Academics

Notable Faculty & Student Achievements

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January 2018

  • Assistant Professor of Business Gaby Flores presented “Construct Validity of an Objective Measure of Ethical Climates” at the Iberoamerican Academy of Management in New Orleans, LA, on Dec. 9.





  • Associate Professor of Sociology Reggie Byron had a teaching exercise titled “Teaching about Police Violence with Open Source Police Shootings Data and Census Data” published in TRAILS, The American Sociological Association’s Teaching Resources And Innovations Library for Sociology. He has also accepted an invitation to serve as a reviewer for the National Science Foundation’s ADVANCE (Institutional Transformation) grant proposals in the Washington, D.C., area in mid-February.





  • Associate Professor of Theatre Desiderio Roybal designed stage scenery for Penfold Theatre’s production of Miracle on 34th Street. Roybal created the interior of the fictional 1947 KPNF radio station where actors used live, foley sound effects for this classic radiocast. The production was presented Nov. 30Dec. 23.





  • Southwestern Head Football Coach Joe Austin coached in the 20th annual Tazon de Estrellas all-star game on Dec. 16, 2017, at CETYS University in Tijuana, Mexico. This is Coach Austin’s eighth consecutive selection to the all-star coaching staff. The game, held every December in Mexico, pits all-stars from Mexico’s CONADEIP Division I against all-stars from our NCAA Division III.





  • Professor of Art and Art History and Chair of Art History Thomas Noble Howe in December published an article on the recently published Roman Garden at Stabiae in the journal of the national garden club of Italy, “Un giardino romano a pasesaggio (“A Roman Strolling Garden”) Garden Club, Organo uffficiale dell’ugai – Storia, Scienza, Arte e Mito delle piante e dei fiori, (47, novembre, 2017) 14-16.





  • Associate Professor of Art History Patrick Hajovsky will present his current research at the annual Mesoamerica Meetings (formerly Maya Meetings) at the University of Texas-Austin on Saturday, Jan. 13. This year’s theme, “Mesoamerican Philosophies: Animate Matter, Metaphysics, and the Natural Environment,” includes workshops on Maya hieroglyphs and a symposium of top scholars in Aztec studies across disciplines.





  • Professor of Theatre John Ore designed the dance lighting for Georgetown Ballet’s production of The Nutcracker. Ore also mentored Matt Murphy, class of 2019, Sam Bruno, class of 2020, and Andrew Snyder, class of 2021, who served as support technicians on this holiday classic performed in Alma Thomas Theater.





December 2017

  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Communication Studies Lamiyah Bahrainwala facilitated a panel titled “Talking about Race with your Child” through the Parent Advisory Committee at Child’s Day Child Development Center on Dec. 5, 2017. The panel featured experts from education, social work, and policy to provide specific strategies for parents to talk about race and racism with preschool-aged children.





  • Professor of Music Lois Ferrari conducted the Austin Civic Orchestra’s 3rd concert of the season, Austin Home-Grown, which featured music written by local composers Donald Grantham and Dan Welcher on Dec. 10. Both composers were on hand to help rehearse and conduct their works So Long As Days Shall Be and Prairie Light. This concert is part of a larger season theme, Made in America, to which Ferrari and the ACO are committed to performing only music written by American composers throughout its 2017-18 season.





  • Director of Teaching, Learning, and Scholarship Julie Sievers served on the faculty of the Humanities Texas workshop, “Teaching Edgar Allan Poe,” for Central Texas middle and high school English teachers on Dec. 7 in Austin, Texas.  Her invited workshop focused on “Teaching Critical Reading Skills.”





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth has been accepted to co-organize a section for the XIV. Kongress der Internationalen Vereinigung für Germanistik (IVG) in Palermo, Italy, July 26–Aug. 2, 2020, with the theme “Wege der Germanistik in transkulturellen Perspektiven.” The section is titled “Behinderungen und Herausforderungen –– Disability Studies in der Germanistik,” inviting work on the intersections of Disability Studies and German Studies. IVG, fostering international collaborations in German Studies, has been meeting in a different country every 5th year since 1951. Berroth’s organizing team includes Dr. Federica La Manna, University of Calabria, Arcavacata, Italy, Dr. Waltraud Maierhofer, University of Iowa, and Dr. Nina Schmidt, Freie Universität Berlin, Germany. The section reflects interdisciplinary collaborations between the fine arts, humanities, and natural sciences. Co-organizers are planning to publish an edited volume coordinated with the conference. Berroth, who teaches and mentors students in the “Global Health” Paideia theme, looks forward to connecting with her colleagues on integrating STEM and German, especially through the Einstein-Projekt Patho/Graphics at the Free University of Berlin.





  • Associate Professor of Anthropology Brenda Sendejo presented “’Claiming Space’: Chicana Knowledge Production and Feminist Praxis as Critical Interventions in Belonging” at the American Anthropological Association Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C., on Nov. 30. The paper was part of an invited panel titled “Critical Anthropology of Informal Educational Processes in Latinx Communities.”





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Education Suzanne García-Mateus co-presented a poster titled “How do heritage speakers support their 3rd generation children’s bilingual development? An urgent call for making connections between family and institutional language policy decisions” at the 116th Annual Meeting of the American Anthropological Association, Washington, D.C., Nov. 29–Dec. 3, 2017.





  • Assistant Professor of Business Debika Sihi participated on a panel in Austin, Texas on Dec. 7, 2017 with Kevin Brown (a partner at Waller Lansden Dortch & Davis, LLP ) and Ryan Garcia (a social media attorney at Dell and adjunct professor at University of Texas at Austin Law) sponsored by the Association of Corporate Counsel, Austin Chapter. The panel was titled Marketing Liability in the Digital Age: Tales from the Trenches and Best Practices and addressed legal issues arising from advertising, social media, online data collection, and copyright infringement.





  • The Southwestern University’s German Program, with leadership from Part-time Assistant Professor of German Michelle Reyes and support from Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth and Administrative Assistant Susie Bullock, hosted the First Annual SU Poetry Slam. A grant from the American Association of Teachers of German (AATG) Deutsch macht Spaß, part of the German government’s Netzwerk Deutsch program, augmented by funding from Community Engaged Learning and the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures, provided for an evening of poetry readings and competition. The goal of the event was to build community by celebrating spoken word art in all its forms with a special focus on German poetry. We had a wonderful turnout with an audience of about seventy from Southwestern’s campus, our local community, and the greater Austin area. The event included a sponsored reading by Poetry Co-Editor for Chicon Street Poetry Journal, Nancy Lili Gonzalez. Another highlight of the evening was the event’s Master of Ceremonies, Joe Brundidge, author of Element 615 and co-host of KOOP 91.7’s Writing On the Air. The presenters included students, faculty, members of local associations and local Austin artists, speaking in German, Chinese, Spanish, and English. Our student presenters, some offering their own original work, included Andrew Jezisek, class of 2021, majoring in German and Education, Melina Boutris, class of 2021, majoring in German and Special Education, Claire Harding, class of 2020, who pursues a Physics major and German minor. Furthermore, we applauded Molly Cardenas, class of 2018, English major and Feminist Studies minor, Chris Cunningham, class of 2019  Communication Studies major, Jordy Goodman, class of 2018  Feminist studies major and German minor, Christine Gutierrez, class of 2020, Studio Arts major, Shea Brewer, class of 2019,  Communication Studies major, and Gamah Toney, class of 2020, Computer Science major and minoring in Studio Arts. Congratulations to all!





  • Professor of English David Gaines’s poem “Egyptian Rings and Spanish Boots” was selected for inclusion in the New Rivers Press anthology titled “Visiting Bob: Poems Inspired by the Life and Work of Bob Dylan” edited by Thom Tammaro and Alan Davis. The volume will appear in early 2018.





  • Head Football Coach Joe Austin, Associate Head Football Coach Tom Ross, and Defensive Coordinator Bill Kriesel were presenters at the Baden-Wurttemberg American Football Convention in Stuttgart, Germany, Dec. 1–3. The trio delivered nine lectures during the convention.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor in Communication Studies  Shannon Holland ’s invited chapter “Verifying Victory: The Militarized Politics of Sex Verification in International Sports” was published in Michael Butterworth’s (ed) book titled  Sports and Militarism: Contemporary Global Perspectives  (Routledge, 2017).





  • President Edward Burger was recently interviewed by the Houston Chronicleabout his vision for both Southwestern as well as for higher education. An edited transcription can be found here.  





  • Isabel Tweraser , class of 2019, won the 2017 Southwestern Concerto contest. She will be perform “Hungarian Rhapsody” by David Popper with the Austin Civic Orchestra on Feb. 3, 2018.





  • Artworks by eleven students from Southwestern’s Studio Art department were selected for the 38th Annual Central Texas Art Competition at Temple College from four area colleges and five high schools.  Sophia Anthony, class of 2018, was awarded the Best of Show Award for her self-portrait. Lauren Valentine (painting), class of 2019, and Sonja Lea (painting), class of 2018, were two artists among the six given Awards of Excellence in the College Division. Paintings by Huakai (Sebastian) Chen, class of 2018, Danbi Heo, class of 2019, Lauren Muskara, Summer Rodgers, both class of 2020, Jessica Holmberg, Emily Leon, both class of 2021, and drawings by Ana Olvera and Hayley Schultz, both class of 2020, were also selected by the juror, Assistant Professor Jeffie Brewer from the School of Art at Stephen F. Austin University.





  • Professor of Anthropology Melissa Johnson presented her paper “Everyday Politics of Whiteness in Belize” as part of the panel “Everyday Calculations of Whiteness in Latin America” and served as Discussant for the panel “Water Matters: Anthropologists on Climate, Contamination and Vulnerable Embodiment, Part 1” at the 116th Annual Meeting of the American Anthropological Association, Washington, D.C., Nov. 29–Dec. 3, 2017.





  • Part-time Assistant Professor of Music Hai Zheng Olefsky was featured as a soloist with the Austin Youth Symphony Orchestra to perform ” Prayer” by Ernest Bloch at the Austin Youth Orchestra Winter Concert on Dec. 3.





  • Assistant Professor of Business Debika Sihi and two co-authors published a paper titled “Managerial perspectives on crowdsourcing in the new product development process” in Industrial Marketing Management. The paper explores the use of crowdsourcing in the new product development (NPD) process of business to business (B2B) companies.





  • Associate Professor of Theatre Desiderio Roybal designed stage scenery for the play Miracle on 34th Street produced by Penfold Theatre in Austin, Texas.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor in Communication Studies Shannon Holland published the chapter “Critical Analysis” in The SAGE Encyclopedia of Communication Research Methods (2017). The chapter examines the foundations and interdisciplinary scope of critical/cultural communication studies.





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth participated in the 2017 joined conference of the American Association of Teachers of German (AATG) and the American Council on the Teaching Foreign Languages (ACTFL) in Nashville, Tenn., Nov. 17–19. Berroth organized two panels, sponsored by the Coalition of Women in German, on approaches to teaching about Syrian refugees in Germany with a focus on solidarity and social justice. Her contribution focused on normalizing representations of the presence and participation of refugees in German culture through the integration of genres and content in Intermediate level courses. Furthermore, Berroth presented her research and teaching on Climate Fiction on a panel titled “Inventions, Innovations, Connections: STEM and German Literature.” A member of the AATG leadership team on diversity and inclusion “Alle lernen Deutsch” and the special interest group “Small Undergraduate German Programs,” Berroth contributed to national discussions on improving teaching and learning modern languages for people with disabilities. Berroth introduced initial strategies developed by her NEH grant working group for offering open access materials in a Digital Humanities Advancement project.





  • Assistant Professor of Economics Patrick Van Horn’s research article “In the Eye of a Storm: Manhattan’s Money Center Banks During the International Financial Crisis of 1931” (coauthored with Gary Richardson) was accepted for publication in the peer-reviewed journal Explorations in Economic History.





  • Professor of Art Mary Visser was invited by teacher of the year Lea Bertsch to speak on 3D Printing and its applications in science at the Lake Travis High School Science Department for the classes in Medical Microbiology, Pathophysiology, and Anatomy & Physiology.  





November 2017

  • Vice President for Finance and Administration Craig Erwin and Associate Vice President for Information Technology Todd Watson participated in the 2017 Apogee Customer Technology Seminar held in Austin at the Omni Hotel on Nov. 14. Both were invited participants in a panel session titled, “Working with University Leadership on Technical Decisions.” Other panelists included Carol Thomas, VP Information Technology, New England College, and Dan Updegrove, Consultant on IT in Higher Education.  The panel was moderated by Pat Walsh, VP Sales, Midwest Region, Apogee, who addressed the question about how to innovate as a campus to achieve true business value, improve the quality of student life on campus significantly, and empower colleagues so they can do a better job.





  • The 103rd annual convention of the National Communication Association was held in Dallas on November 16–20. Southwestern University was represented by faculty, students, and alumni.

      • Communication major Audrey Davis, class of 2019, presented the paper “You Say You Wanna Gloss With Us—Translating Music for Deaf Audiences,” and Communication major Kayleigh Hanna, class of 2018, presented her paper “Witches and Bitches: Rhetoric of WitchCraft in Historical Perspective.”
      • Chair and Associate Professor of Communication Studies Valerie Renegar responded to a series of papers on a panel featuring leaders in the field of feminism and consciousness raising. She also contributed to a panel on innovative modes of hybrid and online learning.
      • Visiting Assistant Professor of Communication Studies Shannon Holland presented the papers “Visibility of Audism” and “Western Manhood and Sex Verification in International Sports.”
      • Visiting Assistant Professor of Communication Studies Lamiyah Bahrainwala presented two papers: “Preaching (American-Muslim) Style” and “A Burkean-Stylistic Analysis of ‘Moderate’ Muslim Comedy.” She also was included on a panel titled “Deconstructing our relevance: discussion panel of marginalized scholars.”

    Finally, three Southwestern alumni, Sally Spalding ’09, Tony Irizarry ’16, and Vallery Rusu ’17, presented papers at the conference on a range of topics in communication studies.





  • Assistant Professor of Computer Science Jacob Schrum attended the Dagstuhl Research Seminar: “Artificial and Computational Intelligence in Games: AI-Driven Game Design” in Nov. 2017. The Castle Dagstuhl - Leibniz Center for Computer Science, in Dagstuhl, Germany, aims to further world class research in Computer Science by hosting invitation-only research seminars on various topics throughout the year. With various researchers from around the world, Schrum participated in workshops on the topics of “Emergence in Games,” “Playful NPCs and Games,” “Game Design Search Spaces,” and conducted a workshop on “Human-Assisted Content Creation Within Games.”





