Academics

Faculty Notables

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November 2017

  • Elyssa Sliheet, Class of 2019,  and Adina Friedman, Class of 2019, presented  “Inventing a Mobile Service” and “How Can Technology Help At-Risk Youth Get Enough Support to Stay in School,” respectively, at Opportunities for Undergraduate Research in Computer Science, a three-day research-focused workshop at Carnegie Mellon University Oct 20–22, 2017.  Associate Professor of Computer Science Barbara Anthony served as the faculty sponsor.  Funding was provided by the Fleming Student Travel Fund, the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science at Southwestern, as well as Carnegie Mellon’s School of Computer Science and Women@SCS.

  • Five seniors presented at the Texas Undergraduate Mathematics Conference (TUMC) on Oct. 21, 2017, held this year in San Antonio.

    • Victoria Gore, class of 2018, presented “Modeling Trends in Austin Traffic.”

    • Bonnie Henderson, class of 2018, presented “The Mathemasticks of Flower Sticks.”

    • Kristen McCrary, class of 2018, presented  “Math and Mancala.”

    • Penny Phan, class of 2018, presented “Singapore:  Model of a Savings Fund.”

    • Sam Vardy, class of 2018, presented “The Price of Health.”

    Each presentation was based on preliminary capstone work in Fall 2017 supervised by Associate Professor of Mathematics Therese Shelton who also attended.  Other students in attendance were Isaac Hopkins, class of 2018, Hannah Freeman and Aiden Steinle, both class of 2020, and Mercedes Gonzalez, class of 2021. Visiting Assistant Professor of Mathematics John Ross also attended the Project NExT events and aided our students. There were 28 talks by students at 14 institutions at the TUMC. Southwestern had the most students giving presentations. Approximately 115 students from 23 institutions attended. Southwestern funding for students was provided by the Fleming Student Travel Fund and the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science. Shelton was funded through the Faculty-Student Project fund at Southwestern. The University of Incarnate Word subsidized the TUMC.

  • Professor of Feminist Studies Alison Kafer was invited to speak at Yale University in honor of Donna Haraway’s receiving the Wilbur L. Cross Medal. There were two symposia celebrating Haraway’s work. Kafer spoke in the opening symposium, which centered on “The Cyborg Manifesto.” Her talk “Cyborgs and Other Crip Kin” stems from new work on crip technoscience. A program for the symposia, held Nov. 2–3, is available here.

  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Music Dana Zenobi presented a lecture recital on the art songs of sister composers Nadia and Lili Boulanger at McLennan Community College in Waco, Texas. She performed along with pianist Jeanne Sasaki on Oct. 26.

  • Assistant Professor of Art History Allison Miller published a review of the book, Beyond the First Emperor’s Mausoleum: New Perspectives on Qin Art, edited by Liu Yang on caa.reviews, a publication of the College Art Association, on Oct. 27.

  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Communication Studies Shannon Holland was interviewed and quoted by VICE Media in an article titled “After Timberlake Super Bowl Announcement, Internet Calls for ‘Justice for Janet’.”  In the article, Holland reflects on her published research regarding news coverage of the 2004 Super Bowl halftime controversy,  which she argues depicted Jackson as the primary or sole architect of the infamous “wardrobe malfunction.” She also discusses how the NFL’s  decision to feature Timberlake in the upcoming Super Bowl halftime show further reinforces white male privilege within and beyond the NFL.

  • Part-Time Assistant Professor of Theatre Bethany Lynn Corey and Associate Professor of Theatre Desiderio Roybal were recognized with nominations by The B. Iden Payne Awards Council. Bethany Lynn Corey’s original play All Aboard was recognized as an Outstanding Theatre for Youth Production. Desiderio Roybal was recognized for Outstanding Set Design of The Herd produced by Jarrott Productions. The B. Iden Payne Awards Council recognizes outstanding theatrical performance, production and design in Austin.

  • Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers published “Billie Jean Beats Bobby: Watching BATTLE OF THE SEXES in Trumpian Times” in Lilith Magazine’s Blog.

