Academics

Notable Faculty & Student Achievements

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June 2020

  • Conner Joyce ’19  had his paper, “A Path-Dependent Explanation of Divergent Nuclear Trajectories,” accepted for publication in the Pi Sigma Alpha Undergraduate Journal of Politics. The paper is based on Joyce’s honors thesis in political science in 2019. It examines why some countries attempt to acquire nuclear weapons and others do not. Joyce is currently in a master’s program at the LBJ School at the University of Texas. 





  • Technical Assistant and Exhibitions Coordinator Seth Daulton  is currently exhibiting seven mixed-media monoprints in the lobby of Georgetown City Hall. The exhibition, titled Seth Daulton: Sites (Revisited) , features some of Daulton’s works from his Site  series and follows his successful exhibit last fall at Houston’s Dillon Kyle Architects. The exhibition at City Hall is on view June 1–July 31, with a closing reception to be announced. Georgetown City Hall is currently open to the public Monday–Friday 8:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.; however, please wear a mask and practice social distancing while in the space. More information and images of the exhibition can be found below:





  • Professor of Philosophy Michael Bray’s article “The Virus Infects Politics: Six Theses on Social Reproduction, Biopolitical Economies, and the Legitimacy of States,” appeared online in two parts in the new journal Spectre. Read it here: Part 1, Part 2.





  • Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin helped organize and served as a “mentor” for the International Studies Association’s (ISA’s) Second Emerging Global South Scholar Workshop. The workshop brought together 20 Global South scholars from Argentina, Brazil, China, Colombia, India, Jamaica, Kazakhstan, Lebanon, Mexico, Nigeria, Pakistan, Portugal, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Uganda, and the U.S. (selected from more than 250 applicants) with seven “mentors” from Egypt, India, Mexico, South Africa, the U.S, and the U.K. During the workshop, Selbin specifically cochaired a session on publishing strategies for peer-reviewed journals. Originally scheduled for Ifrane, Morocco, the workshop was funded by the ISA’s Committee on the Status of Engagement with the Global South, who, along with the Global South Caucus of the ISA, sponsored the event.





  • Associate Professor of English Michael Saenger  published a blog post for the Times of Israel  titled “Why Black Lives Matter for Jews.” Read it here .





  • Professor of Political Science Shannon Mariotti  worked with several friends to organize a Racial Justice March in solidarity and partnership with Black Lives Matter in the community of Alamo Heights. The march took place Saturday, June 6, and more than 500 people turned out to protest against White Silence and support Black Lives Matter. One goal was to begin a community conversation about white privilege as it relates to racial injustice and police violence. Media outlets covered the march and interviewed Mariotti; you can read the Texas Public Radio article here , as well as an article by the San Antonio Express News  here .





  • Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts and Professor of Music Michael Cooper  published a chapter titled “‘Inner Necessity’: Fabulation, Frame, and Musical Memory in Mendelssohn’s Lobgesang ” in Rethinking Mendelssohn  (ed. Benedict Taylor; Oxford University Press, 2020, pp. 60–90). The chapter complements Cooper’s recently published source-critical edition of the Lobgesang , proposing that the composition is not a thinly veiled knock-off of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony , as is generally argued, but rather an audacious experiment in the construction of a frame narrative in choral–orchestral music. Cooper’s prose is admittedly stultifying, but the diagrams and music examples in this chapter are enough to impress music dweebs on an intergalactic scale.





  • Part-Time Instructor of Communication Studies Katie Bradford has completed a Ph.D. in Communication Studies at The University of Texas at Austin. Her dissertation, “Moving between the Conversation ‘at Hand’ and the ‘Handheld’ Conversation: Participation in Family Dinners with Smartphones,” investigates how people incorporate technology into their face-to-face interactions. Her research responds to contemporary concerns about smartphones and their impact on communication—and is novel because it is based on an analysis of video-recorded natural conversational data, not just surveys or observations.





  • Assistant Professor of Communication Studies Lamiyah Bahrainwala (LB)  published the article “Precarity, Citizenship, and the ‘Traditional’ Student” in the journal Communication Education  some time this spring, when she had already stopped using a calendar. She is grateful to the Southwestern students who educated her about what their precarities look like. If you feel at all inclined to read it, LB suggests waiting until you are in a good place emotionally.





  • Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers published “Surviving the Pandemic: Suggestions for Liberal-Arts Colleges” in Inside Higher Ed.





  • Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts and Professor of Music Michael Cooper  published twelve source-critical world-premiere editions of compositions by Florence B. Price (1887–1953), the first African-American woman to have her music performed by a major U.S. orchestra and the subject of the most powerful and sustained musical revival since the mid-20th-century rediscovery of Gustav Mahler. The works are the song “Don’t You Tell Me No,” which Price composed for use on the so-called Stroll in Chicago’s Black Belt in the 1930s; the spiritual “Nobody Knows the Trouble I’ve Seen” arranged for solo piano; the three-movement programmatic suites Snapshots  and Village Scenes  and the five-movement Preludes  for solo piano; and “Impromptu No. 1,” “Song without Words in G Major,” “Tarantella,” “To a Brown Leaf,” “To a Certain Pair of Newlyweds,” “Until We Meet,” and “Waltzing on a Sunbeam.” All were published by G. Schirmer/AMP (New York), the largest publisher of sheet music globally.





May 2020

  • Emeritus Professor of Economics Emily Northrop’s op-ed about climate change and COVID-19 was featured in AL.com. It can be read here.





  • Assistant Professor of History Jethro Hernández Berrones presented virtually the paper titled ”Birthing the Children of the Revolution: Professional Midwifery in Mexico City during the 1920s and ’30s” at the Latin American Studies Association on May 14, 2020. In this paper, Hernández Berrones argues that the Escuela Libre de Obstetricia y Enfermeria was a gendered space where different medical knowledges, obstetrical practices, and political positions coincided, offering midwifery students a poorly defined and consequently open space for challenging the growing presence of male doctors in the intimacy and domesticity of women´s reproductive lives.





  • Assistant Professor of Political Science Emily Sydnor talked about her recent book, Disrespectful Democracy: The Psychology of Political Incivility, the concerns raised by calls for civility, and who the most conflict-avoidant president might have been on the podcast Politics in Question. The episode is available here.





  • Professor of Political Science Shannon Mariotti coorganized the second annual interdisciplinary Politics of the Mindful Revolution miniconference as part of the Western Political Science Association conference. She helped organize three author-meets-critics roundtables. One panel features law professor and mindfulness teacher Rhonda Magee speaking with commentators about her book The Inner Work of Racial Justice. Another panel features religious studies professor Ann Gleig speaking with commentators about her book American Dharma: Buddhism beyond Modernity. A third panel features the sociologist, yoga teacher, and poet Becky Thompson speaking with commentators about her book Teaching with Tenderness: Toward an Embodied Practice. Our panels are all open to the public and will take place on Zoom throughout the day on Thursday, May 21. You can find the full program here .





