Academics

Notable Faculty & Student Achievements

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May 2018

  • Associate Professor of Theatre Desiderio Roybal was nominated for an Austin Critics Table Award for Best Scenic Design for his design of Trinity Theatre’s production of Florian Zeller’s The Father, directed by Professor Emeritus of Theatre Rick Roemer and produced by David Jarrott Productions. The Father is a tragi-comedy mystery, which takes a sobering and realistic look at family dynamics using unsentimental and emotionally charged scenes. The audience experiences the confusion of dementia as seen through the eyes of a man living through the physical and psychological loss of self. The incremental vanishing and reappearing scenic elements provided a poignant commentary on what is and is not real.





  • Associate Professor of History Melissa Byrnes was featured in a podcast on the legacies of 1968. Listen here: Part I, Part II.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of History Joseph Hower was the featured guest for Union City Radio’s “Labor History Today” podcast for the week of May 13. He discussed the life of labor leader Jerry Wurf and the upcoming Supreme Court case of Janus v. AFSCME. The full podcast is available here. The discussion begins at the 18:00 minute mark.





  • Assistant Professor of Psychology Carin Perilloux and several students recently published an article titled “Creative Casanovas: Mating Strategy Predicts Using—but Not Preferring—Atypical Flirting Tactics” in Evolutionary Psychological Science. This paper documents a series of studies conducted over a year and a half examining unexpectedness in flirting behaviors. Justin White ’18, Helena Lorenz ’18, and Aliehs Lee ’17 are co-authors.





  • Music and Computer Science double-major Isabel Tweraser, class of 2019, has been awarded a $1,200 ACM-W scholarship to help her travel to Kyoto, Japan, to present her peer-reviewed conference paper “Querying Across Time to Interactively Evolve Animations” at the upcoming Genetic and Evolutionary Computation Conference. The paper was co-authored with Lauren Gillespie, class of 2019, and Assistant Professor of Computer Science Jacob Schrum. ACM is the Association for Computing Machinery, and ACM-W scholarships are specifically aimed at helping female students attend research conferences in hopes of encouraging them to pursue further research opportunities in the future.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Communication Studies Lamiyah Bahrainwala facilitated a panel titled “Talking about Race with your Child” at Russell Lee Elementary School in Austin on May 8, 2018. The panel featured experts in education, education policy, social work, and critical race theory, and provided specific strategies for talking about race with elementary school-aged children.





  • Caleb Martin ’17, a Music Education major and former student of Part-time Instructor of Applied Music Anna Carney, has been accepted to the Buffet Crampon Summer Clarinet Academy in Jacksonville, Fla. This is an honor offered to only 20 clarinetists across North America. Caleb will have the opportunity to work closely with internationally acclaimed artist faculty, including Philippe Cuper, Pierre Génisson, Alides Rodriguez, Victoria Luperi, and Inn-Hyuck Cho. There will be a hands-on seminar on instrument maintenance and adjustment as well as several lectures given by the artist faculty. Caleb is currently teaching music in the Georgetown public schools and also serves as assistant principal clarinet in the Austin Civic Orchestra, conducted by Professor of Music Lois Ferrari.





  • Professor of Music Lois Ferrari  conducted the Austin Civic Orchestra (ACO) in their 5th concert of the season, Texas Rising Stars, in Bates Recital Hall at the University of Texas Butler School of Music on March 25, 2018. In addition to showcasing the winners of UT’s string concerto contest, the ACO also performed Aaron Copland’s “Appalachian Spring” ballet suite for 13 instruments and Pulitzer Prize winning composer Jennifer Higdon’s “Blue Cathedral.” This concert was performed as part of the larger 2017–2018 season theme, Made in America, for which Ferrari and the ACO are committed to performing music written by American composers.





  • President Edward Burger was interviewed by the Austin American-Statesman in April about the future of higher education and Southwestern University. A portion of that interview appeared in their Sunday, May 13, 2018, edition. The piece is also available online.





  • Professor of Art and Art History Thomas Noble Howe has been invited to present a lecture titled “The Birth and Death of Modern Architecture in America, 1930–1970” in the conference After and Beyond the Crisis: The USA in the 1930s at the University of Perugia, Italy, on May 15, 2018. The conference is part of the lecture series “American Voices in Italy” sponsored by the American Embassy in Rome.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Art Ron Geibel’s artwork is featured in Issue IX of Create! Magazine, an independent, contemporary art magazine highlighting the work of artists, makers, and creative entrepreneurs from around the world. He also has artwork published in A Ceramic Guide: The Art of Creating and Teaching Wheel-Thrown Ceramics by Trent Berning. The book offers a detailed approach to the ceramic medium and highlights the use of the potter’s wheel as a mode of artistic expression.





  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Alison Marr and her 11 co-authors had a piece published in the May 2018 issue of the Notices of the American Mathematical Society about their experiences at the Workshop on Increasing Minority Participation in Undergraduate Mathematics this past summer in Park City, Utah. The piece is available here.





  • Elyssa Sliheet, Class of 2019, and Daniela Beckelhymer, Class of 2020, attended the Infinite Possibilities Conference for Women of Color in Mathematics and Statistics in Washington, D.C., April 14–15, 2018. Sliheet presented a poster on her REU (Research Experiences for Undergraduates) research “Shift Operators on Directed Infinite Graphs” and Beckelhymer presented a poster on her SCOPE research with Associate Professor of Mathematics Alison Marr “Choose Your Own Adventure: An Analysis of Interactive Gamebooks using Graph Theory.” Beckelhymer won a prize for Best Undergraduate Poster Presentation at the conference.





  • Assistant Professor of Music Hai Zheng Olefskywill be honored by Austin Mayor Steve Adler and the Austin City Council with a special proclamation on Thursday, May 10, 2018 at 5:30 p.m. at City Hall for her contribution to the community as the Artistic Director for the Young Musicians Festival Competition at the Asian American Cultural Center for the past 18 years. She will also perform at the Austin City Council Chamber on that day. The performance will be aired live on ATXN.





  • Professor of Political Science Shannon Mariotti was invited to serve as a Guest Editor for the journal Political Theory: An International Journal of Political Philosophy. She will edit the journal’s new “Guide to the Archives” on the topic of political theory and American literature.





  • Madison Vardeman, class of 2018, will present her communication studies capstone research “U2 and Nostalgia: Running to Stand Still or the Start of a Beautiful Day?” at The U2 Conference on June 15, 2018. Vardeman’s research analyzes U2’s Joshua Tree Tour 2017concert in Dallas, Texas, to prove that a nostalgic framework can be used in a way that does not solely glorify the past. She argues that this can be accomplished by applying the principles of Affect Theory and Aristotle’s emotional appeals to place focus on the emotional reactions that nostalgia elicits rather than focusing on the memories of the past events that are associated with the original JoshuaTreealbum and tour.





  • Professor of Psychology Carin Perilloux and her WOU collaborator, Jaime Cloud, presented a poster with two students at the Western Psychological Association annual convention in Portland, Ore., on April 28, 2018. The poster was titled “Mate-by-numbers: Budget, mating strategy, and sex determine preferences in partner’s facial and bodily traits.” Justin Whiteand Helena Lorenz,both class of 2018, co-authored the presentation.





  • Associate Professor of English Michael Saenger published a new blog for the Times of Israel titled “Liberal Zionism, Renewed.”





  • Thirteen students and four faculty traveled to Dallas, Texas, April 5 7 to attend and give talks at the 98th Annual Meeting of the Texas Section Mathematical Association of America held at El Centro College.

    • Associate Professor of Mathematics Alison Marr co-presented “Starting Inquiry-Based Learning Consortia”
    • Associate Professor of Mathematics Gary Richter presented “Revisiting a Limit as X approaches 0, the limit of sin(x)/x = 1”
    • D’Andre Adams, class of 2020, and Daniela Beckelhymer, class of 2018, presented their SCOPE 2017 research with Dr. Marr titled “Choosing Your Own Adventure: An Analysis of Interactive Gamebooks Using Graph Theory”
    • Morgan Engle, class of 2018, presented her SCOPE 2017 and capstone research supervised by Associate Professor of Mathematics Therese Shelton and Visiting Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies Becca Edwards titled “Influence of ENSO on United States Gulf Coast Ozone Using a Surface Ozone Climatology”
    • Sam Vardy, class 2018, presented a pedagogical talk supervised by Visiting Assistant Professor of Mathematics John Ross titled “Taking on Statistics with R(Our) Power”
    • Taylor Axtel, class of 2019, Alan Carr and Charlie Ellison, both class of 2020, presented research supervised by Associate Professor of Mathematics Fumiko Futamura, “3-D Matrices: How Do They Work?”
    • Music major Jacob Wilson, class of 2020, presented a musical composition from Dr. Futamura’s Explorations in Mathematics course “Frieze Patterns in Music”
    • Aiden Steinle,  class of 2020, presented research supervised by Dr. Futamura, “Staying in Shape with Real World Mappings.” Aiden won an award for Best Presentation in Geometry.
    • The other four student attendees were Keyshaan Castle, class of  2020, Katie Dyo and Elyssa Sliheet, both class of 2019, and Bonnie Henderson, class of 2018. Dr. Futamura and Dr. Ross also attended the meeting, with Dr. Ross participating in the Texas Section Project NeXT meeting.




  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Fumiko Futamura was invited to give two talks, one on April 13 at Texas State University in San Marcos, Texas, titled “How to Mathematically Immerse Yourself in Art,” and the other on April 17 at the Phi Beta Kappa event (En)Lightning Talks Houston titled “When Artists Become Mathematicians.” The (En)Lightning Talk was a 5-minute talk, complete with a countdown clock and an M.C. ready to hit a gong when time ran out. Futamura finished her talk in 4 minutes and 58 seconds.





  • Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry Maha Zewail-Foote was invited to give a seminar at the University of Houston on her research involving genetic instability and cancer. She also met with faculty and students from the chemistry and biochemistry departments.





  • Professor of Art and Art History and Chair of Art History Thomas Noble Howe just published a conference paper titled “Bold Imitator: Greek ‘Orders,’ the Autodidact Polymath Architect and the Apollonion of Syracuse” in “The Many Faces of Mimesis, Selected Essays from the 2017 Symposium on the Hellenic Heritage of Western Greece, Siracusa, Sicily, May, 2017,” eds. Heather Reid, Jeremy DeLong, (Parnassos Press, Sioux City, IA, 2018) 1-20. The paper was written from a keynote address he delivered at a conference in Siracusa, Sicily, in May 2017. The paper returns to Howe’s much-referenced dissertation “The Invention of the Doric Order” (Harvard, 1985) and exploits recent scholarship to strengthen his argument that the complex Doric order of architecture was (incredibly) created all at once in one project (the Apollonionthe Apollo Temple), and was nearly complete on its first appearance because it was an adaptive imitation of a type of Egyptian colonnade, by arguing that the first Greek architects were the same type of well-travelled polymaths and masters of rule-and-compass geometry as the first so-called Greek “physiological” philosophers (the ‘Milesians’). The first true ‘liberal arts’-trained (i.e. self-trained) professionals were therefore not philosophers, but architects, who were the first Greeks to write actual prose treatises. Then, as throughout history, what constituted an ‘architect’ was very fluid. The underlying theoretical basis of the paper is that adaptive inheritance is essential to successful innovation and that fluid borders between creative professions are too.





  • Professor of Economics Dirk Early had his research proposal “Effective Homeless Interventions and the Importance of Local Housing Market Conditions” accepted for funding through a partnership between the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and the U.S. Bureau of the Census. The research grant funds his analysis of data from the Family Options Study, a randomized evaluation of housing interventions targeted toward homeless families. He will examine which interventions available to homeless families are the most effective in reducing homelessness and whether their effectiveness varies with local housing market conditions. The primary goal of the research is to guide policymakers in developing homeless prevention strategies that are the most effective for their area.





  • Associate Professor of Communication Studies Bob Bednar presented a keynote address titled “Melancholy Remains: Encountering Images, Objects, and Spaces of Trauma” at the 26th Annual Symposium About Language and Society, Austin (SALSA), “Language in Society: Culture, Space & Identity” at the University of Texas at Austin, on April 20, 2018.





  • Associate Professor of Art History Patrick Hajovsky was invited to a conference on “Sacrifice and Conversion,” held at Harvard University’s Villa I Tatti, outside of Florence, Italy, April 1920, 2018. He presented on Aztec concepts of blood and heart sacrifice and their conversion into Christian idioms through ideas of the body and excess. While there, he was interviewed by a reporter for Arqueología mexicanato respond on the recent theory that the central face of the Aztec Calendar Stone is a portrait of the king Moteuczoma (r. 1502-20).





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth organized a community outreach event which welcomed 20 students and their teachers from Paul Klee Gymnasium in Gersthofen (close to Augsburg), Germany to Southwestern. On a German American Partnership Program, GAPP, those students took a campus tour and interacted with student of German in classes and during lunch. Since 1972, GAPP has been funded by the German Foreign Office and is the only short-term exchange program that receives an assistance award from the U.S. Department of State. The SU German Program regularly collaborates with German teachers at McNeil and Westwood High Schools, inspiring intercultural understanding, promoting German language instruction, and motivating personal friendships across cultures. This marks the 5th bi-annual partnership collaboration. The German program thanks Director of Community-Engaged Learning Sarah Brackmann and Faculty Administrative Assistant Susie Bullock for their support.





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth participated in the Northeast Modern Language Association Conference in Pittsburgh, Pa., April 1215, 2018. She presented two papers. One introduced SU’s innovative experience abroad for student-athletes on a round table titled “Outreach Strategies and Innovative Teaching in Small German Program Building.” The other, titled “Slow Violence in Marica Bodrožić’s Memory Narratives,” introduced eco-critical perspectives on Bodrožić’s trilogy, which is part of Berroth’s monograph project.





  • German majors Melina Boutris, class of 2021, and Martin Lopez, class of 2018, presented their research projects at the University of North Texas Undergraduate German Studies Conference in Denton on April 15, 2018. Boutris presented her analysis of German Hip-Hop artist and rapper Samy Delux’s representation of his relationship to German identifications in “Dis wo ich herkomm.” Lopez presented his analysis of German chancellor Merkel’s position during the 2015 European solidarity crisis in response to refugees fleeing war and persecution. Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth mentored both students.





  • Political Science major Elizabeth Wright, class of 2018, published her fall 2017 Senior Capstone project, “I Always Feel Like Somebody’s Watching Me. Understanding the Authoritarian Tendencies of the U.S. National Security State,” in Politikon, the peer-reviewed, flagship publication of the International Association for Political Science Students. Wright is currently a Fellow at the Muslim Public Affairs Council and will remain there while starting an MA in Security Policy Studies at George Washington University’s Elliott School in the fall.





  • Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin spoke on “Nicaragua’s Crisis and/in the Regional Political Landscape” as part of a Foro Urgente Nicaragua at the Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies at the University of Texas at Austin.





  • President Edward Burger delivered the closing Keynote Address at the 2018 Fulbright Foundation Educational Forum on April 27, 2018, in Athens, Greece. The theme of the Forum was “Redesigning Educational Systems: From Theory to Praxis,” and the opening keynote speaker was Allan Goodman, President of the Institute of International Education, who oversees all Fulbright Foundation programs.





April 2018

  • Visiting Assistant Professorof Education Suzanne Garcia-Mateusand Cristina Costas,class of 2019, presented a paper titled “Bilinguals Raising Bilingual Children: Institutional, Societal, and Familial Influence on Bilingual Parents’ Family Language Policy.” This new study examines how community members are making sense of the way local institutions and society support or influence family language policy decisions. The presentation was part of a panel titled “Language Planning and Language Policy” at The Symposium about Language and Society Austin (SALSA XXVI) at The University of Texas at Austin, April 20–21, 2018.





  • Associate Professor of Sociology Reggie Byron, Professor of Sociology Maria Lowe, Professor of Sociology Sandi Nenga, and five students attended the annual meeting of the Southern Sociological Society in New Orleans, La., April 4–7.  

    • Madeline Carrola, class of 2019, presented “’We’re Not Wasting Coffee Grounds’: How College Students Respond to Peers’ Resource Consumption and Waste Disposal by Social Class.”
    • Sophia Galewsky, class of 2018, presented “Abortion Provision as High Risk Activism: What Motivates Providers?”
    • Mary Jalufka, class of 2018, presented “White Female Elementary School Teachers and Campus Safety in the Wake of Sandy Hook.”
    • Esteffany Luna, class of 2018, presented “Am I Still Latino Enough? The Construction of a Latino Identity among Hispanics who do not Speak Spanish.” Luna’s paper was also the recipient of the 2018 Odum Undergraduate Paper Award. This marks the 9th time in 13 years that a Southwestern sociology senior has won this award.
    • Dr. Byron co-organized a panel titled “Innovative Uses of Data in the Study of Workplace Discrimination” and presented a co-authored paper titled “Bureaucratic Legitimation, Discrimination, and the Racialized Character of Organizational Life.”
    • Dr. Nenga served as a presider for multiple sessions at the meeting.
    • Dr. Lowe and Dakota Cortez,class of 2019, presented “Race and Contested Public Spaces in a Liberal Predominantly White Planned Urban Community.”