  • Professor of Music Lois Ferrari was invited to conduct a New York State School Music Association (NYSSMA) all-county concert in the Saratoga, NY, area. Ferrari rehearsed and conducted approximately 80 high school musicians over the course of three days, all culminating in a festival concert on Oct. 21.

  • Professor of Art and Art History Thomas Noble Howe gave lectures at the preliminary presentation of the publication of the excavation of the garden of the Great Peristyle of the Villa Arianna (‘Ariadne’) at Stabiae (Quaderni di Studi Pompeiani, VII) at the local Rotary of Castellammare di Stabia and the national convention of the Garden Club of Italy on Oct. 13–14. The lectures were in Italian.

  • Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin presented a paper “What’s Left of the Russian Revolution’s Global Imaginary at 100: China and Cuba in an Era of Resurgent Revolution and (New) Authoritarian Revanchism” at a conference on “The Russian Revolution Centenary: Reflections on the 21st Century” held at the University of Peloponnese, Corinth, Greece.

  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Art Ron Geibel was one of 150 artists from across the county asked to participate in an exhibition/fundraiser titled “Build Hope, Not Walls” at Big Medium Gallery in Austin, Texas. Artists were asked to create one brick to contribute to an installation celebrating individuality. All proceeds were donated to the following organizations that support immigrants and refugees: American Gateways, Casa Marianella, Preemptive Love, and Refugee Services of Texas. The exhibition was on view Oct. 13–15, 2017.

  • Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers’ article “Got Jewish Milk?: Screening Epstein and Van Sant for Intersectional Film History” is the lead article in the latest issue of the Journal Jewish Film And New Media. Rob Epstein’s The Times of Harvey Milk (1984) and Gus Van Sant’s Milk (2008), the two major films that narrate the life and tragically dramatic death of gay politician and activist Harvey Milk (1930–1978), are widely recognized as part of the queer cinematic canon but are less often categorized as Jewish films. While Epstein’s film adroitly presents a “Kosher-style” Milk, the Jewishness of Van Sant’s Milk is less certain. However, a well-established pattern of gay and lesbian Jews citing Milk as one of their own—what Meyers terms “Jewqhooing”—enabled a Jewish reception of the movie Milk. Querying and queerying the Jewishness of Milk (the man as well as the movies that purport to represent his life and times) illuminate the complex ways Jewishness continues to be cinematically conveyed or whitewashed as well as the intersections between queer and Jewish film history. This article is part of Meyers’ book-in-progress on Jewish American Cinema.

  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Physics and Environmental Studies Rebecca Paulsen Edwards served on a panel for a discussion of “What to do in your class before students start using MATLAB” at the 2017 Teaching Computation in the Sciences Using MATLAB workshop in Northfield, Minn., Oct. 15–17.

  • Assistant Professor of Art History Allison Miller was a special guest at the Archaeological Institute of America (AIA)–Orange County’s annual grant fundraiser on Saturday, Oct. 14th, in Santa Ana, Calif. The AIA-OC is one of the few local AIA societies that raises money to support graduate student research in archaeology. Miller’s remarks centered on her current research on the color purple in ancient China. The Executive Director of the AIA, Ann Benbow, was also in attendance at the event. Miller also gave an invited lecture titled “Terracotta Warriors after the First Emperor: Re-evaluating the Qin Legacy in the Han” at the Bowers Museum in Orange County, Calif., on Sunday, Oct. 15. The lecture was delivered as the part of the AIA’s 2017–2018 lecture program and sponsored by the Orange County Society of the AIA.

  • Technical Assistant and Exhibitions Coordinator Seth Daulton was featured on “Spork in the Road,” a podcast that cultivates conversations with creative individuals about their path, craft, and passions. “Spork in the Road” is produced by Rivers Barden Architects in Houston, Texas. To listen to the podcast visit sporkintheroad.net.

  • Assistant Professor of Computer Science Chad Stolper presented a poster “Atomic Operations for Specifying Graph Visualization” at the IEEE VIS 2017 Conference in Phoenix, Ariz. Oct. 3–6. The poster was co-authored with Will Price, class of 2019, and Matt Sanford, class of 2020, along with colleagues at Georgia Tech, and was partly based on Price and Sanford’s SCOPE research this past summer.