  • Professor of Music Kiyoshi Tamagawa ’s review of the audio recording Gabriel Dupont: The Complete Piano Music  by pianist Bo Ties (MSR Classics) was published in the College Music Symposium  (vol. 60, no. 1; online edition May 1, 2020), the official journal of the College Music Society.





  • Meili Criezis ’17 published the peer-reviewed article “Online Deceptions: Renegotiating Gender Boundaries on ISIS Telegram” in the University of Leiden’s online journal Perspectives on Terrorism in February. She has since taken a new position as a program associate with the Polarization and Extremism Research Lab at American University. 





  • Associate Professor of Music Jason Hoogerhyde  has published a review of pianist Matthew Odell’s recording Connections: The Music of Olivier Messiaen and his Students  (Albany Records, 2019) in the scholarly journal and affiliated digital resource repository College Music Symposium  (spring 2020, vol. 60, no. 1).





  • Professor Emeritus of English David Gaines  reviewed Baron Wormser’s novel Songs from a Voice: Being the Recollections, Stanzas, and Observations of Abe Runyan, Songwriter and Performer  (Woodhall Press, 2020) for The Midwest Review . You can read the review here .





  • Professor of Philosophy Phil Hopkins was selected to serve as an outside consultant on the training audit review panel as part of the Austin Police Department (APD) evaluation mandated by recent Austin City Council Resolution 66, which set up an investigation into bias and bigotry within the APD. 





  • Associate Professor of Spanish Carlos de Oro  published an article titled “Traveling Narratives, Neorealism, and Marginalization: Ciro Guerra’s Cinema of Denunciation and Resistance” in the peer-reviewed journal Latin American Perspectives . He also presented a paper about the same topic at the 2020 Southeastern Council of Latin American Studies conference in Austin, TX.





  • Associate Professor of Computer Science Barbara Anthon coauthored a paper with Christine Chung from Connecticut College that will appear in a June 2020 volume of Theoretical Computer Science . The article, “ Equilibria in Doodle Polls under Three Tie-Breaking Rules ,” considers price of anarchy and price of stability in approval voting scenarios such as Doodle polls.





  • Professor of Political Science and Dean of the Faculty Alisa Gaunder’s article “Conservative Women in Germany and Japan: Chancellors versus Madonnas,” coauthored with Sarah Wiliarty, appears in hard copy in the latest issue of Politics and Gender (vol. 16, pp. 99-122).





  • Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin has been appointed by International Studies Association (ISA) President Helen V. Milner and approved by the ISA Governing Council as one of the nine members of the ISA Publications Committee. The committee is responsible for overseeing the eight journals the association publishes. As a member of the Feminist Theory & Gender Studies, Global Development Studies, and Theory Sections and the Global South and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, & Allies Caucuses, as well as being affiliated with the Women’s Caucus, Selbin intends to work to further the groups’ respective agendas as well as to be a voice for small liberal-arts college faculty in the publication process.





April 2020

  • Professor of Chemistry Emily Niemeyer, Jiyoun Ahn ’17, and Andie Alford ’17 published an article titled “Variation in Phenolic Profiles and Antioxidant Properties among Medicinal and Culinary Herbs of the LamiaceaeFamily” in the most recent issue of the Journal of Food Measurement and Characterization. Ahn and Alford grew 23 common and less-well-known Lamiaceaeplants during the SCOPE summer research program and then analyzed them for their chemistry capstone research. Niemeyer completed the project by conducting mass spectral analysis of the herbs during her spring 2019 sabbatical in collaboration with colleagues at the University of Texas at Austin. The research was supported by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI), the Robert A. Welch Foundation, and the Herbert and Kate Dishman endowment.





  • Double major in German and physics Claire Harding ’20 earned a prestigious Fulbright Award. The nationally competitive Fulbright English Teaching Assistantship will take Harding to Germany, where she will integrate hands-on science learning with lessons in American cultures and the English language. The Fulbright English Teaching Assistant (ETA) Program places recent college graduates and young professionals as English teaching assistants in secondary schools or universities overseas, improving foreign students’ English language abilities and knowledge of the U.S. while increasing the U.S. student’s own language proficiency and knowledge of the host country. ETAs also pursue individual study/research plans in addition to their teaching responsibilities. Harding’s teacher and mentor, Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth, deeply appreciates Harding’s contributions to the German program as a tutor and member of the leadership team of the German Club.





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth accepted an invitation issued by Priscilla Layne, president of the American Association of Teachers of German (AATG), to speak at the AATG-sponsored roundtable at the 2021 Modern Language Association conference in Toronto, Canada. The conference theme is Persistence. The roundtable addresses networking strategies in small programs. The panelists on this roundtable come from a variety of institutions, from large public state schools to small liberal-arts colleges. Berroth looks forward to representing small language programs at Southwestern University on this panel.





  • Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts and Professor of Music Michael Cooper published five source-critical world-premiere editions of compositions by Florence B. Price (1887–1953), the first African-American woman to have her music performed by a major U.S. orchestra and the subject of the most powerful and sustained musical revival since the mid-20th century’s rediscovery of Gustav Mahler. Published by G. Schirmer / AMP (New York), the largest publisher of sheet music globally, the works are “Some o’ These Days,” “Joshua Fit de Battle of Jericho,” “Placid Lake,” “Fantasie Nègre No. 2,” and “Whim Wham.” “Fantasie Nègre No. 2” and “Some o’ These Days” are featured tracks on acclaimed pianist Lara Downes’s genre-fluid new album, Some of These Days. Both may be heard on one of Cooper’s Price playlists on Spotify here.





  • Professor of Art Mary Visser ’s 3D digital sculpture Circle of Life  is now installed in the 2020 International Digital Sculpture Exhibition in the online sculpture park maintained by the DAAP, the College of Design, Architecture, Art, and Planning at  the University of Cincinnati. This exhibition accompanies the Sixième Concours International de Sculpture Numérique sponsored by the Paris, France–based nonprofit Ars Mathematica. The 3D digitally printed artworks will be on exhibit from April 10, 2020, to the end of June. Selected entries will then be 3D color printed by international sponsor Mimaki Global, and exhibited in late June at the Galerie Maître Albert, in Paris, June 1–15, 2020, where the theme is polychrome digital sculpture. The main partner, Mimaki recently launched a new 3D color printer, the 3DUJ-553, which will be used to 3D print these juried sculptures in full color and pattern for Intersculpt 2020. The International Digital Sculpture Exhibition is online now in the 3D virtual-reality art gallery at the DAAP coordinates 32s 20w 145.  





  • Professor of English David Gaines  contributed a chapter titled “Dylan’s Literary Fans: The Economy of Prestige and Reading with One Hand Waving Free” to the conference volume New Approaches to Bob Dylan  (Southern Denmark University Press). The chapter grew out of his spring 2018 capstone course, American Nobelity, and his conference presentation in Denmark that semester.





  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Therese Shelton  has joined the editorial board for the CODEE Journal . The CODEE Journal  is a peer-reviewed, open-access publication distributed by the CODEE (Community of Ordinary Differential Equations Educators) and published by the Claremont Colleges Library. It features original materials that promote the teaching and learning of ordinary differential equations.