  • Assistant Professor of History Jessica Hower presented a paper titled “‘Thy bright sphere’: Elizabeth I, the Armada, and the Atlantic World, ca. 1570–1600” at the “Elizabeth I: The Armada and Beyond, 1588 to 2018” Conference, sponsored by Royal Museums Greenwich and the Society for Court Studies, at Queen’s House and National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, United Kingdom, April 19–21, 2018.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Art Ron Geibel’s work was chosen for The 22nd San Angelo National Ceramic Competition. The juror for the exhibition, Peter Held, is an award winning artist, academic, writer and former curator at the Ceramics Research Center at Arizona State University. The exhibition celebrates both functional and sculptural ceramics from the United States, Canada, and Mexico. The exhibition is on view April 20–June 24 at the San Angelo Museum of Fine Arts in San Angelo, Texas.





  • Senior Physics and Computational Math double-major Yash Gandhi, class of 2018, has been awarded an H. Y. Benedict Fellowship from Alpha Chi National Honor Society. Alpha Chi is a national honor society that was founded at Southwestern University in 1922, and is only open to the top 10% of juniors and seniors. Furthermore, only two Alpha Chi members from each university may be nominated to be awarded one of 10 fellowships awarded nationwide. The $3,000 in fellowship money will be used to help Yash attend graduate studies in Computer Science next year. Full press release here.





  • Emma Walsh,  class of 2018, presented a paper based on her history honors research, “The Nuremberg War Trials and the Legacy of the Armenians,” at the 9th Annual Texas A&M History Conference, “Conflicts and Resolutions.”





  • Part-time Instructor of Applied Music Katherine Altobello ’99 performed the mezzo-soprano solos of Mack Wilberg’s “Requiem” with St. Edward’s University Masterworks Singers and Orchestra, under the baton of Dr. Morris Stevens. This was the Texas premiere of the work, performed on March 4 and 8, 2018, at St. Edward’s University Ballroom and St. Theresa’s Catholic Church in Austin.





  • Director of Special Collections and Archives Jason W. Dean’s article “The Manuscript Works of S. Fred Prince (1857–1949),” co-authored with Sarah B. Cahalan, director of the Marian Library at the University of Dayton, appeared in the most recent issue of the journal Archives of Natural History.The article is the first academic examination of the significant (and unknown) botanical and scientific illustrator S. Fred Prince. The article is the product of a seven-year collaboration and effort between Dean and Cahalan





  • Associate Professor of Theatre Kerry Bechtel recently designed the costumes for Unity Theatre’s production of Becky’s New Car in Brenham, Texas. Bechtel has been working with Unity Theatre, a professional theatre company located in historic Brenham, for the past 8 years. This production runs through May 6, 2018.





  • Professor of Anthropology Melissa Johnson presented a paper, “Human Being otherwise: Commoning, Blackness and Freedom in Belize,” for the panel series “The Commons, Commoning and Co-Becoming” at the American Association of Geographers Annual Meeting in New Orleans, La., April 13, 2018.





  • Associate Professor of Education Alicia Moore serves as the Educational Consultant for Bela’s Children’s Books. Most recently, she provided her expertise to the author of the wonderful book The Silent Surprisewhich shares the playground adventure of a young boy who is autistic and nonverbal. The Bela’s Children’s Books Collection was created with the hope of helping children and parents become more aware of current and prevalent social issues using the collection to foster teachable moments that explore self-awareness. Leslie A. Turner ’11, an Austin-based illustrator, theatrical designer, and fabricator, beautifully illustrated the book, while Nekia Becerra ’12, Technology Design Coach in Austin ISD, and Nichole Aguirre ’12, Director of Early Childhood in Manor ISD, wrote the complementary lesson plans for The Silent Surpriseunder the supervision of Dr. Moore.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Education Suzanne García-Mateus presented a paper titled “‘Envisioning and Understanding Two-Way Dual Language Bilingual Education for Transnational Emergent Bilingual Learners” as part of the symposium “Dual Language Education and Neoliberal Reforms: When a Bilingual School Becomes a School of Choice” at the American Educational Research Association (AERA) conference in New York City, NY, April 13–17, 2018.





  • Several Psychology faculty members and students presented papers at the annual meeting of the Southwestern Psychological Association in Houston April 7–8. Students presenting with Professor of Psychology Traci Giuliano included:

    • Kirk Zanetti, Taylor Torres, both class of 2020, and Athena Pinero, class of 2019: “Now that’s aggressive: Examining the relationship between political orientation and political flaming.”
    • Sarah Butterworth, Justin White, Kyle Fraser, all class of 2018, and Lizette Cantu, class of 2019: “Is he flirting with me? How sender gender influences emoji interpretation.”
    • Allison Cook, Rachel Allen, Winston Cook, all class of 2018, and Daniella Orces, class of 2019: Emoji manners: Perceptions of students’ and teachers’ emoji use in emails.”
    • Kate Davis, Dean Neubek,class of 2019, and Emily Olson, class of 2020:Fake smiles, faker accounts: The relationship between life satisfaction and Finstagram use.”
    • Sarah Butterworth, Rachel Allen, and Allison Cook, all class of 2018: Blogging a way out: A study of depression and Tumblr usage.”

    Students presenting with Associate Professor of Psychology Bryan Neighborsincluded:

    • Rachel Allen, Matthew Gonzales, both class of 2018, Kaylyn Evans ’16, and Purna Bajekal ’16: “Attachment Insecurity and Cognitive Distortions Among Offenders in Substance Treatment.”

    Students presenting with Assistant Professor of Psychology Carin Perillouxincluded:

    • Helena Lorenz and Justin White, both class of 2018: Creative Casanovas: Mating strategy predicts using — but not preferring — unusual flirting tactics.”




  • Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin was a participant on a roundtable organized by Cynthia Enloe titled “Diversifying the Discipline: Problems, Policies, and Prescriptions” and served as a mentor for ISA’s Taskforce on the Global South’s “Mentoring Café: Strategies and Support for Global South Scholars” at the 2018 International Studies Association meeting. In addition, as associate editor he co-convened the 2018 International Studies Perspective’s Editorial Board Meeting and chaired the annual meeting of the New Millennium Books in International Studies series of which he is co-editor. Finally, as part of the ISA’s Taskforce on the Global South as well as the nascent South-South Educational Scholarly Collaboration and Knowledge Interchange Initiative, Selbin was invited to attend conferences in the coming year in Quito, Ecuador, and Guadalejara, Mexico.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of History Joseph Hower presented a paper titled “Betty the Bureaucrat?: Public Workers and Comparable Worth in the Long 1970s” at the annual meeting of the Organization of American Historians in Sacramento, Calif., April 13.





  • Associate Director of Grants Niki Bertrand won the Patricia Whitten prize for best primatology poster/presentation at the 2018 American Association of Physical Anthropologists Meeting in Austin, Texas. Her poster, titled “Effects of tourism on the behavior of wild, habituated groups of Macaca nigra,” discussed one aspect of her dissertation research. Her attendance at the conference was generously supported by the Asian Studies Small Research Grant from the Asian Studies Program at the University at Buffalo.





  • Professor of Art and Art History Thomas Noble Howe has been invited to speak to the University of Texas community and the public about his recent publication of the ten-year project to excavate, study, reconstruct and interpret the 108 m. long garden of the ancient Roman Villa Arianna at Stabiae near Pompeii. The lecture will take place Friday, April 20, at 4:00 p.m. in the Department of Classics on the University of Texas campus. The findings have been presented in the last two years at lectures in St. Petersburg, Moscow, Hong Kong, San Antonio, Seattle, the Pompeii area, Rome, and the Representations series on the SU campus, and other preliminary publications. Howe has been lead excavation director, editor and author.





  • Associate Professor of English Michael Saenger was invited to deliver a keynote lecture at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi. His talk, titled “Shakespeare in a Time of Madness,” will be part of Shakespeare’s Birthday Celebration on April 23.





  • Associate Professor of English Michael Saenger wrote a review, available here, of a performance of Ben Jonson’s Volpone.





  • Assistant Professor of Computer Science Chad Stolper, along with co-authors at Microsoft Research and Georgia Tech, had a book chapter titled “Data-Driven Storytelling Techniques: Analysis of a Curated Collection of Visual Stories” published in the edited volume Data-Driven Storytelling published by AK Peters/CRC Press. The chapter details design patterns that data-driven journalists have been using to present their work.





  • Associate Professor of Art History Allison Miller gave an invited lecture titled “Terracotta Warriors after the First Emperor: Re-evaluating the Qin Legacy in the Han” at Saint Mary’s University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, April 5. Her lecture was sponsored by the departments of Modern Languages and Classics, History, and Asian Studies. On April 6, Miller flew to Fredericton, New Brunswick, to give an invited lecture on the same topic for the New Brunswick Society of the Archaeological Institute of America. This lecture, held at New Pavilion Beaverbrook Art Gallery, was organized by faculty from the University of New Brunswick-Fredericton and delivered as part of the Archaeological Institute of America’s 2017–2018 lecture program.





  • Spanish and Latin American and Border Studies students Karla Pérez, class of 2019, Alexandra Vásquez, Stephanie García, and Marie Nugpo, all class of 2018, presented research papers at the XXVI Latin American Studies Symposium at Rollins College April 6, 2018, under the supervision of Associate Professor of Spanish Angeles Rodríguez Cadena.





  • Director of Special Collections and Archives Jason W. Dean was invited by the Grace Museum of Abilene and the Old Jail Art Center of Albany to give two presentations at those institutions. His presentation at the Grace focused on Hertzog’s work with noted Texas authors including John Graves, J. Frank Dobie, and Tom Lea. His presentation in Albany focused on the 1958 Hertzog reprinting of the foundational book “Interwoven,” written by Albany resident Sallie Reynolds Matthews. Descendants of the author attended the talk.





  • Technical Assistant and Exhibitions Coordinator Seth Daulton participated in a conference-sponsored, themed printmaking portfolio, “PLACE: Meaningful Space,” at the annual Southern Graphics Council International (SGCI) conference in Las Vegas, Nev., April 4–7. The portfolio included prints from 20 national and international artists that speak to how places are meaningful to us. An excerpt from the portfolio abstract: “There are places where we achieve epiphany, a maximum synchronization of a place and our heartbeat — a meaningful space. This experience is defined as ‘Topophilia’ — a strong perception of place, the affective bond with environment, mental, emotional, and cognitive ties to a place.”





  • Five Economics majors traveled to present their research at the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas Undergraduate Research conference held April 6.

    • Maranda Kahl, class of 2018, presented “Wellbeing and Marriage: Does Marriage Improve Mental Health?”
    • Manuela Figueroa-Casaand Aresha Davwa, both class of 2018, presented “A Cost-Benefit Analysis of Federal Housing Assistance Programs.”  
    • Stan Kannegieter, class of 2019, presented “Does Higher Education Decrease Hypertension Death Rates?”
    • Penny Phan, class of 2018, presented a poster related to her work on “The Effect of H-1B Visas on Economic Growth.”  




  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Political Science Emily Sydnor presented two papers at the Midwest Political Science Association’s Annual Meeting. The first, “What’s your excuse? The Effects of Personal and Political Justifications for Flip-Flopping,” demonstrated that constituents are more effectively persuaded by explanations for a Congressman’s position shift when they are grounded in public opinion or personal experience, rather than party politics. The second, “Creating Trust in Government,” investigated whether local governments could increase citizen trust by emphasizing the participatory nature or policy successes of the government. Two current political science students, Emily Tesmer,class of 2020, and Camille Martin, class of 2019, presented posters analyzing survey experiments they are conducting on the SU campus.





  • Professor of English David Gaines published “The Old and the New,” a review of Why Bob Dylan Matters, in “The Bridge,” the leading Dylan fanzine in Europe.





  • Nine Computer Science and Computational Math majors traveled to present research posters at the South Central Regional Conference of the Consortium for Computing Sciences in Colleges held April 6 at Texas Christian University in Fort Worth, Texas.

    • Valentine Cantu, Yash Gandhi, Marissa Madrid-Ortega,and Kolton Noreen,all class of 2018, won 2nd place in the poster competition for their research “Looking AHEAD: Developing an Advising Hub for EQUIP And DRAFT,” which was done as part of their senior capstone in software engineering along with students Kristen McCrary and Angus Strickland,both class of 2018, under the supervision of Associate Professor of Computer Science Barbara Anthony.
    • Will Price,class of 2019, and Matt Sanford,class of 2020, won 3rd place in the poster competition for their research “Dynamic Graph-Level Operations (DGLOs),” which was done as part of SCOPE 2017 under the supervision of Assistant Professor of Computer Science Chad Stolper.
    • Bobby Garza,class of 2019, presented “Encryption Using Nonlinear Dynamics,” which was also done as part of SCOPE 2017 under the supervision Dr. Chris Curry, former Coordinator of FIrst-Year Physics Labs.
    • Sarah “Darwin” Johnson,class of 2020, presented “Evolution of Board Game Playing Agents,” which was done as part of SCOPE 2017 under the supervision of Assistant Professor of Computer Science Jacob Schrum.
    • Alice Quintanilla , class of 2020, presented “Evolving Artificial Intelligences to Compete in Real-Time Strategy Games,” which was done as part of SCOPE 2017 under the supervision of Dr. Schrum.
    • Assistant Professors of Computer Science Jacob Schrum and Chad Stolper also attended the conference.




  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Art Ron Geibel served on a panel titled “New Queers Eve: LGBT Clay” at the 52nd annual National Council on Education for the Ceramic Arts (NCECA) conference in Pittsburgh, Pa., March 14–17. The panel featured four LGBT artists who make choices about the legibility of their queer experience in overt and coded ways in their work. For Queer Theorist José Esteban Muñoz, living a queer experience in or out of the public eye is an act of artwork and activism, filled with poignancy, pleasure, beauty, and urgent work. Panelists discussed ways in which they navigate issues of exposure and vulnerability by making this aspect of their experience public through depictions, metaphors, and objects.





  • Assistant Professor of Business Debika Sihi was invited to participate in the “Survey of Digital Governance in Municipalities Worldwide” conducted by the E-Governance Institute at the Institute for Public Service at Suffolk University. This study represents a continued effort to evaluate digital governance in large municipalities throughout the world. Invited participants, who work/research in the domain of digital innovation, contribute by evaluating online citizen participation opportunities of various municipalities.





  • Professor of Economics Emily Northrop’s blog Southwestern University faculty collectively endorse climate legislation” was published by the Citizens’ Climate Lobby (CCL) on April 4, 2018. CCL has nearly 100,000 members worldwide, organized into 475 chapters. It is a grassroots organization that lobbies for a carbon tax with proceeds distributed to US households on an equal basis.  





  • Alumni Nathan Townsend ‘17 and Shelby Hall ‘17 have had their capstone research project “How Changes in Block Design Affect Swimming Relay Start Performance” based on their research with Professor of Kinesiology Scott McLean and Professor of Kinesiology Jimmy Smith accepted for presentation at the 23rd Annual Congress of the European College of Sport Science in July of 2018.  This is the largest sports science conference in Europe.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Physics and Environmental Studies Rebecca Edwards launched two ozonesonde instruments on weather balloons from the SU campus on March 30 and 31. She was assisted by mathematics student Morgan Engle, class of 2018, environmental studies students Lucas Evans, class of 2018, and Daniella De Souza, class of 2019, and alumnus Amy McKee ’96 and her family.  The launches are part of an experiment designed to evaluate the impact of the growing Austin Metro area on the air quality in Georgetown. Instrumentation carried by the balloons measures ozone, an air pollutant at the surface, as well as temperature and relative humidity. Each balloon reached an altitude of 30 km before bursting and provided valuable insight into the vertical structure of the atmosphere over the City of Georgetown.  Three more launches are planned for the month of April and all launches are open to all. This research was generously supported by a Green Fund grant.





  • Professor of Political Science Shannon Mariotti presented a paper titled “Zen and the Art of Democracy: Sensory Perception, Aesthetics, and the Political Value of Buddhist Modernism” on the panel “Mindfulness and Politics: Embodied Social Change” at the Western Political Science Association conference in San Francisco, Calif., on March 30, 2018. She also presented a paper on her experiments with mindfulness and meditation as pedagogical practices in the political science classroom at a roundtable titled “Staying Centered with Too Much To Do: The Possibilities and Dangers of Mindfulness in the Neoliberal University.”





  • Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers published “Manicotti, Anyone?: A Kosher for Passover Easter Dinner” in Tablet. Read it here.





  • Assistant Professor of History Jessica Hower published an article titled “‘All Good Stories’: Historical Fiction in Pedagogy, Theory, and Scholarship” in Rethinking History: The Journal of Theory and Practice 23, no. 1 (January 2019, online publication March 28, 2018): 1–48. She was also appointed to the Journal’s editorial board.





  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Therese Shelton has a peer-reviewed paper, “Mathematical Modeling Projects: Success For All Students,” published in the journal PRIMUS: Problems, Resources, and Issues in Mathematics Undergraduate Studies. DOI: 10.1080/10511970.2016.124932. The paper appeared online in February 2017 and will appear in the April 2018 print issue (Volume 28, Number 4).





  • English Professor David Gaines was interviewed by BBC Radio 4 on March 25, 2018 regarding “Trouble No More,” a new documentary film about Bob Dylan’s Born-Again music and views. Listen here (begins at 22:30).





March 2018

  • Professor of Political Science Shannon Mariotti was invited to give a lecture at The University of Texas at San Antonio on Feb. 22, 2018. Her talk to the department of Political Science and Geography drew from her current book project and was titled “The Experience of Democracy and the Politics of Buddhist Modernism.”





  • Director of General Chemistry Labs Willis Weigand and Professor of Chemistry Emily Niemeyer went with six Southwestern students to the American Chemical Society National Meeting in New Orleans, La., on March 19, 2018. The following students presented their research:

      • Tyler Adams , class of 2018, presented a poster on his research with Weigand titled “Synthesis and characterization of a copper (II) ethylene amine complex by an improved reaction methodology.”
      • Ryan Peraino , class of 2018, presented a poster on his research with Weigand titled “Synthesis and characterization of new thiadiazole sulfonamide ligands reacted with copper (II) salts.”
      • Margaret Rowand , class of 2018, presented a poster on her research with Weigand titled “Synthesis and characterization of a novel copper (II) thiosemicarbazone complex.”
      • Triston Beadle , class of 2018, presented a poster on his research with Niemeyer titled “Anthocyanin concentrations, antioxidant properties, and phenolic contents among commercially available acai berry supplements.”
      • Jillian Bradley , class of 2018, presented her poster “Surface functionalization of silicone films using click chemistry: synthetic strategies for designing mechanically tunable surfaces” based on her Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.
      • Alison Riggs, class of 2018, presented a poster, “Effects of oxidative stress on non-B DNA structures in a yeast model system,” based on her research with Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry Maha Zewail-Foote and Part-time Assistant Professor of Chemistry Michael Douglas.




  • Southwestern University has been awarded TreeCampus USA designation by the Arbor Day Foundation. Earning this distinction was a joint effort by the 2017 Spring Environmental Studies Capstone Group, Physical Plant, the SU Business Office, the Sustainability Committee, and the Environmental Studies Program. Students involved in the project include SU alumni Vallery Rusu ’17, Alex Morris ‘17, Olivia Ruane ’17, Colleen Nair ’17, and Rebecca Huteson ’17.





  • Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies Joshua Long served as an invited panelist at the Society for the Study of Southern Literature Conference in February where he presented on a chapter he published last year in the UNC Press volume The Bohemian South titled “Liminality and the Search for the New Austin Bohemianism.”





  • Music majors Melanie Lim, class of 2021, and Chloe Easterling, class of 2020, participated in the South Texas District Auditions of the National Association of Teachers of Singing. The students performed art songs and arias before a panel of judges and received written critiques. The event was held at The University of Mary Hardin Baylor in Belton, Texas on March 24. Visiting Assistant Professor of Music Dana Zenobi served as an adjudicator and concluded her term as Secretary of the South Texas NATS chapter.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Education Suzanne García-Mateus presented a paper titled “‘They are mostly like Spanish-speakers. We are Pro- Spanish speakers.’ The Power of Hegemony in a Two-Way Bilingual Education Classroom” as part of the colloquium, “Bilingualism for all?: Challenges and opportunities in two-way immersion” at the American Association of Applied Linguistics (AAAL) conference, Chicago, Ill., March 24–27, 2018.





  • Professor of Music and Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts Michael Cooper channeled the percussionist skeleton in his academic closet to publish a review of The Cambridge Companion to Percussion (ed. Russell Hartenberger; Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2016) in Performance Practice Review 22 (2017): 1-5.





  • Assistant Professor of Computer Science Jacob Schrum has had four full-length peer-reviewed papers accepted to appear in the proceedings of, and be presented at, the 2018 Genetic and Evolutionary Computation Conference (GECCO), to take place July 15-19 in Kyoto, Japan. The four papers are:

      • “Querying Across Time to Interactively Evolve Animations,” written with Music major and Computer Science minor Isabel Tweraser, and Computer Science/Chemistry double-major Lauren Gillespie, both class of 2019. This work deals with the simulated evolution of artistic animations, and includes the results of a human-subject study conducted at SU. The various pieces of art generated by users can be seen on here. This research will also be presented at this year’s Research and Creative Works Symposium.
      • “Evolving Indirectly Encoded Convolutional Neural Networks to Play Tetris With Raw Features,” written solely by Schrum, but extends previous research conducted as part of SCOPE 2016 with students Lauren Gillespie, class of 2019, and Gabriela Gonzalez ’16. This previous work was presented at GECCO last year. Though both papers evolve artificial agents to play Tetris, the new results are a vast improvement, due to the use of Convolutional Neural Networks.
      • “Evolving Mario Levels in the Latent Space of a Deep Convolutional Generative Adversarial Network,” joint research with several researchers in the area of Artificial Intelligence and Games from around the world. The work began as part of a research seminar on AI-Driven Game Design held at the Castle Dagstuhl Leibniz-Center for Computer Science. One session at the seminar focused on “Game Search Space Design and Representation.” Schrum joined several researchers from this group to explore interesting ways of generating new levels for the game Super Mario Bros. based on existing game levels.
      • “Divide and Conquer: Neuroevolution for Multiclass Classification,” joint research with Data Scientists as SparkCognition, Inc., an AI-startup in Austin where Schrum works as a part-time consulting scientist. The paper is associated with a product called Darwin, which uses simulated evolution to solve various types of Data Science problems. The paper specifically explores how Darwin can solve classification problems using ensembles.




  • Associate Professor of Sociology Reggie Byron and Southwestern University alumni Will Molidor ’12 and Andy Cantu ’13 had a co-authored paper titled “U.S. Newspapers’ Portrayals of Home Invasion Crimes” accepted for publication at The Howard Journal of Crime and Justice. The paper is the first study in existence to quantitatively analyze newspaper portrayals of these crimes. The co-authors read and content-coded over 3,000 newspaper articles from 15 U.S. cities before running a model to determine the predictors of enhanced home invasion crime news coverage.





  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Therese Shelton and Visiting Assistant Professor of Mathematics John Ross had a peer-reviewed paper, “Supermarkets, Highways, and Natural Gas Production: Statistics and Social Justice,” published in the journal PRIMUS: Problems, Resources, and Issues in Mathematics Undergraduate Studies. This work began with a 2016 ACS Workshop on Math for Social Justice.





  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Therese Shelton is a co-principal investigator with a newly awarded three-year grant from the National Science Foundation. This will support the mission of the mathematical community SIMIODE to encourage and support faculty in using modeling to motivate learning of differential equations in context. The award will fund faculty development, practitioner workshops, and more.





  • Associate Professor of History Melissa Byrnes presented a paper, “Awakening the Public Conscience: The French Committee for Amnesty in Portugal and Anti-Salazar Activism,” at the Society for French Historical Studies Annual Conference in Pittsburgh, Pa., March 8–10. She also chaired and provided the formal comment for a panel on “Transnational Human Rights in the Twentieth Century: Decolonization and Activism in the ’68 Years.”





  • Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry Maha Zewail-Foote was awarded a prestigious research grant from the National Institutes of Health. Over the next two years, Zewail-Foote and colleagues will utilize a cutting-edge technology to detect DNA damage caused by environmental agents within specific DNA sequences. DNA damage can lead to genetic mutations and instability, which is responsible for many human diseases.





  • Associate Professor of Spanish Angeles Rodriguez Cadena presented a paper titled “Memoria cultural y una heroína de la Independencia de 1810: Gertrudis Bocanegra en la literatura y el cine” (“Cultural memory and a heroine of the Mexican Independence of 1810: Gertrudis Bocanegra in literature and film”) at the XXI Congreso Internacional de Literatura y Estudios Hispánicos, Quito, Ecuador, March 79, 2018.





  • Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers published “Faculty Service and the Difference between Opportunity and Exploitation” in the Chronicle of Higher Education.





  • Associate Vice President for Alumni and Parent Relations Megan Frisque was recognized as one of Alpha Xi Delta Fraternity’s “40 Under 40” in the Winter issue of “The Quill,” the fraternity’s national magazine. The article included alumnae members who are “realizing their potential in their careers and communities.”





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Music Dana Zenobi appeared as both a performer and a presenter at the second annual Music by Women Festival, held at Mississippi University for Women March 13.  Zenobi and University of Texas at Austin trombonist Megan Boutin performed “Love While You May,” a recently-composed song cycle for soprano and trombone by Southwestern alumna Ashley H. Kraft ’14. Zenobi also performed “Petite rêve,” a four-song cycle by Los Angeles based composer Genevieve Vincent.  She presented a lecture recital titled “À deux voix: Romantic Duets for Women’s Voices” along with former Southwestern faculty member Dr. Agnes Vojtko and pianist Dr. Michael Bunchman (University of Southern Mississippi). The lecture recital presented works by Fanny Mendelssohn Hensel, Cécile Chaminade, and sister composers Maria Malibran and Pauline Viardot with the intent of situating this vocal literature more firmly within the canon.





  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Fumiko Futamura organized students and faculty to create a hyperbolic crochet coral reef for a table at the Hot Science Cool Talks event on coral reefs at the University of Texas on Feb.16. To prepare for the event, she gave talks on hyperbolic geometry and crochet at SU for the 107 Lecture in Mathematics and for the Art Association, and taught students, faculty and staff how to crochet hyperbolic planes that incidentally look like coral. Nine students, faculty and alumni contributed: Kari Darr ’19, Visiting Assistant Professor of Mathematics Linda DiLullo, Christi Ho ’18, Abigail Jendrusch ’19, Jacob Jimerson ’19, Chris Nissen ’18, Aiden Steinle ’18, Natalie Young ’19. Christi, Jacob and Aiden attended the event, teaching the public about hyperbolic geometry and how to crochet. The coral reef will be on display in the entrance to the Smith Library from March 20 to the end of the semester.





  • Southwestern University, along with two other ACS institutions, Millsaps College and Hendrix College, was the recipient of a recently-funded ACS Diversity Grant to support an initiative known as FOCUS (Faculty of Color Uniting for Success). The project’s overall objectives are to enhance recruitment, success, and the retention of faculty of color at our three institutions and in all ACS consortia schools. It aims to raise awareness of the challenges that faculty of color face through sustained advocacy, summer workshops, and regular surveys of participants on campus climate. In conjunction with ACS’s Director of Diversity and Inclusion, Anita Davis, the initiative will also provide materials and webinars to help educate institutional leadership about ways to better support faculty of color. This year, the FOCUS project will host its summer workshop at Southwestern June 1015. This workshop was designed to bring together faculty of color from ACS member colleges for a week-long summer retreat focusing on scholarship, networking, self-care, professional advancement, navigating service demands, and the challenges that faculty of color face on their path to professional success in the academy. It will include faculty participants from Hendrix, Millsaps, and Southwestern. Associate Professor of Education Alicia Moore serves as the FOCUS Program Director. Director of Teaching, Learning and Scholarship Julie Sievers, Senior Director of Foundation Relations Larkin Tom, and Associate Professor of Anthropology Brenda Sendejo serves on the FOCUS steering committee and will serve as facilitators for the 2018 FOCUS summer retreat.





  • Retired Professor of Theater and former Dean of the Sarofim School of Fine Arts Paul Gaffney was honored when Mayor Dale Ross and the City Council declared February 27, 2018, PAUL GAFFNEY DAY in Georgetown, Texas, in recognition of his contributions to the arts at Southwestern University and in the city of Georgetown.  The proclamation recognized his service as Dean of the School of Fine Arts, his work in guiding the expansion and renovation of the Alma Thomas Fine Arts Center, his service as the first Chair of the Georgetown Arts and Culture Board, and his work on developing the Georgetown Art Center. The Mayor and City Council presented him with the proclamation at its meeting on that date.





  • Assistant Professor of Business Debika Sihi and Southwestern University alumna Kara Lawson ’16 published a co-authored paper titled “Marketing Leaders and Social Media: Blending Personal and Professional Identities” in the Journal of Marketing Theory and Practice. The paper examines marketing leaders’ use of social media accounts which connect their personal and professional identities. Using feedback from Chief Marketing Officers (CMOs) and secondary social media data, the authors investigate the motivation, benefits, and challenges in maintaining an account which is both personal and professional in nature. In addition, content published through these accounts is analyzed to better understand the nature of the information disseminated through these channels.





  • Associate Professor of Art History Allison Miller gave an invited, remote guest lecture titled “Art & Politics in Mao’s China” in Patricia Schiaffini-Vedani’s “Politics of China Through Literature and Film” course at Texas State University on Feb. 22, 2018.





  • Associate Vice President for Facilities Management Mike Millerhas become a John Maxwell Certified Trainer, Speaker, and Coach.





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth completed a review of “Framing Islam: Faith, Fascination, and Fear in Twenty-First Century German Culture,” a special issue of Colloquia Germanica: Internationale Zeitschrift für Germanistik, guest-edited by Heidi Denzel de Tirado and Faye Stewart. The review appears in the 2018 Women in German Yearbook: Feminist Studies in German Literature & Culture.





  • Esteban Woo Kee , class of 2018, presented his research on “ACT UP and the Revolution of Gay Rights” at the 6th Annual Human Rights Undergraduate Research Workshop at Illinois Wesleyan University, Feb. 23 25, 2018.





  • Professor of Art and Art History and Chair of Art History Thomas Noble Howe will lead the formal public presentation of the recent publication of the volume “Excavation and Study of the Garden of the Great Peristyle of the Villa Arianna at Stabiae, 2007-2012,” Quaderni di Studi Pompeiani, VII 1916 (1917) at the Centro di Studi Americani, Palazzo Mattei di Giove, Via Michelangelo Caetani 32, Roma, on March 12, 2018. The event is co-sponsored by the American Embassy in Rome, the American Academy in Rome and the Fondazione Restoring Ancient Stabiae, of which Howe is Scientific Director. The principal lecture, “Strolling with Power: Recent Discoveries at the Garden of the Villa Arianna, Stabiae,” to be given by Howe, will be either in English or Italian.





  • Associate Professor of Computer Science Barbara Anthony was a panelist on the “Teaching with the Cloud” panel at Special Interest Group for Computer Science Education (SIGCSE) 2018, the 49th ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education, in Baltimore, Md., in Feb. 2018.





  • Associate Professor of Spanish Abby Dings’ article titled “The Undergraduate Spanish Major Curriculum: Faculty, Alumni and Student Perceptions” (coauthored with Tammy Jandrey Hertel) was published in the Winter 2017 issue of Foreign Language Annals.





February 2018

  • The February Newsletter of the American Association of Teachers of German (AATG) features a report on Southwestern’s First Annual Poetry Slam. Part-time adjunct Assistant Professor of German Michelle Reyes and Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth organized this event to promote community engagement and intercultural learning through spoken word art. AATG co-sponsored the event with a Deutsch macht Spaß(German is fun) grant.





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth completed peer review for 11 research presentations and 94 session proposals submitted for the 2018 convention of the American Association of Teachers of German (AATG) and the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL). Each member of the team of three reviewers is appointed by the Presidents of those organizations, recognizing their experience and expertise, to serve as representative for the profession at the K–12, College, and Research University levels. Team members are responsible for reviewing portions of the proposals submitted across all levels of instruction. They perform this substantial service to the profession using an elaborate, nationally recognized rubric that includes addressing relevance, content, purpose, outcomes, and strategies for engagement for each proposed conference contribution.





  • Institutional Research Analyst Grace Mineta presented “Make Your Data Tell a Story: The Dos and Don’ts of Creating Graphics” on Feb. 13 at the Texas Association of Institutional Research (TAIR) 2018 conference in Corpus Christi, Texas.





