. Though both papers evolve artificial agents to play Tetris, the new results are a vast improvement, due to the use of Convolutional Neural Networks.
      • “Evolving Mario Levels in the Latent Space of a Deep Convolutional Generative Adversarial Network,” joint research with several researchers in the area of Artificial Intelligence and Games from around the world. The work began as part of a research seminar on AI-Driven Game Design held at the Castle Dagstuhl Leibniz-Center for Computer Science. One session at the seminar focused on “Game Search Space Design and Representation.” Schrum joined several researchers from this group to explore interesting ways of generating new levels for the game Super Mario Bros. based on existing game levels.
      • “Divide and Conquer: Neuroevolution for Multiclass Classification,” joint research with Data Scientists as SparkCognition, Inc., an AI-startup in Austin where Schrum works as a part-time consulting scientist. The paper is associated with a product called Darwin, which uses simulated evolution to solve various types of Data Science problems. The paper specifically explores how Darwin can solve classification problems using ensembles.




  • Associate Professor of Sociology Reggie Byron and Southwestern University alumni Will Molidor ’12 and Andy Cantu ’13 had a co-authored paper titled “U.S. Newspapers’ Portrayals of Home Invasion Crimes” accepted for publication at The Howard Journal of Crime and Justice. The paper is the first study in existence to quantitatively analyze newspaper portrayals of these crimes. The co-authors read and content-coded over 3,000 newspaper articles from 15 U.S. cities before running a model to determine the predictors of enhanced home invasion crime news coverage.





  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Therese Shelton and Visiting Assistant Professor of Mathematics John Ross had a peer-reviewed paper, “Supermarkets, Highways, and Natural Gas Production: Statistics and Social Justice,” published in the journal PRIMUS: Problems, Resources, and Issues in Mathematics Undergraduate Studies. This work began with a 2016 ACS Workshop on Math for Social Justice.





  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Therese Shelton is a co-principal investigator with a newly awarded three-year grant from the National Science Foundation. This will support the mission of the mathematical community SIMIODE to encourage and support faculty in using modeling to motivate learning of differential equations in context. The award will fund faculty development, practitioner workshops, and more.





  • Associate Professor of History Melissa Byrnes presented a paper, “Awakening the Public Conscience: The French Committee for Amnesty in Portugal and Anti-Salazar Activism,” at the Society for French Historical Studies Annual Conference in Pittsburgh, Pa., March 8–10. She also chaired and provided the formal comment for a panel on “Transnational Human Rights in the Twentieth Century: Decolonization and Activism in the ’68 Years.”





  • Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry Maha Zewail-Foote was awarded a prestigious research grant from the National Institutes of Health. Over the next two years, Zewail-Foote and colleagues will utilize a cutting-edge technology to detect DNA damage caused by environmental agents within specific DNA sequences. DNA damage can lead to genetic mutations and instability, which is responsible for many human diseases.





  • Associate Professor of Spanish Angeles Rodriguez Cadena presented a paper titled “Memoria cultural y una heroína de la Independencia de 1810: Gertrudis Bocanegra en la literatura y el cine” (“Cultural memory and a heroine of the Mexican Independence of 1810: Gertrudis Bocanegra in literature and film”) at the XXI Congreso Internacional de Literatura y Estudios Hispánicos, Quito, Ecuador, March 79, 2018.





  • Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers published “Faculty Service and the Difference between Opportunity and Exploitation” in the Chronicle of Higher Education.





  • Associate Vice President for Alumni and Parent Relations Megan Frisque was recognized as one of Alpha Xi Delta Fraternity’s “40 Under 40” in the Winter issue of “The Quill,” the fraternity’s national magazine. The article included alumnae members who are “realizing their potential in their careers and communities.”