  • Professor of English David Gaines  published “His Back Pages” in The Bridge  (vol. 66, spring 2020), the leading journal of Bob Dylan studies in Europe. Therein, he reviewed “History of a Voice” poet Bryan Wormser’s new Dylan-inspired novel.





  • Associate Professor of Sociology Reggie Byron is reviewing more than 35 published articles (as the only invited reviewer from a liberal-arts university) for the prestigious Richard Scott Best Article Award through the Organizations, Occupations, and Work section of the American Sociological Association.





  • Associate Professor of Sociology Reggie Byron had a peer-reviewed article titled “Neighborhood Context, Race, and U.S. Newspaper Coverage of Home-Invasion Crime” accepted for publication in the Journal of Criminal Justice and Popular Culture.





  • Professor of Sociology Maria Lowe, Associate Professor of Sociology Reggie Byron, and student coauthors Holly O’Hara ’17 and Dakota Cortez ’19 had a peer-reviewed article titled “Neutralized Hegemonic Banter: The Persistence of Sexist and Racist Joking among Undergraduate Students” accepted for publication in Sociological Inquiry. This is the fourth such coauthored campus climate–related study that Lowe and Byron have published.





  • Assistant Professor of Mathematics John Ross has joined the editorial board for the MAA Reviews. This outlet publishes reviews of undergraduate and graduate texts in mathematics and is hosted by the Mathematical Association of America. Ross joins the board as an associate editor of analysis.





March 2020

  • Professor of Chemistry Emily Niemeyer and Katie McCance ’15 published an article titled “Classroom Observations to Characterize Active Learning within Introductory Undergraduate Science Courses” in the March/April issue of the Journal of College Science Teaching. The authors discuss the analysis of observation data to characterize different instructional practices in science classrooms. McCance, a doctoral student in the Department of STEM Education at North Carolina State University, and Niemeyer collaborated on the study with Timothy Weston, a research faculty member at the University of Colorado, Boulder. The research was completed with support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI).





  • Associate Professor of Computer Science Barbara Anthony had a poster accepted to the 51st ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education (SIGCSE ’20). While the March 2020 presentation in Portland, OR, was cancelled day-of because of COVID-19, the poster is now displayed in the revised virtual conference. The peer-reviewed work on “Introducing Parallelism to First-Year CS Majors” (with coauthors D. Cenk Erdil, Sacred Heart University; Olga Glebova, Georgia State University; and Robert Montante, Bloomsburg University) resulted from work begun at a weeklong training in August 2019 by the National Science Foundation–supported Center for Parallel and Distributed Computing Curriculum Development and Educational Resources.





  • Assistant Professor of Computer Science Jacob Schrum has had two peer-reviewed papers accepted to appear in the proceedings of the 2020 Genetic and Evolutionary Computation Conference. Both papers were sparked by research collaborations with coauthors that began at the 2017 Dagstuhl Seminar on AI-Driven Game Design . SU computer science major Jake Gutierrez  ’22 later contributed to this line of research as part of SCOPE 2019, and major work finalizing the projects occurred as part of the 2019 Dagstuhl Seminar on Revolutions in Computational Game AI .

    • “Interactive Evolution and Exploration within Latent Level–Design Space of Generative Adversarial Networks” was written along with Gutierrez and four other collaborators: Vanessa Volz, Jialin Liu, Simon Lucas, and Sebastian Risi. It presents a method for interactively designing video-game levels for Super Mario Bros. and The Legend of Zelda  using techniques that emulate the style of levels from the original games.
    • “CPPN2GAN: Combining Compositional Pattern–Producing Networks and GANs for Large-Scale Pattern Generation” was written with Vanessa Volz and Sebastian Risi and focuses on a way of scaling up the levels generated by our method to very large spaces. This particular approach to encoding game levels still emulates levels from Mario and Zelda but can generate content of arbitrary size that is connected in a cohesive way.




  • Computer science major Jake Gutierrez ’22 and Assistant Professor of Computer Science Jacob Schrum have had their peer-reviewed paper “Generative Adversarial Network Rooms in Generative Graph Grammar Dungeons for The Legend of Zelda” accepted for publication in the proceedings of the 2020 IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers) Congress on Evolutionary Computation, which will be part of this year’s World Congress on Computational Intelligence. This research started as part of SCOPE 2019 and continued into fall 2019 with a human-subject study, which involved members of the SU community evaluating video-game dungeons created by the artificial-intelligence methods developed for the paper.





  • Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts and Professor of Music Michael Cooper published the first fully source-critical editions of the full score and piano–vocal score Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy’s symphony-cantata Lobgesang(Song of Praise) with Bärenreiter-Verlag. Widely hailed after its 1840 premiere as the beginning of a “completely new art-form” and performed at least 26 times in the seven years between its completion and Mendelssohn’s death, the Lobgesangwas later derided by critics such as Wagner for supposedly being unbecomingly indebted to Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony. Cooper’s edition, in addition to drawing on previously never-before-cited correspondence and review and drawing on sources from six archives and libraries in four countries, shows that the work is not a unilinear sequence of movements, as the Ninthis, but rather an audacious experiment in musical time and narrativity, specifically in its transferal of the idea of the “frame story” (after the model of the Decameronor A Thousand and One Nights) into musical form. Cooper began work on this pair of editions (spanning 295 pages and 103 pages, respectively) in 2015 but seems to have survived. 





  • Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts and Professor of Music Michael Cooper  published six new source-critical editions of compositions by Florence B. Price with G. Schirmer, the single largest publisher of sheet music globally: “First Romance,” “In Sentimental Mood,” “Three Roses,” “Your Hands in Mine,” “Fantasy No. 2 for Violin and Piano,” and “Valsette Mignon.” The first four of these editions were released simultaneously by acclaimed pianist Lara Downes on her new EP From the Heart  and are available on one of Cooper’s Price playlists on Spotify here . The editions are nos. 19–24 in Cooper’s currently contracted set of 64 Price editions to be released in the near future. 





  • Mosaic Ambassadors Anna Franklin ’22 and Nalyah Johnson ’20 presented at the Leading and Learning Student Educators Forum at the University of Texas at Austin on February 22. Their presentation, “Engage, Reflect, Articulate: Mosaic at Southwestern University,” showcased techniques they utilize as student facilitators to help other students engage in dialogue and develop outside of the classroom.





  • A coauthored chapter by Professor of Education Michael Kamen and education majors Abigail Luna ’20 and Sarah Buchanan ’20, “Block Play and a Pedagogical Model for Playful STEM Learning,” has been accepted for publication in Bloom, M. B. & Quebec Fuentes, S. (Eds.), Advancing Science and Mathematics Education for a Sustainable Future. In addition, this chapter has also been posted as this month’s featured research article for discussion in the Reading Group on Playfutures. PlayFutures, initiated by the Lego Foundation, is an online global community of researchers, practitioners, parents and influencers/policymakers who strive towards expanding the opportunities for learning through play.