  • Associate Professor of Art History Allison Miller was interviewed live on the television news show, China 24, produced by China Global Television Network. Miller discussed the significance of China’s terracotta army after one of the terracotta warriors was vandalized at the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia.





  • Part-time Instructor of Applied Music Adrienne Inglis’ composition “Cochineal” for SATB chorus and electronic dance track enjoyed its world première performance Feb. 10, 2018, with Inversion Ensemble. Inglis’ son, Walter Torres, a PhD oceanography student at Duke, created the electronic dance track. Inversion Ensemble performed “Cochineal” Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018, at Wesleyan at Estrella and Sunday, Feb. 25, 2018, at Westminster Presbyterian Church Fellowship Hall. “Cochineal” combines earthy and electronic sound to set to music the ancient Andean recipe for dyeing alpaca wool with cochineal, an insect full of carminic acid that feeds on prickly pear cactus. The recipe depicts the synthesis of insects, alpaca wool, minerals, water, fire, sun, time, and a couple of unusual ingredients to create colorful beauty. Using Andean harmonies and scales, the music captures the grandeur of the Andes mountains and the artisanal tradition of hand-crafting colorful yarn from local natural ingredients. The electronic track features compelling dance rhythms produced from original sound design and processing with software instruments Serum, Alchemy, Sylenth, and Massive among others. “Cochineal” is the first musical collaboration between Adrienne Inglis and Walter Torres.





  • Associate Professor of History Melissa Byrnes presented a paper titled “Anti-Salazarism and Student Solidarity: Franco-Portuguese Student Activism in the 1960s” at the 1968 in Global Perspectives conference hosted by the University of South Carolina, Feb. 15–17, 2018.





  • Virginia Stofer ’15 had a peer-reviewed paper on her capstone research titled “Do wrist orthoses cause compensatory elbow and shoulder movements when performing drinking and hammering tasks?” published in the Irish Journal of Occupational Therapy. Professor of Kinesiology Jimmy Smith and Professor of Kinesiology Scott McLean were co-authors on the paper.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Music Dana Zenobi performed as the featured artist for LOLA (Local Opera Local Artists) Austin’s quarterly concert series on Feb. 15. Her program, “A Valentine to Female Composers,” introduced Austin-area music lovers to art songs by female composers, including Alma Mahler, Fanny Mendelssohn, Lori Laitman, Libby Larsen, and two sets of sister composers, Lili and Nadia Boulanger and Pauline Viardot and Maria Malibran.  She also performed a newly-composed song cycle by Canadian-born composer Genevieve Vincent, who is currently based in Los Angeles, Calif.





  • Professor of Psychology Traci Giuliano was an invited presenter at LASA (Liberal Arts and Sciences Academy) high school in Austin last week. She spoke as part of their Cultural Awareness Day on the topic of gender and sexual orientation.





  • Director of Advising and Retention Jennifer Leach attended the NACADA Administrators’ Institute in Daytona Beach, Fla., Feb. 8–10, 2018, where she was able to meet with others with similar titles/responsibilities to consider practices that will continue to enhance advising at Southwestern. She was also asked to apply to be a faculty member for next year’s institute as a representative for private universities.





  • Associate Professor of Theatre Desiderio Roybal designed the stage setting for Frank Zeller’s play, The Father, produced by DJ Productions in Austin, TX. The director of the production is SU Professor Emeritus of Theatre Rick Roemer. The production runs through early March. The Fatherexplores family dynamics as we all age. As life expectancies lengthen, so do the social and economic repercussions of an aging population, not the least of which is the effect of memory loss, dementia and Alzheimer’s on families and caregivers. With the inevitable and trying parent-child role reversals, the non-linear structure of the script thrusts the audience headlong into the world of Andre, the father, to wonder, ”What is true, what is reality?”





  • Communications major Shea C. Brewer, class of 2019, had his final project in a course on Feminist Fairy Tales accepted for publication in the online literary journal Spider Mirror. His teacher and mentor for the project is Visiting Assistant Professor of German Michelle Reyes. Spider Mirroris a blog-style journal that seeks to promote and support the arts in all its modern forms. Brewer’s tale, The “Seven” Dwarfs, explores the potential untold story of an eighth dwarf by the name of Leery, with a twist on the picture perfect image of classic Snow White.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Art Ron Geibel is one of eight local artists selected to take part in The Contemporary Austin’s 2018 Crit Group. The program helps build a network for artists by providing monthly group critiques and one-on-one studio visits with the co-leaders and gallerists.  Participating artists were selected by Annette Carlozzi, former Curator at Large at the Blanton Museum of Art, Sterling Allen, Assistant Professor of Sculpture at Texas State University, and Andrea Mellard, Director of Public Programs and Community Engagement for The Contemporary Austin. The program culminates in a group exhibition at grayDuck Gallery in Austin in August 2018.





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth presented a moderated talk on “Global Football: Integrating Academics, Athletics and Intercultural Learning” for the HEDS UP session at the 104th annual meeting of the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U) on Jan. 24–27, 2018, in Washington, DC. Out of more than 450 proposals received, fewer than 20 percent were accepted, and Berroth’s presentation was one of five selected for this TED Talk-inspired format. Berroth introduced a large audience to Southwestern’s innovative short-term embedded experience abroad for student athletes in our football program. With the small set of data from the first two programs in Germany and Italy, she is beginning to track how SU’s approach can lower barriers for students typically underserved or underrepresented in traditional study abroad programs, including men, student athletes, students of color, and first generation students.





  • Professor of Music Lois Ferrari conducted the Austin Civic Orchestra’s 4th concert of the season, An American in Paris, which featured music written by Gershwin, Larsen, Barber, and Popper, on Feb. 3. Featured were local soloists Toby Blumenthal and Southwestern student Isabel Tweraser, class of 2019 and winner of the 2017 Southwestern Concerto Contest. This concert is a part of the larger ‛17–‛18 season theme, Made in America, for which Ferrari and the ACO are committed to performing music written by American composers.





  • Professor of Political Science and Dean of the Faculty Alisa Gaunder’s article titled “‘Madonnas,’ ‘Assassins,’ and ‘Girls’: How Female Politicians Respond to Media Labels Reflecting Party Leader Strategy” was published in the most recent issue of the interdisciplinary U.S.-Japan Women’s Journal.





  • Professor of English David Gaines presented “Bob Dylan, Beautiful Classroom Moments, and ‘Everything Side By Side Created Equal’” on Feb. 10 in Tulsa, Okla. He was one of three invited speakers at “Dylan in the Classroom,” the inaugural symposium of the University of Tulsa’s Institute for Bob Dylan Studies and the affiliated Bob Dylan Archive. As well as addressing the ways in which Dylan’s music is being taught and studied from elementary classrooms through high school and into college, he also discussed the possible future directions of Dylan Studies and chaired a course planning workshop.





  • Associate Professor of History Melissa K. Byrnes  gave a talk for the Newcomers & Friends of Georgetown about philanthropy, community engagement, and the lessons and experiences from her First Year Seminar, “Doing Good and Doing It Well.”





  • Assistant Professor of Art History Allison Miller gave an invited lecture titled “Terra-cotta Warriors after the First Emperor: Re-evaluating the Qin Legacy in the Han” at the University of Richmond on Feb. 1. The lecture was delivered as part of the Archaeological Institute of America’s 2017–2018 lecture program.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Education Suzanne García-Mateus received second place in the Bilingual Education Research SIG Outstanding Dissertation Award, which will be presented on April 15, 2018, at the American Educational Research Association (AERA) conference in New York City. She is also a finalist for the AERA Second Language Research SIG Outstanding Dissertation Award.





  • Natalia Kapacinskas , class of 2018, will present “L.T. Meade, Fictional Plagiarism, and a New Model of Authorship” at the 26th annual British Women Writers Conference held this April at the University of Texas at Austin. The paper is a selection from her English Honors Thesis on the evolution of plagiarism and women’s writing in the long nineteenth century (1789–1914).





  • Elyssa Sliheet , class of 2019, won an award for an Outstanding Poster in the Student Poster Session of the Mathematical Association of America (MAA) Joint Mathematics Meeting (JMM) in San Diego, Calif. Jan. 9–13, 2018. Her work, “Shift Operators on Directed Infinite Graphs,” was conducted at an NSF-funded summer Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) with several other undergraduates under advisor Ruben Martinez-Avendao of Universidad Autónoma Del Estado De Hidalgo. There were over 500 posters in 16 topical categories at the JMM poster session. Awards were given for the top 15% in each category. Her travel was funded by the Southwestern Student Travel Fund, the MAA Student Travel Fund, and the NSF.





January 2018

  • Part-Time Instructor of Applied Music Katherine Altobello ’99 was the guest vocalist in Austin Chamber Ensemble’s “Berlin Bernstein Birthdays and More” featuring works by Irving Berlin, George Gershwin, Leonard Bernstein, and Claude Debussy. Altobello performed alongside pianists Marti Ahern and Stephen Burnaman. Performances were Jan. 26–27, inaugurating Huston-Tillotson University’s “all Steinway school.”





  • Professor of Psychology Traci Giuliano gave an invited presentation, “Things I wish my students knew before they came to college,” at the Austin ISD’s AVID College Readiness Symposium held at St. Edward’s University.





  • President Edward Burger was an invited speaker at an American Mathematical Society Special Session on Diophantine Approximation and Analytic Number Theory in Honor of Jeffrey Vaaler on Jan. 12 at the national Joint Mathematics Meetings held in San Diego, Calif. There he spoke on “Applications of orthogonality within non-archimedean and human contexts.” On Jan. 23, he delivered a public address on the future of undergraduate education at Johns Hopkins University as well as met with their president and engaged with their Commission on Education to assess their plans for the future.





  • Professor of Theatre John Ore designed the lighting and served as stage manager for Arts Avenue’s full production of the classic musical  Meet Me In St. Louis  in the Alma Thomas Theater .   Ore also mentored sound designer Jaden Williams, class of 2020, and tech director Christian Aderholt, class of 2018, who contributed hugely to the show’s successful four-performance run from Jan. 3–6, 2018.





  • Part-time Assistant Professor of Applied Music Li Kuang recently attended the Big XII Trombone Conference held Jan. 1214 at Texas Tech University in Lubbock, TX. The Big XII Trombone Conference is an annual trombone event that attracts professional trombone players, college trombone professors, trombone students and trombone enthusiasts across the country. Kuang served as a faculty member in this conference. He also presented a solo performance and adjudicated the final rounds of both the “Yamaha Tenor Trombone Solo Competition” and the “Big XII Bass Trombone Solo Competition.” The renowned bass trombonist of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra Mr. Charlie Vernon was also among the invited guest artists to this conference.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor or Art Ron Geibel currently has sculptures featured in two exhibitions. The first exhibition, “By Hand,” an international craft competition at Blue Line Gallery in Roseville, Calif., will be on view Jan. 19 March 3, 2018. The second, “Contemporary South,” will open Feb. 2 at Visual Art Exchange in Raleigh, NC. “Contemporary South” showcases some of the most ambitious and timely works by artists from across the regional south. The exhibition is on view through March 24, 2018.





  • Ellie Crowley, class of 2020, was chosen as the Campus Leader for the Up to Us competition, a competition between campuses across the nation with the main goal of raising awareness about the national debt in a nonpartisan manner. Crowley will lead a Southwestern student team that will host a range of year-round activities educating peers about national debt.





  • Based on a pedagogical collaboration with the Center for Biodiversity and Conservation within the American Museum of Natural History, contributions made by Professor of Biology Romi Burks and several colleagues have been compiled and published in  Lessons in Conservation: Volume VIII,a special “Student Learning” issue of the online journal. These materials are freely available to other instructors.





  • Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers presented “Removing the Jew from the Lesbian: Kissing Jessica Stein” at the annual meeting of the Association for Jewish Studies (AJS) in December 2017. She also published “7 Jewish Feminist Highlights of 2017” and “Our Bodies, Our Memories, Our Poetry: A Review of Leslea Newman’s Lovely” in Lilith Magazine’s Blog.





  • Professor of Spanish Katy Ross’ most recent article came out in an edited volume called Gender in Urban Spaces: Literary and Visual Narratives of the New Millennium (Palgrave MacMillan 2017). She will share this work with the SU campus at the Representations Lecture Series on Tuesday, February 20.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Physics Rebecca Edwards attended the 98th American Meteorological Society Annual Meeting, January 711 in Austin. She presented a poster titled “Peak Over Threshold Analysis of Heavy Precipitation in Texas” based upon work done with physics student Mady Akers, class of 2018. She also gave a presentation about this summer’s SCOPE project titled “The Balcones Escarpment Environmental Monitoring Experiment” during the Educational Symposium. Edwards was joined at the meeting by mathematics student Morgan Engle, class of 2018, who presented a poster about her Capstone research, “Insights into the Influence of ENSO on United States Gulf Coast Ozone Using a Surface Ozone Climatology.”





  • Professor of Political Science  Shannon Mariotti  was invited to contribute the essay on “Adorno and Democracy” to the forthcoming Blackwell Companion to  Adorno , edited by Peter Gordon, Max Pensky, and Espen Hammer.





  • Assistant Professor of Business Gaby Flores presented “Construct Validity of an Objective Measure of Ethical Climates” at the Iberoamerican Academy of Management in New Orleans, LA, on Dec. 9.





  • Associate Professor of Sociology Reggie Byron had a teaching exercise titled “Teaching about Police Violence with Open Source Police Shootings Data and Census Data” published in TRAILS, The American Sociological Association’s Teaching Resources And Innovations Library for Sociology. He has also accepted an invitation to serve as a reviewer for the National Science Foundation. 





  • Associate Professor of Theatre Desiderio Roybal designed stage scenery for Penfold Theatre’s production of Miracle on 34th Street. Roybal created the interior of the fictional 1947 KPNF radio station where actors used live, foley sound effects for this classic radiocast. The production was presented Nov. 30Dec. 23.





  • Southwestern Head Football Coach Joe Austin coached in the 20th annual Tazon de Estrellas all-star game on Dec. 16, 2017, at CETYS University in Tijuana, Mexico. This is Coach Austin’s eighth consecutive selection to the all-star coaching staff. The game, held every December in Mexico, pits all-stars from Mexico’s CONADEIP Division I against all-stars from our NCAA Division III.





  • Professor of Art and Art History and Chair of Art History Thomas Noble Howe in December published an article on the recently published Roman Garden at Stabiae in the journal of the national garden club of Italy, “Un giardino romano a pasesaggio (“A Roman Strolling Garden”) Garden Club, Organo uffficiale dell’ugai – Storia, Scienza, Arte e Mito delle piante e dei fiori, (47, novembre, 2017) 14-16.





  • Associate Professor of Art History Patrick Hajovsky will present his current research at the annual Mesoamerica Meetings (formerly Maya Meetings) at the University of Texas-Austin on Saturday, Jan. 13. This year’s theme, “Mesoamerican Philosophies: Animate Matter, Metaphysics, and the Natural Environment,” includes workshops on Maya hieroglyphs and a symposium of top scholars in Aztec studies across disciplines.





  • Professor of Theatre John Ore designed the dance lighting for Georgetown Ballet’s production of The Nutcracker. Ore also mentored Matt Murphy, class of 2019, Sam Bruno, class of 2020, and Andrew Snyder, class of 2021, who served as support technicians on this holiday classic performed in Alma Thomas Theater.





December 2017

  • Professor of Music Lois Ferrari conducted the Austin Civic Orchestra’s 3rd concert of the season, Austin Home-Grown, which featured music written by local composers Donald Grantham and Dan Welcher on Dec. 10. Both composers were on hand to help rehearse and conduct their works So Long As Days Shall Be and Prairie Light. This concert is part of a larger season theme, Made in America, to which Ferrari and the ACO are committed to performing only music written by American composers throughout its 2017-18 season.





  • Director of Teaching, Learning, and Scholarship Julie Sievers served on the faculty of the Humanities Texas workshop, “Teaching Edgar Allan Poe,” for Central Texas middle and high school English teachers on Dec. 7 in Austin, Texas.  Her invited workshop focused on “Teaching Critical Reading Skills.”





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth has been accepted to co-organize a section for the XIV. Kongress der Internationalen Vereinigung für Germanistik (IVG) in Palermo, Italy, July 26–Aug. 2, 2020, with the theme “Wege der Germanistik in transkulturellen Perspektiven.” The section is titled “Behinderungen und Herausforderungen –– Disability Studies in der Germanistik,” inviting work on the intersections of Disability Studies and German Studies. IVG, fostering international collaborations in German Studies, has been meeting in a different country every 5th year since 1951. Berroth’s organizing team includes Dr. Federica La Manna, University of Calabria, Arcavacata, Italy, Dr. Waltraud Maierhofer, University of Iowa, and Dr. Nina Schmidt, Freie Universität Berlin, Germany. The section reflects interdisciplinary collaborations between the fine arts, humanities, and natural sciences. Co-organizers are planning to publish an edited volume coordinated with the conference. Berroth, who teaches and mentors students in the “Global Health” Paideia theme, looks forward to connecting with her colleagues on integrating STEM and German, especially through the Einstein-Projekt Patho/Graphics at the Free University of Berlin.