  • Assistant Professor of Art History Allison Miller gave an invited lecture titled “Purple in Ancient China: New Reflections on its Sources and Status” at the Center for East Asian Studies at The University of Texas at Austin on Nov. 10. The lecture was sponsored by the China Endowment, the Yew Endowed Fund, and the Suez Endowment.





  • Professor of Spanish Katy Ross and SU alumna Lauren Fellers ’14 published “Subversive Texts: MommyBlogs to Blog-Books in Spain” in the Hispanic Studies Review 2.2.





  • Professor of Economics Emily Northrop presented “Climate Change Across the Curriculum” at the recent annual conference of the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education. She described the components of SU’s initiative to inspire and better prepare faculty to include assignments, conversations — even passing references — to climate change in their courses.





    • Professor of Feminist Studies Alison Kafer published a new essay in the Cambridge Companion to Literature and Disability, edited by Clare Barker and Stuart Murray (Cambridge UP, 2017). Co-written with Eunjung Kim, Kafer’s chapter, “Disability and the Edges of Intersectionality,” uses the writings of Michelle Cliff and Audre Lorde to describe an intersectional approach to disability studies.




  • Professor of Biology and Lillian Nelson Pratt Chair Ben Pierce gave an invited seminar on his research titled “Evolution and Ecology of the Georgetown salamander” to biology students and faculty at Richland College in Dallas, Texas, on Nov. 8, 2017.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Music Dana Zenobi was competitively selected from the Texas, Oklahoma and New Mexico region of the National Association of Teachers of Singing (NATS) to perform on the 2017 Texoma Regional Conference Artist Series. Her lecture recital “Songs of the Boulanger Sisters: Stylistic Analysis Through a Gender Lens” presented historical context and stylistic analysis of art songs by sister composers Nadia and Lili Boulanger, with the intent of situating this literature more firmly within the canon of French melodie. Current Music Education major Tabitha Thiemens ’19 also attended the conference, which was held at Texas A&M University - Commerce, Nov. 9–11. Thiemens performed as part of the student auditions, which involved over 500 college students from the region.  She attended master classes, artist series performances, and a recital by nationally renowned soprano Elizabeth Baldwin.





  • Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin was interviewed by the Russian journal LEFTBLOG under the title “The Magical Realism of Revolution: Interview with Eric Selbin.”





  • Assistant Professor of Business Debika Sihi presented her project titled “Like the Brand, Trust the Brand? Privacy Concerns of Brand Followers on Social Media” at the Society of Marketing Advances Annual Conference in Louisville, Ky. Nov. 7–11, 2017.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Political Science Emily Sydnor published the article “Platforms for Incivility: Examining Perceptions Across Different Media Formats,” in the journal Political Communication. The article demonstrates that our identification of language as civil or uncivil depends on the medium used to convey a political message and is available here.





  • Associate Professor of Political Science Shannon Mariotti’s “Contemporary Democratic Theory” course was featured in a New York Times article about strategies for discussing divisive contemporary political issues across political differences. This class brings Dr. Mariotti’s current research on the politics of Buddhist modernism to bear on her teaching: the class experiments with how meditation and mindfulness practices conceptually relate to the practice of democracy in everyday life and also prove useful in critically but compassionately analyzing the democratic deficits and dilemmas of contemporary American life. See Laura Pappano’s “Class Interrupted,” in the “Education Life” section of the Sunday edition of the New York Times, Nov. 5, 2017.





  • Professor of English David Gaines delivered “Landscape and Characters: Hill Country Stories in Progress,” an invited lecture, at Schreiner University in Kerrville on Nov. 9. Gaines spoke to students and faculty in the Texas Studies Program about his current research into and writing about 630 acres of hill country land from the early nineteenth-century to the present.





  • Professor of Feminist Studies Alison Kafer has a chapter in the new anthology Queer Feminist Science Studies: A Reader,edited by Cyd Cipolla, Kristina Gupta, David Rubin, and Angela Willey (University of Washington Press, 2017). Her contribution, “At the Same Time, Out of Time: Ashley X,” is an abridged version of the chapter of the same title in her book Feminist Queer Crip(Indiana UP, 2013). Another version of the chapter was published earlier this year in the latest edition of the Disability Studies Reader, edited by Lennard J. Davis (Routledge, 2017).





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth presided at the pre-conference Steering Committee Meeting and the Business Meeting for the 42nd annual conference of the Coalition of Women in German, held in Banff, Alberta, Canada, Oct. 26–29, 2017. At the conference, Berroth organized the Pedagogy Panel, convening scholars from across the nation to share research and experiences with integrating STEM and German in connected curricula, integrated programs, specialized study abroad offerings, and collaborations with internship providers in Germany. For the coming three years, Women in German will host the conference at Sewanee: The University of the South, our ACS colleagues.





  • Professor of Feminist Studies Alison Kafer led a workshop on “Disability Rights & Justice: Theories, Activisms, and Movements of Relation” as part of the Fulbright Pakistan Fall Enrichment Seminar at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on Nov. 3. Over 100 graduate students from Pakistan attended the Fulbright Seminar, which was focused on “US Social Movements.” While on campus, she also met with graduate and undergraduate students in Women’s and Gender Studies.





  • Professor of Religion Elaine Craddock gave two presentations at the annual Conference on South Asia in Madison, Wisconsin, Oct. 26–28. She presented the paper “Recalibrating Fieldwork” as part of the Queer Pre-Conference: Navigating Normativity from a Non-normative Perspective in Academia and the Field. She also presented the paper “Tamil Transgender Servants of the Goddess” for the panel Purity, Power, and Purpose: Non-elite Goddess Traditions in India and Their Encounters with Modernities.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Communication Studies Lamiyah Bahrainwala published the article “When Terrorists Play Ball” in the journal Communication and Sport. This article examines how the media recuperates sports from terrorism discourse, focusing on Boston Marathon Bomber Tamerlan Tsarnaev, who was also an accomplished boxer.





  • Assistant Professor of History Jessica Hower gave an invited talk on her current book project, Tudor Empire: The Making of Britain and the British Atlantic World, 1485-1603, at Oxford University, Oxford, UK, on Oct. 31, 2017. The lecture was part of “The Long History of Ethnicity & Nationhood Reconsidered Seminar Series,” Michaelmas Term 2017, sponsored by TORCH: The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities, Bing Overseas Studies Program Stanford University, and the University of Birmingham BRIHC: Birmingham Research Institute for History and Cultures.





  • Associate Professor of Communication Studies Valerie Renegar published a new article in Women’s Studies in Communication titled “‘Abusive Furniture:’ Visual Metonymy and the Hungarian Stop Violence Against Women Campaign” about a provocative set of anti-domestic violence images and will be available in the winter issue of the journal.





  • Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin was one of the “leading cultural producers, artists, theorists, and activists” invited to participate by The Center for Creative Ecologies at the University of California at Santa Cruz in their “questionnaire” To the Barricades! Culture and Politics at the Centenary of the October Revolution. His responses can be found here.





  • Professor of Feminist Studies Alison Kafer was invited to speak at Yale University in honor of Donna Haraway’s receiving the Wilbur L. Cross Medal. There were two symposia celebrating Haraway’s work. Kafer spoke in the opening symposium, which centered on “The Cyborg Manifesto.” Her talk “Cyborgs and Other Crip Kin” stems from new work on crip technoscience. A program for the symposia, held Nov. 2–3, is available here.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Music Dana Zenobi presented a lecture recital on the art songs of sister composers Nadia and Lili Boulanger at McLennan Community College in Waco, Texas. She performed along with pianist Jeanne Sasaki on Oct. 26.





  • Assistant Professor of Art History Allison Miller published a review of the book, Beyond the First Emperor’s Mausoleum: New Perspectives on Qin Art, edited by Liu Yang on caa.reviews, a publication of the College Art Association, on Oct. 27.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Communication Studies Shannon Holland was interviewed and quoted by VICE Media in an article titled “After Timberlake Super Bowl Announcement, Internet Calls for ‘Justice for Janet’.”  In the article, Holland reflects on her published research regarding news coverage of the 2004 Super Bowl halftime controversy,  which she argues depicted Jackson as the primary or sole architect of the infamous “wardrobe malfunction.” She also discusses how the NFL’s  decision to feature Timberlake in the upcoming Super Bowl halftime show further reinforces white male privilege within and beyond the NFL.





  • Part-Time Assistant Professor of Theatre Bethany Lynn Corey and Associate Professor of Theatre Desiderio Roybal were recognized with nominations by The B. Iden Payne Awards Council. Bethany Lynn Corey’s original play All Aboard was recognized as an Outstanding Theatre for Youth Production. Desiderio Roybal was recognized for Outstanding Set Design of The Herd produced by Jarrott Productions. The B. Iden Payne Awards Council recognizes outstanding theatrical performance, production and design in Austin.





  • Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers published “Billie Jean Beats Bobby: Watching BATTLE OF THE SEXES in Trumpian Times” in Lilith Magazine’s Blog.





  • Professor of Music Lois Ferrari was invited to conduct a New York State School Music Association (NYSSMA) all-county concert in the Saratoga, NY, area. Ferrari rehearsed and conducted approximately 80 high school musicians over the course of three days, all culminating in a festival concert on Oct. 21.





  • Professor of Art and Art History Thomas Noble Howe gave lectures at the preliminary presentation of the publication of the excavation of the garden of the Great Peristyle of the Villa Arianna (‘Ariadne’) at Stabiae (Quaderni di Studi Pompeiani, VII) at the local Rotary of Castellammare di Stabia and the national convention of the Garden Club of Italy on Oct. 13–14. The lectures were in Italian.





  • Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin presented a paper “What’s Left of the Russian Revolution’s Global Imaginary at 100: China and Cuba in an Era of Resurgent Revolution and (New) Authoritarian Revanchism” at a conference on “The Russian Revolution Centenary: Reflections on the 21st Century” held at the University of Peloponnese, Corinth, Greece.





  • Elyssa Sliheet, Class of 2019,  and Adina Friedman, Class of 2019, presented  “Inventing a Mobile Service” and “How Can Technology Help At-Risk Youth Get Enough Support to Stay in School,” respectively, at Opportunities for Undergraduate Research in Computer Science, a three-day research-focused workshop at Carnegie Mellon University Oct 20–22, 2017.  Associate Professor of Computer Science Barbara Anthony served as the faculty sponsor.  Funding was provided by the Fleming Student Travel Fund, the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science at Southwestern, as well as Carnegie Mellon’s School of Computer Science and Women@SCS.





  • Five seniors presented at the Texas Undergraduate Mathematics Conference (TUMC) on Oct. 21, 2017, held this year in San Antonio.

    • Victoria Gore, class of 2018, presented “Modeling Trends in Austin Traffic.”

    • Bonnie Henderson, class of 2018, presented “The Mathemasticks of Flower Sticks.”

    • Kristen McCrary, class of 2018, presented  “Math and Mancala.”

    • Penny Phan, class of 2018, presented “Singapore:  Model of a Savings Fund.”

    • Sam Vardy, class of 2018, presented “The Price of Health.”

    Each presentation was based on preliminary capstone work in Fall 2017 supervised by Associate Professor of Mathematics Therese Shelton who also attended.  Other students in attendance were Isaac Hopkins, class of 2018, Hannah Freeman and Aiden Steinle, both class of 2020, and Mercedes Gonzalez, class of 2021. Visiting Assistant Professor of Mathematics John Ross also attended the Project NExT events and aided our students. There were 28 talks by students at 14 institutions at the TUMC. Southwestern had the most students giving presentations. Approximately 115 students from 23 institutions attended. Southwestern funding for students was provided by the Fleming Student Travel Fund and the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science. Shelton was funded through the Faculty-Student Project fund at Southwestern. The University of Incarnate Word subsidized the TUMC.





  • Professor of Feminist Studies Alison Kafer was invited to speak at Yale University in honor of Donna Haraway’s receiving the Wilbur L. Cross Medal. There were two symposia celebrating Haraway’s work. Kafer spoke in the opening symposium, which centered on “The Cyborg Manifesto.” Her talk “Cyborgs and Other Crip Kin” stems from new work on crip technoscience. A program for the symposia, held Nov. 2–3, is available here.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Music Dana Zenobi presented a lecture recital on the art songs of sister composers Nadia and Lili Boulanger at McLennan Community College in Waco, Texas. She performed along with pianist Jeanne Sasaki on Oct. 26.





  • Assistant Professor of Art History Allison Miller published a review of the book, Beyond the First Emperor’s Mausoleum: New Perspectives on Qin Art, edited by Liu Yang on caa.reviews, a publication of the College Art Association, on Oct. 27.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Communication Studies Shannon Holland was interviewed and quoted by VICE Media in an article titled “After Timberlake Super Bowl Announcement, Internet Calls for ‘Justice for Janet’.”  In the article, Holland reflects on her published research regarding news coverage of the 2004 Super Bowl halftime controversy,  which she argues depicted Jackson as the primary or sole architect of the infamous “wardrobe malfunction.” She also discusses how the NFL’s  decision to feature Timberlake in the upcoming Super Bowl halftime show further reinforces white male privilege within and beyond the NFL.





  • Part-Time Assistant Professor of Theatre Bethany Lynn Corey and Associate Professor of Theatre Desiderio Roybal were recognized with nominations by The B. Iden Payne Awards Council. Bethany Lynn Corey’s original play All Aboard was recognized as an Outstanding Theatre for Youth Production. Desiderio Roybal was recognized for Outstanding Set Design of The Herd produced by Jarrott Productions. The B. Iden Payne Awards Council recognizes outstanding theatrical performance, production and design in Austin.





  • Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers published “Billie Jean Beats Bobby: Watching BATTLE OF THE SEXES in Trumpian Times” in Lilith Magazine’s Blog.





  • Professor of Music Lois Ferrari was invited to conduct a New York State School Music Association (NYSSMA) all-county concert in the Saratoga, NY, area. Ferrari rehearsed and conducted approximately 80 high school musicians over the course of three days, all culminating in a festival concert on Oct. 21.





  • Professor of Art and Art History Thomas Noble Howe gave lectures at the preliminary presentation of the publication of the excavation of the garden of the Great Peristyle of the Villa Arianna (‘Ariadne’) at Stabiae (Quaderni di Studi Pompeiani, VII) at the local Rotary of Castellammare di Stabia and the national convention of the Garden Club of Italy on Oct. 13–14. The lectures were in Italian.





  • Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin presented a paper “What’s Left of the Russian Revolution’s Global Imaginary at 100: China and Cuba in an Era of Resurgent Revolution and (New) Authoritarian Revanchism” at a conference on “The Russian Revolution Centenary: Reflections on the 21st Century” held at the University of Peloponnese, Corinth, Greece.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Art Ron Geibel was one of 150 artists from across the county asked to participate in an exhibition/fundraiser titled “Build Hope, Not Walls” at Big Medium Gallery in Austin, Texas. Artists were asked to create one brick to contribute to an installation celebrating individuality. All proceeds were donated to the following organizations that support immigrants and refugees: American Gateways, Casa Marianella, Preemptive Love, and Refugee Services of Texas. The exhibition was on view Oct. 13–15, 2017.





  • Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers’ article “Got Jewish Milk?: Screening Epstein and Van Sant for Intersectional Film History” is the lead article in the latest issue of the Journal Jewish Film And New Media. Rob Epstein’s The Times of Harvey Milk (1984) and Gus Van Sant’s Milk (2008), the two major films that narrate the life and tragically dramatic death of gay politician and activist Harvey Milk (1930–1978), are widely recognized as part of the queer cinematic canon but are less often categorized as Jewish films. While Epstein’s film adroitly presents a “Kosher-style” Milk, the Jewishness of Van Sant’s Milk is less certain. However, a well-established pattern of gay and lesbian Jews citing Milk as one of their own—what Meyers terms “Jewqhooing”—enabled a Jewish reception of the movie Milk. Querying and queerying the Jewishness of Milk (the man as well as the movies that purport to represent his life and times) illuminate the complex ways Jewishness continues to be cinematically conveyed or whitewashed as well as the intersections between queer and Jewish film history. This article is part of Meyers’ book-in-progress on Jewish American Cinema.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Physics and Environmental Studies Rebecca Paulsen Edwards served on a panel for a discussion of “What to do in your class before students start using MATLAB” at the 2017 Teaching Computation in the Sciences Using MATLAB workshop in Northfield, Minn., Oct. 15–17.





  • Assistant Professor of Art History Allison Miller was a special guest at the Archaeological Institute of America (AIA)–Orange County’s annual grant fundraiser on Saturday, Oct. 14th, in Santa Ana, Calif. The AIA-OC is one of the few local AIA societies that raises money to support graduate student research in archaeology. Miller’s remarks centered on her current research on the color purple in ancient China. The Executive Director of the AIA, Ann Benbow, was also in attendance at the event. Miller also gave an invited lecture titled “Terracotta Warriors after the First Emperor: Re-evaluating the Qin Legacy in the Han” at the Bowers Museum in Orange County, Calif., on Sunday, Oct. 15. The lecture was delivered as the part of the AIA’s 2017–2018 lecture program and sponsored by the Orange County Society of the AIA.





  • Technical Assistant and Exhibitions Coordinator Seth Daulton was featured on “Spork in the Road,” a podcast that cultivates conversations with creative individuals about their path, craft, and passions. “Spork in the Road” is produced by Rivers Barden Architects in Houston, Texas. To listen to the podcast visit sporkintheroad.net.





  • Assistant Professor of Computer Science Chad Stolper presented a poster “Atomic Operations for Specifying Graph Visualization” at the IEEE VIS 2017 Conference in Phoenix, Ariz. Oct. 3–6. The poster was co-authored with Will Price, class of 2019, and Matt Sanford, class of 2020, along with colleagues at Georgia Tech, and was partly based on Price and Sanford’s SCOPE research this past summer.





  • Associate Professor Kerry Bechtel recently designed the costumes for Junie B. Jones is Not a Crook at Main Street Theater in Houston. In the wake of Hurricane Harvey, this production will be touring to schools in areas hardest hit by the disaster to bring the arts back to their communities. Following this production, Bechtel has designed the costumes for Akeelah and the Bee with Main Street Theater. This production will be performed in downtown Houston at the Midtown Arts & Theater Center (MATCH) facilities. Both of these productions were assisted by current student Worth Payton, class of 2018.





  • Professor of Biology Romi Burks’ research was published in the 2017 e-book version of “Biology and management of invasive apple snails” edited by Ravi Joshi, Robert Cowie, and Leocardio Sebastian. Along with six co-authors working with apple snails, Burks wrote a chapter titled “Identity, reproductive potential, distribution, ecology and management of invasive Pomacea maculata in the southern United States.” Co-authors included Dr. Jennifer Bernatis and manager Jess van Dyke from Florida, Dr. Jacoby Carter from the USGS Wetland Research Facility and Dr. Charles Martin from Louisiana (now in Florida), and from the University of Georgia, Dr. Jeb Byers and Dr. Bill McDowell (most recently at Colby College). Although a long time in production, this chapter will hopefully serve as research for the number of new researchers working on apple snails as this species continues to spread.





  • Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin gave an invited talk “Global Patterns of Publishing Academic Knowledge: It’s Time for the Global South” about the inequalities of global academic knowledge production at the 2017 Asociación Mexicana de Estudios Iternacionales (AMEI) meeting in Huatulco, Oaxaca, Mexico. This talk and a forthcoming panel “Diversifying the Discipline: Problems, Policies, and Prescriptions” and “Mentoring Café: Strategies and Support for Global South Scholars” at the 2018 International Studies Association meetings are related in part to the “decolonial turn” in International Relations (a putative shift is attributed in part to a co-authored book with Southwestern alum Professor Meghana Nayak ’97, Decentering IR), and loosely connected to the efforts of the emergent South-South Educational Scholarly Collaboration and Knowledge Interchange Initiative.





October 2017

  • Director of Teaching, Learning, and Scholarship Julie Sievers presented “Faculty Development and the Whole Professor” with Allison Adams of Emory University and Adrienne Christensen  of Macalester College at the Annual Meeting of the Professional and Organizational Development Network in Montreal, Canada, on Oct. 28. She also served on the conference team as the poster session co-chair.





  • Associate Professor of Theatre Desiderio Roybal has been nominated for a B. Iden Payne Award in Scenic Design. His design for The Herd, a David Jarrott Production, is one of five designs being considered for the best scenic design of 2016–2017 season in the Greater Austin Area. The recipient of this top design award will be announced at the November 3rd, B. Iden Payne Award Ceremony being held at the Scottish Rite Theater, Austin, Texas. His designs for The Herd, The Price, and Clybourne Park received the Austin Critics Table Award for Excellence in Scenic Design in June 2017.





  • Associate Professor of Computer Science Barbara Anthony presented a paper titled “Several Questions which Work for Almost Any Computer Science Exam” at the 26th Annual Rocky Mountain Conference of the Consortium for Computing Sciences in Colleges in Orem, Utah, held Oct. 13–14, 2017. Her paper will be published in the December 2017 issue of the Journal of Computing Sciences in Colleges.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Music Dana Zenobi was competitively selected to present a lecture titled “Financial Mentorship Strategies for Voice Teachers” at the fall meeting of the National Association of Teachers of Singing, South Texas Chapter. Informed by her work directing BELTA (Building Empowering Lives Through Art), a nonprofit that provides free crowdfunding services to artists and musicians, her presentation focused on crowdfunding best practices, fiscal sponsorship for artists and the basics of searching for grants to individuals.





  • Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin was the featured speaker at Project Minnesota/León’s (PML) annual fundraiser on Oct. 14. His remarks were on the topic of contemporary Nicaraguan politics. He also led a seminar on the same topic for some PML’s board members and donors.





  • Technical Assistant and Exhibitions Coordinator Seth Daulton spoke at Baylor University as a visiting artist on Oct. 9. Daulton presented demonstrations in lithography and intaglio printing, shared his work, spoke about the conceptual ideas in his work and process, and discussed his career path as an artist and educator.  





  • Professor of Feminist Studies Alison Kafer gave an invited talk and led a seminar at Purdue University on Oct. 5. Her talk, “Access Rebels: A Crip Manifesto for Social Justice,” was co-sponsored by Purdue’s Critical Disability Studies Program and the Purdue Honors College. Using the frame of “access rebels,” Kafer discussed the possibility of building radical cultures of accessibility and solidarity. She also led a seminar with undergraduate and graduate students on her research about the Ashley X case.





  • Assistant Professor of Art History Allison Miller gave an invited lecture titled “Terracotta Warriors after the First Emperor: Re-evaluating the Qin Legacy in the Han” at University of Colorado Boulder on Oct. 5. The lecture was delivered as the part of the 2017–2018 lecture program of the Archaeological Institute of America (AIA), and co-sponsored by the Boulder chapter of the AIA and the Museum of Natural History at the University of Colorado Boulder.





  • Professor of Biology Romi Burks presented an invited talk at a Symposium within the XCLAMA (Latin American MalacologicalSociety) about the results from five years of investigating apple snails in Uruguay. The presentation, titled “Overlapping and Overlooked: Pomacea species distribution, diversity and hybridization in Uruguay,” included four alumni co-authors (Sofia Campos ’16, Carissa Bishop ’17, Paul Glasheen ’16, and Averi Segrest ’16), five Uruguayan collaborators (Clementina Calvo, Dr. Mariana Meerhoff, Cristhian Clavijo, Ana Elise Röhrdanz, and Fabricio Scarabino) along with United States partner Dr. Ken Hayes of Howard University. This work represents the first evidence presented for hybridization of the snails in the native range, which has broad evolutionary implications. In addition, the work included a description of the broad and complex distribution of a cryptic species, a species containing individuals that are morphologically identical to those in a different species.





  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Alison Marr recently had her proposal “Hidden No More: Stories of Triumph, Excellence, and Achievement in Math and Computer Science” selected for funding as a mini-grant through the “WATCH US” grant from the National Science Foundation INCLUDES program. This mini-grant will bring four women from underrepresented groups with doctorates in mathematics and computer science to campus over the 2017–2018 academic year for a lecture series where each speaker will tell her journey to math (or computer science) and also share the type of research she does.





  • Professor of Music Lois Ferrari led the Austin Civic Orchestra (ACO) into its 41st season with a concert at the Austin ISD Performing Arts Center on Sept. 24. As Music Director of the ACO, Ferrari opened the orchestra’s Made in America season by conducting a program of music by Bernstein, Copland, Ellington, and Stookey. The latter, with text by Lemony Snicket, is a narrated who-dun-it aimed at engaging younger audience members. The ACO also sponsored an instrument petting zoo prior to the concert and offered this performance as a “pay what you wish” event.





  • Professors of Biology Maria Cuevas and Maria Todd presented their research “Expression of claudin-3 and -4 tight junction proteins in endometrial cancer cell lines and tumor tissues derived from African American women” at the 10th American Association of Cancer Research Conference on the Science of Cancer Health Disparities in Racial/Ethnic Minorities and the Medically Underserved in Atlanta, Ga. Sept. 25–28. An abstract was published in the AACR Meeting Proceedings.





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth will give a presentation on Southwestern’s Football + Experience Abroad program at the 2018 Annual Meeting of the Association of American Colleges and Universities’ (AAC&U) held January 24–27, 2018, in Washington, DC. Berroth’s proposal was one of over 450 submitted to present at the conference. AAC&U accepted fewer than 20 percent of those submitted. The proposals selected represent the work of faculty members, administrators, and higher education leaders at colleges, community colleges, universities, and educational organizations across the country.





  • Assistant Professor of Business Hazel Nguyen published an article titled “Stock market liquidity: Financially constrained firms and share repurchase” in the journal Accounting and Finance Research, 2017, vol 6(4).





  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Fumiko Futamura and Robert Lehr ’15 published a paper in Mathematics Magazine’s October 2017 issue titled “A New Perspective on Finding the Viewpoint” (90, no. 4, p. 267-77). The article uses projective geometry to give a new method for determining where a viewer should stand in front of a two-point perspective drawing to view it correctly.





  • Part-Time Instructor of Economics and Business Jim Christianson recently made a presentation to the Waco Scandinavian Club titled “History of the 10,000 Swedish Settlers of Travis and Williamson Counties 1870–1910.”





September 2017

  • Professor of Art Victoria Star Varner’s artwork from her “Crossed Paths” series was selected for the exhibition “Small Format 2017” in Dublin, Ireland. Organized by Black Church Print Studio, the exhibition is being held at Library Project, a “cultural hub at the heart of Temple Bar, multidisciplinary in approach. The space offers visitors an open door to discover local and international contemporary art practices through a collection of publications and a variety of exhibitions and events.” Earlier this year, she exhibited three large drawings in her “Centripetal Forces” series at the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor in “Drawing Perspectives,” an invitational exhibition of five artists curated by Professor Barbara Fontaine White, who described her curatorial intent in the catalogue as follows, “’Drawing Perspectives’ celebrates a variety of approaches to drawing and demonstrates the complexity of content and media utilized today.”  Varner also exhibited five of her engravings at the VAM Gallery in Austin in “Eight from Texas,” curated by Professor Tim High, University of Texas. Lily Press in Washington, D.C., a fine art press, is currently publishing two editions of large prints, created by Varner at the press this summer with Master Printer Susan Goldman, owner and operator.





  • Professor of Art Victoria Star Varner’s artwork from her “Crossed Paths” series was selected for the exhibition “Small Format 2017” in Dublin, Ireland. Organized by Black Church Print Studio, the exhibition is being held at Library Project, a “cultural hub at the heart of Temple Bar, multidisciplinary in approach. The space offers visitors an open door to discover local and international contemporary art practices through a collection of publications and a variety of exhibitions and events.” Earlier this year, she exhibited three large drawings in her “Centripetal Forces” series at the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor in “Drawing Perspectives,” an invitational exhibition of five artists curated by Professor Barbara Fontaine White, who described her curatorial intent in the catalogue as follows, “’Drawing Perspectives’ celebrates a variety of approaches to drawing and demonstrates the complexity of content and media utilized today.”  Varner also exhibited five of her engravings at the VAM Gallery in Austin in “Eight from Texas,” curated by Professor Tim High, University of Texas. Lily Press in Washington, D.C., a fine art press, is currently publishing two editions of large prints, created by Varner at the press this summer with Master Printer Susan Goldman, owner and operator.