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth earned a materials grant from the German Academic Exchange Service, DAAD. Materials enriching the teaching and learning of German at SU include a curated collection of literary works published in 2019 and a collection of German classics adapted for beginning learners.





  • Assistant Professor of Psychology Carin Perilloux presented a poster with her collaborator Dr. Jaime Cloud (Western Oregon University) at the evolutionary psychology pre-conference at the annual meeting of the Society of Personality and Social Psychology (SPSP) in New Orleans, LA. You can download an image of the poster, “Women with Attractive Faces Want it All,” here.





  • Daniela Beckelhymer ’20 and Emily Thompson ’22 presented “Who Feels the Tingles? The Emotional Side of ASMR” at the emotion pre-conference with Assistant Professor of Psychology Carin Perilloux at the annual meeting of the Society of Personality and Social Psychology (SPSP) in New Orleans, LA. This poster is based on work completed on a 2019 SCOPE project.





  • Associate Professor of Psychology Erin Crockett presented a poster with students MacKenzie Maddox ’19, Athena Pinero ’20, and Aaron Mink ’21 titled “Is Emotional Suppression All Bad? The Consequences Associated with Suppressing Negative and Positive Emotions” at the annual meeting of the Society of Personality and Social Psychology (SPSP) in New Orleans, LA. This research was the result of a faculty-student research project in the summer of 2019.





  • Professor of Psychology Traci Giuliano presented a poster titled “A 3-Pronged Approach for Teaching Psychology Students to Understand and Avoid Plagiarism” at the teaching pre-conference of the annual meeting of the Society of Personality and Social Psychology (SPSP) in New Orleans, LA.





  • Assistant Professor of History Jethro Hernández Berrones presented a paper titled “Midwife Tomasa C. De Jumper: The Appropriation of and Contestation to Obstetrical Knowledge after the Mexican Revolution” in the panel “Health and Revolution in Twentieth-Century Latin America” at the 67th Annual Meeting of the Southeastern Council of Latin American Studies celebrated in Austin, TX, in March 4–8, 2020. In his paper, Hernández Berrones discussed how clinical histories taken by midwives in Mexico City in the 1930s demonstrate the key role midwives trained in proprietary medical schools had in helping women give birth to their children both in public spaces and in domestic settings. These highly skilled women challenged assumptions by male physicians and government authorities about their training institutions and practical skills. They were the ones in charge of giving birth to the children of the revolution.





  • Joanne Powers Austin Chair and Professor of English Eileen Cleere delivered a paper titled “Ecopsychology and the Greening of Jane Eyre” at the annual Interdisciplinary Nineteenth-Century Studies (INCS) Conference in Los Angeles, CA, March 4–8, 2020. She also participated in a pedagogy workshop called  “How to Teach Victorian Literature Online.” Cleere currently serves on the governing board of INCS as second vice president.





  • Associate Professor of English and Chair of Early Modern Studies Michael Saenger has been named chair of the section for faculty in the humanities at the Academic Engagement Network (AEN). AEN is a national organization of faculty members and staff on American university and college campuses that seeks to oppose efforts to delegitimize Israel; to support robust discussion, research, and education about Israel in the academy; to promote campus free expression and academic freedom; and to counter antisemitism when it occurs on campus.





  • Professor of English David Gaines reviewed Sam Wasson’s The Big Goodbye, a book about the making of the 1974 film Chinatown, in the February 25th Austin Chronicle. Read his review here.





  • Senior Director of Integrative & Community-Engaged Learning Sarah Brackmann presented her research on high-impact practices and Southwestern’s Paideia philosophy at the third annual HIPs in the States Conference.





February 2020

  • Danyale Kellogg  ’19, a graduate from the history department at SU and now a Master of International Affairs candidate at the Bush School of Government and Public Service of Texas A&M University, presented a paper at the 11th Annual Texas A&M History Conference, “The Challenge of Change,” in February. The paper, titled “Forgotten Intelligence from the Forgotten War: Victory Disease, American Intelligence Failures, and the US Government´s False Perception of the Chinese During the Korean War,” was based on her final capstone paper where she examined US Intelligence failures to anticipate the Chinese intervention in the Korean War in the early 1950s.





  • In the month of February, Assistant Director of Admission Rebecca Rother presented case studies for admission at several high schools, presented an essay writing workshop, was on a panel at the AISD AVID College Readiness Symposium, and presented at a gap-year fair.





  • Biology major Rebecca Chastain ’20 presented a poster coauthored with Professor of Biology Ben Pierce at the Texas Academy of Sciences meeting in Nacogdoches, TX,  February 28–29. Chastain’s poster on Texas chirping frogs won first place in the terrestrial ecology section of the meeting.





  • Professor of Political Science Shannon Mariotti published an invited article for the volume A Companion to Adorno, edited by Peter Gordon, Espen Hammer, and Max Pensky. This volume is part of the Blackwell Companions to Philosophy  series and, with 40 essays, is the largest collection of essays by Adorno specialists ever gathered in a single volume. Her piece is titled “Adorno’s Democratic Modernism in America: Leaders and Educators as Political Artists.” Bridging disciplinary divides, this essay brings the lens of artistic modernism to bear on Adorno’s writings on democracy in America to illuminate the distinctive contributions of a political theory that might only appear partial and preliminary when analyzed through the lens of conventional politics. Adorno’s understanding of “democratic enlightenment” resonates with the modernist concept of epiphany and represents a translation of artistic modernism to the political realm. She shows how Adorno’s lessons on the meaningful everyday practice of democracy speak powerfully and practically to people in the U.S. today.





  • Assistant Professor of Mathematics John Ross  and Professor of Mathematics Kendall Richards ’ book Introductory Analysis: An Inquiry Approach  was released by Taylor & Francis–CRC Press. The text is an inquiry-based exploration of the real number line, seriously examining fundamental topics in the field of real analysis. Beyond the main content, the text features an extended prologue that introduces readers to inquiry-based proof writing, as well as a suite of extended explorations into advanced special topics in the field. An early version of this text was read by SU math majors Morgan Engle  ’18 and Elyssa Sliheet  ’19, and improvements were made based on their suggestions.





  • Part-Time Assistant Professor of Anthropology Naomi Reed was interviewed by CBS News to contribute to a Web and television segment on a Texas textbook’s representations of slavery and Black people. The article reads in part, “CBS News is not the first to point out problems with The American Pageant. Dr. Naomi Reed is a sociocultural anthropologist and professor at Southwestern University in Texas. She looked at the 12th edition of the textbook in 2007 and the 15th edition in 2015, and said it consistently takes a white redemptive narrative of American history.” You can read the article here.