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Music Dana Zenobi appeared as both a performer and a presenter at the second annual Music by Women Festival, held at Mississippi University for Women March 13.  Zenobi and University of Texas at Austin trombonist Megan Boutin performed “Love While You May,” a recently-composed song cycle for soprano and trombone by Southwestern alumna Ashley H. Kraft ’14. Zenobi also performed “Petite rêve,” a four-song cycle by Los Angeles based composer Genevieve Vincent.  She presented a lecture recital titled “À deux voix: Romantic Duets for Women’s Voices” along with former Southwestern faculty member Dr. Agnes Vojtko and pianist Dr. Michael Bunchman (University of Southern Mississippi). The lecture recital presented works by Fanny Mendelssohn Hensel, Cécile Chaminade, and sister composers Maria Malibran and Pauline Viardot with the intent of situating this vocal literature more firmly within the canon.





  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Fumiko Futamura organized students and faculty to create a hyperbolic crochet coral reef for a table at the Hot Science Cool Talks event on coral reefs at the University of Texas on Feb.16. To prepare for the event, she gave talks on hyperbolic geometry and crochet at SU for the 107 Lecture in Mathematics and for the Art Association, and taught students, faculty and staff how to crochet hyperbolic planes that incidentally look like coral. Nine students, faculty and alumni contributed: Kari Darr ’19, Visiting Assistant Professor of Mathematics Linda DiLullo, Christi Ho ’18, Abigail Jendrusch ’19, Jacob Jimerson ’19, Chris Nissen ’18, Aiden Steinle ’18, Natalie Young ’19. Christi, Jacob and Aiden attended the event, teaching the public about hyperbolic geometry and how to crochet. The coral reef will be on display in the entrance to the Smith Library from March 20 to the end of the semester.





  • Southwestern University, along with two other ACS institutions, Millsaps College and Hendrix College, was the recipient of a recently-funded ACS Diversity Grant to support an initiative known as FOCUS (Faculty of Color Uniting for Success). The project’s overall objectives are to enhance recruitment, success, and the retention of faculty of color at our three institutions and in all ACS consortia schools. It aims to raise awareness of the challenges that faculty of color face through sustained advocacy, summer workshops, and regular surveys of participants on campus climate. In conjunction with ACS’s Director of Diversity and Inclusion, Anita Davis, the initiative will also provide materials and webinars to help educate institutional leadership about ways to better support faculty of color. This year, the FOCUS project will host its summer workshop at Southwestern June 1015. This workshop was designed to bring together faculty of color from ACS member colleges for a week-long summer retreat focusing on scholarship, networking, self-care, professional advancement, navigating service demands, and the challenges that faculty of color face on their path to professional success in the academy. It will include faculty participants from Hendrix, Millsaps, and Southwestern. Associate Professor of Education Alicia Moore serves as the FOCUS Program Director. Director of Teaching, Learning and Scholarship Julie Sievers, Senior Director of Foundation Relations Larkin Tom, and Associate Professor of Anthropology Brenda Sendejo serves on the FOCUS steering committee and will serve as facilitators for the 2018 FOCUS summer retreat.





  • Retired Professor of Theater and former Dean of the Sarofim School of Fine Arts Paul Gaffney was honored when Mayor Dale Ross and the City Council declared February 27, 2018, PAUL GAFFNEY DAY in Georgetown, Texas, in recognition of his contributions to the arts at Southwestern University and in the city of Georgetown.  The proclamation recognized his service as Dean of the School of Fine Arts, his work in guiding the expansion and renovation of the Alma Thomas Fine Arts Center, his service as the first Chair of the Georgetown Arts and Culture Board, and his work on developing the Georgetown Art Center. The Mayor and City Council presented him with the proclamation at its meeting on that date.





  • Assistant Professor of Business Debika Sihi and Southwestern University alumna Kara Lawson ’16 published a co-authored paper titled “Marketing Leaders and Social Media: Blending Personal and Professional Identities” in the Journal of Marketing Theory and Practice. The paper examines marketing leaders’ use of social media accounts which connect their personal and professional identities. Using feedback from Chief Marketing Officers (CMOs) and secondary social media data, the authors investigate the motivation, benefits, and challenges in maintaining an account which is both personal and professional in nature. In addition, content published through these accounts is analyzed to better understand the nature of the information disseminated through these channels.