  • Associate Professor of Anthropology Brenda Sendejo presented “’Claiming Space’: Chicana Knowledge Production and Feminist Praxis as Critical Interventions in Belonging” at the American Anthropological Association Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C., on Nov. 30. The paper was part of an invited panel titled “Critical Anthropology of Informal Educational Processes in Latinx Communities.”





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Education Suzanne García-Mateus co-presented a poster titled “How do heritage speakers support their 3rd generation children’s bilingual development? An urgent call for making connections between family and institutional language policy decisions” at the 116th Annual Meeting of the American Anthropological Association, Washington, D.C., Nov. 29–Dec. 3, 2017.





  • Assistant Professor of Business Debika Sihi participated on a panel in Austin, Texas on Dec. 7, 2017 with Kevin Brown (a partner at Waller Lansden Dortch & Davis, LLP ) and Ryan Garcia (a social media attorney at Dell and adjunct professor at University of Texas at Austin Law) sponsored by the Association of Corporate Counsel, Austin Chapter. The panel was titled Marketing Liability in the Digital Age: Tales from the Trenches and Best Practices and addressed legal issues arising from advertising, social media, online data collection, and copyright infringement.





  • The Southwestern University’s German Program, with leadership from Part-time Assistant Professor of German Michelle Reyes and support from Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth and Administrative Assistant Susie Bullock, hosted the First Annual SU Poetry Slam. A grant from the American Association of Teachers of German (AATG) Deutsch macht Spaß, part of the German government’s Netzwerk Deutsch program, augmented by funding from Community Engaged Learning and the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures, provided for an evening of poetry readings and competition. The goal of the event was to build community by celebrating spoken word art in all its forms with a special focus on German poetry. We had a wonderful turnout with an audience of about seventy from Southwestern’s campus, our local community, and the greater Austin area. The event included a sponsored reading by Poetry Co-Editor for Chicon Street Poetry Journal, Nancy Lili Gonzalez. Another highlight of the evening was the event’s Master of Ceremonies, Joe Brundidge, author of Element 615 and co-host of KOOP 91.7’s Writing On the Air. The presenters included students, faculty, members of local associations and local Austin artists, speaking in German, Chinese, Spanish, and English. Our student presenters, some offering their own original work, included Andrew Jezisek, class of 2021, majoring in German and Education, Melina Boutris, class of 2021, majoring in German and Special Education, Claire Harding, class of 2020, who pursues a Physics major and German minor. Furthermore, we applauded Molly Cardenas, class of 2018, English major and Feminist Studies minor, Chris Cunningham, class of 2019  Communication Studies major, Jordy Goodman, class of 2018  Feminist studies major and German minor, Christine Gutierrez, class of 2020, Studio Arts major, Shea Brewer, class of 2019,  Communication Studies major, and Gamah Toney, class of 2020, Computer Science major and minoring in Studio Arts. Congratulations to all!





  • Professor of English David Gaines’s poem “Egyptian Rings and Spanish Boots” was selected for inclusion in the New Rivers Press anthology titled “Visiting Bob: Poems Inspired by the Life and Work of Bob Dylan” edited by Thom Tammaro and Alan Davis. The volume will appear in early 2018.





  • Head Football Coach Joe Austin, Associate Head Football Coach Tom Ross, and Defensive Coordinator Bill Kriesel were presenters at the Baden-Wurttemberg American Football Convention in Stuttgart, Germany, Dec. 1–3. The trio delivered nine lectures during the convention.





  • President Edward Burger was recently interviewed by the Houston Chronicleabout his vision for both Southwestern as well as for higher education. An edited transcription can be found here.  





  • Isabel Tweraser , class of 2019, won the 2017 Southwestern Concerto contest. She will be perform “Hungarian Rhapsody” by David Popper with the Austin Civic Orchestra on Feb. 3, 2018.





  • Artworks by eleven students from Southwestern’s Studio Art department were selected for the 38th Annual Central Texas Art Competition at Temple College from four area colleges and five high schools.  Sophia Anthony, class of 2018, was awarded the Best of Show Award for her self-portrait. Lauren Valentine (painting), class of 2019, and Sonja Lea (painting), class of 2018, were two artists among the six given Awards of Excellence in the College Division. Paintings by Huakai (Sebastian) Chen, class of 2018, Danbi Heo, class of 2019, Lauren Muskara, Summer Rodgers, both class of 2020, Jessica Holmberg, Emily Leon, both class of 2021, and drawings by Ana Olvera and Hayley Schultz, both class of 2020, were also selected by the juror, Assistant Professor Jeffie Brewer from the School of Art at Stephen F. Austin University.





  • Professor of Anthropology Melissa Johnson presented her paper “Everyday Politics of Whiteness in Belize” as part of the panel “Everyday Calculations of Whiteness in Latin America” and served as Discussant for the panel “Water Matters: Anthropologists on Climate, Contamination and Vulnerable Embodiment, Part 1” at the 116th Annual Meeting of the American Anthropological Association, Washington, D.C., Nov. 29–Dec. 3, 2017.





  • Part-time Assistant Professor of Music Hai Zheng Olefsky was featured as a soloist with the Austin Youth Symphony Orchestra to perform ” Prayer” by Ernest Bloch at the Austin Youth Orchestra Winter Concert on Dec. 3.





  • Assistant Professor of Business Debika Sihi and two co-authors published a paper titled “Managerial perspectives on crowdsourcing in the new product development process” in Industrial Marketing Management. The paper explores the use of crowdsourcing in the new product development (NPD) process of business to business (B2B) companies.





  • Associate Professor of Theatre Desiderio Roybal designed stage scenery for the play Miracle on 34th Street produced by Penfold Theatre in Austin, Texas.





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth participated in the 2017 joined conference of the American Association of Teachers of German (AATG) and the American Council on the Teaching Foreign Languages (ACTFL) in Nashville, Tenn., Nov. 17–19. Berroth organized two panels, sponsored by the Coalition of Women in German, on approaches to teaching about Syrian refugees in Germany with a focus on solidarity and social justice. Her contribution focused on normalizing representations of the presence and participation of refugees in German culture through the integration of genres and content in Intermediate level courses. Furthermore, Berroth presented her research and teaching on Climate Fiction on a panel titled “Inventions, Innovations, Connections: STEM and German Literature.” A member of the AATG leadership team on diversity and inclusion “Alle lernen Deutsch” and the special interest group “Small Undergraduate German Programs,” Berroth contributed to national discussions on improving teaching and learning modern languages for people with disabilities. Berroth introduced initial strategies developed by her NEH grant working group for offering open access materials in a Digital Humanities Advancement project.





  • Assistant Professor of Economics Patrick Van Horn’s research article “In the Eye of a Storm: Manhattan’s Money Center Banks During the International Financial Crisis of 1931” (coauthored with Gary Richardson) was accepted for publication in the peer-reviewed journal Explorations in Economic History.





  • Professor of Art Mary Visser was invited by teacher of the year Lea Bertsch to speak on 3D Printing and its applications in science at the Lake Travis High School Science Department for the classes in Medical Microbiology, Pathophysiology, and Anatomy & Physiology.  





November 2017

  • Nov. 3–4, three teams of SU students competed in the ACM International Collegiate Programming Competition (ICPC) South-Central USA Regional hosted by Baylor University in Waco, Texas. Programming contests are structured as collections of problems that teams must write code to solve. Teams are ranked by the number of problems solved and then by the speed with which they solved them. Between the practice contest Friday evening and the contest Saturday afternoon, all three Southwestern teams — SU Transfer Crew (Sara Boyd and Devon Fulcher, both class of 2020, and Adanna Court, class of 2018), SU Pirates (Sabin Oza, class of 2021, Kayla Ingram and Colin Scruggs, both class of 2019), and String[ ] arghhhhhhhhs (Alexander Hoffman, Matt Sanford, both class of 2020, and Will Price, class of 2019) — solved at least one problem. This year’s teams were coached by Associate Professor of Computer Science Barbara Anthony and Assistant Professor of Computer Science Chad Stolper, the latter of whom accompanied the teams to the competition.





  • Vice President for Finance and Administration Craig Erwin and Associate Vice President for Information Technology Todd Watson participated in the 2017 Apogee Customer Technology Seminar held in Austin at the Omni Hotel on Nov. 14. Both were invited participants in a panel session titled, “Working with University Leadership on Technical Decisions.” Other panelists included Carol Thomas, VP Information Technology, New England College, and Dan Updegrove, Consultant on IT in Higher Education.  The panel was moderated by Pat Walsh, VP Sales, Midwest Region, Apogee, who addressed the question about how to innovate as a campus to achieve true business value, improve the quality of student life on campus significantly, and empower colleagues so they can do a better job.





  • The 103rd annual convention of the National Communication Association was held in Dallas on November 16–20. Southwestern University was represented by faculty, students, and alumni.

      • Communication major Audrey Davis, class of 2019, presented the paper “You Say You Wanna Gloss With Us—Translating Music for Deaf Audiences,” and Communication major Kayleigh Hanna, class of 2018, presented her paper “Witches and Bitches: Rhetoric of WitchCraft in Historical Perspective.”
      • Chair and Associate Professor of Communication Studies Valerie Renegar responded to a series of papers on a panel featuring leaders in the field of feminism and consciousness raising. She also contributed to a panel on innovative modes of hybrid and online learning.
      • Visiting Assistant Professor of Communication Studies Shannon Holland presented the papers “Visibility of Audism” and “Western Manhood and Sex Verification in International Sports.”
      • Visiting Assistant Professor of Communication Studies Lamiyah Bahrainwala presented two papers: “Preaching (American-Muslim) Style” and “A Burkean-Stylistic Analysis of ‘Moderate’ Muslim Comedy.” She also was included on a panel titled “Deconstructing our relevance: discussion panel of marginalized scholars.”

    Finally, three Southwestern alumni, Sally Spalding ’09, Tony Irizarry ’16, and Vallery Rusu ’17, presented papers at the conference on a range of topics in communication studies.





  • Assistant Professor of Computer Science Jacob Schrum attended the Dagstuhl Research Seminar: “Artificial and Computational Intelligence in Games: AI-Driven Game Design” in Nov. 2017. The Castle Dagstuhl - Leibniz Center for Computer Science, in Dagstuhl, Germany, aims to further world class research in Computer Science by hosting invitation-only research seminars on various topics throughout the year. With various researchers from around the world, Schrum participated in workshops on the topics of “Emergence in Games,” “Playful NPCs and Games,” “Game Design Search Spaces,” and conducted a workshop on “Human-Assisted Content Creation Within Games.”





  • Assistant Professor of Art History Allison Miller gave an invited lecture titled “Purple in Ancient China: New Reflections on its Sources and Status” at the Center for East Asian Studies at The University of Texas at Austin on Nov. 10. The lecture was sponsored by the China Endowment, the Yew Endowed Fund, and the Suez Endowment.





  • Professor of Spanish Katy Ross and SU alumna Lauren Fellers ’14 published “Subversive Texts: MommyBlogs to Blog-Books in Spain” in the Hispanic Studies Review 2.2.





  • Professor of Economics Emily Northrop presented “Climate Change Across the Curriculum” at the recent annual conference of the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education. She described the components of SU’s initiative to inspire and better prepare faculty to include assignments, conversations — even passing references — to climate change in their courses.





    • Professor of Feminist Studies Alison Kafer published a new essay in the Cambridge Companion to Literature and Disability, edited by Clare Barker and Stuart Murray (Cambridge UP, 2017). Co-written with Eunjung Kim, Kafer’s chapter, “Disability and the Edges of Intersectionality,” uses the writings of Michelle Cliff and Audre Lorde to describe an intersectional approach to disability studies.




  • Professor of Biology and Lillian Nelson Pratt Chair Ben Pierce gave an invited seminar on his research titled “Evolution and Ecology of the Georgetown salamander” to biology students and faculty at Richland College in Dallas, Texas, on Nov. 8, 2017.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Music Dana Zenobi was competitively selected from the Texas, Oklahoma and New Mexico region of the National Association of Teachers of Singing (NATS) to perform on the 2017 Texoma Regional Conference Artist Series. Her lecture recital “Songs of the Boulanger Sisters: Stylistic Analysis Through a Gender Lens” presented historical context and stylistic analysis of art songs by sister composers Nadia and Lili Boulanger, with the intent of situating this literature more firmly within the canon of French melodie. Current Music Education major Tabitha Thiemens ’19 also attended the conference, which was held at Texas A&M University - Commerce, Nov. 9–11. Thiemens performed as part of the student auditions, which involved over 500 college students from the region.  She attended master classes, artist series performances, and a recital by nationally renowned soprano Elizabeth Baldwin.





  • Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin was interviewed by the Russian journal LEFTBLOG under the title “The Magical Realism of Revolution: Interview with Eric Selbin.”





  • Assistant Professor of Business Debika Sihi presented her project titled “Like the Brand, Trust the Brand? Privacy Concerns of Brand Followers on Social Media” at the Society of Marketing Advances Annual Conference in Louisville, Ky. Nov. 7–11, 2017.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Political Science Emily Sydnor published the article “Platforms for Incivility: Examining Perceptions Across Different Media Formats,” in the journal Political Communication. The article demonstrates that our identification of language as civil or uncivil depends on the medium used to convey a political message and is available here.





  • Associate Professor of Political Science Shannon Mariotti’s “Contemporary Democratic Theory” course was featured in a New York Times article about strategies for discussing divisive contemporary political issues across political differences. This class brings Dr. Mariotti’s current research on the politics of Buddhist modernism to bear on her teaching: the class experiments with how meditation and mindfulness practices conceptually relate to the practice of democracy in everyday life and also prove useful in critically but compassionately analyzing the democratic deficits and dilemmas of contemporary American life. See Laura Pappano’s “Class Interrupted,” in the “Education Life” section of the Sunday edition of the New York Times, Nov. 5, 2017.





  • Professor of English David Gaines delivered “Landscape and Characters: Hill Country Stories in Progress,” an invited lecture, at Schreiner University in Kerrville on Nov. 9. Gaines spoke to students and faculty in the Texas Studies Program about his current research into and writing about 630 acres of hill country land from the early nineteenth-century to the present.





  • Professor of Feminist Studies Alison Kafer has a chapter in the new anthology Queer Feminist Science Studies: A Reader,edited by Cyd Cipolla, Kristina Gupta, David Rubin, and Angela Willey (University of Washington Press, 2017). Her contribution, “At the Same Time, Out of Time: Ashley X,” is an abridged version of the chapter of the same title in her book Feminist Queer Crip(Indiana UP, 2013). Another version of the chapter was published earlier this year in the latest edition of the Disability Studies Reader, edited by Lennard J. Davis (Routledge, 2017).





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth presided at the pre-conference Steering Committee Meeting and the Business Meeting for the 42nd annual conference of the Coalition of Women in German, held in Banff, Alberta, Canada, Oct. 26–29, 2017. At the conference, Berroth organized the Pedagogy Panel, convening scholars from across the nation to share research and experiences with integrating STEM and German in connected curricula, integrated programs, specialized study abroad offerings, and collaborations with internship providers in Germany. For the coming three years, Women in German will host the conference at Sewanee: The University of the South, our ACS colleagues.





  • Professor of Feminist Studies Alison Kafer led a workshop on “Disability Rights & Justice: Theories, Activisms, and Movements of Relation” as part of the Fulbright Pakistan Fall Enrichment Seminar at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on Nov. 3. Over 100 graduate students from Pakistan attended the Fulbright Seminar, which was focused on “US Social Movements.” While on campus, she also met with graduate and undergraduate students in Women’s and Gender Studies.





  • Professor of Religion Elaine Craddock gave two presentations at the annual Conference on South Asia in Madison, Wisconsin, Oct. 26–28. She presented the paper “Recalibrating Fieldwork” as part of the Queer Pre-Conference: Navigating Normativity from a Non-normative Perspective in Academia and the Field. She also presented the paper “Tamil Transgender Servants of the Goddess” for the panel Purity, Power, and Purpose: Non-elite Goddess Traditions in India and Their Encounters with Modernities.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Communication Studies Lamiyah Bahrainwala published the article “When Terrorists Play Ball” in the journal Communication and Sport. This article examines how the media recuperates sports from terrorism discourse, focusing on Boston Marathon Bomber Tamerlan Tsarnaev, who was also an accomplished boxer.