  • Part-Time Professor of Applied Music Adrienne Inglis’s composition “Fireflies” will enjoy its world-première performance by Inversion Ensemble and Part-Time Assistant Professor of Music Matt Teodori at 7:00 p.m. on February 29, 2020, , at the Concordia University Chapel and at 3:00 p.m. on March 1, 2020, at Redeemer Presbyterian Church in Austin, Texas. Commissioned by Inversion Ensemble, “Fireflies” (2019) for mixed chorus, piano, and percussion evokes the vivid imagery of Margaret Noodin’s bilingual poem “Fireflies,” from her 2015 book Weweni: Poems in Anishinaabemowin and English.Honoring the composer’s Ojibwe ancestors, the piece sets the poem’s English text, including the Anishinaabemowin word for fireflies (Waawaatesiwag). Moments of musical and whispered aleatory capture visions of fireflies on a summer night. Colorful augmented sixth chords and lush harmonies kindle visions of love and nature amid the dreamy mixolydian modality and lilting ¾ time.





  • Head of Special Collections & Archives Megan Firestone was interviewed for and mentioned in a Williamson County Sunarticle about her presentation for the Preservation Georgetown First Friday event held at Grace Heritage Center. 





  • Assistant Professor of Art Ron Geibel ’s sculpture from his Untitled (decoy)  series was selected for the 33rd annual Materials: Hard + Soft International Contemporary Craft Competition and Exhibition at the Patterson–Appleton Arts Center in Denton, TX. The exhibition was curated by Beth McLaughlin, chief curator of exhibitions and collections at Fuller Craft Museum, in Brockton, MA. McLaughlin selected 72 works from over 1,300 submissions from 16 countries. Recognized as one of the premier craft exhibitions in the country, the Materials: Hard and Soft  exhibition celebrates the evolving field of contemporary craft and is on view through May 9, 2020.





  • Outreach and Information Literacy Librarian Theresa Zelasko moderated a panel of academic librarians at the recent Greater Austin Area Information Literacy Symposium (GAAILS). The panel, “Information Literacy and the Austin-Area Student,” featured three academic librarians from area institutions answering questions about high-school and college freshman information-literacy initiatives. GAAILS 2020 was held Friday, February 21, at Austin Community College Eastview Campus.





  • Kinesiology majors Brielle Adolph ’20, Chelsea Banawis ’20, Kendall Barton ’20, Morgan Gilpin ’20, Jazmin Howard ’20, Haley Hurt ’20, Brianna Lombardi ’20, Leilani McDaniel ’20, and Nadia Netek ’20 presented their capstone research projects at the Texas chapter of the American College of Sports Medicine Annual Meeting, February 20–21, 2020, in Waco, TX.  McDaniel was selected as a finalist in the undergraduate research competition.





  • Associate Vice President for Alumni and Parent Relations Megan Frisque was recently announced as one of four professionals to serve on PeopleGrove’s Alumni Innovation Advisory Board. PeopleGrove is an online platform that connects university prospects, students, and alumni with the connections, communities, and mentors needed to succeed. The University partners with PeopleGrove on its PirateConnect networking and mentoring platform. Other members of the Alumni Innovation Advisory Board include Susan deMuth, assistant vice president of alumni relations at Johns Hopkins University and the executive director of the Johns Hopkins Alumni Association; Jeff Minhs, executive director of alumni relations at the University of California, Irvine; and Lisa Vaccarelli, senior consultant at Plus Delta Partners, previously associate vice president of alumni and constituent engagement at Temple University.





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth gave an invited presentation at the Northeast Conference on Teaching Foreign Languages, February 13–15, in New York, NY. Her talk connected to the conference theme “Languages for All: Envisioning Language Learning Opportunities for Every Learner” and focused on increasing inclusion through networking. The presentation was sponsored by the American Association of Teachers of German.





  • Professor of Music Kiyoshi Tamagawa  participated as an invited performer in two events at the recent Texas Music Educators Association’s (TMEA’s) convention in San Antonio. On Wednesday, February 12 and Thursday, February 13, he performed Ravel’s Tzigane  with former Texas All-State Orchestra member and current Eastman School of Music student Grace Song as part of It Starts with Music , a video and performance event commemorating TMEA’s centennial. On Friday, February 14, he accompanied internationally acclaimed mezzo-soprano and Texas Tech graduate Susan Graham at the session “A Conversation with Susan Graham” and during her appearance at the Past Presidents’ dinner.





  • Associate Director of Admission Jamar Keaton was a highlighted speaker for the Cy-Fair ISD College Knowledge Night on February 10. He led panel discussions focused on test-optional application policies as well as the truths and myths surrounding liberal-arts education for more than 600 juniors and their families.





  • Technical Assistant and Exhibitions Coordinator Seth Daulton  currently has a solo show titled Seth Daulton: Sites  at Dillon Kyle Architects in Houston, TX. The exhibition features 10 new mixed-media works that focus on ideas of space, place, the built environment, and psychological geography. The show is up February 7, 2020–March 8, 2020.





  • Assistant Director of Admission Rebecca Rother presented about finding the right college fit at Cedar Ridge High School in Round Rock and at Glenn High School in Leander this past January.





  • Professor of Biology and Chair of the Pre-Med Advisory Committee Maria Cuevas was the recipient of the inaugural Advisor of the Year Award conferred by the Texas Association of Advisors for the Health Professions (TAAHP). The award was created to recognize a TAAHP member who has exhibited excellence in health professions advising over the past year. Cuevas added significant resources for students in her first two years as Southwestern’s chief faculty pre-health advisor and chair of the Pre-Med Committee, including a robust pre-health website, a physical home for pre-health students in the new science building, and an enhanced process for committee recommendation letters.





  • Professor of Music Lois Ferrari recently conducted the Austin Civic Orchestra in a performance of Mahler’s 4th Symphony. The concert was presented in the Alma Thomas Theater on February 8, 2020. Part-Time Instructor of Applied Music Katherine Altobello ’99 was the guest soloist. A preconcert talk was given by SU alumni Walter P. (Gus) Sterneman III ’07.





  • Head of Special Collections & Archives Megan Firestone presented at a Preservation Georgetown First Friday event on February 7, 2020. She gave two presentations on the role of Special Collections, collections related to Georgetown and Williamson County, and the growth of SU Special Collections’ digital collections.





  • Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts and Professor of Music Michael Cooper published seven world-première editions of works by Florence B. Price with G. Schirmer (New York): “Remembrance,” “Sketches in Sepia,” “Clouds,” “Meditation,” “Summer Moon,” “On a Quiet Lake,” and “Down a Southern Lane.” The editions are nos. 12–18 in Cooper’s series of 67 editions of Price’s music to be published with Schirmer, and their recordings are part of a series of 17 world-première recordings of Price’s music to be released by pianist Lara Downes in the spring of 2020, all timed to coincide with the publication of Cooper’s editions. Inquisitive and courageous souls will find abridged versions of the editions’ impossibly tedious forewords at Schirmer’s homepage for Price’s piano works here; those interested in hearing Price’s lyrical and deeply original music may access Downes’s recordings for free through Spotify, YouTube, or Naxos Music Library in the SU Libraries’ collection of databases, courtesy of Naxos America (Cooper’s Price–Downes playlist on Spotify is here). 