  • Associate Professor of Art History Allison Miller gave an invited, remote guest lecture titled “Art & Politics in Mao’s China” in Patricia Schiaffini-Vedani’s “Politics of China Through Literature and Film” course at Texas State University on Feb. 22, 2018.





  • Associate Vice President for Facilities Management Mike Millerhas become a John Maxwell Certified Trainer, Speaker, and Coach.





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth completed a review of “Framing Islam: Faith, Fascination, and Fear in Twenty-First Century German Culture,” a special issue of Colloquia Germanica: Internationale Zeitschrift für Germanistik, guest-edited by Heidi Denzel de Tirado and Faye Stewart. The review appears in the 2018 Women in German Yearbook: Feminist Studies in German Literature & Culture.





  • Esteban Woo Kee , class of 2018, presented his research on “ACT UP and the Revolution of Gay Rights” at the 6th Annual Human Rights Undergraduate Research Workshop at Illinois Wesleyan University, Feb. 23 25, 2018.





  • Professor of Art and Art History and Chair of Art History Thomas Noble Howe will lead the formal public presentation of the recent publication of the volume “Excavation and Study of the Garden of the Great Peristyle of the Villa Arianna at Stabiae, 2007-2012,” Quaderni di Studi Pompeiani, VII 1916 (1917) at the Centro di Studi Americani, Palazzo Mattei di Giove, Via Michelangelo Caetani 32, Roma, on March 12, 2018. The event is co-sponsored by the American Embassy in Rome, the American Academy in Rome and the Fondazione Restoring Ancient Stabiae, of which Howe is Scientific Director. The principal lecture, “Strolling with Power: Recent Discoveries at the Garden of the Villa Arianna, Stabiae,” to be given by Howe, will be either in English or Italian.





  • Associate Professor of Computer Science Barbara Anthony was a panelist on the “Teaching with the Cloud” panel at Special Interest Group for Computer Science Education (SIGCSE) 2018, the 49th ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education, in Baltimore, Md., in Feb. 2018.





  • Associate Professor of Spanish Abby Dings’ article titled “The Undergraduate Spanish Major Curriculum: Faculty, Alumni and Student Perceptions” (coauthored with Tammy Jandrey Hertel) was published in the Winter 2017 issue of Foreign Language Annals.





February 2018

  • The February Newsletter of the American Association of Teachers of German (AATG) features a report on Southwestern’s First Annual Poetry Slam. Part-time adjunct Assistant Professor of German Michelle Reyes and Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth organized this event to promote community engagement and intercultural learning through spoken word art. AATG co-sponsored the event with a Deutsch macht Spaß(German is fun) grant.





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth completed peer review for 11 research presentations and 94 session proposals submitted for the 2018 convention of the American Association of Teachers of German (AATG) and the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL). Each member of the team of three reviewers is appointed by the Presidents of those organizations, recognizing their experience and expertise, to serve as representative for the profession at the K–12, College, and Research University levels. Team members are responsible for reviewing portions of the proposals submitted across all levels of instruction. They perform this substantial service to the profession using an elaborate, nationally recognized rubric that includes addressing relevance, content, purpose, outcomes, and strategies for engagement for each proposed conference contribution.





  • Institutional Research Analyst Grace Mineta presented “Make Your Data Tell a Story: The Dos and Don’ts of Creating Graphics” on Feb. 13 at the Texas Association of Institutional Research (TAIR) 2018 conference in Corpus Christi, Texas.





  • Associate Professor of Art History Allison Miller was interviewed live on the television news show, China 24, produced by China Global Television Network. Miller discussed the significance of China’s terracotta army after one of the terracotta warriors was vandalized at the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia.