  • Assistant Professor of History Jessica Hower presented a paper titled “From ‘Tydder’ to ‘Tudor,’ ‘Stewart’ to ‘Stuart’: Dynasty, Empire, and Identity in the Early Modern Atlantic World” at the “Modern Invention of Dynasty: A Global Intellectual History, 1500–2000” Conference at the University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK, Sept. 21–23, 2017.





  • Assistant Professor of Business Debika Sihi chaired and participated in a panel at the Marketing Management Association Conference in Pittsburgh, Pa., held Sept. 20–22, 2017. The panel focused on methods to  develop innovative and original marketing course materials and design class discussions which garner thoughtful student engagement.





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth accepted a nomination to serve on the American Association of Teachers of German (AATG) Program Committee for the 2018 AATG / American Council on Teaching Foreign Languages (ACTFL) Convention and World Languages Expo in New Orleans, La., Nov. 16–18, 2018. This prestigious nomination came from the president of the AATG who annually selects three AATG members. The committee identifies topics and chairs for a number of planned sessions of special interest to the membership. Committee members also review and select all session proposals with a focus on German. They are instrumental in shaping a future-oriented program representative of important aspects in teaching and learning German. This convention marks an important year of intentional inter-connectedness and will be especially exciting since AATG and ACTFL will be meeting in conjunction with the Fédération Internationale des Professeurs de Langues Vivantes/International Modern Language Teachers’ Federation (FIPLV). Furthermore, AATG has extended an invitation for Berroth to participate in the Internationaler Deutschlehrerinnen- und Deutschlehrerverband in a North America meeting.





  • Professor of Feminist Studies Alison Kafer had a chapter published in the new collection Disability Studies and the Environmental Humanities: Toward an Eco-Crip Theory, edited by Sarah Jaquette Ray and Jay Sibara (University of Nebraska, 2017). Her contribution, “Bodies of Nature: The Environmental Politics of Disability,” is reprinted from her book Feminist Queer Crip (Indiana University, 2013) and is included in the “Foundations” section of the anthology.





  • Assistant Professor of History Jethro Hernandez Berrones published an article titled “Homeopathy ‘for Mexicans’: Medical Popularisation, Commercial Endeavours, and Patients’ Choice in the Mexican Medical Marketplace, 1853–1872” in the journal Medical History, 61, 4.





  • Part-time Instructor of Applied Music Adrienne Inglis’ composition “Pájaros” for solo flute and strings enjoyed its world première performance Sept. 17, 2017, with the composer as soloist with the Balcones Community Orchestra under the direction of Dr. Robert Radmer. Based on bird songs of central Texas, the piece was warmly received with a standing ovation. Inglis also performed the first movement of “Concerto No. 4” by François Devienne. Inversion Ensemble will perform “Pájaros” Saturday, Sept. 30, 2017, at 7 p.m. at Westminster Presbyterian Church Fellowship Hall in Austin, and Sunday, Oct. 1, 2017, at 3 p.m. at First United Methodist Church of Pflugerville.





  • Professor of Music Kiyoshi Tamagawa’s article “Chopsticks, Golliwogs and Wigwams: The Need for Cultural Awareness in Piano Teaching Materials and Repertoire” appeared in the October/November 2017 issue of American Music Teacher, the journal of the Music Teachers National Association. The article explores how piano teaching materials and repertoire still in use today can convey attitudes toward ethnic and cultural groups that do not reflect the progress being made in daily life.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Art Ron Geibel will have an installation in ”Fountain: sculptural musings on the readymade” at St. Edward’s University in Austin. The artists in the exhibit investigate reconfigured, found, mass-produced, or functional objects to elicit sculptures that are familiar yet absurd, compelling yet irreverent, perplexing yet seductive. Opening Reception will be Friday, Sept. 22, from 6–8 p.m. at St. Edward’s  Fine Arts Gallery. The installation will be on view through Oct. 12, 2017.





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth was elected to the American Association of Teachers of German (AATG) Texas leadership team. On a three-year term, she will serve as Vice President, President, and Outgoing President to assure continuity and mentoring. At the Sept. 9, 2017, joint meeting of all three Texas AATG chapters, Berroth delivered a presentation on her research and teaching praxis in Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) with sample lessons from her project of connecting German and Math to an audience of German teachers working at Texas high schools, colleges, and universities.





  • Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin gave a talk on the “Pink Tide” and Latin America’s Political Pendulum at the Bulverde/Spring Branch Public Library as part of the Foreign Policy Association’s Great Decisions discussion program.





  • President Edward Burger was invited to lead the plenary session, “The State of Higher Education in Texas,” at the Annual Meeting of the Independent Colleges and Universities of Texas held in Austin on Sept. 11, 2017, in which he discussed educational issues with Lee Jackson, Chancellor of The University of North Texas System, and Bill Powers, President Emeritus of The University of Texas at Austin.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Education Suzanne García-Mateus co-authored  an article titled “Translanguaging Pedagogies for Positive Identities in Two-Way Dual Language Bilingual Education” in the Journal of Language, Identity & Education. This is a timely article considering the rise of two-way dual language programs in the local area(s).





  • Associate Professor of History Melissa Byrnes writes for the blog Lawyers, Guns & Money. The blog was recently named one of the top 100 political science blogs on the web. Read her recent pieces here.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Art Ron Geibel was invited to participate in “In-Cahoots: Mischievously Playful Craft” at Signature Gallery in Atlanta, Ga. The exhibition features artists who push the boundary of craft, technique, and concept. The gallery is on view Sept. 16–Oct. 7.





  • Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin participated in a panel titled “What Have We Learned About Revolutions?” at the 2017 meeting of the American Political Science Association. His remarks were under the rubric “Revolution in the Age of Authoritarian Revanchism.”





  • Deidra McCall, Class of 2017, participated in the Honors Program and presented a research paper titled “Racialized Politics and the Confederate Flag: Why Society Can Never Be Color-Blind” at the August 2017 American Sociological Association (ASA) annual meeting in Montreal, Canada. Her participation was funded through her award as Southwestern’s first Mellon Undergraduate Fellow. At this same conference, Professor of Sociology Maria Lowe and Associate Professor of Sociology Reggie Byron presented a paper titled “Neutralizing Harm: Sexist and Racist Jokes among Undergraduate Students.” Holly O’Hara, Class of 2017, and Dakota Cortez, Class of 2019, are co-authors on the paper. This paper is part of a larger project supported by SU’s Faculty-Student Collaborative research funds. Byron also served his final year on the ASA Honors Program Advisory Council.





  • Assistant Professor of Art History Allison Miller presented a paper at The Second Conference of the European Association for Asian Art and Archaeology, held at the University of Zurich, Switzerland, from Aug. 24–27. The paper, titled “The Status of the Mural in Early Han Art: Reflections from the Shiyuan Tomb,” was presented on a panel that she organized and chaired titled “Mural Painting in Han China: Re-Examining the Origins and Development of the Genre.”





  • Technical Assistant and Exhibitions Coordinator Seth Daulton exhibited new mixed media works and a limited edition book at the Nicole Longnecker Gallery in Houston, TX. The work was part of a three-person exhibition on view from July 8–Sept. 4, 2017.





  • Assistant Professor of German Michelle Reyes and Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth’s proposal submitted for programming in MLL German has been selected to receive a Deutsch macht Spaß Grant in the amount of $500. The American Association of Teachers of German (AATG) is offering these grants through funds provided by the German government’s Netzwerk Deutsch program. The grant will support a community outreach program in October.





August 2017

  • Professor of Chemistry & Biochemistry Maha Zewail-Foote published the article “Alternative DNA structure formation in the mutagenic human c-MYC promoter” in the highly ranked journal Nucleic Acids Research. This research is significant because it implicates the involvement of a three-stranded DNA structure in genome instability associated with the human c-MYC oncogene region and cancer. Chemistry alumni Sarah Coe ’17 and Olivia Drummond ’17 were involved in this research project.





  • Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers published “The Disappearing Jew” in Inside Higher Education.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Art Ron Geibel had work selected for the fourth annual Juried National exhibition at Red Lodge Clay Center in Red Lodge, Mont. The exhibition highlights the diverse scope of ideas and techniques artists are exploring in contemporary ceramics.  The exhibition will be on view to the public September 1–22, 2017.





  • Associate Professor of Communication Studies Bob Bednar was quoted in a recent article in VICE Motherboard exploring the cultural influence of the iPhone on the tenth anniversary of its release. The June 27, 2017 article, by Caroline Haskins, is titled “The iPhone Has Objectified Our Faces.”





  • Professor of Theatre Kathleen Juhl and Cathy Madden’s co-edited book, Galvanizing Performance: The Alexander Technique as a Catalyst for Excellence, was published on August 21, 2017. The Alexander Technique is practiced widely by performing artists. It encourages artists to make the choice to perform with ease and confidence. This book is the first of its kind because it focuses specifically on the ways performing artists and their teachers engage the Alexander Technique as they rehearse and perform. The book represents the first time Alexander Technique teachers have formally opened the doors to their teaching studios and classrooms to reveal specific pedagogies for working with the technique and performance.





  • Senior Director of Advancement Services and Operations Leigh Petersen chaired the APRA (Association of Professional Researchers for Advancement) Data Analytics Symposium in Anaheim, Calif. in August. Close to 150 universities and nonprofits joined together for two days for intensive data analytic presentations and internationally known speakers.





  • Assistant Professor of Business Debika Sihi co-authored the article “Effects of Offline Ad Content on Online Brand Search: Insights from Super Bowl Advertising,” which is forthcoming in the Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Education Suzanne García-Mateus published an article titled “Translanguaging Pedagogies for Positive Identities in Two-Way Dual Language Bilingual Education” in the Journal of Language, Identity & Education. The article is coauthored with Deborah Palmer, a professor at the University of Colorado, Boulder.





  • Assistant Professor of History Jethro Hernandez Berrones co-organized the symposium “(Un)Bounded Doctors: Nation, Profession, and Place in the Local and Global Formation of Medical Groups in the 19th and 20th Centuries” together with Dr. Beatriz Teixeira Weber from Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Brazil, for the International Congress of the History of Science and Technology in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, July 23–29, 2017. The symposium brought together scholars from McGill University (Canada), University of Western Ontario (Canada), Universidade Federal de Santa Maria (Brazil), Casa de Oswaldo Cruz/Fiocruz (Brazil), Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (Mexico), Brown University (USA), and Southwestern University (USA) to discuss the demography of doctors as a result of state-building processes, migration, professional organization, and the provision of health. In this panel, Hernandez Berrones presented the paper “From Foreign Healers to International Doctors: Internationalism and the Consolidation of Homeopathy in Mexico, 1853–1942.” The ideas for this paper resulted from conversations with Latin American & Border Studies committee members about the inclusion of Borderland Studies in the Latin American Studies Program and with students and faculty during the First Borderlands Symposium in the fall of 2016.





  • Head Football Coach Joe Austin’s solicited article “Rev-Up Your ‘Jet’ Motion Offense with Explosive Play-Action Passes” was published by American Football Monthly on Aug. 15, 2017.





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth is a member of the Collaborative Work Group/Board of Authors on an innovative German project. With leadership from Macalester College German Studies professor Britt Abel, a Digital Humanities Advancement Grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) will help the group create digital open-educational resources for teaching and learning German language and culture. Dr. Faye Stewart, a former Brown Junior Visiting Assistant Professor of German at Southwestern, is also a member of the team.





  • President Edward Burger was recently elected to serve on the Governing Board of the Aspen Institute Wye Seminars in collaboration with the Association of American Colleges and Universities.





  • Professor of Biology Romi Burks attended the Ecological Society of America meetings in Portland, Ore., with three of her research students, Carissa Bishop ’17, Madison Granier, class of 2019, and Sophia Campos ’16, Aug. 6–11. All three presented their own research posters at this national meeting attended by over 4,000 ecologists. Bishop shared her experience mentoring her peers in an Invertebrate Ecology lab taught by Burks. Her poster “Turning an RA into a TA: Case study in utilizing undergraduate research expertise to improve a molecular ecology course undergraduate research experience” evaluated a module made possible by funds from the Keck Foundation. Granier presented her poster titled “Snail Slime in Real Time: qPCR Detection of Environmental DNA from Apple Snails”  which includes a collaboration with SU alumni Dr. Matthew Barnes ’06. This project extends her SCOPE research from the summer of 2016. Campos added the final samples to her analysis and presented a poster titled “Cryptic Yet Curiously Common: Population genetic structure and diversity of a cryptic Pomacea sp. and its better known congeneric P. canaliculata.”  Co-authors include Dr. Ken Hayes from Howard University and Cristhian M. Blavijo and Fabrizio Scarabino from Uruguay.





  • Professor of Art and Art History and chair of Art History Thomas Noble Howe published Excavation and Study of the Garden of the Great Peristyle of the Villa Arianna, Stabiae, 2007-2010 (Quaderni  di Studi Pompeiani, VII, [Associazione Internazionale di Amici di Pompei/Editrice Longobardi, Castellammare di Pompei/Fondazione Restoring Ancient Stabiae, 2016 (2017)]. Howe is lead author/editor and excavation director of the project, 2007–13 and along with Kathryn Gleason (Cornell), Michele Palmer, and Ian Sutherland (Middlebury). The publication is supported by subventions from the von Bothmer Fund of the Archaeological Institute of America, Associazione Internationale Amici di Pompei, School of Architecture Preservation and Planning, University of Maryland, Joyce and Erik Young. The major significance of this excavation of this enormous excellently preserved garden (c. 108 x 35 m.) is that it is the first actual archaeological evidence of the existence of the type of garden seen in the famous garden fresco of the Villa of the empress Livia at Prima Porta, formerly thought to be a “fantasy” painting. Howe and Gleason have since developed and published further theses on how this discovery clarifies exactly how elite inhabitants and guests used this garden and ambient architecture to move through spaces and interact in an intensely political environment. At one point Howe lead field seasons of as many as 110 people from twelve institutions and seven countries.





  • Assistant Professor of Computer Science Chad Stolper co-authored the article “Vispubdata.org: A Metadata Collection About IEEE Visualization (VIS) Publications” which has been published in the September 2017 issue of IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics (IEEE TVCG).





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Political Science Emily Sydnor published an article titled “Easing Political Digestion: The effects of news curation on citizens’ behavior” in the Journal of Information Technology and Politics. The article is coauthored with Danielle Psimas, a 2015 graduate of the University of Virginia’s Politics Honors Program.