  • Associate Professor Kerry Bechtel recently designed the costumes for Junie B. Jones is Not a Crook at Main Street Theater in Houston. In the wake of Hurricane Harvey, this production will be touring to schools in areas hardest hit by the disaster to bring the arts back to their communities. Following this production, Bechtel has designed the costumes for Akeelah and the Bee with Main Street Theater. This production will be performed in downtown Houston at the Midtown Arts & Theater Center (MATCH) facilities. Both of these productions were assisted by current student Worth Payton, class of 2018.

  • Professor of Biology Romi Burks’ research was published in the 2017 e-book version of “Biology and management of invasive apple snails” edited by Ravi Joshi, Robert Cowie, and Leocardio Sebastian. Along with six co-authors working with apple snails, Burks wrote a chapter titled “Identity, reproductive potential, distribution, ecology and management of invasive Pomacea maculata in the southern United States.” Co-authors included Dr. Jennifer Bernatis and manager Jess van Dyke from Florida, Dr. Jacoby Carter from the USGS Wetland Research Facility and Dr. Charles Martin from Louisiana (now in Florida), and from the University of Georgia, Dr. Jeb Byers and Dr. Bill McDowell (most recently at Colby College). Although a long time in production, this chapter will hopefully serve as research for the number of new researchers working on apple snails as this species continues to spread.

  • Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin gave an invited talk “Global Patterns of Publishing Academic Knowledge: It’s Time for the Global South” about the inequalities of global academic knowledge production at the 2017 Asociación Mexicana de Estudios Iternacionales (AMEI) meeting in Huatulco, Oaxaca, Mexico. This talk and a forthcoming panel “Diversifying the Discipline: Problems, Policies, and Prescriptions” and “Mentoring Café: Strategies and Support for Global South Scholars” at the 2018 International Studies Association meetings are related in part to the “decolonial turn” in International Relations (a putative shift is attributed in part to a co-authored book with Southwestern alum Professor Meghana Nayak ’97, Decentering IR), and loosely connected to the efforts of the emergent South-South Educational Scholarly Collaboration and Knowledge Interchange Initiative.

October 2017

  • Associate Professor of Theatre Desiderio Roybal has been nominated for a B. Iden Payne Award in Scenic Design. His design for The Herd, a David Jarrott Production, is one of five designs being considered for the best scenic design of 2016–2017 season in the Greater Austin Area. The recipient of this top design award will be announced at the November 3rd, B. Iden Payne Award Ceremony being held at the Scottish Rite Theater, Austin, Texas. His designs for The Herd, The Price, and Clybourne Park received the Austin Critics Table Award for Excellence in Scenic Design in June 2017.

  • Associate Professor of Computer Science Barbara Anthony presented a paper titled “Several Questions which Work for Almost Any Computer Science Exam” at the 26th Annual Rocky Mountain Conference of the Consortium for Computing Sciences in Colleges in Orem, Utah, held Oct. 13–14, 2017. Her paper will be published in the December 2017 issue of the Journal of Computing Sciences in Colleges.

  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Music Dana Zenobi was competitively selected to present a lecture titled “Financial Mentorship Strategies for Voice Teachers” at the fall meeting of the National Association of Teachers of Singing, South Texas Chapter. Informed by her work directing BELTA (Building Empowering Lives Through Art), a nonprofit that provides free crowdfunding services to artists and musicians, her presentation focused on crowdfunding best practices, fiscal sponsorship for artists and the basics of searching for grants to individuals.

  • Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin was the featured speaker at Project Minnesota/León’s (PML) annual fundraiser on Oct. 14. His remarks were on the topic of contemporary Nicaraguan politics. He also led a seminar on the same topic for some PML’s board members and donors.

  • Technical Assistant and Exhibitions Coordinator Seth Daulton spoke at Baylor University as a visiting artist on Oct. 9. Daulton presented demonstrations in lithography and intaglio printing, shared his work, spoke about the conceptual ideas in his work and process, and discussed his career path as an artist and educator.  