  • Part-time Instructor of Applied Music Adrienne Inglis’ composition “Cochineal” for SATB chorus and electronic dance track enjoyed its world première performance Feb. 10, 2018, with Inversion Ensemble. Inglis’ son, Walter Torres, a PhD oceanography student at Duke, created the electronic dance track. Inversion Ensemble performed “Cochineal” Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018, at Wesleyan at Estrella and Sunday, Feb. 25, 2018, at Westminster Presbyterian Church Fellowship Hall. “Cochineal” combines earthy and electronic sound to set to music the ancient Andean recipe for dyeing alpaca wool with cochineal, an insect full of carminic acid that feeds on prickly pear cactus. The recipe depicts the synthesis of insects, alpaca wool, minerals, water, fire, sun, time, and a couple of unusual ingredients to create colorful beauty. Using Andean harmonies and scales, the music captures the grandeur of the Andes mountains and the artisanal tradition of hand-crafting colorful yarn from local natural ingredients. The electronic track features compelling dance rhythms produced from original sound design and processing with software instruments Serum, Alchemy, Sylenth, and Massive among others. “Cochineal” is the first musical collaboration between Adrienne Inglis and Walter Torres.





  • Associate Professor of History Melissa Byrnes presented a paper titled “Anti-Salazarism and Student Solidarity: Franco-Portuguese Student Activism in the 1960s” at the 1968 in Global Perspectives conference hosted by the University of South Carolina, Feb. 15–17, 2018.





  • Virginia Stofer ’15 had a peer-reviewed paper on her capstone research titled “Do wrist orthoses cause compensatory elbow and shoulder movements when performing drinking and hammering tasks?” published in the Irish Journal of Occupational Therapy. Professor of Kinesiology Jimmy Smith and Professor of Kinesiology Scott McLean were co-authors on the paper.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Music Dana Zenobi performed as the featured artist for LOLA (Local Opera Local Artists) Austin’s quarterly concert series on Feb. 15. Her program, “A Valentine to Female Composers,” introduced Austin-area music lovers to art songs by female composers, including Alma Mahler, Fanny Mendelssohn, Lori Laitman, Libby Larsen, and two sets of sister composers, Lili and Nadia Boulanger and Pauline Viardot and Maria Malibran.  She also performed a newly-composed song cycle by Canadian-born composer Genevieve Vincent, who is currently based in Los Angeles, Calif.





  • Professor of Psychology Traci Giuliano was an invited presenter at LASA (Liberal Arts and Sciences Academy) high school in Austin last week. She spoke as part of their Cultural Awareness Day on the topic of gender and sexual orientation.





  • Director of Advising and Retention Jennifer Leach attended the NACADA Administrators’ Institute in Daytona Beach, Fla., Feb. 8–10, 2018, where she was able to meet with others with similar titles/responsibilities to consider practices that will continue to enhance advising at Southwestern. She was also asked to apply to be a faculty member for next year’s institute as a representative for private universities.





  • Associate Professor of Theatre Desiderio Roybal designed the stage setting for Frank Zeller’s play, The Father, produced by DJ Productions in Austin, TX. The director of the production is SU Professor Emeritus of Theatre Rick Roemer. The production runs through early March. The Fatherexplores family dynamics as we all age. As life expectancies lengthen, so do the social and economic repercussions of an aging population, not the least of which is the effect of memory loss, dementia and Alzheimer’s on families and caregivers. With the inevitable and trying parent-child role reversals, the non-linear structure of the script thrusts the audience headlong into the world of Andre, the father, to wonder, ”What is true, what is reality?”