  • Assistant Professor of History Jessica Hower gave an invited talk on her current book project, Tudor Empire: The Making of Britain and the British Atlantic World, 1485-1603, at Oxford University, Oxford, UK, on Oct. 31, 2017. The lecture was part of “The Long History of Ethnicity & Nationhood Reconsidered Seminar Series,” Michaelmas Term 2017, sponsored by TORCH: The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities, Bing Overseas Studies Program Stanford University, and the University of Birmingham BRIHC: Birmingham Research Institute for History and Cultures.





  • Associate Professor of Communication Studies Valerie Renegar published a new article in Women’s Studies in Communication titled “‘Abusive Furniture:’ Visual Metonymy and the Hungarian Stop Violence Against Women Campaign” about a provocative set of anti-domestic violence images and will be available in the winter issue of the journal.





  • Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin was one of the “leading cultural producers, artists, theorists, and activists” invited to participate by The Center for Creative Ecologies at the University of California at Santa Cruz in their “questionnaire” To the Barricades! Culture and Politics at the Centenary of the October Revolution. His responses can be found here.





  • Professor of Feminist Studies Alison Kafer was invited to speak at Yale University in honor of Donna Haraway’s receiving the Wilbur L. Cross Medal. There were two symposia celebrating Haraway’s work. Kafer spoke in the opening symposium, which centered on “The Cyborg Manifesto.” Her talk “Cyborgs and Other Crip Kin” stems from new work on crip technoscience. A program for the symposia, held Nov. 2–3, is available here.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Music Dana Zenobi presented a lecture recital on the art songs of sister composers Nadia and Lili Boulanger at McLennan Community College in Waco, Texas. She performed along with pianist Jeanne Sasaki on Oct. 26.





  • Assistant Professor of Art History Allison Miller published a review of the book, Beyond the First Emperor’s Mausoleum: New Perspectives on Qin Art, edited by Liu Yang on caa.reviews, a publication of the College Art Association, on Oct. 27.





  • Part-Time Assistant Professor of Theatre Bethany Lynn Corey and Associate Professor of Theatre Desiderio Roybal were recognized with nominations by The B. Iden Payne Awards Council. Bethany Lynn Corey’s original play All Aboard was recognized as an Outstanding Theatre for Youth Production. Desiderio Roybal was recognized for Outstanding Set Design of The Herd produced by Jarrott Productions. The B. Iden Payne Awards Council recognizes outstanding theatrical performance, production and design in Austin.





  • Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers published “Billie Jean Beats Bobby: Watching BATTLE OF THE SEXES in Trumpian Times” in Lilith Magazine’s Blog.





  • Professor of Music Lois Ferrari was invited to conduct a New York State School Music Association (NYSSMA) all-county concert in the Saratoga, NY, area. Ferrari rehearsed and conducted approximately 80 high school musicians over the course of three days, all culminating in a festival concert on Oct. 21.





  • Professor of Art and Art History Thomas Noble Howe gave lectures at the preliminary presentation of the publication of the excavation of the garden of the Great Peristyle of the Villa Arianna (‘Ariadne’) at Stabiae (Quaderni di Studi Pompeiani, VII) at the local Rotary of Castellammare di Stabia and the national convention of the Garden Club of Italy on Oct. 13–14. The lectures were in Italian.





  • Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin presented a paper “What’s Left of the Russian Revolution’s Global Imaginary at 100: China and Cuba in an Era of Resurgent Revolution and (New) Authoritarian Revanchism” at a conference on “The Russian Revolution Centenary: Reflections on the 21st Century” held at the University of Peloponnese, Corinth, Greece.





  • Elyssa Sliheet, Class of 2019,  and Adina Friedman, Class of 2019, presented  “Inventing a Mobile Service” and “How Can Technology Help At-Risk Youth Get Enough Support to Stay in School,” respectively, at Opportunities for Undergraduate Research in Computer Science, a three-day research-focused workshop at Carnegie Mellon University Oct 20–22, 2017.  Associate Professor of Computer Science Barbara Anthony served as the faculty sponsor.  Funding was provided by the Fleming Student Travel Fund, the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science at Southwestern, as well as Carnegie Mellon’s School of Computer Science and Women@SCS.





  • Five seniors presented at the Texas Undergraduate Mathematics Conference (TUMC) on Oct. 21, 2017, held this year in San Antonio.

    • Victoria Gore, class of 2018, presented “Modeling Trends in Austin Traffic.”

    • Bonnie Henderson, class of 2018, presented “The Mathemasticks of Flower Sticks.”

    • Kristen McCrary, class of 2018, presented  “Math and Mancala.”

    • Penny Phan, class of 2018, presented “Singapore:  Model of a Savings Fund.”

    • Sam Vardy, class of 2018, presented “The Price of Health.”

    Each presentation was based on preliminary capstone work in Fall 2017 supervised by Associate Professor of Mathematics Therese Shelton who also attended.  Other students in attendance were Isaac Hopkins, class of 2018, Hannah Freeman and Aiden Steinle, both class of 2020, and Mercedes Gonzalez, class of 2021. Visiting Assistant Professor of Mathematics John Ross also attended the Project NExT events and aided our students. There were 28 talks by students at 14 institutions at the TUMC. Southwestern had the most students giving presentations. Approximately 115 students from 23 institutions attended. Southwestern funding for students was provided by the Fleming Student Travel Fund and the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science. Shelton was funded through the Faculty-Student Project fund at Southwestern. The University of Incarnate Word subsidized the TUMC.





  • Professor of Feminist Studies Alison Kafer was invited to speak at Yale University in honor of Donna Haraway’s receiving the Wilbur L. Cross Medal. There were two symposia celebrating Haraway’s work. Kafer spoke in the opening symposium, which centered on “The Cyborg Manifesto.” Her talk “Cyborgs and Other Crip Kin” stems from new work on crip technoscience. A program for the symposia, held Nov. 2–3, is available here.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Music Dana Zenobi presented a lecture recital on the art songs of sister composers Nadia and Lili Boulanger at McLennan Community College in Waco, Texas. She performed along with pianist Jeanne Sasaki on Oct. 26.





  • Assistant Professor of Art History Allison Miller published a review of the book, Beyond the First Emperor’s Mausoleum: New Perspectives on Qin Art, edited by Liu Yang on caa.reviews, a publication of the College Art Association, on Oct. 27.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Communication Studies Shannon Holland was interviewed and quoted by VICE Media in an article titled “After Timberlake Super Bowl Announcement, Internet Calls for ‘Justice for Janet’.”  In the article, Holland reflects on her published research regarding news coverage of the 2004 Super Bowl halftime controversy,  which she argues depicted Jackson as the primary or sole architect of the infamous “wardrobe malfunction.” She also discusses how the NFL’s  decision to feature Timberlake in the upcoming Super Bowl halftime show further reinforces white male privilege within and beyond the NFL.





  • Part-Time Assistant Professor of Theatre Bethany Lynn Corey and Associate Professor of Theatre Desiderio Roybal were recognized with nominations by The B. Iden Payne Awards Council. Bethany Lynn Corey’s original play All Aboard was recognized as an Outstanding Theatre for Youth Production. Desiderio Roybal was recognized for Outstanding Set Design of The Herd produced by Jarrott Productions. The B. Iden Payne Awards Council recognizes outstanding theatrical performance, production and design in Austin.





  • Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers published “Billie Jean Beats Bobby: Watching BATTLE OF THE SEXES in Trumpian Times” in Lilith Magazine’s Blog.





  • Professor of Music Lois Ferrari was invited to conduct a New York State School Music Association (NYSSMA) all-county concert in the Saratoga, NY, area. Ferrari rehearsed and conducted approximately 80 high school musicians over the course of three days, all culminating in a festival concert on Oct. 21.





  • Professor of Art and Art History Thomas Noble Howe gave lectures at the preliminary presentation of the publication of the excavation of the garden of the Great Peristyle of the Villa Arianna (‘Ariadne’) at Stabiae (Quaderni di Studi Pompeiani, VII) at the local Rotary of Castellammare di Stabia and the national convention of the Garden Club of Italy on Oct. 13–14. The lectures were in Italian.





  • Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin presented a paper “What’s Left of the Russian Revolution’s Global Imaginary at 100: China and Cuba in an Era of Resurgent Revolution and (New) Authoritarian Revanchism” at a conference on “The Russian Revolution Centenary: Reflections on the 21st Century” held at the University of Peloponnese, Corinth, Greece.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Art Ron Geibel was one of 150 artists from across the county asked to participate in an exhibition/fundraiser titled “Build Hope, Not Walls” at Big Medium Gallery in Austin, Texas. Artists were asked to create one brick to contribute to an installation celebrating individuality. All proceeds were donated to the following organizations that support immigrants and refugees: American Gateways, Casa Marianella, Preemptive Love, and Refugee Services of Texas. The exhibition was on view Oct. 13–15, 2017.





  • Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers’ article “Got Jewish Milk?: Screening Epstein and Van Sant for Intersectional Film History” is the lead article in the latest issue of the Journal Jewish Film And New Media. Rob Epstein’s The Times of Harvey Milk (1984) and Gus Van Sant’s Milk (2008), the two major films that narrate the life and tragically dramatic death of gay politician and activist Harvey Milk (1930–1978), are widely recognized as part of the queer cinematic canon but are less often categorized as Jewish films. While Epstein’s film adroitly presents a “Kosher-style” Milk, the Jewishness of Van Sant’s Milk is less certain. However, a well-established pattern of gay and lesbian Jews citing Milk as one of their own—what Meyers terms “Jewqhooing”—enabled a Jewish reception of the movie Milk. Querying and queerying the Jewishness of Milk (the man as well as the movies that purport to represent his life and times) illuminate the complex ways Jewishness continues to be cinematically conveyed or whitewashed as well as the intersections between queer and Jewish film history. This article is part of Meyers’ book-in-progress on Jewish American Cinema.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Physics and Environmental Studies Rebecca Paulsen Edwards served on a panel for a discussion of “What to do in your class before students start using MATLAB” at the 2017 Teaching Computation in the Sciences Using MATLAB workshop in Northfield, Minn., Oct. 15–17.





  • Assistant Professor of Art History Allison Miller was a special guest at the Archaeological Institute of America (AIA)–Orange County’s annual grant fundraiser on Saturday, Oct. 14th, in Santa Ana, Calif. The AIA-OC is one of the few local AIA societies that raises money to support graduate student research in archaeology. Miller’s remarks centered on her current research on the color purple in ancient China. The Executive Director of the AIA, Ann Benbow, was also in attendance at the event. Miller also gave an invited lecture titled “Terracotta Warriors after the First Emperor: Re-evaluating the Qin Legacy in the Han” at the Bowers Museum in Orange County, Calif., on Sunday, Oct. 15. The lecture was delivered as the part of the AIA’s 2017–2018 lecture program and sponsored by the Orange County Society of the AIA.





  • Technical Assistant and Exhibitions Coordinator Seth Daulton was featured on “Spork in the Road,” a podcast that cultivates conversations with creative individuals about their path, craft, and passions. “Spork in the Road” is produced by Rivers Barden Architects in Houston, Texas. To listen to the podcast visit sporkintheroad.net.





  • Assistant Professor of Computer Science Chad Stolper presented a poster “Atomic Operations for Specifying Graph Visualization” at the IEEE VIS 2017 Conference in Phoenix, Ariz. Oct. 3–6. The poster was co-authored with Will Price, class of 2019, and Matt Sanford, class of 2020, along with colleagues at Georgia Tech, and was partly based on Price and Sanford’s SCOPE research this past summer.





  • Associate Professor Kerry Bechtel recently designed the costumes for Junie B. Jones is Not a Crook at Main Street Theater in Houston. In the wake of Hurricane Harvey, this production will be touring to schools in areas hardest hit by the disaster to bring the arts back to their communities. Following this production, Bechtel has designed the costumes for Akeelah and the Bee with Main Street Theater. This production will be performed in downtown Houston at the Midtown Arts & Theater Center (MATCH) facilities. Both of these productions were assisted by current student Worth Payton, class of 2018.





  • Professor of Biology Romi Burks’ research was published in the 2017 e-book version of “Biology and management of invasive apple snails” edited by Ravi Joshi, Robert Cowie, and Leocardio Sebastian. Along with six co-authors working with apple snails, Burks wrote a chapter titled “Identity, reproductive potential, distribution, ecology and management of invasive Pomacea maculata in the southern United States.” Co-authors included Dr. Jennifer Bernatis and manager Jess van Dyke from Florida, Dr. Jacoby Carter from the USGS Wetland Research Facility and Dr. Charles Martin from Louisiana (now in Florida), and from the University of Georgia, Dr. Jeb Byers and Dr. Bill McDowell (most recently at Colby College). Although a long time in production, this chapter will hopefully serve as research for the number of new researchers working on apple snails as this species continues to spread.





  • Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin gave an invited talk “Global Patterns of Publishing Academic Knowledge: It’s Time for the Global South” about the inequalities of global academic knowledge production at the 2017 Asociación Mexicana de Estudios Iternacionales (AMEI) meeting in Huatulco, Oaxaca, Mexico. This talk and a forthcoming panel “Diversifying the Discipline: Problems, Policies, and Prescriptions” and “Mentoring Café: Strategies and Support for Global South Scholars” at the 2018 International Studies Association meetings are related in part to the “decolonial turn” in International Relations (a putative shift is attributed in part to a co-authored book with Southwestern alum Professor Meghana Nayak ’97, Decentering IR), and loosely connected to the efforts of the emergent South-South Educational Scholarly Collaboration and Knowledge Interchange Initiative.





October 2017

  • Director of Teaching, Learning, and Scholarship Julie Sievers presented “Faculty Development and the Whole Professor” with Allison Adams of Emory University and Adrienne Christensen  of Macalester College at the Annual Meeting of the Professional and Organizational Development Network in Montreal, Canada, on Oct. 28. She also served on the conference team as the poster session co-chair.





  • Associate Professor of Theatre Desiderio Roybal has been nominated for a B. Iden Payne Award in Scenic Design. His design for The Herd, a David Jarrott Production, is one of five designs being considered for the best scenic design of 2016–2017 season in the Greater Austin Area. The recipient of this top design award will be announced at the November 3rd, B. Iden Payne Award Ceremony being held at the Scottish Rite Theater, Austin, Texas. His designs for The Herd, The Price, and Clybourne Park received the Austin Critics Table Award for Excellence in Scenic Design in June 2017.





  • Associate Professor of Computer Science Barbara Anthony presented a paper titled “Several Questions which Work for Almost Any Computer Science Exam” at the 26th Annual Rocky Mountain Conference of the Consortium for Computing Sciences in Colleges in Orem, Utah, held Oct. 13–14, 2017. Her paper will be published in the December 2017 issue of the Journal of Computing Sciences in Colleges.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Music Dana Zenobi was competitively selected to present a lecture titled “Financial Mentorship Strategies for Voice Teachers” at the fall meeting of the National Association of Teachers of Singing, South Texas Chapter. Informed by her work directing BELTA (Building Empowering Lives Through Art), a nonprofit that provides free crowdfunding services to artists and musicians, her presentation focused on crowdfunding best practices, fiscal sponsorship for artists and the basics of searching for grants to individuals.





  • Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin was the featured speaker at Project Minnesota/León’s (PML) annual fundraiser on Oct. 14. His remarks were on the topic of contemporary Nicaraguan politics. He also led a seminar on the same topic for some PML’s board members and donors.





  • Technical Assistant and Exhibitions Coordinator Seth Daulton spoke at Baylor University as a visiting artist on Oct. 9. Daulton presented demonstrations in lithography and intaglio printing, shared his work, spoke about the conceptual ideas in his work and process, and discussed his career path as an artist and educator.  





  • Professor of Feminist Studies Alison Kafer gave an invited talk and led a seminar at Purdue University on Oct. 5. Her talk, “Access Rebels: A Crip Manifesto for Social Justice,” was co-sponsored by Purdue’s Critical Disability Studies Program and the Purdue Honors College. Using the frame of “access rebels,” Kafer discussed the possibility of building radical cultures of accessibility and solidarity. She also led a seminar with undergraduate and graduate students on her research about the Ashley X case.





  • Assistant Professor of Art History Allison Miller gave an invited lecture titled “Terracotta Warriors after the First Emperor: Re-evaluating the Qin Legacy in the Han” at University of Colorado Boulder on Oct. 5. The lecture was delivered as the part of the 2017–2018 lecture program of the Archaeological Institute of America (AIA), and co-sponsored by the Boulder chapter of the AIA and the Museum of Natural History at the University of Colorado Boulder.