  • Professor of Psychology Fay Guarraci, Chantal Gonzalez ’19,  Devon Lucero’19, Kate Davis’20, and Sarah Meerts, an associate professor of neuroscience and psychology at Carleton College, published a longitudinal study in the journal Current Aging Science titled “Sexual Behavior Is Enhanced by Regular, Repeated Mating Behavior from Young Adulthood to Middle Age in Female Long-Evans Rats.”





January 2020

  • Every year, the General Board of Higher Education and Ministry awards Sam Taylor Fellowships to full-time faculty members at United Methodist–affiliated colleges and universities in Texas. This year, eight Southwestern University faculty members won grants up to $2,000:

    • Associate Professor of French Aaron Prevots, “Esther Tellermann: Enigma, Prayer, Identity”
    • Associate Professor of Spanish María de los Ángeles Rodriguez Cadena, “Cultural Memory and Historical Fiction: Women of the Past on Television and Film by Four Contemporary Mexican Women Directors”
    • Associate Professor of Computer Science Barbara Anthony, “The Social Welfare of Human Behavior in Doodle Polls”
    • Associate Professor of Psychology Bryan Neighbors, “Central Texas Treatment Center Aftercare Assessment”
    • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth , “Minimalism and Restraint”
    • Professor of Psychology Fay Guarraci, “Poverty: Understanding the Long-Term Effects of Poverty Using an Animal Model”
    • Assistant Professor of History Joseph Hower, “The Life and Career of Author–Activist Ralph de Toledano”
    • Associate Professor of Communication Studies Valerie Renegar, “Contemporary Modes of Parenting: Disrupting the Representation of Stepmothers in Popular Culture”

    Learn more about this prestigious grant here.





  • Professor of Art and Art History Thomas Howe  recently published two invitational drawings in the celebration of the Tribunal de Contas de Portugal (the Portuguese Court of Auditors) at the 630th anniversary of its first Regulations. The publication is titled “O Número :  A Emblemática Tapeçaria que Almada Negreiros Concebeu para o Tribunal de Contas ”  (“ The Number:  The Iconic Tapestry Designed by Almada Negreiros for the Tribunal de Contas”), published in Portuguese. The drawings are from Howe’s publication with Ingrid Rowland, Vitruvius: The Ten Books on Architecture  (Cambridge University Press, 1999)—illustrations of the supposedly innate proportions of the Vitruvian “human.” The illustrations are a variation of the famous drawing by Leonardo da Vinci but show the ideal human as half male, half female—the first ever revision of the famous image of Leonardo’s male figure, based on the actual meaning of the term humanus , which is not gender specific in Latin.  The illustrations also appeared in a Portuguese translation of Vitruvius.





  • Professor of Biology and holder of the Lillian Nelson Pratt Chair Ben Pierce authored the seventh edition of Genetics: A Conceptual Approach, which was published by Macmillan Learning. This new edition emphasizes active learning and updates the book with the latest research in genetics.





  • Associate Professor of Business Debika Sihi served as a judge for the American Marketing Association (AMA) Collegiate Case Competition in collaboration with Cotton Incorporated. The competition includes submissions from student teams from different universities across the U.S.





  • Professor of Biology Romi BurksLauren Muskara ’20, Esther Nyaberi ’21, and Kaitlin Galassini ’21 attended the Texas Conservation Symposium, January 9–10th. Each gave a presentation. All three students received financial acknowledgments of the quality of their undergraduate research talks. The research on environmental DNA started during SCOPE 2018 and 2019 and will hopefully soon contribute to submissions to peer-reviewed journals. Their talk titles included the following:

    • “Looking at and beyond the Horizon: Studying Nonnative Apple Snails in Texas and Diversity across the Globe” by Burks.
    • “Indicating Invasion with eDNA: Detecting Apple Snails along Oyster Creek” by Muskara, coauthored by Shellsea Miller ’20, Burks, and Matthew Barnes ‘’06, assistant professor of natural resources management at Texas Tech University.
    • “Old School or New School: Comparing the Efficiency of eDNA Sampling by Hand and with the ANDe™ eDNA Backpack” by Galassini, coauthored by Nyaberi, Burks, and Barnes.
    • “Effect of the Degradation of eDNA in the Presence of Microplastics” by Nyaberi, coauthored by Galassini, Burks, and Barnes.

    Professor of Biology Ben Pierce, the Williamson County Conservation Fund (WCCF), and Southwestern University cosponsored the symposium, which attracted 118 attendees and featured 25 talks. 





  • Assistant Professor of Political Science Emily Sydnor  was interviewed about her recently published book, Disrespectful Democracy: The Psychology of Political Incivility  (Columbia University Press, 2019), as part of the National Institute for Civil Discourse’s podcast series. The conversation ranged from the specific findings of the book to broader debates about the role that civility and incivility have in democracies. The interview is available here .





  • Dean of Enrollment Services Christine Bowman was one of five college admission deans from around the country invited to participate in the Casady School’s (OK) Junior Parent forum.  She presented not only on Southwestern but also the benefits of a liberal-arts education.





  • Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin published a review of the redoubtable Margaret Randall’s Exporting Revolution: Cuba’s Global Solidarity(Duke University Press, 2017) in the Canadian journal Left History: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Historical Inquiry and Debate.





  • Associate Professor of Communication Studies Bob Bednar presented a paper titled “Trauma Remains: The Material Temporalities of Objects Placed at Roadside Crash Shrines” at the Material Temporalities Workshop at the Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Diversity, in Göttingen, Germany, on January 23–24, 2020. 





  • Sociology alumna Samantha Pentecost ’19 has had her capstone paper, “Gendering the Boy Scouts: Examining Hegemonic Masculinity at a Coed Backpacking Camp,” accepted for publication in the Journal for Undergraduate Ethnography(vol. 10, no. 2). In addition, sociology alumna Madeline Carrola ’19 received the best undergraduate paper award for her capstone paper, “Performing TheHandmaid’s Tale: The Use of Dystopian Literature at Political Protests,” at the October 2019 Mid-South Sociological Association meeting. Both capstone papers were written under the direction of Professor of Sociology Maria Lowe.





  • Professor of Education Michael Kamen and Project WILD Coordinator (Texas Parks and Wildlife Department) Kiki Corry presented a preprogram workshop session titled “Project WILD Facilitator Training” at the Association for Science Teacher Education 2020 international conference in San Antonio, TX.





  • Professor of Education Michael Kamen and senior education majors Abigail Luna’20 and Sarah Buchanan’20 presented their research, “Pedagogical Model and Strategies for Playful Learning in Science,” at the Association for Science Teacher Education 2020 international conference in San Antonio, TX. 





  • Mellon Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow in the Feminist Studies Program Sequoia Maner’s coedited book, Revisiting the Elegy in the Black Lives Matter Era, was published by Routledge Press. The title is available with a 20% discount from the publisher with the code HUM20 at checkout.





  • Assistant Professor of Communication Studies Lamiyah Bahrainwala (LB) published a chapter titled “Visible Allies and Muslim Inclusion” in the book Academic Labor beyond the College Classroom: Working for Our Values(edited by Holly Hassel and Kirsti Cole). The chapter discusses the Muslims in Academia Symposium that took place at Southwestern in spring 2019.