  • Associate Professor of Computer Science Barbara Anthony and Kathryn Reagan ’16 coauthored an article on “Community-Engaged Projects in Operations Research” in the Summer 2017 issue of Science Education and Civic Engagement: An International Journal. The research for this article was conducted during the Spring 2015 Operations Research course, with support from Director of Community-Engaged Learning Sarah Brackmann. Reagan was a Community-Engaged Learning Teaching Assistant and Anthony was a participant in the CEL Faculty Fellows program.





  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Fumiko Futamura presented a talk, “Fractals in Japanese Woodblock Prints,” as part of the Academic and Cultural Lecture Series of the Japan-America Society of Greater Austin in July 2017. This public lecture was presented at St. Edward’s University.





  • Four of our mathematics faculty, two students, and an alumnus were active at MathFest, a national meeting of the Mathematical Association of America (MAA) held July 26–29, 2017 in Chicago, Ill.

    • Associate Professor of Mathematics Fumiko Futamura co-presented the minicourse “Visualizing Projective Geometry Through Photographs and Perspective Drawings” with Annalisa Crannell of Franklin & Marshall College and Marc Frantz of Indiana University.

    • Visiting Assistant Professor John Ross presented “Lessons Learned Creating IBL Course Notes” at the MathFest Contributed Paper Session “Inquiry-Based Teaching and Learning.”

    • Associate Professor of Mathematics Therese Shelton co-organized and presented the workshop “Examples and Experiences in Teaching a Modeling-Based Differential Equations Course” with Rosemary Farley of Manhattan College, Patrice Tiffany of Manhattan College, and Brian Winkel of SIMIODE.

    • Beulah Agyemang-Barimah ’17 and Shelton co-presented “Pharmacokinetic Models for Active Learning” with Theresa Laurent of St. Louis College of Pharmacy.  This was part of the Contributed Paper Session “A Modeling First Approach in a Tradition Differential Equations Class.” Shelton’s work was supported by the Keck Foundation Grant at Southwestern.

    • Daniela Beckelhymer and D’Andre Adams, both class of 2020, presented “Choose Your Own Adventure: An Analysis of Interactive Gamebooks Using Graph Theory” in the MAA Student Paper Session based on work from the 2017 SCOPE work supervised by Associate Professor of Mathematics Alison Marr.  Their travel was supported by the SCOPE and S-STEM programs at Southwestern.

    • Ross and Marr served as judges for some of the MAA Student Paper Sessions.





  • Professor of Music Kiyoshi Tamagawa was a featured artist and one of three guest presenters at the Oregon Music Teachers’ Association annual conference in Lincoln City, Ore, July 14–16, 2017. He presented two sessions, “Basics of Contrapuntal Playing on the Keyboard” and “Echoes from the East: Debussy and the Javanese Gamelan,” taught a master class on the keyboard music of J.S. Bach, and performed a solo recital of music by Bach, Debussy and Schumann.





  • Associate Professor of Computer Science Barbara Anthony was an invited participant at the Google Cloud Platform Faculty Institute held at Google’s Mountain View, Calif., campus in July–Aug. 2017. The institute brought together approximately 60 faculty and numerous Googlers to consider how cloud technologies can be more effectively incorporated into the classroom.





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth was invited to present the concluding paper in a three-session section on integrating STEM and German at the XVI. International Conference of Teachers of German, IDT, in Fribourg, Switzerland from July 31–Aug. 4, 2017. IDT meets every fourth year and is the world’s largest international convention for teachers of German. Berroth shared her research in Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) resulting from her ACS funded interdisciplinary project on connecting Math and German, on which she collaborated with Assistant Professor of Computer Science Jacob Schrum. Berroth’s participation was funded by a scholarship from the Goethe Institute in Washington, DC.





  • Associate Professor of English Michael Saenger presented a paper at a seminar on the topic of strangers and immigration in Shakespeare and the modern world at the conference of ESRA (European Shakespeare Research Association) in Gdansk, Poland. In addition, at the same conference, he led a workshop titled “Shakespeare Between Languages.” In this workshop, a variety of European Shakespeare scholars translated a section of English poetry into French, Polish, Italian, Spanish and Chinese. Saenger led a discussion of the practical and theoretical challenges and opportunities of these varied encounters with language difference.





  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Alison Marr co-organized the mini-conference “Constructing the Future of Inquiry-Based Learning (IBL) Conference: The Past 20 Years and the Next 20 Years” on July 27, 2017 in Chicago, Ill.  Visiting Assistant Professor John Ross presented the poster “Using IBL in Classes with Fewer or Shorter Meetings” at the IBL conference.  Associate Professor of Mathematics Therese Shelton also participated in the IBL conference.





  • Professor of Religion Laura Hobgood published a chapter titled “Animals” in The Routledge Companion to Death and Dying, ed. Christopher Moreman. Routledge, 2017.





  • Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers published “The Misogyny of MENASHE” in Lilith Magazine Blog.





  • Professor of Mathematics Kendall Richards coauthored (with Horst Alzer) the article “Inequalities for the Ratio of Complete Elliptic Integrals,” which was recently published in the Proceedings of the American Mathematical Society.





  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Alison Marr was among 10 faculty from across the country selected to attend the Workshop on Increasing Minority Participation in Undergraduate Mathematics at the Park City Math Institute in June 2017.  The workshop was led by Dr. Bill Velez from University of Arizona and Dr. Erica Walker from Teachers College, Columbia University.





  • Assistant Professor of Economics Patrick Van Horn presented his research titled “The Federal Reserve as a Start-Up: New Evidence from the Daily Discount Ledger from 1914–1917” at the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas on July 11, 2017. His paper was coauthored by Christoffer Koch.





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth was invited to observe and participate in sessions of the intensive summer language programs in Arabic at Al Akhawayn University in Ifrane, Morocco in July 2017. The guest visit, pedagogy observation, and intensive study was made possible by a Sam Taylor Fellowship awarded by the United Methodist Church.





July 2017

  • Associate Professor of Anthropology Brenda Sendejo was invited to present as a part of a panel at the 2017 American Library Association Annual Meeting in Chicago, Ill. This panel, titled “Giving Voice to Diverse Collections Through Digitization,” included other professionals from Amherst College, Washington University, the University of Minnesota, and Washington State University. The panel focused on ways that digitization of material in archives and special collections can help to give voice to underrepresented groups in the historical narrative. Sendejo presented on the Latina History Project, a collaborative project between Sendejo, Professor of Feminist Studies Alison Kafer, and Southwestern’s Special Collections. Over 100 librarians and archivists were in attendance. The panel was organized and planned by Director of Special Collections & Archives Jason W. Dean.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of History Joseph Hower presented a paper titled “’Every Candidate…Is Running Against Our Union’: AFSCME’s Response to Tax Cut Fever in the Late 1970s” at the annual meeting of the Labor and Working Class History Association at the University of Washington in Seattle.





  • Part-time Assistant Professor of Applied Music Li Kuang was invited to hold a four-day guest artist residency at both Yantai University’s College of Fine Arts and Jilin College of Fine Arts in China May 30–June 10, 2017. During the time of these residencies, Kuang taught masterclasses, gave private lessons, conducted clinics and presented solo recitals at both schools. In addition, Kuang was invited to teach a masterclass at Sichuan Conservatory of Music in Chengdu, China, on May 23. His residencies received great success and his trip to China helped create connections between Chinese music schools and Southwestern University. Kuang has already received several additional invitations from major conservatories for guest artist residencies and has set engagements with some of them for the summer of 2018.





  • Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers published “Flying While Female on El Al” on Lilith’s Magazine blog.


    Meyers also published “‘Are You or Have You Ever Been a Zionist?’  A Letter to Chicago Dyke March” in The Forward.  





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Art Ron Geibel had work selected for an exhibition titled “Small Works” at Trestle Gallery in Brooklyn, New York. The exhibition was juried by Bill Carroll, Director of the Studio Program of the Elizabeth Foundation for the Arts in New York City. Small Works features over 60 local, national, and international artists in all different areas of contemporary art who focus on the significance of intimately scaled works of art.  The exhibition will be on view to the public July 6–27, 2017.





  • Professor of Art Mary Visser presented a paper titled “Think, Connect and Create” at the 2017 annual meetings of the AEFA/Service of Art and Education in Paris, France. This paper presents how liberal arts universities use 3D printing as an educational tool that helps students make connections across disciplines.





  • Assistant Professor of Art History Allison Miller published a review of the book Color in Ancient and Medieval East Asia (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2015) in volume 137, issue 1 of the Journal of the American Oriental Society.





  • Associate Professor of Sociology Reggie Byron presented a paper titled “Employment Discrimination Activism and Intergenerational Change” at the CERES Conference at the University of Edinburgh on June 16, 2017. This paper compares race-based employment discrimination claims across the U.S. and U.K.





June 2017

  • Associate Professor of English Michael Saenger published a review of The City Theater’s production of Taming of the Shrew in Austin.





  • Professor of English David Gaines was interviewed by BuzzFeed and quoted in the article “People Think Bob Dylan Plagiarized His Nobel Lecture From SparkNotes” on June 15. Gaines joined the conversation regarding Bob Dylan’s alleged use of Spark Notes in his discussion of Moby-Dick.





  • Professor of Music and Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts Michael Cooper published a chapter titled “Faust’s Schubert: Schubert’s _Faust_” in Goethe’s “Faust” in Music: Music in Goethe’s “Faust,” ed. Lorraine Byrne Bodley (New York: Boydell, 2017). The first study to discuss the complete corpus of Schubert’s settings from Faust as a group in their dramatic and historical context, the chapter argues that Schubert, treating Part I of Goethe’s tragedy just four years after its publication in Vienna, was the first composer not only to appreciate the significance of Goethe’s recasting the traditional Faust narrative as a wager rather than a pact (and hence a venture in which humanity could outsmart or otherwise overcome the cosmic forces of Good and Evil that operate in the foreground of the drama), but also to understand that the true driving force of the drama is not Faust himself, but Gretchen. In so doing Schubert musically iterated “the woman question” that was gaining increasing prominence in late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century European cultural spheres, grappled astutely with a theme of Goethe’s drama even as much of the literary world was viewing it with incomprehension or outright hostility, and pioneered interpretive trends that have since assumed almost dogmatic status.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Art Ron Geibel had two sculptures selected for an exhibition titled “Sweet ‘n Low: An International show of Cute” at Bedford Gallery in Walnut Creek, Calif.  The exhibition was juried by Evan Pricco, editor of Juxtapoz Magazine, and Susannah Kelly and Neil Perry of Antler Gallery in Portland, Ore. Sweet ‘n Low features artwork from over 130 local, national, and international artists who extend the genre of cute from cuddly and precious to creepy and ironic. The exhibition will be on view June 22–Aug. 27, 2017.





  • Part-time Instructor of Applied Music Adrienne Inglis’ composition “Letters to Faith” made its world premiere June 3 at Austin’s new choral collective Inversion Ensemble. The eight-voice a cappella choral work sets to music two letters written by Inglis’ grandparents to their daughter, Faith Inglis, while she was a student at Pomona College. Faith’s parents wrote these letters to comfort and encourage her after a poor showing on an exam, but unwittingly revealed amusing and poignant family characteristics.





  • Associate Professor of Anthropology Brenda Sendejo presented “The Face of God Has Changed: Mujerista Ethnography and the Politics of Spirituality in the Borderlands” at the Inter University Program for Latino Research (IUPLR) conference in San Antonio on May 18. She was invited to present on a panel titled “Cultural Anthropology in the U.S.-Mexican Borderlands: A Texas Perspective.” Sendejo spoke on her current book project and a forthcoming publication on the emergence of Chicana feminist thought in Texas, which she connected to Southwestern’s Latina History Project.





  • Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers published “Serious Missteps in Dirty Dancing Remake” in Lilith Magazine’s blog.





  • Associate Professor of Theatre Desiderio Roybal’s scenic design for the play, The Herd, has been added to the short list of plays under consideration for B. Iden Payne award nominations for 2016–2017. Roybal also received the Austin Critics Table Award for Excellence in Scenic Design for the 2016–2017 theatre season for his designs for  Clybourne Park, The Price, and The Herd. All three plays were credited for design excellence. The Herd and The Price were designed for David Jarrott Productions. Clybourne Park was designed for Penfold Theatre. These plays were selected for the award from all the plays produced in Austin and the Greater Austin Area for 2016–2017. The adjudicators were critics writing for both print and online publications including the Austin-American Statesman, Austin Chronicle, CTX Live, BroadwayWorld Austin, Austin Entertainment Weekly, ConflictofInterest.com, and Arts and Culture Texas. Clybourne Park also received the Austin Critics Table Award for Excellence in Collaborative Ensemble Production. Roybal was scenic designer, Justin Smith ’04 was technical director, and Austin Mueck ’18 was assistant scenic designer.





  • Professor of Music Lois Ferrari performed (conducted) three concert programs with the Austin Civic Orchestra (ACO) over the past four months. The March 25 concert, “Texas Rising Stars,” featured concerto winners from the Butler School of Music at the University of Texas-Austin in addition to William Grant Still’s Afro-American Symphony. On May 13, the ACO hosted the Texas Guitar Quartet in a performance of Rodrigo’s Concierto Andaluz for Four Guitars. Also on the program was Tchaikovsky’s 4th Symphony. June 9–10 marked the 40th annual Zilker Park pops concerts. This year featured music by the Beatles and an eclectic array of music chosen by ACO audiences throughout the 2016–17 season.





May 2017

  • Assistant Professor of History Jethro Hernandez Berrones organized the panel “Medical Pluralism in Latin America Revisited: Chinese Medicine, Homeopathy, and Psychoanalysis in the Latin American Landscape in the 19th and 20th Centuries” for the annual meeting of the American Association for the History of Medicine in Nashville, Tenn. (May 4–7, 2017). In this panel, he also presented the paper titled “’Hostilidad,’ ‘Desorden’ and ‘Indisciplina’: The Challenges of Medical Pluralism at the National Homeopathic Hospital during the Age of Institutionalization of Biomedicine in Mexico City, 1893–1934.”





  • Southwestern Head Men and Women’s Tennis Coach Billy Porter was named Wilson/Intercollegiate Tennis Association’s Men’s Tennis West Region Coach of the Year.





  • Associate Professor of Political Science Shannon Mariotti was invited to contribute the essay on “Adorno and Democracy” for the Blackwell Companion to Adorno, a volume that will be edited by Espen Hammer, Peter Gordon, and Max Pensky. Her essay, “The Dispossession of the Public and the ‘Common Benefits’ Clause: Working Against Neoliberal Oligarchy through U.S. State Constitutions,” was also just published in American Political Thought: An Alternative View, edited by Alex Zamalin and Jonathan Keller (Routledge, 2017).