  • Professor of Feminist Studies Alison Kafer gave an invited talk and led a seminar at Purdue University on Oct. 5. Her talk, “Access Rebels: A Crip Manifesto for Social Justice,” was co-sponsored by Purdue’s Critical Disability Studies Program and the Purdue Honors College. Using the frame of “access rebels,” Kafer discussed the possibility of building radical cultures of accessibility and solidarity. She also led a seminar with undergraduate and graduate students on her research about the Ashley X case.

  • Assistant Professor of Art History Allison Miller gave an invited lecture titled “Terracotta Warriors after the First Emperor: Re-evaluating the Qin Legacy in the Han” at University of Colorado Boulder on Oct. 5. The lecture was delivered as the part of the 2017–2018 lecture program of the Archaeological Institute of America (AIA), and co-sponsored by the Boulder chapter of the AIA and the Museum of Natural History at the University of Colorado Boulder.

  • Professor of Biology Romi Burks presented an invited talk at a Symposium within the XCLAMA (Latin American MalacologicalSociety) about the results from five years of investigating apple snails in Uruguay. The presentation, titled “Overlapping and Overlooked: Pomacea species distribution, diversity and hybridization in Uruguay,” included four alumni co-authors (Sofia Campos ’16, Carissa Bishop ’17, Paul Glasheen ’16, and Averi Segrest ’16), five Uruguayan collaborators (Clementina Calvo, Dr. Mariana Meerhoff, Cristhian Clavijo, Ana Elise Röhrdanz, and Fabricio Scarabino) along with United States partner Dr. Ken Hayes of Howard University. This work represents the first evidence presented for hybridization of the snails in the native range, which has broad evolutionary implications. In addition, the work included a description of the broad and complex distribution of a cryptic species, a species containing individuals that are morphologically identical to those in a different species.

  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Alison Marr recently had her proposal “Hidden No More: Stories of Triumph, Excellence, and Achievement in Math and Computer Science” selected for funding as a mini-grant through the “WATCH US” grant from the National Science Foundation INCLUDES program. This mini-grant will bring four women from underrepresented groups with doctorates in mathematics and computer science to campus over the 2017–2018 academic year for a lecture series where each speaker will tell her journey to math (or computer science) and also share the type of research she does.

  • Professor of Music Lois Ferrari led the Austin Civic Orchestra (ACO) into its 41st season with a concert at the Austin ISD Performing Arts Center on Sept. 24. As Music Director of the ACO, Ferrari opened the orchestra’s Made in America season by conducting a program of music by Bernstein, Copland, Ellington, and Stookey. The latter, with text by Lemony Snicket, is a narrated who-dun-it aimed at engaging younger audience members. The ACO also sponsored an instrument petting zoo prior to the concert and offered this performance as a “pay what you wish” event.

  • Professors of Biology Maria Cuevas and Maria Todd presented their research “Expression of claudin-3 and -4 tight junction proteins in endometrial cancer cell lines and tumor tissues derived from African American women” at the 10th American Association of Cancer Research Conference on the Science of Cancer Health Disparities in Racial/Ethnic Minorities and the Medically Underserved in Atlanta, Ga. Sept. 25–28. An abstract was published in the AACR Meeting Proceedings.

  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth will give a presentation on Southwestern’s Football + Experience Abroad program at the 2018 Annual Meeting of the Association of American Colleges and Universities’ (AAC&U) held January 24–27, 2018, in Washington, DC. Berroth’s proposal was one of over 450 submitted to present at the conference. AAC&U accepted fewer than 20 percent of those submitted. The proposals selected represent the work of faculty members, administrators, and higher education leaders at colleges, community colleges, universities, and educational organizations across the country.

  • Assistant Professor of Business Hazel Nguyen published an article titled “Stock market liquidity: Financially constrained firms and share repurchase” in the journal Accounting and Finance Research, 2017, vol 6(4).

  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Fumiko Futamura and Robert Lehr ’15 published a paper in Mathematics Magazine’s October 2017 issue titled “A New Perspective on Finding the Viewpoint” (90, no. 4, p. 267-77). The article uses projective geometry to give a new method for determining where a viewer should stand in front of a two-point perspective drawing to view it correctly.

  • Part-Time Instructor of Economics and Business Jim Christianson recently made a presentation to the Waco Scandinavian Club titled “History of the 10,000 Swedish Settlers of Travis and Williamson Counties 1870–1910.”