  • Professor of Biology Romi Burks presented an invited talk at a Symposium within the XCLAMA (Latin American MalacologicalSociety) about the results from five years of investigating apple snails in Uruguay. The presentation, titled “Overlapping and Overlooked: Pomacea species distribution, diversity and hybridization in Uruguay,” included four alumni co-authors (Sofia Campos ’16, Carissa Bishop ’17, Paul Glasheen ’16, and Averi Segrest ’16), five Uruguayan collaborators (Clementina Calvo, Dr. Mariana Meerhoff, Cristhian Clavijo, Ana Elise Röhrdanz, and Fabricio Scarabino) along with United States partner Dr. Ken Hayes of Howard University. This work represents the first evidence presented for hybridization of the snails in the native range, which has broad evolutionary implications. In addition, the work included a description of the broad and complex distribution of a cryptic species, a species containing individuals that are morphologically identical to those in a different species.





  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Alison Marr recently had her proposal “Hidden No More: Stories of Triumph, Excellence, and Achievement in Math and Computer Science” selected for funding as a mini-grant through the “WATCH US” grant from the National Science Foundation INCLUDES program. This mini-grant will bring four women from underrepresented groups with doctorates in mathematics and computer science to campus over the 2017–2018 academic year for a lecture series where each speaker will tell her journey to math (or computer science) and also share the type of research she does.





  • Professor of Music Lois Ferrari led the Austin Civic Orchestra (ACO) into its 41st season with a concert at the Austin ISD Performing Arts Center on Sept. 24. As Music Director of the ACO, Ferrari opened the orchestra’s Made in America season by conducting a program of music by Bernstein, Copland, Ellington, and Stookey. The latter, with text by Lemony Snicket, is a narrated who-dun-it aimed at engaging younger audience members. The ACO also sponsored an instrument petting zoo prior to the concert and offered this performance as a “pay what you wish” event.





  • Professors of Biology Maria Cuevas and Maria Todd presented their research “Expression of claudin-3 and -4 tight junction proteins in endometrial cancer cell lines and tumor tissues derived from African American women” at the 10th American Association of Cancer Research Conference on the Science of Cancer Health Disparities in Racial/Ethnic Minorities and the Medically Underserved in Atlanta, Ga. Sept. 25–28. An abstract was published in the AACR Meeting Proceedings.





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth will give a presentation on Southwestern’s Football + Experience Abroad program at the 2018 Annual Meeting of the Association of American Colleges and Universities’ (AAC&U) held January 24–27, 2018, in Washington, DC. Berroth’s proposal was one of over 450 submitted to present at the conference. AAC&U accepted fewer than 20 percent of those submitted. The proposals selected represent the work of faculty members, administrators, and higher education leaders at colleges, community colleges, universities, and educational organizations across the country.





  • Assistant Professor of Business Hazel Nguyen published an article titled “Stock market liquidity: Financially constrained firms and share repurchase” in the journal Accounting and Finance Research, 2017, vol 6(4).





  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Fumiko Futamura and Robert Lehr ’15 published a paper in Mathematics Magazine’s October 2017 issue titled “A New Perspective on Finding the Viewpoint” (90, no. 4, p. 267-77). The article uses projective geometry to give a new method for determining where a viewer should stand in front of a two-point perspective drawing to view it correctly.





  • Part-Time Instructor of Economics and Business Jim Christianson recently made a presentation to the Waco Scandinavian Club titled “History of the 10,000 Swedish Settlers of Travis and Williamson Counties 1870–1910.”





September 2017

  • Professor of Art Victoria Star Varner’s artwork from her “Crossed Paths” series was selected for the exhibition “Small Format 2017” in Dublin, Ireland. Organized by Black Church Print Studio, the exhibition is being held at Library Project, a “cultural hub at the heart of Temple Bar, multidisciplinary in approach. The space offers visitors an open door to discover local and international contemporary art practices through a collection of publications and a variety of exhibitions and events.” Earlier this year, she exhibited three large drawings in her “Centripetal Forces” series at the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor in “Drawing Perspectives,” an invitational exhibition of five artists curated by Professor Barbara Fontaine White, who described her curatorial intent in the catalogue as follows, “’Drawing Perspectives’ celebrates a variety of approaches to drawing and demonstrates the complexity of content and media utilized today.”  Varner also exhibited five of her engravings at the VAM Gallery in Austin in “Eight from Texas,” curated by Professor Tim High, University of Texas. Lily Press in Washington, D.C., a fine art press, is currently publishing two editions of large prints, created by Varner at the press this summer with Master Printer Susan Goldman, owner and operator.





  • Professor of Art Victoria Star Varner’s artwork from her “Crossed Paths” series was selected for the exhibition “Small Format 2017” in Dublin, Ireland. Organized by Black Church Print Studio, the exhibition is being held at Library Project, a “cultural hub at the heart of Temple Bar, multidisciplinary in approach. The space offers visitors an open door to discover local and international contemporary art practices through a collection of publications and a variety of exhibitions and events.” Earlier this year, she exhibited three large drawings in her “Centripetal Forces” series at the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor in “Drawing Perspectives,” an invitational exhibition of five artists curated by Professor Barbara Fontaine White, who described her curatorial intent in the catalogue as follows, “’Drawing Perspectives’ celebrates a variety of approaches to drawing and demonstrates the complexity of content and media utilized today.”  Varner also exhibited five of her engravings at the VAM Gallery in Austin in “Eight from Texas,” curated by Professor Tim High, University of Texas. Lily Press in Washington, D.C., a fine art press, is currently publishing two editions of large prints, created by Varner at the press this summer with Master Printer Susan Goldman, owner and operator.





  • Assistant Professor of History Jessica Hower presented a paper titled “From ‘Tydder’ to ‘Tudor,’ ‘Stewart’ to ‘Stuart’: Dynasty, Empire, and Identity in the Early Modern Atlantic World” at the “Modern Invention of Dynasty: A Global Intellectual History, 1500–2000” Conference at the University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK, Sept. 21–23, 2017.





  • Assistant Professor of Business Debika Sihi chaired and participated in a panel at the Marketing Management Association Conference in Pittsburgh, Pa., held Sept. 20–22, 2017. The panel focused on methods to  develop innovative and original marketing course materials and design class discussions which garner thoughtful student engagement.





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth accepted a nomination to serve on the American Association of Teachers of German (AATG) Program Committee for the 2018 AATG / American Council on Teaching Foreign Languages (ACTFL) Convention and World Languages Expo in New Orleans, La., Nov. 16–18, 2018. This prestigious nomination came from the president of the AATG who annually selects three AATG members. The committee identifies topics and chairs for a number of planned sessions of special interest to the membership. Committee members also review and select all session proposals with a focus on German. They are instrumental in shaping a future-oriented program representative of important aspects in teaching and learning German. This convention marks an important year of intentional inter-connectedness and will be especially exciting since AATG and ACTFL will be meeting in conjunction with the Fédération Internationale des Professeurs de Langues Vivantes/International Modern Language Teachers’ Federation (FIPLV). Furthermore, AATG has extended an invitation for Berroth to participate in the Internationaler Deutschlehrerinnen- und Deutschlehrerverband in a North America meeting.





  • Professor of Feminist Studies Alison Kafer had a chapter published in the new collection Disability Studies and the Environmental Humanities: Toward an Eco-Crip Theory, edited by Sarah Jaquette Ray and Jay Sibara (University of Nebraska, 2017). Her contribution, “Bodies of Nature: The Environmental Politics of Disability,” is reprinted from her book Feminist Queer Crip (Indiana University, 2013) and is included in the “Foundations” section of the anthology.





  • Assistant Professor of History Jethro Hernandez Berrones published an article titled “Homeopathy ‘for Mexicans’: Medical Popularisation, Commercial Endeavours, and Patients’ Choice in the Mexican Medical Marketplace, 1853–1872” in the journal Medical History, 61, 4.





  • Part-time Instructor of Applied Music Adrienne Inglis’ composition “Pájaros” for solo flute and strings enjoyed its world première performance Sept. 17, 2017, with the composer as soloist with the Balcones Community Orchestra under the direction of Dr. Robert Radmer. Based on bird songs of central Texas, the piece was warmly received with a standing ovation. Inglis also performed the first movement of “Concerto No. 4” by François Devienne. Inversion Ensemble will perform “Pájaros” Saturday, Sept. 30, 2017, at 7 p.m. at Westminster Presbyterian Church Fellowship Hall in Austin, and Sunday, Oct. 1, 2017, at 3 p.m. at First United Methodist Church of Pflugerville.





  • Professor of Music Kiyoshi Tamagawa’s article “Chopsticks, Golliwogs and Wigwams: The Need for Cultural Awareness in Piano Teaching Materials and Repertoire” appeared in the October/November 2017 issue of American Music Teacher, the journal of the Music Teachers National Association. The article explores how piano teaching materials and repertoire still in use today can convey attitudes toward ethnic and cultural groups that do not reflect the progress being made in daily life.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Art Ron Geibel will have an installation in ”Fountain: sculptural musings on the readymade” at St. Edward’s University in Austin. The artists in the exhibit investigate reconfigured, found, mass-produced, or functional objects to elicit sculptures that are familiar yet absurd, compelling yet irreverent, perplexing yet seductive. Opening Reception will be Friday, Sept. 22, from 6–8 p.m. at St. Edward’s  Fine Arts Gallery. The installation will be on view through Oct. 12, 2017.





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth was elected to the American Association of Teachers of German (AATG) Texas leadership team. On a three-year term, she will serve as Vice President, President, and Outgoing President to assure continuity and mentoring. At the Sept. 9, 2017, joint meeting of all three Texas AATG chapters, Berroth delivered a presentation on her research and teaching praxis in Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) with sample lessons from her project of connecting German and Math to an audience of German teachers working at Texas high schools, colleges, and universities.





  • Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin gave a talk on the “Pink Tide” and Latin America’s Political Pendulum at the Bulverde/Spring Branch Public Library as part of the Foreign Policy Association’s Great Decisions discussion program.





  • President Edward Burger was invited to lead the plenary session, “The State of Higher Education in Texas,” at the Annual Meeting of the Independent Colleges and Universities of Texas held in Austin on Sept. 11, 2017, in which he discussed educational issues with Lee Jackson, Chancellor of The University of North Texas System, and Bill Powers, President Emeritus of The University of Texas at Austin.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Education Suzanne García-Mateus co-authored  an article titled “Translanguaging Pedagogies for Positive Identities in Two-Way Dual Language Bilingual Education” in the Journal of Language, Identity & Education. This is a timely article considering the rise of two-way dual language programs in the local area(s).





  • Associate Professor of History Melissa Byrnes writes for the blog Lawyers, Guns & Money. The blog was recently named one of the top 100 political science blogs on the web. Read her recent pieces here.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Art Ron Geibel was invited to participate in “In-Cahoots: Mischievously Playful Craft” at Signature Gallery in Atlanta, Ga. The exhibition features artists who push the boundary of craft, technique, and concept. The gallery is on view Sept. 16–Oct. 7.





  • Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin participated in a panel titled “What Have We Learned About Revolutions?” at the 2017 meeting of the American Political Science Association. His remarks were under the rubric “Revolution in the Age of Authoritarian Revanchism.”





  • Deidra McCall, Class of 2017, participated in the Honors Program and presented a research paper titled “Racialized Politics and the Confederate Flag: Why Society Can Never Be Color-Blind” at the August 2017 American Sociological Association (ASA) annual meeting in Montreal, Canada. Her participation was funded through her award as Southwestern’s first Mellon Undergraduate Fellow. At this same conference, Professor of Sociology Maria Lowe and Associate Professor of Sociology Reggie Byron presented a paper titled “Neutralizing Harm: Sexist and Racist Jokes among Undergraduate Students.” Holly O’Hara, Class of 2017, and Dakota Cortez, Class of 2019, are co-authors on the paper. This paper is part of a larger project supported by SU’s Faculty-Student Collaborative research funds. Byron also served his final year on the ASA Honors Program Advisory Council.





  • Assistant Professor of Art History Allison Miller presented a paper at The Second Conference of the European Association for Asian Art and Archaeology, held at the University of Zurich, Switzerland, from Aug. 24–27. The paper, titled “The Status of the Mural in Early Han Art: Reflections from the Shiyuan Tomb,” was presented on a panel that she organized and chaired titled “Mural Painting in Han China: Re-Examining the Origins and Development of the Genre.”





  • Technical Assistant and Exhibitions Coordinator Seth Daulton exhibited new mixed media works and a limited edition book at the Nicole Longnecker Gallery in Houston, TX. The work was part of a three-person exhibition on view from July 8–Sept. 4, 2017.





  • Assistant Professor of German Michelle Reyes and Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth’s proposal submitted for programming in MLL German has been selected to receive a Deutsch macht Spaß Grant in the amount of $500. The American Association of Teachers of German (AATG) is offering these grants through funds provided by the German government’s Netzwerk Deutsch program. The grant will support a community outreach program in October.





August 2017

  • Professor of Chemistry & Biochemistry Maha Zewail-Foote published the article “Alternative DNA structure formation in the mutagenic human c-MYC promoter” in the highly ranked journal Nucleic Acids Research. This research is significant because it implicates the involvement of a three-stranded DNA structure in genome instability associated with the human c-MYC oncogene region and cancer. Chemistry alumni Sarah Coe ’17 and Olivia Drummond ’17 were involved in this research project.





  • Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers published “The Disappearing Jew” in Inside Higher Education.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Art Ron Geibel had work selected for the fourth annual Juried National exhibition at Red Lodge Clay Center in Red Lodge, Mont. The exhibition highlights the diverse scope of ideas and techniques artists are exploring in contemporary ceramics.  The exhibition will be on view to the public September 1–22, 2017.





  • Associate Professor of Communication Studies Bob Bednar was quoted in a recent article in VICE Motherboard exploring the cultural influence of the iPhone on the tenth anniversary of its release. The June 27, 2017 article, by Caroline Haskins, is titled “The iPhone Has Objectified Our Faces.”





  • Professor of Theatre Kathleen Juhl and Cathy Madden’s co-edited book, Galvanizing Performance: The Alexander Technique as a Catalyst for Excellence, was published on August 21, 2017. The Alexander Technique is practiced widely by performing artists. It encourages artists to make the choice to perform with ease and confidence. This book is the first of its kind because it focuses specifically on the ways performing artists and their teachers engage the Alexander Technique as they rehearse and perform. The book represents the first time Alexander Technique teachers have formally opened the doors to their teaching studios and classrooms to reveal specific pedagogies for working with the technique and performance.





  • Senior Director of Advancement Services and Operations Leigh Petersen chaired the APRA (Association of Professional Researchers for Advancement) Data Analytics Symposium in Anaheim, Calif. in August. Close to 150 universities and nonprofits joined together for two days for intensive data analytic presentations and internationally known speakers.





  • Assistant Professor of Business Debika Sihi co-authored the article “Effects of Offline Ad Content on Online Brand Search: Insights from Super Bowl Advertising,” which is forthcoming in the Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Education Suzanne García-Mateus published an article titled “Translanguaging Pedagogies for Positive Identities in Two-Way Dual Language Bilingual Education” in the Journal of Language, Identity & Education. The article is coauthored with Deborah Palmer, a professor at the University of Colorado, Boulder.





  • Assistant Professor of History Jethro Hernandez Berrones co-organized the symposium “(Un)Bounded Doctors: Nation, Profession, and Place in the Local and Global Formation of Medical Groups in the 19th and 20th Centuries” together with Dr. Beatriz Teixeira Weber from Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Brazil, for the International Congress of the History of Science and Technology in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, July 23–29, 2017. The symposium brought together scholars from McGill University (Canada), University of Western Ontario (Canada), Universidade Federal de Santa Maria (Brazil), Casa de Oswaldo Cruz/Fiocruz (Brazil), Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (Mexico), Brown University (USA), and Southwestern University (USA) to discuss the demography of doctors as a result of state-building processes, migration, professional organization, and the provision of health. In this panel, Hernandez Berrones presented the paper “From Foreign Healers to International Doctors: Internationalism and the Consolidation of Homeopathy in Mexico, 1853–1942.” The ideas for this paper resulted from conversations with Latin American & Border Studies committee members about the inclusion of Borderland Studies in the Latin American Studies Program and with students and faculty during the First Borderlands Symposium in the fall of 2016.





  • Head Football Coach Joe Austin’s solicited article “Rev-Up Your ‘Jet’ Motion Offense with Explosive Play-Action Passes” was published by American Football Monthly on Aug. 15, 2017.