  • Professor of Feminist Studies Alison Kafer gave an invited talk at Portland State University (PSU) on May 11. She spoke about coalition-building and imagining social justice futures. While at PSU, she met with students, staff, and faculty from the Disability Resource Center, the Queer Resource Center, and the Women’s/Gender/Sexuality Studies Department, among others.





  • Professor of Education Michael Kamen and Mary Rouhiainen, Class of 2018, co-presented findings from their summer Faculty-Student Research project titled “Role of Imaginary Play in the Zone of Proximal Development and Science Learning” at the annual conference of the National Association for Research in Science Teaching.





  • Assistant Professor of Economics Patrick Van Horn presented his archival efforts at the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas and the results of those efforts at the Innovative Solutions for Archives and Financial Crises Conference at the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis. The event was co-hosted by the European Association for Banking and Financial History. Van Horn was the closing speaker at the Archival Showcase, which bridged the efforts by archivists and economists to use historical materials to investigate economic issues.





  • Professor of Art and Art History Thomas Noble Howe will deliver the opening plenary lecture: “Bold Imitator: The Arrival of the Greek Monumental ‘Orders,’ the Autodidact Polymath Architect and the Apollonion of Syracuse” at the conference Fonte Aretusa  Πηγὴ Ἀρέθουσα, Third Interdisciplinary Symposium on the Heritage of Western Greece, with special emphasis on: Μίμησις – Μimēsis: imitation, emulation, representation, reenactment, at the Sicily Center for International Education in Syracuse, Sicily, May 25–28, 2017. The invitation is the third in the last year which relates to recent interest in his dissertation “The Invention of the Doric Order” (Harvard 1985) on what is arguably the most controversial topic in architectural history, the creation of the Greek architectural “orders” (column types). The lecture proposes that the methodology which is generally used in architectural design classes, such as his own architecture studios, should be applied to questions of architectural history. Howe also will be chairing a session. The lecture will be in English, the chaired session in Italian. The lecture reprises a topic presented recently: that the profession of architect did not rise from the profession of builders.





  • Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers has been invited to join the editorial board of Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Political Science Emily Sydnor presented a paper titled “The Emotional Consequences of Political Incivility and Psychological Conflict Orientation” at the European Consortium for Political Research Joint Session Workshops in Nottingham, United Kingdom. The workshop, titled “Political Incivility in Parliament, Party Competition and Political Communication,” brought together scholars from 10 countries for four days of in-depth discussion on the topic.





  • Manager of Facilities & Maintenance Operations Shorty Schwartz was elected to the Texas Association of Physical Plant Administrators (TAPPA) for a one-year term. TAPPA is an organization of higher education facilities management professionals that promotes professionalism, networking, and education amongst the higher education facilities community.





  • Associate Director of Grants Niki Bertrand was awarded Honorable Mention for her recent poster presentation at the American Association of Physical Anthropologists meeting in New Orleans in April 2017. Bertrand’s doctoral thesis explores how anthropogenic factors influence stress-related behavior and physiology in a critically endangered species of monkey in Indonesia. The poster focused on one aspect of her research, the innovative collection of salivary cortisol using a non-invasive method from untrained, wild macaques. Bertrand was also awarded the 2017 Opler Scholarship for Dissertation Writing from the University at Buffalo Anthropology Department to support the completion of her thesis.





  • Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry Maha Zewail-Foote gave an invited seminar at the University of North Texas. Her talk included work from her sabbatical on the consequences of damage to non-B DNA structures including its role in causing human genetic diseases such as cancer.





  • Associate Professor of Sociology Reggie Byron gave an invited lecture titled “Implicit Bias, Microaggressions, and the March Toward More Inclusive Pedagogies” at SUNY Geneseo on April 27, 2017. He spent April 28 meeting with Geneseo students and their Special Diversity Commission to talk about campus climate issues and retention efforts.   





  • Part-time Instructor of Applied Music Katherine Altobello ’99 was the featured guest performer for Austin Bridal Magazine’s 30th Anniversary Gala on Apr. 13 in Austin, Texas.





  • Southwestern was well represented at the Association of College Admission Counselor Super Conference in San Antonio, Texas Apr. 23—25. Dean of Enrollment Services Christine Bowman presented “The ABC’s of Paying for College,” as well as “A Grapefruit or a Plum? What Students Should Consider when their College list is a Fruit Basket which includes Small Liberal Arts Colleges and Medium and Large Public and Private Institutions. Associate Professor of Mathematics Alison Marr presented “STEM and the Liberal Arts! Yes, Really” and Admission Counselor Patrick Firme presented “No, Nope, Na-Ah, No Way: Counseling Denied Students.”  This conference saw high school and college admission professionals from the Southern Texas and Rocky Mountain Regions of the United States.





  • Retired Associate Professor Rebecca Sheller and Professors of Biology Maria Cuevas and Maria Todd published an article in Biological Proceedings Online titled “Comparison of transepithelial resistance measurement techniques: Chopsticks vs. Endohm.” Measurement of transepithelial resistance (TER) is frequently used to determine the strength of tight junctions between epithelial cells in culture. However, the use of different technical approaches to measure TER sometimes results in inconsistent reports for TER readings within the same cell lines. To address this discrepancy, they compared two frequently used approaches (Chopsticks and Endhohm) and two types of polymer inserts (polycarbonate vs. polyester) to measure the TER values of three mammalian cell lines. Their study demonstrated the importance of using a single approach when seeking to measure and compare the TER values of cultured cell lines.





  • Assistant Professor of German Michelle Reyes and Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth accepted an invitation to screen and discuss the documentary Out of the Shadows: German Stories of Love, War and Faith on Apr. 25, 2017. Their presentation contributed to the Spring 2017 film series “Nachkriegsidentitäten - Post War Identities” hosted by the Department of Germanic Studies at The University of Texas, Austin.





  • Associate Professor of History Melissa Byrnes presented a paper “From ‘Ghetto’ to ‘Apartheid’: Education Policy as Housing Discrimination in 1970s Lyon” at the Society for French Historical Studies Annual Conference in Washington, D.C. She also participated in a special roundtable on “Human Rights in the Modern Francophone World.”





  • Professor of Art Victoria Star Varner had two prints selected for the 11th Biennial International Miniature Print Exhibition 2017 at the Center for Contemporary Printmaking in Norwalk, Connecticut, by Fredya Spira, Associate Curator of Prints and Drawings at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. The juror reviewed 632 prints from 294 artists from 24 countries and 32 U.S. states. Varner’s prints, “Crossed Paths: Short Version” and “Path Over Tienanmen” will be on view from June 4—Aug. 27 at the Center.





  • Professor of Music Lois Ferrari has been awarded second place for the 2016 American Prize Competition in orchestral conducting (community orchestra). The American Prize competitions are national awards adjudicated through submission of recorded performances. Ferrari submitted video recordings of her performances of Beethoven’s 2nd Symphony, the Shostakovich 5th Symphony, and the Marquez Danzon No. 2, all performed with the Austin Civic Orchestra.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Music Dana Zenobi was invited to present a lecture titled “Practical Uses for Technology in the Solo Voice Studio” at Northwest Vista College in San Antonio, Texas on Apr. 19.





  • Associate Professor of Theatre Desiderio Roybal designed stage scenery and was Scenic Artist for David Jarrott Productions’ staging of The Herd, by Rory Kennear, now playing at Trinity Street Theatre. His interior, suburban London setting showcased paintings by two local artists, Shanny Lott of Austin and Associate Director of University Events Xan Koonce. This is Roybal’s second design for David Jarrott Productions. His first design, The Price by Arthur Miller, was awarded the 2016 Best Scene Design Award in Austin and the Greater Austin area by the Central Texas Excellence in Theatre Awards.





  • Part-time Instructor of Applied Music Katherine Altobello ’99 judged the Spring 2017 Choir Competition for The Texas Charter School Academic and Athletic League (TCSAAL). TCSAAL works to aid the individual growth of Texas’ charter school students through academic and athletic competition, promotion of teamwork and a healthy lifestyle, and the constant pursuit for academic excellence.





  • Professor of English David Gaines offered two classroom workshops and delivered an invited address to the Texas Writers’ Conference at Schreiner University in Kerrville, Texas, on Apr. 25. The title of his address was “Dylan, Revelations, and Change: The Nobel Prize and ‘Literature.’”





  • Professor of Music and Austin Civic Orchestra Music Director Lois Ferrari led the Austin Civic Orchestra to second place in the 2016 American Prize Competition in community orchestra performance. The American Prize competitions are national awards adjudicated through submission of recorded performances. Ferrari and the ACO submitted live performances of Berlioz’s Symphonie Fantastique, Milhaud’s Creation du Monde, and the Marquez Danzon.





  • Professor of Political Science Shannon Mariotti participated in a panel titled “Mindfulness, Meditation, and Politics: Practices of the Social, Practices of the Self” on Apr. 13, 2017 at the Western Political Science Association conference in Vancouver, Canada. Her paper was titled “Zen Democracy: Experience and the Political Value of Modern Western Buddhism” and draws from a new book project.





  • Professor of Art and Art History, Chair of Art History, and Coordinator General of the Restoring Ancient Stabiae Foundation Thomas Howe will give an invited lecture, “Strolling with Power: New Light on Movement and Viewing in the Elite Villas of Stabiae,” at the conference “Gasparow Readings: Literature and Politics in Classical Antiquity” on Apr. 21. The conference is jointly organized by Russian State University for the Humanities (RSUH) and by Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration (RANEPA). It will be held at the RANEPA premises in the south-west of Moscow. Howe was invited to chair one of the sessions. The lecture will be in English with Russian translation.





  • Southwestern biochemistry alumna Katie Ferrick ’16 is the recipient of the prestigious NSF Graduate Research Fellowship. Ferrick conducted research with Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry Maha Zewail-Foote during her four years at Southwestern. She is currently in graduate school at Stanford University. This year, there were 13,000 applications and NSF made 2,000 award offers





  • Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers published “Cinematic Sustenance for a Jewish Feminist Exodus” in Lilith Magazine Blog.





  • Assistant Professor of Art History Allison Miller gave an invited presentation titled “Emperor Jing’s Yangling: A New Model for the Han Imperium” at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York on Apr. 9. The lecture was part of a three-day symposium offered in conjunction with the major international loan exhibition, Age of Empires: Chinese Art of the Qin and Han Dynasties (221 B.C.–A.D. 220). The landmark exhibition features works borrowed from 32 museums and archaeological institutes in China that have never been previously shown in the West. Scholars from North America, Europe, and Asia discussed the significance of these recent archaeological finds from a global perspective in the symposium, which was organized by the Met, the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World at New York University, and the NYU Center for Ancient Studies.





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth earned a full scholarship from the Goethe Institute in Washington, D.C., to participate in the 41st International Convention of Teachers of German (IDT), July 8–Aug. 4, 2017 in Freiburg i.Ü. Switzerland,  titled “Building Bridges—Connecting with German: People—Environments—Cultures. Berroth will present on her work of connecting STEM and German.





  • Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry Maha Zewail-Foote gave an invited seminar at Texas State University. Her talk was titled “DNA damage within alternatively structured DNA: Novel mechanisms of genetic instability in cancer.”





  • Assistant Professor of History Jessica Hower presented a paper titled “To bere the sam good hart’ of Empire: The Meaning and Making of British Imperialism in the Sixteenth Century” at the annual British Scholar Society’s Britain and the World Conference in Austin, Texas, on Apr. 6, 2017.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Music Dana Zenobi represented Southwestern University as a judge at the South Texas Chapter of the National Association of Teachers of Singing (NATS) auditions, held at Texas State University on Apr. 8. Zenobi was re-elected as an officer and will serve a second two-year term as Secretary of the South Texas NATS Chapter.





  • Associate Professor of Theatre Kerry Bechtel designed the costumes for the Houston-based Main Street Theater production of Bunnicula, based on the young adult novel. This is the second production for Main Street she has designed this season.





  • Associate Professor of English Michael Saenger chaired one panel at the Renaissance Society of America in Chicago. He collaborated with Associate Professor of Theatre Sergio Costola to co-chair and co-organize another panel, in addition to co-writing a paper. The paper explored the relationship between eugenics and the movement of foreign bodies in the Renaissance.





  • Professor of Feminist Studies Alison Kafer reviewed Christina Crosby’s memoir, A Body, Undone: Living On after Great Pain (NYU, 2016), for the American Literary History Online Review. Kafer was also an invited keynote speaker at the Shepard Symposium on Social Justice at the University of Wyoming, April 5–8. Her talk, “Health Rebels: A Crip Manifesto for Social Justice,” focused on the possibilities of coalition-building around issues of health, illness, and disability. While at the symposium, Kafer gave an interview with Wyoming Public Radio, spoke on an invited plenary panel, and met with students interested in social justice.





April 2017

  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Political Science Emily Sydnor participated in the second research convening of the National Institute for Civil Discourse in Tucson, Ariz., on March 23–25.  She presented work she began with Southwestern alumna Grace Atkins ’16 titled “Signaling Incivility: The Role of Speaker, Substance and Tone.” She also presented her work on “The Emotional Consequences of Political Incivility and Psychological Conflict Orientation” at the Midwest Political Science Association’s annual meeting in Chicago, Ill., April 6–9.





  • Professor of Economics Emily Northrop’s article “A Stable Climate or Economic Growth?” was accepted for publication in the Review of Social Economy.  This research compares the rate of improvement in global CO2/GDP needed to meet the Paris Agreement commitments to the rate of progress we’ve achieved over the last 30 years.





  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Fumiko Futamura and Visiting Assistant Professor of Mathematics John Ross took eight students to the Texas Section Meeting of the Mathematical Association of America (MAA) at Texas A&M University-Commerce March 30–April 1, 2017.

    • Amy Jenkins, Class of 2017, presented “Instruments in Ones and Zeros: How Computers Mimic Timbre.” Jenkins’ work was based on her capstone supervised by Futamura.

    • Other students in attendance were Victoria Gore, Class of 2017, Morgan Engle,  Bonnie Henderson and Elyssa Sliheet, all Class of 2018, Sarah Cantu, Class of 2019, and Daniela Beckelhymer, D’Andre Adams, Victor Herrera, all Class of 2020. Gore, Henderson, Beckelhymer, Adams, and Herrera participated in the Calculus Bowl and made it to the final round.