September 2017

  • Professor of Art Victoria Star Varner’s artwork from her “Crossed Paths” series was selected for the exhibition “Small Format 2017” in Dublin, Ireland. Organized by Black Church Print Studio, the exhibition is being held at Library Project, a “cultural hub at the heart of Temple Bar, multidisciplinary in approach. The space offers visitors an open door to discover local and international contemporary art practices through a collection of publications and a variety of exhibitions and events.” Earlier this year, she exhibited three large drawings in her “Centripetal Forces” series at the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor in “Drawing Perspectives,” an invitational exhibition of five artists curated by Professor Barbara Fontaine White, who described her curatorial intent in the catalogue as follows, “’Drawing Perspectives’ celebrates a variety of approaches to drawing and demonstrates the complexity of content and media utilized today.”  Varner also exhibited five of her engravings at the VAM Gallery in Austin in “Eight from Texas,” curated by Professor Tim High, University of Texas. Lily Press in Washington, D.C., a fine art press, is currently publishing two editions of large prints, created by Varner at the press this summer with Master Printer Susan Goldman, owner and operator.

  • Assistant Professor of History Jessica Hower presented a paper titled “From ‘Tydder’ to ‘Tudor,’ ‘Stewart’ to ‘Stuart’: Dynasty, Empire, and Identity in the Early Modern Atlantic World” at the “Modern Invention of Dynasty: A Global Intellectual History, 1500–2000” Conference at the University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK, Sept. 21–23, 2017.

  • Assistant Professor of Business Debika Sihi chaired and participated in a panel at the Marketing Management Association Conference in Pittsburgh, Pa., held Sept. 20–22, 2017. The panel focused on methods to  develop innovative and original marketing course materials and design class discussions which garner thoughtful student engagement.

  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth accepted a nomination to serve on the American Association of Teachers of German (AATG) Program Committee for the 2018 AATG / American Council on Teaching Foreign Languages (ACTFL) Convention and World Languages Expo in New Orleans, La., Nov. 16–18, 2018. This prestigious nomination came from the president of the AATG who annually selects three AATG members. The committee identifies topics and chairs for a number of planned sessions of special interest to the membership. Committee members also review and select all session proposals with a focus on German. They are instrumental in shaping a future-oriented program representative of important aspects in teaching and learning German. This convention marks an important year of intentional inter-connectedness and will be especially exciting since AATG and ACTFL will be meeting in conjunction with the Fédération Internationale des Professeurs de Langues Vivantes/International Modern Language Teachers’ Federation (FIPLV). Furthermore, AATG has extended an invitation for Berroth to participate in the Internationaler Deutschlehrerinnen- und Deutschlehrerverband in a North America meeting.

  • Professor of Feminist Studies Alison Kafer had a chapter published in the new collection Disability Studies and the Environmental Humanities: Toward an Eco-Crip Theory, edited by Sarah Jaquette Ray and Jay Sibara (University of Nebraska, 2017). Her contribution, “Bodies of Nature: The Environmental Politics of Disability,” is reprinted from her book Feminist Queer Crip (Indiana University, 2013) and is included in the “Foundations” section of the anthology.

  • Assistant Professor of History Jethro Hernandez Berrones published an article titled “Homeopathy ‘for Mexicans’: Medical Popularisation, Commercial Endeavours, and Patients’ Choice in the Mexican Medical Marketplace, 1853–1872” in the journal Medical History, 61, 4.

  • Part-time Instructor of Applied Music Adrienne Inglis’ composition “Pájaros” for solo flute and strings enjoyed its world première performance Sept. 17, 2017, with the composer as soloist with the Balcones Community Orchestra under the direction of Dr. Robert Radmer. Based on bird songs of central Texas, the piece was warmly received with a standing ovation. Inglis also performed the first movement of “Concerto No. 4” by François Devienne. Inversion Ensemble will perform “Pájaros” Saturday, Sept. 30, 2017, at 7 p.m. at Westminster Presbyterian Church Fellowship Hall in Austin, and Sunday, Oct. 1, 2017, at 3 p.m. at First United Methodist Church of Pflugerville.