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth is a member of the Collaborative Work Group/Board of Authors on an innovative German project. With leadership from Macalester College German Studies professor Britt Abel, a Digital Humanities Advancement Grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) will help the group create digital open-educational resources for teaching and learning German language and culture. Dr. Faye Stewart, a former Brown Junior Visiting Assistant Professor of German at Southwestern, is also a member of the team.





  • President Edward Burger was recently elected to serve on the Governing Board of the Aspen Institute Wye Seminars in collaboration with the Association of American Colleges and Universities.





  • Professor of Biology Romi Burks attended the Ecological Society of America meetings in Portland, Ore., with three of her research students, Carissa Bishop ’17, Madison Granier, class of 2019, and Sophia Campos ’16, Aug. 6–11. All three presented their own research posters at this national meeting attended by over 4,000 ecologists. Bishop shared her experience mentoring her peers in an Invertebrate Ecology lab taught by Burks. Her poster “Turning an RA into a TA: Case study in utilizing undergraduate research expertise to improve a molecular ecology course undergraduate research experience” evaluated a module made possible by funds from the Keck Foundation. Granier presented her poster titled “Snail Slime in Real Time: qPCR Detection of Environmental DNA from Apple Snails”  which includes a collaboration with SU alumni Dr. Matthew Barnes ’06. This project extends her SCOPE research from the summer of 2016. Campos added the final samples to her analysis and presented a poster titled “Cryptic Yet Curiously Common: Population genetic structure and diversity of a cryptic Pomacea sp. and its better known congeneric P. canaliculata.”  Co-authors include Dr. Ken Hayes from Howard University and Cristhian M. Blavijo and Fabrizio Scarabino from Uruguay.





  • Professor of Art and Art History and chair of Art History Thomas Noble Howe published Excavation and Study of the Garden of the Great Peristyle of the Villa Arianna, Stabiae, 2007-2010 (Quaderni  di Studi Pompeiani, VII, [Associazione Internazionale di Amici di Pompei/Editrice Longobardi, Castellammare di Pompei/Fondazione Restoring Ancient Stabiae, 2016 (2017)]. Howe is lead author/editor and excavation director of the project, 2007–13 and along with Kathryn Gleason (Cornell), Michele Palmer, and Ian Sutherland (Middlebury). The publication is supported by subventions from the von Bothmer Fund of the Archaeological Institute of America, Associazione Internationale Amici di Pompei, School of Architecture Preservation and Planning, University of Maryland, Joyce and Erik Young. The major significance of this excavation of this enormous excellently preserved garden (c. 108 x 35 m.) is that it is the first actual archaeological evidence of the existence of the type of garden seen in the famous garden fresco of the Villa of the empress Livia at Prima Porta, formerly thought to be a “fantasy” painting. Howe and Gleason have since developed and published further theses on how this discovery clarifies exactly how elite inhabitants and guests used this garden and ambient architecture to move through spaces and interact in an intensely political environment. At one point Howe lead field seasons of as many as 110 people from twelve institutions and seven countries.





  • Assistant Professor of Computer Science Chad Stolper co-authored the article “Vispubdata.org: A Metadata Collection About IEEE Visualization (VIS) Publications” which has been published in the September 2017 issue of IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics (IEEE TVCG).





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Political Science Emily Sydnor published an article titled “Easing Political Digestion: The effects of news curation on citizens’ behavior” in the Journal of Information Technology and Politics. The article is coauthored with Danielle Psimas, a 2015 graduate of the University of Virginia’s Politics Honors Program.





  • Associate Professor of Computer Science Barbara Anthony and Kathryn Reagan ’16 coauthored an article on “Community-Engaged Projects in Operations Research” in the Summer 2017 issue of Science Education and Civic Engagement: An International Journal. The research for this article was conducted during the Spring 2015 Operations Research course, with support from Director of Community-Engaged Learning Sarah Brackmann. Reagan was a Community-Engaged Learning Teaching Assistant and Anthony was a participant in the CEL Faculty Fellows program.





  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Fumiko Futamura presented a talk, “Fractals in Japanese Woodblock Prints,” as part of the Academic and Cultural Lecture Series of the Japan-America Society of Greater Austin in July 2017. This public lecture was presented at St. Edward’s University.





  • Four of our mathematics faculty, two students, and an alumnus were active at MathFest, a national meeting of the Mathematical Association of America (MAA) held July 26–29, 2017 in Chicago, Ill.

    • Associate Professor of Mathematics Fumiko Futamura co-presented the minicourse “Visualizing Projective Geometry Through Photographs and Perspective Drawings” with Annalisa Crannell of Franklin & Marshall College and Marc Frantz of Indiana University.

    • Visiting Assistant Professor John Ross presented “Lessons Learned Creating IBL Course Notes” at the MathFest Contributed Paper Session “Inquiry-Based Teaching and Learning.”

    • Associate Professor of Mathematics Therese Shelton co-organized and presented the workshop “Examples and Experiences in Teaching a Modeling-Based Differential Equations Course” with Rosemary Farley of Manhattan College, Patrice Tiffany of Manhattan College, and Brian Winkel of SIMIODE.

    • Beulah Agyemang-Barimah ’17 and Shelton co-presented “Pharmacokinetic Models for Active Learning” with Theresa Laurent of St. Louis College of Pharmacy.  This was part of the Contributed Paper Session “A Modeling First Approach in a Tradition Differential Equations Class.” Shelton’s work was supported by the Keck Foundation Grant at Southwestern.

    • Daniela Beckelhymer and D’Andre Adams, both class of 2020, presented “Choose Your Own Adventure: An Analysis of Interactive Gamebooks Using Graph Theory” in the MAA Student Paper Session based on work from the 2017 SCOPE work supervised by Associate Professor of Mathematics Alison Marr.  Their travel was supported by the SCOPE and S-STEM programs at Southwestern.

    • Ross and Marr served as judges for some of the MAA Student Paper Sessions.





  • Professor of Music Kiyoshi Tamagawa was a featured artist and one of three guest presenters at the Oregon Music Teachers’ Association annual conference in Lincoln City, Ore, July 14–16, 2017. He presented two sessions, “Basics of Contrapuntal Playing on the Keyboard” and “Echoes from the East: Debussy and the Javanese Gamelan,” taught a master class on the keyboard music of J.S. Bach, and performed a solo recital of music by Bach, Debussy and Schumann.





  • Associate Professor of Computer Science Barbara Anthony was an invited participant at the Google Cloud Platform Faculty Institute held at Google’s Mountain View, Calif., campus in July–Aug. 2017. The institute brought together approximately 60 faculty and numerous Googlers to consider how cloud technologies can be more effectively incorporated into the classroom.





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth was invited to present the concluding paper in a three-session section on integrating STEM and German at the XVI. International Conference of Teachers of German, IDT, in Fribourg, Switzerland from July 31–Aug. 4, 2017. IDT meets every fourth year and is the world’s largest international convention for teachers of German. Berroth shared her research in Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) resulting from her ACS funded interdisciplinary project on connecting Math and German, on which she collaborated with Assistant Professor of Computer Science Jacob Schrum. Berroth’s participation was funded by a scholarship from the Goethe Institute in Washington, DC.





  • Associate Professor of English Michael Saenger presented a paper at a seminar on the topic of strangers and immigration in Shakespeare and the modern world at the conference of ESRA (European Shakespeare Research Association) in Gdansk, Poland. In addition, at the same conference, he led a workshop titled “Shakespeare Between Languages.” In this workshop, a variety of European Shakespeare scholars translated a section of English poetry into French, Polish, Italian, Spanish and Chinese. Saenger led a discussion of the practical and theoretical challenges and opportunities of these varied encounters with language difference.





  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Alison Marr co-organized the mini-conference “Constructing the Future of Inquiry-Based Learning (IBL) Conference: The Past 20 Years and the Next 20 Years” on July 27, 2017 in Chicago, Ill.  Visiting Assistant Professor John Ross presented the poster “Using IBL in Classes with Fewer or Shorter Meetings” at the IBL conference.  Associate Professor of Mathematics Therese Shelton also participated in the IBL conference.





  • Professor of Religion Laura Hobgood published a chapter titled “Animals” in The Routledge Companion to Death and Dying, ed. Christopher Moreman. Routledge, 2017.





  • Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers published “The Misogyny of MENASHE” in Lilith Magazine Blog.





  • Professor of Mathematics Kendall Richards coauthored (with Horst Alzer) the article “Inequalities for the Ratio of Complete Elliptic Integrals,” which was recently published in the Proceedings of the American Mathematical Society.





  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Alison Marr was among 10 faculty from across the country selected to attend the Workshop on Increasing Minority Participation in Undergraduate Mathematics at the Park City Math Institute in June 2017.  The workshop was led by Dr. Bill Velez from University of Arizona and Dr. Erica Walker from Teachers College, Columbia University.





  • Assistant Professor of Economics Patrick Van Horn presented his research titled “The Federal Reserve as a Start-Up: New Evidence from the Daily Discount Ledger from 1914–1917” at the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas on July 11, 2017. His paper was coauthored by Christoffer Koch.





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth was invited to observe and participate in sessions of the intensive summer language programs in Arabic at Al Akhawayn University in Ifrane, Morocco in July 2017. The guest visit, pedagogy observation, and intensive study was made possible by a Sam Taylor Fellowship awarded by the United Methodist Church.





July 2017

  • Associate Professor of Anthropology Brenda Sendejo was invited to present as a part of a panel at the 2017 American Library Association Annual Meeting in Chicago, Ill. This panel, titled “Giving Voice to Diverse Collections Through Digitization,” included other professionals from Amherst College, Washington University, the University of Minnesota, and Washington State University. The panel focused on ways that digitization of material in archives and special collections can help to give voice to underrepresented groups in the historical narrative. Sendejo presented on the Latina History Project, a collaborative project between Sendejo, Professor of Feminist Studies Alison Kafer, and Southwestern’s Special Collections. Over 100 librarians and archivists were in attendance. The panel was organized and planned by Director of Special Collections & Archives Jason W. Dean.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of History Joseph Hower presented a paper titled “’Every Candidate…Is Running Against Our Union’: AFSCME’s Response to Tax Cut Fever in the Late 1970s” at the annual meeting of the Labor and Working Class History Association at the University of Washington in Seattle.





  • Part-time Assistant Professor of Applied Music Li Kuang was invited to hold a four-day guest artist residency at both Yantai University’s College of Fine Arts and Jilin College of Fine Arts in China May 30–June 10, 2017. During the time of these residencies, Kuang taught masterclasses, gave private lessons, conducted clinics and presented solo recitals at both schools. In addition, Kuang was invited to teach a masterclass at Sichuan Conservatory of Music in Chengdu, China, on May 23. His residencies received great success and his trip to China helped create connections between Chinese music schools and Southwestern University. Kuang has already received several additional invitations from major conservatories for guest artist residencies and has set engagements with some of them for the summer of 2018.





  • Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers published “Flying While Female on El Al” on Lilith’s Magazine blog.


    Meyers also published “‘Are You or Have You Ever Been a Zionist?’  A Letter to Chicago Dyke March” in The Forward.  





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Art Ron Geibel had work selected for an exhibition titled “Small Works” at Trestle Gallery in Brooklyn, New York. The exhibition was juried by Bill Carroll, Director of the Studio Program of the Elizabeth Foundation for the Arts in New York City. Small Works features over 60 local, national, and international artists in all different areas of contemporary art who focus on the significance of intimately scaled works of art.  The exhibition will be on view to the public July 6–27, 2017.





  • Professor of Art Mary Visser presented a paper titled “Think, Connect and Create” at the 2017 annual meetings of the AEFA/Service of Art and Education in Paris, France. This paper presents how liberal arts universities use 3D printing as an educational tool that helps students make connections across disciplines.





  • Assistant Professor of Art History Allison Miller published a review of the book Color in Ancient and Medieval East Asia (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2015) in volume 137, issue 1 of the Journal of the American Oriental Society.





  • Associate Professor of Sociology Reggie Byron presented a paper titled “Employment Discrimination Activism and Intergenerational Change” at the CERES Conference at the University of Edinburgh on June 16, 2017. This paper compares race-based employment discrimination claims across the U.S. and U.K.





June 2017

  • Associate Professor of English Michael Saenger published a review of The City Theater’s production of Taming of the Shrew in Austin.





  • Professor of English David Gaines was interviewed by BuzzFeed and quoted in the article “People Think Bob Dylan Plagiarized His Nobel Lecture From SparkNotes” on June 15. Gaines joined the conversation regarding Bob Dylan’s alleged use of Spark Notes in his discussion of Moby-Dick.





  • Professor of Music and Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts Michael Cooper published a chapter titled “Faust’s Schubert: Schubert’s _Faust_” in Goethe’s “Faust” in Music: Music in Goethe’s “Faust,” ed. Lorraine Byrne Bodley (New York: Boydell, 2017). The first study to discuss the complete corpus of Schubert’s settings from Faust as a group in their dramatic and historical context, the chapter argues that Schubert, treating Part I of Goethe’s tragedy just four years after its publication in Vienna, was the first composer not only to appreciate the significance of Goethe’s recasting the traditional Faust narrative as a wager rather than a pact (and hence a venture in which humanity could outsmart or otherwise overcome the cosmic forces of Good and Evil that operate in the foreground of the drama), but also to understand that the true driving force of the drama is not Faust himself, but Gretchen. In so doing Schubert musically iterated “the woman question” that was gaining increasing prominence in late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century European cultural spheres, grappled astutely with a theme of Goethe’s drama even as much of the literary world was viewing it with incomprehension or outright hostility, and pioneered interpretive trends that have since assumed almost dogmatic status.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Art Ron Geibel had two sculptures selected for an exhibition titled “Sweet ‘n Low: An International show of Cute” at Bedford Gallery in Walnut Creek, Calif.  The exhibition was juried by Evan Pricco, editor of Juxtapoz Magazine, and Susannah Kelly and Neil Perry of Antler Gallery in Portland, Ore. Sweet ‘n Low features artwork from over 130 local, national, and international artists who extend the genre of cute from cuddly and precious to creepy and ironic. The exhibition will be on view June 22–Aug. 27, 2017.





  • Part-time Instructor of Applied Music Adrienne Inglis’ composition “Letters to Faith” made its world premiere June 3 at Austin’s new choral collective Inversion Ensemble. The eight-voice a cappella choral work sets to music two letters written by Inglis’ grandparents to their daughter, Faith Inglis, while she was a student at Pomona College. Faith’s parents wrote these letters to comfort and encourage her after a poor showing on an exam, but unwittingly revealed amusing and poignant family characteristics.





  • Associate Professor of Anthropology Brenda Sendejo presented “The Face of God Has Changed: Mujerista Ethnography and the Politics of Spirituality in the Borderlands” at the Inter University Program for Latino Research (IUPLR) conference in San Antonio on May 18. She was invited to present on a panel titled “Cultural Anthropology in the U.S.-Mexican Borderlands: A Texas Perspective.” Sendejo spoke on her current book project and a forthcoming publication on the emergence of Chicana feminist thought in Texas, which she connected to Southwestern’s Latina History Project.





  • Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers published “Serious Missteps in Dirty Dancing Remake” in Lilith Magazine’s blog.





  • Associate Professor of Theatre Desiderio Roybal’s scenic design for the play, The Herd, has been added to the short list of plays under consideration for B. Iden Payne award nominations for 2016–2017. Roybal also received the Austin Critics Table Award for Excellence in Scenic Design for the 2016–2017 theatre season for his designs for  Clybourne Park, The Price, and The Herd. All three plays were credited for design excellence. The Herd and The Price were designed for David Jarrott Productions. Clybourne Park was designed for Penfold Theatre. These plays were selected for the award from all the plays produced in Austin and the Greater Austin Area for 2016–2017. The adjudicators were critics writing for both print and online publications including the Austin-American Statesman, Austin Chronicle, CTX Live, BroadwayWorld Austin, Austin Entertainment Weekly, ConflictofInterest.com, and Arts and Culture Texas. Clybourne Park also received the Austin Critics Table Award for Excellence in Collaborative Ensemble Production. Roybal was scenic designer, Justin Smith ’04 was technical director, and Austin Mueck ’18 was assistant scenic designer.





  • Professor of Music Lois Ferrari performed (conducted) three concert programs with the Austin Civic Orchestra (ACO) over the past four months. The March 25 concert, “Texas Rising Stars,” featured concerto winners from the Butler School of Music at the University of Texas-Austin in addition to William Grant Still’s Afro-American Symphony. On May 13, the ACO hosted the Texas Guitar Quartet in a performance of Rodrigo’s Concierto Andaluz for Four Guitars. Also on the program was Tchaikovsky’s 4th Symphony. June 9–10 marked the 40th annual Zilker Park pops concerts. This year featured music by the Beatles and an eclectic array of music chosen by ACO audiences throughout the 2016–17 season.