  • Dean of Enrollment Services Christine Bowman spoke to teachers at the Round Rock ISD Gifted and Talented Summit regarding the value of a teacher recommendation.  This is the second year that she has spoken at this event.





  • The Department of Mathematics and Computer Science was active at the Joint Mathematics Meetings, with national meetings of the Mathematical Association of America (MAA), the American Mathematical Society (AMS), the Association for Women in Mathematics (AWM), and more. It is the largest meeting of mathematicians in the world. The meetings were held in Denver, CO, January 15–18, 2020.

    • Sarah Friday ’21 and Jordan Smith ’20 presented “Diagonalizing the Undiagonalizable,” research based and expanding on a 2019 SCOPE project with Professor of Mathematics Fumiko Futamura. Aaron Waclawczyk ’21 was a coauthor who helped extend the SCOPE work. The presentation was in the AMS contributed-paper session on algebra and algebraic geometry.
    • Daniela Beckelhymer ’20 presented her mathematics capstone project titled “The Costs and Rewards of Pursuing Different Postsecondary Degrees“ as part of the undergraduate poster session. Professor of Mathematics Alison Marr supervised the project.
    • Marr presented “Choose Your Own Adventure: An Analysis of Interactive Gamebooks Using Graph Theory” in the MAA contributed-paper session “Tell Me a Story: Connections between Mathematics and Performed or Print Narrative.” D’Andre Adams ’21 and Beckelhymer are coauthors.  The presentation was based on their 2017 SCOPE research and their subsequent publication.
    • Marr  coorganized the MAA contributed-paper session on re-envisioning the calculus sequence with coorganizers Robin Cruz, College of Idaho; Tom Halverson, Macalester College; Joel Kilty, Centre College; Alex M. McAllister, Centre College; and Chad Topaz, Williams College.
    • Marr  was a coauthor of the talk “Calculus: Origins, Reforms, and New Directions” with Robin Cruz, College of Idaho; Tom Halverson, Macalester College; Joel Kilty, Centre College; Alex M. McAllister, Centre College; and Chad Topaz, Williams College.
    • Marr and Assistant Professor of Mathematics John D. Ross presented the preliminary report “A Re-Envisioning of the Calculus Sequence for the Modern Student” with coauthors Joel Kilty, Centre College, and Alex M. McAllister, Centre College.
    • Ross  presented “Exploring Big Ideas in Calculus 1 through Bite-Sized IBL Lessons” in the MAA contributed-paper session on inquiry-based learning and teaching.
    • Associate Professor of Mathematics Therese Shelton copresented “Building Community through Systemic Initiative for Modeling Investigations and Opportunities with Differential Equations (SIMIODE)” in the MAA poster session on projects supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) Division of Undergraduate Education. Her coauthors were the coprincipal investigators of their NSF grant: Brian Winkel, SIMIODE and emeritus professor from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point; Richard C. Harwood, Newberg University; Audrey Malagon, Virginia Wesleyan University; and Patrice Tiffany, Manhattan College. The NSF grant partly funded Shelton’s attendance. Shelton served on the SIMIODE Board of Contributing Advisors, as well as participated in a meeting of her NSF grant coprincipal investigators.
    • Shelton  coorganized the AMS special session “Wall-to-all Modeling Activities in Differential Equations Courses.” Her coorganizers were Janet Fierson, La Salle University, and Brian Winkel, SIMIODE.
    • Shelton  participated in the meeting of the national MAA Committee on Sessions of Contributed Papers.
    • Visiting Assistant Professor of Mathematics Safia Chettih presented the preliminary report “A Combinatorial Model for an Honest ∞-Operad” in the AMS special session on computational and categorical methods in homotopy theory. Her coauthors were L. Bonatto, University of Oxford; A. Linton, University of Southampton; S. Raynor, Macquarie University; M. Roberston, University of Melbourne; and N. Wahl, University of Copenhagen.
    • Visiting Assistant Professor of Mathematics John M. Osborn also attended.




  • Associate Professor of Art History Allison Miller gave an invited lecture titled “Terracotta Warriors after the First Emperor: Re-Evaluating the Qin Legacy in the Han” on January 17, 2020, at the University of Central Florida in Orlando. The talk was the last of three talks Miller gave this academic year as a 2019–2020 Archaeological Institute of America (AIA) program lecturer.





  • Professor of Art History Thomas Noble Howe  has just published two invitational book chapters, “Hellenistic Architecture” (17,000 words) and “The Christian Roman Empire, A.D. 306–c. A.D. 500” (11,000 words), in the 21st edition of Sir Banister Fletcher’s A History of Architecture  (commissioned by the Royal Institute of British Architects and the University of London; published by, Bloomsbury Press,  pp. 284–331 and409–436). The Banister Fletcher is the oldest and arguably most prestigious repeatedly reedited history of architecture, first published in 1893. Howe has been invited to attend the presentation at the Royal Institute of British Architects and Bloomsbury Press in London on January 28. Both chapters are the only currently available one-volume histories of either period of architectural history.





  • Computer science majors Anna Krolikowski ’20, Sarah Friday ’20, and Alice Quintanilla ’20 coauthored a peer-reviewed paper with Assistant Professor of Computer Science Jacob Schrum that was accepted to the EvoMUSART: International Conference on Computational Intelligence in Music, Sound, Art, and Design. Their paper, “Quantum Zentanglement: Combining Picbreeder and Wave Function Collapse to Create Zentangles,” presents a computational approach to generating art reminiscent of Zentangles. Examples of generated art are available here.





  • Professor of Music and Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts Michael Cooper  published two editions of previously unpublished works by Florence B. Price (1887–1953) with G. Schirmer (New York). “Night” (1945) is scored for women’s chorus with piano and was given its posthumous premiere by Visiting Assistant Professor of Music Beth Everett  and the SU Chorale in November 2018. This work is based on a poem by Bessie Mayle (1898–1959) that was first published in The Crisis  in 1930; the poem celebrates the beauty and resilience of the blackness of the nighttime sky as a metaphor for the beauty and resilience of Black experience. The second edition, Fantasie Nègre No. 4 , is a milestone in the ongoing Florence Price renaissance. Its release was timed to coincide with acclaimed pianist Lara Downes’s world-première recording of the work (available on Spotify here ). The editions are nos. 10 and 11 in Cooper’s series of 67 editions of Price’s music to be published with Schirmer, and the recording is the first in a series of 17 world-première recordings of Price’s music to be released by Downes in the spring of 2020, all timed to coincide with the release of Cooper’s editions. For more information on this project, see here .





  • Professor of English and Joanne Powers Austin Term Chair Eileen Cleere has been elected second vice president of Interdisciplinary Nineteenth-Century Studies (INCS), an international organization. Her term will run 2020–2021.