  • Professor of Music Kiyoshi Tamagawa’s article “Chopsticks, Golliwogs and Wigwams: The Need for Cultural Awareness in Piano Teaching Materials and Repertoire” appeared in the October/November 2017 issue of American Music Teacher, the journal of the Music Teachers National Association. The article explores how piano teaching materials and repertoire still in use today can convey attitudes toward ethnic and cultural groups that do not reflect the progress being made in daily life.

  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Art Ron Geibel will have an installation in ”Fountain: sculptural musings on the readymade” at St. Edward’s University in Austin. The artists in the exhibit investigate reconfigured, found, mass-produced, or functional objects to elicit sculptures that are familiar yet absurd, compelling yet irreverent, perplexing yet seductive. Opening Reception will be Friday, Sept. 22, from 6–8 p.m. at St. Edward’s  Fine Arts Gallery. The installation will be on view through Oct. 12, 2017.

  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth was elected to the American Association of Teachers of German (AATG) Texas leadership team. On a three-year term, she will serve as Vice President, President, and Outgoing President to assure continuity and mentoring. At the Sept. 9, 2017, joint meeting of all three Texas AATG chapters, Berroth delivered a presentation on her research and teaching praxis in Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) with sample lessons from her project of connecting German and Math to an audience of German teachers working at Texas high schools, colleges, and universities.

  • Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin gave a talk on the “Pink Tide” and Latin America’s Political Pendulum at the Bulverde/Spring Branch Public Library as part of the Foreign Policy Association’s Great Decisions discussion program.

  • President Edward Burger was invited to lead the plenary session, “The State of Higher Education in Texas,” at the Annual Meeting of the Independent Colleges and Universities of Texas held in Austin on Sept. 11, 2017, in which he discussed educational issues with Lee Jackson, Chancellor of The University of North Texas System, and Bill Powers, President Emeritus of The University of Texas at Austin.

  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Education Suzanne García-Mateus co-authored  an article titled “Translanguaging Pedagogies for Positive Identities in Two-Way Dual Language Bilingual Education” in the Journal of Language, Identity & Education. This is a timely article considering the rise of two-way dual language programs in the local area(s).

  • Associate Professor of History Melissa Byrnes writes for the blog Lawyers, Guns & Money. The blog was recently named one of the top 100 political science blogs on the web. Read her recent pieces here.

  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Art Ron Geibel was invited to participate in “In-Cahoots: Mischievously Playful Craft” at Signature Gallery in Atlanta, Ga. The exhibition features artists who push the boundary of craft, technique, and concept. The gallery is on view Sept. 16–Oct. 7.

  • Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin participated in a panel titled “What Have We Learned About Revolutions?” at the 2017 meeting of the American Political Science Association. His remarks were under the rubric “Revolution in the Age of Authoritarian Revanchism.”

  • Deidra McCall, Class of 2017, participated in the Honors Program and presented a research paper titled “Racialized Politics and the Confederate Flag: Why Society Can Never Be Color-Blind” at the August 2017 American Sociological Association (ASA) annual meeting in Montreal, Canada. Her participation was funded through her award as Southwestern’s first Mellon Undergraduate Fellow. At this same conference, Professor of Sociology Maria Lowe and Associate Professor of Sociology Reggie Byron presented a paper titled “Neutralizing Harm: Sexist and Racist Jokes among Undergraduate Students.” Holly O’Hara, Class of 2017, and Dakota Cortez, Class of 2019, are co-authors on the paper. This paper is part of a larger project supported by SU’s Faculty-Student Collaborative research funds. Byron also served his final year on the ASA Honors Program Advisory Council.

  • Assistant Professor of Art History Allison Miller presented a paper at The Second Conference of the European Association for Asian Art and Archaeology, held at the University of Zurich, Switzerland, from Aug. 24–27. The paper, titled “The Status of the Mural in Early Han Art: Reflections from the Shiyuan Tomb,” was presented on a panel that she organized and chaired titled “Mural Painting in Han China: Re-Examining the Origins and Development of the Genre.”

  • Technical Assistant and Exhibitions Coordinator Seth Daulton exhibited new mixed media works and a limited edition book at the Nicole Longnecker Gallery in Houston, TX. The work was part of a three-person exhibition on view from July 8–Sept. 4, 2017.