    Associate Professor of Mathematics Therese Shelton attended the Executive Committee Meeting and Business Meeting as Immediate Past Chair of the Texas MAA, which included duties as Chair of the Nominating Committee, and the Department Liaisons Meeting. Funding for this trip was provided by the following at Southwestern: Fleming Student Travel Fund, the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, and the NSF S-STEM grant.





  • Professor of English David Gaines delivered “Listening To, Writing About and Teaching Dylan,” an invited lecture at Texas A&M University-Central Texas in Killeen on Apr. 10. He presented as part of the university library’s event devoted to the art of the 2016 Nobel Laureate in Literature.





  • Professor of Music Lois Ferrari performed (conducted) three concerts with the Austin Civic Orchestra (ACO) over the past six months. One on Oct. 29, another on Dec. 10, and the final on Feb. 4. The Feb. 4 concert, titled “Spotlight on Southwestern,” was presented in the Alma Thomas Theater and featured an all-Southwestern tribute. Professor of Music Kenny Sheppard lead the Southwestern Chorale in a collaborative performance of Mendelssohn’s Elijah, featuring Associate Professor of Music Bruce Cain and Visiting Assistant Professor of Music Dana Zenobi as soloists. The ACO also performed Professor of Music Michael Cooper’s edition of Mendelssohn’s “Italian” Symphony, and Associate Professor of Music Jason Hoogerhyde’s composition, Lament. Also featured were nine Southwestern alumni, including Gus Sterneman ’06 who is the ACO’s assistant conductor.





  • Professor of Sociology Maria Lowe, Professor of Sociology Sandi Nenga, and eight students presented papers at the annual meeting of the Southern Sociological Society in Greenville, S.C., March 30–April 1.

    • Deidra McCall, Class of 2018, presented “Racialized Politics and the Confederate Flag: Why Society Can Never Be Color-Blind.”

    • Melanie Theriault, Class of 2017, presented “Should we say something about her sister? Family roles and the siblings of people with disabilities.”

    • Samantha Pentecost, Class of 2019, presented “’We’re Not All the Same’: Levels of Conservatism and Assimilation as Predictors for Latino Partisan Choice.”

    • Cadie Pullig, Class of 2017, presented “Talking about Campaign Advertisements: How College Students Discuss the Appearance of Political Candidates.”

    • Kelly McKeon, Class of 2017, presented “Catching Up: Overcoming a Deficit in Cultural Capital as a First Generation College Student.”

    • Sarah Surgeoner, Class of 2017, presented “Femvertising: Commodification and Critical Consumption of Feminism in Advertising.”

    • Holly O’Hara, Class of 2017, and Dakota Cortez, Class of 2019, presented a paper titled “Sexual Assault, Zero Tolerance Policies, and the Gender Climate at a Liberal Arts University.” This paper was co-authored with Associate Professor of Sociology Reginald Byron and Lowe.

    • Holly O’Hara, Class of 2017, presented “Searching for a Genuine Sorority Woman: Greek Recruitment Practices at Public and Private Universities.”

    • Nenga presented “How Teenage Latinas Respond to and Resist Gender Surveillance in a College Readiness Program.”

    • Lowe also served on the program committee for the conference.





  • Professor of Political Science Shannon Mariotti presented a paper on April 1 at the Association for the Study of Law, Culture, and the Humanities conference at Stanford Law School. Her paper was titled “Common Benefits and Equal Privileges: The New Progressive Federalism, State Constitutional Rights, and a Democratic Politics against Neoliberal Oligarchy.”





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of History Joseph Hower published “Public Sector Unionism” in Oxford Research Encyclopedia of American History, eds. John Butler et. al.





  • President Edward Burger delivered the Luncheon Address at the Association of State Supervisors of Mathematics Annual Meeting on April 1 in San Antonio.  His lecture was titled “Leading with the ’20 Year Question.’” All 50 states were represented. On April 7, he returned to San Antonio for the annual meeting of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. There he led a workshop titled “Flipping classrooms into dynamic and impactful learning spaces with videos,” and then the Keynote Address of the conference, titled “Effective Thinking and Creative Puzzle-Solving.”





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth is the recipient of an internationally competitive DAAD scholarship to participate in a faculty development seminar in Erfurt, Germany, April 8–14, 2017. The German Academic Exchange Service (Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst) seminar “Religions in Germany and the 500 Year Anniversary of the Reformation” brings together German teachers from all over the world to learn, discuss, and share resources. Berroth’s contribution, “Martin Luther in Film,” offers insights into research and teaching on filmic representations of the reformer produced in East and West Germany and in the USA. Berroth started this project in 2011, when she mentored Rory Jones ’12. Rory completed his German Honors Thesis on Luther, earned a Fulbright Fellowship, and for the year following his graduation from Southwestern taught English and continued his research exactly where he had hoped to be placed: Lutherstadt Wittenberg, Germany.





  • Assistant Professor of German Michelle Reyes and Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth offered a screening and panel discussion of their documentary, “Out of the Shadows: German Stories of Love, War, and Faith,” on March 30, 2017 at Southwestern University. Reyes, Berroth, and film director Whitney Milam discussed the film and its contexts with attentive audience members, many of whom shared their own memory narratives after the viewing. The documentary offers narratives and reflections of Germans who experienced the horrors of WWII as young children and later immigrated to the United States. Challenging easy dichotomies between victims and perpetrators, those stories reflect the resilience of people who found their ways out of the shadows of war and led faith-filled lives in their new homeland. The film project was made possible by a Sam Taylor Fellowship grant from the United Methodist Church. The inaugural screening at the Texas German Heritage Society in Austin generated interest among diverse audiences. Further screenings and panel discussions are planned for University of Texas at Austin and for Sun City in Georgetown. Reyes and Berroth express their gratitude for the excellent administrative and practical support of Administrative Assistant for the Faculty Susie Bullock.





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth participated in the 48th Annual Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA) Conference in Baltimore, Md, March 23–26, 2017. The convention theme, “Translingual and Transcultural Competence: Toward a Multilingual Future in the Global Era,” furthered a much-needed discussion on the nature and value of the multicultural mosaic that the United States has become in the global era. Berroth presented her research paper titled “Pilgrimages of Recovery: Marica Bodrožić’s Work on Resilience, Landscapes and Humans” for the panel named Writing Spaces: Landscapes and/in German Travel Writing. Berroth also chaired and contributed to a panel sponsored by the Coalition of Women in German, Feminist Approaches to/in German Studies: Inclusivity and Sustainability. Her presentation, “Empathy: Experiments in Teaching for Diversity and Inclusiveness,” reflected on teaching methods and content for teaching on the Syrian refugee crisis and on transnational identity formations.





  • Three Southwestern students, mentored by Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth, presented their work at the Seventh Undergraduate Research Conference in German Studies on Saturday, April 1, 2017. This year the conference, co-organized by Lafayette College and Moravian College, took place at Moravian College in Bethlehem, Pa. This conference gives students the opportunity to present their research in all German-related fields, including but not limited to the study of German literature, film and culture, art history, music, philosophy, history and politics. Rosa Karen Castañeda Hernandez, Class of 2017, a double major in German and Communication Studies, presented her German Capstone project, “Illuminating Dark Tourism: Perspectives on Representations of Holocaust Tourism in Am Ende kommen Touristen (2007),” for a panel on the Holocaust. Miriam Richard, Class of 2018, an Education major who studied German at SU and abroad, presented her research paper titled “The Painful Consciousness of Being Transnational: Representations of Transnational Identities in German Texts and Films.” Aaron Woodall, Class of 2018, a Political Science major, presented his research on “Displacement and the Reconstruction of Transnational Identity.”





  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Therese Shelton was invited to speak at the Undergraduate Mathematics Colloquium at the University of North Texas in Denton, TX on March 29, 2017. She will present “Markovian Recycling and other Math Models,” a continuation of work with Yvette Niyomugaba ’13. Shelton and Niyomugaba conducted research under a Summer Faculty Student Project and throughout Niyomugaba’s senior year. Shelton has expanded and updated the work as part of a sabbatical.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of History Joseph Hower won a Summer Stipend fellowship from the National Endowment for the Humanities to support the completion of his book, A Revolution in Government: Jerry Wurf and the Rise of Public Sector Unions in Postwar America (University of Pennsylvania Press).





  • 2015 graduate Paul Glasheen’s thesis appeared in an advance, online version in the highly respected, peer-reviewed journal Freshwater Science. The study, “Survival, recovery, and reproduction of apple snails (Pomacea spp.) following exposure to drought conditions,” resulted from work that Glasheen conducted in Uruguay as part of a National Science Foundation International Research Experiences for Students (IRES) program co-directed by Professor of Biology Romi Burks and Howard University colleague Dr. Kenneth Hayes. Uruguayan partners Dr. Mariana Meerhoff and M.Sc. Clementina Clavo followed the recovery of the snails after the U.S. team returned in January of 2015.  A close-up photo of the field habitat will grace the cover of the journal when published in June.





  • Professor of Psychology Traci Giuliano and seven of her students presented papers at the annual meeting of the Southwestern Psychological Association in San Antonio March 31–April 2. Sarah Matthews, Class of 2017, Kayleigh Thomas, Maddie Straup, and Martin Martinez, all Class of 2018, presented “Not cool, dude: Perceptions of solicited vs. unsolicited sext messages from men and women”; and Marissa Rosa, Brooke Swift, and Helena Lorenz, all Class of 2018, presented “LOL, ILY: The effects of textspeak and gender on dating profile perceptions.”





March 2017

  • Assistant Professor of Business Debika Sihi and Makaela Starks, Class of 2017, presented their project titled “Online Retail Privacy Policies: Consumer, Manager, and Legal Insights” at the Texas Marketing Faculty Research Colloquium at Baylor University held March 23–24.





  • Associate Professor of Political Science Shannon Mariotti accepted an invitation from the political science department at Trinity University in San Antonio to present a paper on March 23, 2017. She presented a talk, titled “The Experience of Meaningful Democracy: Adorno in America,” that drew from her recent book, Adorno and Democracy: The American Years (University Press of Kentucky, 2017).





  • Part-Time Assistant Professor of German Michelle Reyes authored a book chapter titled “On Women and Dwarves: Material Engagements in the Brothers Grimm’s Kinder- und Hausmärchen” in the book Tracing the Footsteps of Dwarfs: Images, Concepts and Representations in Popular Culture.





  • Assistant Professor of Computer Science Jacob Schrum has had two publications co-authored with students accepted to the Genetic and Evolutionary Computation Conference taking place in July 2017. Both publications are based on research done last summer as part of SCOPE (Summer Collaborative Opportunities and Experiences). “Comparing Direct and Indirect Encodings Using Both Raw and Hand-Designed Features in Tetris,” a full paper written with Lauren Gillespie, Class of 2019, and alumna Gabriela Gonzalez ’16, will be presented as a talk at the conference. “Balancing Selection Pressures, Multiple Objectives, and Neural Modularity to Coevolve Cooperative Agent Behavior,” an extended abstract written with Alex Rollins, Class of 2017, will be presented as a poster.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of English and Creative Writing John Pipkin has been awarded a Yaddo Residential Fellowship (Saratoga Springs, NY) to work on his new novel about the Tour de France under Hitler.  The prize is prestigious: “Collectively, Yaddo artists have won 74 Pulitzer Prizes, 29 MacArthur Fellowships, 68 National Book Awards, and a Nobel Prize (Saul Bellow, who won the Nobel for Literature in 1976). Notable Yaddo artists through the turn of the millennium include James Baldwin, Leonard Bernstein, Truman Capote, Aaron Copland, Philip Guston, Patricia Highsmith, Langston Hughes, Ted Hughes, Jacob Lawrence, Sylvia Plath, Martin Puryear, Katherine Anne Porter, Amy Sillman, Clyfford Still, and David Foster Wallace. More recent guests include Terry Adkins, Laurie Anderson, Jeffrey Eugenides, Sheri Fink, and Matthew Weiner” (www.yaddo.org).





  • Professor and Chair of English Eileen Cleere delivered a paper at the Interdisciplinary Nineteenth-Century Studies Association (INCS) Conference in Philadelphia, Pa., March 17–20. Her paper, “The School Story for Girls, 1872–1929: A Sublimation of Sensation,” was partly based on her 2015 and 2016 faculty-student research, combined with her own new project on post-Freudian psychology and adolescent fiction. Cleere also serves on the Governing Board of INCS.





  • Technical Assistant and Exhibitions Coordinator Seth Daulton exhibited a conference-sponsored themed exchange portfolio titled “Those Who Arrive Survive” during the Southern Graphics Conference International in Atlanta, Ga., March 15–19. The portfolio featured small books produced by artists from across the country. This conference, the largest of its kind, brings together national and international printmakers for panels, portfolios, demonstrations, exhibitions, and discourse on contemporary printmaking practices.





  • Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers published an essay titled “Identity Crisis: The White Jewish Question Posed in THE HUMAN STAIN” in Washington Independent Review of Books.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Art Ron Geibel is featured in an exhibition titled “Mixed Feelings: The Irreverent Object” at Mt. Hood Community College in Gresham, Ore. The exhibition examines how ceramic art, rooted in the domestic, plays an active role in reflecting and shaping identities. The exhibition is part of the National Council on Education for the Ceramic Arts (NCECA) annual conference, March 22–25 in Portland, Ore.