  • Communications major Shea C. Brewer, class of 2019, had his final project in a course on Feminist Fairy Tales accepted for publication in the online literary journal Spider Mirror. His teacher and mentor for the project is Visiting Assistant Professor of German Michelle Reyes. Spider Mirroris a blog-style journal that seeks to promote and support the arts in all its modern forms. Brewer’s tale, The “Seven” Dwarfs, explores the potential untold story of an eighth dwarf by the name of Leery, with a twist on the picture perfect image of classic Snow White.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Art Ron Geibel is one of eight local artists selected to take part in The Contemporary Austin’s 2018 Crit Group. The program helps build a network for artists by providing monthly group critiques and one-on-one studio visits with the co-leaders and gallerists.  Participating artists were selected by Annette Carlozzi, former Curator at Large at the Blanton Museum of Art, Sterling Allen, Assistant Professor of Sculpture at Texas State University, and Andrea Mellard, Director of Public Programs and Community Engagement for The Contemporary Austin. The program culminates in a group exhibition at grayDuck Gallery in Austin in August 2018.





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth presented a moderated talk on “Global Football: Integrating Academics, Athletics and Intercultural Learning” for the HEDS UP session at the 104th annual meeting of the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U) on Jan. 24–27, 2018, in Washington, DC. Out of more than 450 proposals received, fewer than 20 percent were accepted, and Berroth’s presentation was one of five selected for this TED Talk-inspired format. Berroth introduced a large audience to Southwestern’s innovative short-term embedded experience abroad for student athletes in our football program. With the small set of data from the first two programs in Germany and Italy, she is beginning to track how SU’s approach can lower barriers for students typically underserved or underrepresented in traditional study abroad programs, including men, student athletes, students of color, and first generation students.





  • Professor of Music Lois Ferrari conducted the Austin Civic Orchestra’s 4th concert of the season, An American in Paris, which featured music written by Gershwin, Larsen, Barber, and Popper, on Feb. 3. Featured were local soloists Toby Blumenthal and Southwestern student Isabel Tweraser, class of 2019 and winner of the 2017 Southwestern Concerto Contest. This concert is a part of the larger ‛17–‛18 season theme, Made in America, for which Ferrari and the ACO are committed to performing music written by American composers.





  • Professor of Political Science and Dean of the Faculty Alisa Gaunder’s article titled “‘Madonnas,’ ‘Assassins,’ and ‘Girls’: How Female Politicians Respond to Media Labels Reflecting Party Leader Strategy” was published in the most recent issue of the interdisciplinary U.S.-Japan Women’s Journal.





  • Professor of English David Gaines presented “Bob Dylan, Beautiful Classroom Moments, and ‘Everything Side By Side Created Equal’” on Feb. 10 in Tulsa, Okla. He was one of three invited speakers at “Dylan in the Classroom,” the inaugural symposium of the University of Tulsa’s Institute for Bob Dylan Studies and the affiliated Bob Dylan Archive. As well as addressing the ways in which Dylan’s music is being taught and studied from elementary classrooms through high school and into college, he also discussed the possible future directions of Dylan Studies and chaired a course planning workshop.





  • Associate Professor of History Melissa K. Byrnes  gave a talk for the Newcomers & Friends of Georgetown about philanthropy, community engagement, and the lessons and experiences from her First Year Seminar, “Doing Good and Doing It Well.”





  • Assistant Professor of Art History Allison Miller gave an invited lecture titled “Terra-cotta Warriors after the First Emperor: Re-evaluating the Qin Legacy in the Han” at the University of Richmond on Feb. 1. The lecture was delivered as part of the Archaeological Institute of America’s 2017–2018 lecture program.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Education Suzanne García-Mateus received second place in the Bilingual Education Research SIG Outstanding Dissertation Award, which will be presented on April 15, 2018, at the American Educational Research Association (AERA) conference in New York City. She is also a finalist for the AERA Second Language Research SIG Outstanding Dissertation Award.





  • Natalia Kapacinskas , class of 2018, will present “L.T. Meade, Fictional Plagiarism, and a New Model of Authorship” at the 26th annual British Women Writers Conference held this April at the University of Texas at Austin. The paper is a selection from her English Honors Thesis on the evolution of plagiarism and women’s writing in the long nineteenth century (1789–1914).