  • Assistant Professor of German Michelle Reyes and Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth’s proposal submitted for programming in MLL German has been selected to receive a Deutsch macht Spaß Grant in the amount of $500. The American Association of Teachers of German (AATG) is offering these grants through funds provided by the German government’s Netzwerk Deutsch program. The grant will support a community outreach program in October.

  • Professor of Chemistry & Biochemistry Maha Zewail-Foote published the article “Alternative DNA structure formation in the mutagenic human c-MYC promoter” in the highly ranked journal Nucleic Acids Research. This research is significant because it implicates the involvement of a three-stranded DNA structure in genome instability associated with the human c-MYC oncogene region and cancer. Chemistry alumni Sarah Coe ’17 and Olivia Drummond ’17 were involved in this research project.

  • Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers published “The Disappearing Jew” in Inside Higher Education.

  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Art Ron Geibel had work selected for the fourth annual Juried National exhibition at Red Lodge Clay Center in Red Lodge, Mont. The exhibition highlights the diverse scope of ideas and techniques artists are exploring in contemporary ceramics.  The exhibition will be on view to the public September 1–22, 2017.

  • Associate Professor of Communication Studies Bob Bednar was quoted in a recent article in VICE Motherboard exploring the cultural influence of the iPhone on the tenth anniversary of its release. The June 27, 2017 article, by Caroline Haskins, is titled “The iPhone Has Objectified Our Faces.”

  • Professor of Theatre Kathleen Juhl and Cathy Madden’s co-edited book, Galvanizing Performance: The Alexander Technique as a Catalyst for Excellence, was published on August 21, 2017. The Alexander Technique is practiced widely by performing artists. It encourages artists to make the choice to perform with ease and confidence. This book is the first of its kind because it focuses specifically on the ways performing artists and their teachers engage the Alexander Technique as they rehearse and perform. The book represents the first time Alexander Technique teachers have formally opened the doors to their teaching studios and classrooms to reveal specific pedagogies for working with the technique and performance.

  • Senior Director of Advancement Services and Operations Leigh Petersen chaired the APRA (Association of Professional Researchers for Advancement) Data Analytics Symposium in Anaheim, Calif. in August. Close to 150 universities and nonprofits joined together for two days for intensive data analytic presentations and internationally known speakers.

  • Assistant Professor of Business Debika Sihi co-authored the article “Effects of Offline Ad Content on Online Brand Search: Insights from Super Bowl Advertising,” which is forthcoming in the Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science.

  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Education Suzanne García-Mateus published an article titled “Translanguaging Pedagogies for Positive Identities in Two-Way Dual Language Bilingual Education” in the Journal of Language, Identity & Education. The article is coauthored with Deborah Palmer, a professor at the University of Colorado, Boulder.

  • Assistant Professor of History Jethro Hernandez Berrones co-organized the symposium “(Un)Bounded Doctors: Nation, Profession, and Place in the Local and Global Formation of Medical Groups in the 19th and 20th Centuries” together with Dr. Beatriz Teixeira Weber from Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Brazil, for the International Congress of the History of Science and Technology in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, July 23–29, 2017. The symposium brought together scholars from McGill University (Canada), University of Western Ontario (Canada), Universidade Federal de Santa Maria (Brazil), Casa de Oswaldo Cruz/Fiocruz (Brazil), Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (Mexico), Brown University (USA), and Southwestern University (USA) to discuss the demography of doctors as a result of state-building processes, migration, professional organization, and the provision of health. In this panel, Hernandez Berrones presented the paper “From Foreign Healers to International Doctors: Internationalism and the Consolidation of Homeopathy in Mexico, 1853–1942.” The ideas for this paper resulted from conversations with Latin American & Border Studies committee members about the inclusion of Borderland Studies in the Latin American Studies Program and with students and faculty during the First Borderlands Symposium in the fall of 2016.

  • Head Football Coach Joe Austin’s solicited article “Rev-Up Your ‘Jet’ Motion Offense with Explosive Play-Action Passes” was published by American Football Monthly on Aug. 15, 2017.