  • Twenty-two Southwestern students traveled to the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor to attend the 120th meeting of the Texas Academy of Science (TAS), March 4–5. Collectively, Southwestern students gave four oral presentations and presented 12 posters in numerous sections of the Academy including Conservation Biology, Chemistry and Biochemistry, Cell and Molecular Biology, Computer Science, Environmental Science, Physics, Systematics and Evolution, Freshwater Science, and Science Education. Much of the work presented at TAS took place in past summer SCOPE programs. Several students and alumni received awards:

    • Victoria Gore, Class of 2017, received the Best Oral Presentation Award in the Environmental Science Section for her work, “Extreme Precipitation: Changes in Rain Frequency from 1895-2015 in Central Texas.”  Gore worked on this project during SCOPE with her mentor Part-Time Assistant Professor of Physics Rebecca Edwards.
    • Bella Ferranti, Class of  2017, received the Best Oral Presentation Award in the Physics Section for her talk, “Laser Frequency Combs and the Search for Exoplanets.”  This is the second presentation that Ferranti has given at the Texas Academy of Sciences.
    • Lauren Gillespie, Class of 2019, received the Best Poster Presentation Award in Mathematics and Computer Science for her work entitled “Evolving Tetris Players Using Raw Screen Inputs,” which she worked on with Assistant Professor of Computer Science Jacob Schrum.
    • Sofia Campos ’16 took the Best Poster prize in the Systematics and Evolution Section and also won 2nd place overall for her presentation, “Cryptic yet curiously common: Population genetic structure and diversity of a cryptic Pomacea sp. and its better known congeneric P. canaliculata,”  which summarized her work in Uruguay with Professor of Biology Romi Burks.
    • Madison Granier, Class of 2019, received the Best Poster prize in the Conservation Biology section and also received a $1500 grant from the Academy to support her undergraduate research titled “Snail Slime in Real Time: qPCR Detection of Environmental DNA using Apple Snails.”  This work involves a collaboration between Granier, Burks and alumni Matthew Barnes ’06, now an Assistant Professor at Texas Tech University.
    • Carissa Bishop, Class of 2017, won two presentation awards: Best Oral Presentation in Freshwater Science, for her talk entitled “Applying Band-Aids: Challenges associated with molecular detection of Angiostronglyus cantonensis infection within Uruguayan and Brazilian apple snails,” and a Poster Award in Science Education for a collaborative project titled “Innovating molecular art: Communicating the true cost of science through repurposed materials.” Campos ’16, Shannon Walsh and Hugo Cepeda, both Class of 2018, all made contributions to the molecular art piece based on research that they have done with Burks. All of the molecular work has been made possible through a grant awarded to the Natural Sciences by the Keck Foundation.

    Other TAS presenters included Alex Taylor, Renee Walker, Morgan O’Neal, Jillian Bradley, Daniel Gonzalez, Eris Tock, Alex Rollins, and Jiawen Zhang, all Class of 2017, Ramesh Nadeem, Dakota Butler, Diana Beltran, Susan Beltran, and Madelyn Akers, all Class of 2018. Additional faculty mentors included Professor of Chemistry Kerry Bruns, Assistant Professor of Chemistry Michael Gesinski, Professor of Biology Ben Pierce,  and Part-Time Assistant Professor of Biology Airon Wills.





  • Professor of Political Science and Dean of the Faculty Alisa Gaunder published a book titled Japanese Politics and Government with Routledge in March 2017. This book investigates Japanese politics in the postwar era from theoretical and comparative perspectives offering an in-depth exploration of postwar political institutions, political reform in the 1990s, the policymaking process, and the politics of economic growth and stagnation. It also draws attention to key policy issues including women and work, immigration, Japanese aging/low fertility society, security and trade.





  • Southwestern’s Studio Art Department in the Department of Art and Art History has been listed as among the “25 Small Colleges and Universities Strong in Art and Design” in The Fiske Guide to Colleges. The department has received this recognition annually since 2006. Edited by Edward B. Fiske, former education editor for The New York Times, The Fiske Guide serves as a respected, authoritative sourcebook comprising 320+ four-year schools, and is fully updated and expanded annually.





  • Part-Time Instructor of Applied Music Adrienne Inglis recently participated as a flutist, singer, and featured composer in the inaugural concert of Inversion Ensemble, a choral collaborative dedicated to the presentation of new choral works. The Feb. 25 concert in Austin included Inglis’ compositions “In Heaven and on Earth” for chorus, flute and clàrsach, and “On the Mystery of the Incarnation” for chorus and strings.





  • Associate Professor of Political Science Shannon Mariotti gave an invited lecture at Oklahoma City University on March 2. Her talk drew from her new book project and was titled “The Common Benefits Clause: Working Against Neoliberal Oligarchy Through U.S. State Constitutions.”





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Music Dana Zenobi traveled to Mississippi University for Women and presented a lecture recital, “Songs of the Boulanger Sisters,” at the inaugural Music by Women Festival, March 3–4. Dr. Chuck Dillard, area coordinator for collaborative piano at Portland State University, collaborated on the performance portion of the lecture recital.





  • Assistant Professor of History Joseph Hower delivered a paper titled “A Threshold Moment: Public Sector Organizing and Civil Rights Unionism in the Postwar South” at the biennial meeting of the Southern Labor Studies Association in Tampa, Fla. He also chaired and commented on a panel discussion titled “Organizing the New, New South: Labor Unions and Employers in the South during the 1970s and 1980s.”





  • Professor of Biology Ben Pierce was featured in the article “Untangling the Social Web of Frog Choruses” in the March 2017 issue of The Scientist.





  • Director of Special Collections and Archives Jason Dean and Emily Grover ’16 co-authored an article about using social media as a tool for teaching reference works for rare books to undergraduates in the field. They highlight the necessity of these works, as well as the education of undergraduates in the fundamentals of descriptive bibliography, expanding on Grover’s time as a fellow last summer in the Rare Books and Manuscripts Division of the Library of Congress. The piece will be published in the Spring 2017 issue of RBM: A Journal of Rare Books, Manuscripts, and Cultural Heritage.RBM is the Association of College and Research Libraries’ journal covering issues pertaining to special collections libraries and cultural heritage institutions; the preeminent journal in the field.





  • Professor of Feminist Studies Alison Kafer was invited to share a work in progress with the Department of Anthropology at Rice University as part of their brown bag series. Her presentation explored race and disability in relation to notions of mourning, loss, and death. While at Rice, Kafer also met with graduate students and led two workshops with undergraduate students in the “Disability Inside Out” class.





  • Sports Information Director Megan Hardin was announced as the College Sports Information Directors of America (CoSIDA) College Division Rising Star on March 1. The award is one of seven major awards presented to current sports information directors annually at the CoSIDA national convention and is presented to both a university division and a college division member with 10 years of service or less whose work at their institution and service, dedication, energy and enthusiasm to the profession make that individual a “rising star” in athletic communications. Hardin will be presented with the award in Orlando in June at the annual national convention.





  • Studio Arts Technician Daniel Gardner presented a wheel-thrown ceramics workshop at Baylor University in Waco, Texas on Feb. 27.





  • Professor of Spanish Laura Senio Blair, Mattie Cryer, Class of 2017, and Antonio Mendez, Class of 2020, served as coaches at SXSWedu on March 7. Senio Blair met with attendees interested in the liberal arts, Cryer spoke about undergraduate research, and Mendez mentored first-generation college students. The meetings were one-on-one or small group opportunities for students, parents, and attendees to think about and explore their learning goals.





  • Assistant Professor of German Michelle Reyes and Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth presented their documentary film “Out of the Shadows: German Stories of Love, War and Faith” at the Texas German Heritage Society on Feb. 26. This oral history project explores the stories of Germans who were children during WWII and later emigrated to the United States. The project was funded through a Sam Taylor Fellowship. A screening and discussion at Southwestern is scheduled for March 30 at 6:30 p.m.





February 2017

  • President Edward Burger delivered the 2017 Richard Anderson Lecture at the Louisiana and Mississippi Section of the Mathematical Association of America’s Annual Meeting on Feb. 17 at Millsaps College.





  • Professor of Feminist Studies Alison Kafer gave an invited talk at Vanderbilt University on Feb. 23. Her talk, “Wanting: Disability in Relation,” discussed disability in the context of other movements for social justice. While at Vanderbilt, she participated in a workshop with the Disability Justice Caucus of the Nashville Feminist Collective.





  • Associate Professor of Education Alicia Moore delivered the keynote address at the Black History Month celebration hosted by the Sun City Ebony Ladies organization on Saturday, Feb. 28, and performed an original poem titled Black Beauty that was written to disrupt the harmful impact of colorism that exists between and within communities of color. Moore also presented “At the Crossroads of Equality: Paths to Liberation and Progress in Academia,” in honor of Black History Month, on Feb. 8 at the Williamson Museum’s Salon. The Williamson Museum’s Salon is a monthly speaker series that features leading professionals and researchers in their respective fields.





  • Professor of Political Science and Tower-Hester Chair Tim O’Neill’s article “New Directions in Anti-Terrorism Policy” has been accepted for publication in the journal Studies in Conflict & Terrorism. Another article, “The Canucks, Brits and Yanks:  Creative Anti-Terrorist Policy Making in the 21st Century,” will appear in the Winter 2017 edition of the Journal of Conflict and Security Law.  He has also signed a contract with Sage/CQ Press for a textbook on American Politics tentatively titled The Quest for Fair and Effective Government: The American Experience.





  • Professor of English David Gaines presented “Dylan’s Nobel Prize and Its Meaning” to the Congregation Havurah Shalom in Georgetown on Feb. 26.





  • Associate Professor of Theatre Kerry Bechtel recently designed the costumes for Unity Theatre’s production of The Diary of Anne Frank.  This production opened on Feb. 10, 2017 and will continue its run through the beginning of March. Brandy Giordano, Class of 2017, worked as both costume design assistant and costume technician on the production. Unity Theatre is professional theatre company located in historic Brenham, TX.





  • Assistant Professor of Art History Allison Miller gave an invited lecture titled “Beyond the Five Colors: Reconsidering Purple and Its Sources in Ancient China” at Columbia University in New York on Feb. 17. The lecture was part of the Early China Seminar Lecture Series, sponsored by the Tang Center for Early China, the Department for East Asian Languages and Cultures, and The Columbia University Seminars.





  • Professor of Art and Art History, Chair of Art History, and Coordinator General of the Restoring Ancient Stabiae Foundation Thomas Howe has just published an article “Stabiae: A Draught Sustainability Master Plan after the Model of Aerospace” in Atti dei Convegni, no. 306 (Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei, Roma, 2017) 205-222. This article was first presented in Italian at the conference XXXIII Giornata dell’Ambiente: Resilienza delle città d’arte ai terremoti/Enhancing the Resilience of Historic Sites to Earthquakes, Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei Roma on November 3-4, 2015. The Lincei (“Lynxes”) is the oldest and possibly most prestigious scientific academy in Europe; Gallileo was a co-founder in 1602.





  • Austin Mueck, Class of 2018, received a Best Scenic Design Award for his design of the musical, You’re A Good Man, Charlie Brown at the 2017 Texas Educational Theatre Association Conference in Galveston. Associate Professor of Theatre and Resident Scenic Designer Desiderio Roybal mentored and advised Mueck’s poster presentation at the TETA Conference. Mueck designed You’re A Good Man, Charlie Brown for the Southwestern University Theatre Department in November 2016 under the mentorship of Roybal and Southwestern Technical Director Justin J. Smith ’04.





  • Part-Time Instructor of Applied Music Katherine Altobello ’99 performs the role of “Fairy” in Verdi’s brilliant comedic opera Falstaff with the San Diego Opera, directed by Olivier Tambosi and conducted by Daniele Callegari.  Performances take place at the San Diego Civic Theatre February 18, 21, 24, and 26.  The San Diego Opera is ranked among the top 10 opera companies in the United States. For more information visit sdopera.org.





  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Fumiko Futamura published an article titled “The Image of a Square” in the February edition of American Mathematical Monthly, with co-authors Annalisa Crannell and Marc Frantz.





  • Professor of Music Lois Ferrari is a finalist in the 2016 American Prize Competition in Community Orchestra Conducting. The American Prize competitions are national awards judged via submission of recorded video performances. Ferrari’s video entry was of the Shostakovich 5th Symphony and the Marquez Danzon No. 2, both with the Austin Civic Orchestra.





  • Associate Professor of English Michael Saenger was invited to deliver a paper titled “The Foreign Words and Worlds of Twelfth Night” at the conference Global Chaucer and Shakespeare in the Digital World held at George Washington University. He also performed a show at the intermission, featuring his impression of Kenneth Branagh and Alan Rickman. His visit was graciously hosted by George Washington University and the George Washington Digital Humanities Institute.





  • Associate Professor of History Melissa Byrnes published an article titled “Ramadan in the Republic: Imperial necessity and local religious assistance to Muslim migrants” in a special issue of French Cultural Studies: “Religion in France: Belief, identity and laïcité.”





  • Professor of Art and Art History and Coordinator General of the Restoring Ancient Stabiae Foundation Thomas Howe has been invited to lecture on his recent work on the Roman Villas of Stabiae, Italy, at the École Française d’Athènes on Feb. 20. The lecture will summarize the fieldwork of thirty-five institutions from over a dozen countries since 2007. The work included major excavation, garden study, conservation and architectural recording. The lecture will be part of the Kyklos series of lectures sponsored in part by the Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Institut für Klassische Archäologie - Winckelmann-Institut and Deutsches Archäologisches Institut, Athens, Greece.





  • Part-Time Assistant Professor of Physics Rebecca Edwards attended the 97th Annual Meeting of the American Meteorological Society Jan. 22–26 in Seattle, Wash. At the meeting, physics student Oliver Sale, Class of 2017, presented a poster titled “Investigation of Central Texas Surface Ozone Concentrations 1980–2015,” which resulted from work he did with Edwards and Dr. Gary Morris of St. Edward’s University as part of the SCOPE program (Summer 2016) and as part of his capstone research with Associate Professor of Mathematics Therese Shelton.





  • Assistant Professor of History Jessica Hower presented a paper titled “’We could not suffer it’: Kings, Popes, and the Construction of British Empire, ca. 1450–1550” before the Ecclesiastical History Society’s Winter Meeting at Magdalene College at Cambridge University in Cambridge, England on Jan. 14. The conference theme was “Church and Empire.”





  • Associate Professor of Education Alicia Moore delivered the keynote address for the Black History Month celebration at the historic Round Rock Sweet Home Pinnacle of Praise on Saturday, Jan. 28. The address was anchored by the National 2017 Black History Month Theme: The Crisis in Black Education and provided statistics about the disproportionate impact of K–12 school suspension and expulsion on students of color in southern states. In celebration of the occasion, several Round Rock dignitaries were in attendance.





  • Associate Professor of Education and Co-Editor of the Association for the Study of African American Life and History: Black History BulletinAlicia Moore was featured in a recent edition of the Berkeley Review of Education. Ten Tips for Facilitating Classroom Discussions on Sensitive Topics, by Alicia Moore and Molly Deshaies ’12, “provides a foundation of confidence for the teacher and can be used in elementary, secondary, or post-secondary settings.” Moore is a networked leader who collaborates with colleagues to broaden participation and concurrently organizes resistance and advocates for systemic improvements in social justice through knowledge.