  • Elyssa Sliheet , class of 2019, won an award for an Outstanding Poster in the Student Poster Session of the Mathematical Association of America (MAA) Joint Mathematics Meeting (JMM) in San Diego, Calif. Jan. 9–13, 2018. Her work, “Shift Operators on Directed Infinite Graphs,” was conducted at an NSF-funded summer Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) with several other undergraduates under advisor Ruben Martinez-Avendao of Universidad Autónoma Del Estado De Hidalgo. There were over 500 posters in 16 topical categories at the JMM poster session. Awards were given for the top 15% in each category. Her travel was funded by the Southwestern Student Travel Fund, the MAA Student Travel Fund, and the NSF.





January 2018

  • Part-Time Instructor of Applied Music Katherine Altobello ’99 was the guest vocalist in Austin Chamber Ensemble’s “Berlin Bernstein Birthdays and More” featuring works by Irving Berlin, George Gershwin, Leonard Bernstein, and Claude Debussy. Altobello performed alongside pianists Marti Ahern and Stephen Burnaman. Performances were Jan. 26–27, inaugurating Huston-Tillotson University’s “all Steinway school.”





  • Professor of Psychology Traci Giuliano gave an invited presentation, “Things I wish my students knew before they came to college,” at the Austin ISD’s AVID College Readiness Symposium held at St. Edward’s University.





  • President Edward Burger was an invited speaker at an American Mathematical Society Special Session on Diophantine Approximation and Analytic Number Theory in Honor of Jeffrey Vaaler on Jan. 12 at the national Joint Mathematics Meetings held in San Diego, Calif. There he spoke on “Applications of orthogonality within non-archimedean and human contexts.” On Jan. 23, he delivered a public address on the future of undergraduate education at Johns Hopkins University as well as met with their president and engaged with their Commission on Education to assess their plans for the future.





  • Professor of Theatre John Ore designed the lighting and served as stage manager for Arts Avenue’s full production of the classic musical  Meet Me In St. Louis  in the Alma Thomas Theater .   Ore also mentored sound designer Jaden Williams, class of 2020, and tech director Christian Aderholt, class of 2018, who contributed hugely to the show’s successful four-performance run from Jan. 3–6, 2018.





  • Part-time Assistant Professor of Applied Music Li Kuang recently attended the Big XII Trombone Conference held Jan. 1214 at Texas Tech University in Lubbock, TX. The Big XII Trombone Conference is an annual trombone event that attracts professional trombone players, college trombone professors, trombone students and trombone enthusiasts across the country. Kuang served as a faculty member in this conference. He also presented a solo performance and adjudicated the final rounds of both the “Yamaha Tenor Trombone Solo Competition” and the “Big XII Bass Trombone Solo Competition.” The renowned bass trombonist of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra Mr. Charlie Vernon was also among the invited guest artists to this conference.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor or Art Ron Geibel currently has sculptures featured in two exhibitions. The first exhibition, “By Hand,” an international craft competition at Blue Line Gallery in Roseville, Calif., will be on view Jan. 19 March 3, 2018. The second, “Contemporary South,” will open Feb. 2 at Visual Art Exchange in Raleigh, NC. “Contemporary South” showcases some of the most ambitious and timely works by artists from across the regional south. The exhibition is on view through March 24, 2018.





  • Ellie Crowley, class of 2020, was chosen as the Campus Leader for the Up to Us competition, a competition between campuses across the nation with the main goal of raising awareness about the national debt in a nonpartisan manner. Crowley will lead a Southwestern student team that will host a range of year-round activities educating peers about national debt.





  • Based on a pedagogical collaboration with the Center for Biodiversity and Conservation within the American Museum of Natural History, contributions made by Professor of Biology Romi Burks and several colleagues have been compiled and published in  Lessons in Conservation: Volume VIII,a special “Student Learning” issue of the online journal. These materials are freely available to other instructors.





  • Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers presented “Removing the Jew from the Lesbian: Kissing Jessica Stein” at the annual meeting of the Association for Jewish Studies (AJS) in December 2017. She also published “7 Jewish Feminist Highlights of 2017” and “Our Bodies, Our Memories, Our Poetry: A Review of Leslea Newman’s Lovely” in Lilith Magazine’s Blog.





  • Professor of Spanish Katy Ross’ most recent article came out in an edited volume called Gender in Urban Spaces: Literary and Visual Narratives of the New Millennium (Palgrave MacMillan 2017). She will share this work with the SU campus at the Representations Lecture Series on Tuesday, February 20.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Physics Rebecca Edwards attended the 98th American Meteorological Society Annual Meeting, January 711 in Austin. She presented a poster titled “Peak Over Threshold Analysis of Heavy Precipitation in Texas” based upon work done with physics student Mady Akers, class of 2018. She also gave a presentation about this summer’s SCOPE project titled “The Balcones Escarpment Environmental Monitoring Experiment” during the Educational Symposium. Edwards was joined at the meeting by mathematics student Morgan Engle, class of 2018, who presented a poster about her Capstone research, “Insights into the Influence of ENSO on United States Gulf Coast Ozone Using a Surface Ozone Climatology.”





  • Professor of Political Science  Shannon Mariotti  was invited to contribute the essay on “Adorno and Democracy” to the forthcoming Blackwell Companion to  Adorno , edited by Peter Gordon, Max Pensky, and Espen Hammer.





  • Assistant Professor of Business Gaby Flores presented “Construct Validity of an Objective Measure of Ethical Climates” at the Iberoamerican Academy of Management in New Orleans, LA, on Dec. 9.





  • Associate Professor of Sociology Reggie Byron had a teaching exercise titled “Teaching about Police Violence with Open Source Police Shootings Data and Census Data” published in TRAILS, The American Sociological Association’s Teaching Resources And Innovations Library for Sociology. He has also accepted an invitation to serve as a reviewer for the National Science Foundation. 





  • Associate Professor of Theatre Desiderio Roybal designed stage scenery for Penfold Theatre’s production of Miracle on 34th Street. Roybal created the interior of the fictional 1947 KPNF radio station where actors used live, foley sound effects for this classic radiocast. The production was presented Nov. 30Dec. 23.





  • Southwestern Head Football Coach Joe Austin coached in the 20th annual Tazon de Estrellas all-star game on Dec. 16, 2017, at CETYS University in Tijuana, Mexico. This is Coach Austin’s eighth consecutive selection to the all-star coaching staff. The game, held every December in Mexico, pits all-stars from Mexico’s CONADEIP Division I against all-stars from our NCAA Division III.





  • Professor of Art and Art History and Chair of Art History Thomas Noble Howe in December published an article on the recently published Roman Garden at Stabiae in the journal of the national garden club of Italy, “Un giardino romano a pasesaggio (“A Roman Strolling Garden”) Garden Club, Organo uffficiale dell’ugai – Storia, Scienza, Arte e Mito delle piante e dei fiori, (47, novembre, 2017) 14-16.





  • Associate Professor of Art History Patrick Hajovsky will present his current research at the annual Mesoamerica Meetings (formerly Maya Meetings) at the University of Texas-Austin on Saturday, Jan. 13. This year’s theme, “Mesoamerican Philosophies: Animate Matter, Metaphysics, and the Natural Environment,” includes workshops on Maya hieroglyphs and a symposium of top scholars in Aztec studies across disciplines.





  • Professor of Theatre John Ore designed the dance lighting for Georgetown Ballet’s production of The Nutcracker. Ore also mentored Matt Murphy, class of 2019, Sam Bruno, class of 2020, and Andrew Snyder, class of 2021, who served as support technicians on this holiday classic performed in Alma Thomas Theater.