  • Professor of Mathematics Fumiko Futamura  coauthored an IBL-style textbook titled Perspective and Projective Geometry   (Princeton University Press, 2019), with her colleagues Annalisa Crannell, of Franklin & Marshall College, and Marc Frantz, of Indiana University. The textbook introduces students to geometry through perspective drawing, leading students to discover ideas through hands-on activities, including drawing, analyzing Renaissance paintings and photographs, and GeoGebra constructions. The textbook also guides students to develop rigorous proofs for their conjectures and can be used as an introduction to proofs course for undergraduate math majors.





  • Assistant Professor of Biology Kim McArthur was awarded the ADInstruments Educator Scholarship to attend the CrawFly neurophysiology course at the University of the Incarnate Word, January 9–12. This course provides intensive hands-on training for undergraduate educators developing laboratory courses in neuroscience to encourage integration of high-impact research experiences into the undergraduate curriculum. McArthur plans to develop a course in neurobiology that can incorporate modules from this training course.





  • Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers published “7 Jewish Feminist Highlights of 2019” in the Lilith Blog. Read it here.





  • Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers was an invited participant on the roundtable “Building Bridges: Feminist Mentorship, Collaboration, and Coalition Building” at the annual meeting of the Association for Jewish Studies. Meyers talked about diverse forms of mentoring, including public scholarship.





  • Assistant Professor of History Jethro Hernández Berrones reflected on the relevance of homeopathy for understanding access to medicine in Mexico and Latin America in the past and in the present in an interview for the blog of the Brazilian journal História Ciências Saúde—Manguinhos. You can read the interview here.





  • Assistant Professor of History Jethro Hernández Berrones’s entry “A Recipe for the Body: Chiropractic Medicine in Mexico (Part I)” was published by The Recipes Project, a blog dedicated to food, magic, art, science, medicine, and everything related to recipes, from magical charms to veterinary remedies. The entry offers a brief analysis of a few documentary ingredients Hernández Berrones found prospecting the archival mines of unorthodox healers in postrevolutionary Mexico in his efforts to concoct a nuanced narrative of 20th-century medicine in that country. Mexican chiropractors navigated a still-undefined space where national traditions blended with domestic and foreign modernities. Their bodily recipes kept the bodies of thousands of Mexicans fit to modernize a nation, and their activism pushed for the health of the medical body politic.





  • Computer science major Sara Boyd ’20 has been selected as a finalist of the Computing Research Association’s (CRA) Outstanding Undergraduate Researcher Award for 2020. This award program recognizes undergraduate students in North American colleges and universities who show outstanding potential in an area of computing research. Boyd’s award recognizes published work she has done with Associate Professor of Computer Science Barbara Anthony, an REU at the University of Texas at Arlington, as well as project work in several computer science courses.





  • Professor of Classics Hal Haskell delivered an invited paper at Rhodes College in Memphis titled “Ancients Exploiting the Past for Propaganda,” in which he discussed how minor elite dynasties in ancient Greece in the generation following the Trojan War invented connections with their predecessors through the display of antiques. The invitation to speak in Memphis sprang from Haskell’s “Cretan Overseas Connections in Late Minoan IIIC: The Contribution of Transport Stirrup Jars,” a refereed paper delivered at the annual meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America, in Washington, DC, on January 5.





December 2019

  • Professor of Music Lois Ferrari  conducted the Austin Civic Orchestra in a December performance of Vivaldi’s Winter from The Four Seasons , featuring Austin Symphony Orchestra concertmaster Jessica Mathaes. Also on the program was Tchaikovsky’s Nutcracker Suite  and other holiday favorites.





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth was honored with the Outstanding German Educator Award, her profession’s most prestigious form of recognition, at the 2019 Awards Ceremony of the American Association of Teachers of German, in Washington, DC. On November 24, 2019, members and leaders of the profession, as well as representatives of the Goethe Institut, German Academic Exchange Service (Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst), and the Consulates of Germany, Austria, Switzerland, and Liechtenstein, joined in celebrating the awardees’ achievements.





  • Associate Professor of Feminist Studies Brenda Sendejo presented “Intellectual Genealogies of Chicana Feminist Thought” at this year’s National Women’s Studies Association conference in San Francisco, CA. This presentation was an extension of her work in Chicana Movidas: New Narratives of Activism and Feminism in the Movement Era(University of Texas Press, 2018), which won first place for nonfiction multiauthored book at the 2019 International Latino Book Awards.





  • Associate Professor of Feminist Studies Brenda Sendejo  published “Radical Mami Love: Chicana Consejos del Corazón” in Voices from the Ancestors and Beyond: Chicanx/Latinx Spiritual Expressions  (University of Arizona Press, 2019). Sendejo presented on her work along with anthology editor Lara Medina and cocontributor Martha P. Cotera at this year’s Texas Book Festival.





  • Assistant Professor of Biology Kimberly McArthur coauthored a chapter in a recently released comprehensive reference book about zebrafish as a model organism in biomedical research. The chapter titled “Zebrafish as a Model for Revealing the Neuronal Basis of Behavior” appears in The Zebrafish in Biomedical Research: Biology, Husbandry, Diseases, and Research Applications(Elsevier).





  • Southwestern University’s Communication Studies Department was well represented at this year’s National Communication Association convention in Baltimore, MD. In addition to Part-Time Instructor of Communication Studies Katie Bradford’s presentation (from last week’s Notables), Assistant Professor of Communication Studies Lamiyah Bahrainwala (LB) and Visiting Instructor of Communication Studies Kristyn Goldberg presented on a panel titled “Academic Precarities” addressing unsustainable academic structures and developing strategies for countering precarity. LB chaired the panel. The hope was that this panel would not be unique this NCA and that many such panels would take place. The hope was realized.





  • Professor of Music and Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts Michael Cooper published five editions of previously unpublished works by Florence B. Price (1887–1953) with G. Schirmer (New York): “Memory Mist” for piano solo; “Andante con Espressione” for violin and piano; “Judgement Day,” (based on a text by Langston Hughes) for voice and piano; and “I’m Troubled in My Mind” and “Peter, Go Ring dem Bells,” both traditional spirituals for voice and piano. Cooper’s edition of “Memory Mist” was featured by acclaimed pianist Lara Downes as the opening track of her March 2019 Holes in the Sky, an album comprising music exclusively of, by, and for women. The publications are nos. 5–9 in Cooper’s series of 64 editions of hitherto-unpublished works by Price with Schirmer.





  • Computer science alumna Kathryn Reagan ’16 was named as the November spotlight member of the global organization Women Who Code. Read the profile here.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Philosophy Katie Howard  published a review of Bonnie Honig’s recent book Public Things: Democracy in Disrepair  for the journal Arendt Studies . The review is available here.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Philosophy Katie Howard had an article published in Raisons Politiquestitled “Apparitions of Emotion: Toward a Performative Affect-Theory of Assembly.” The article is part of a special issue on the work of Judith Butler. The other authors featured include Butler, who wrote an original piece for the issue. You can read the issue online here.





  • During the first week of December, Professor of Biology Romi Burk s traveled to Bahia Blanca, Argentina, for the triennial congress of the Argentinean Malacological Society, also known as 3CAM.  While there, Burks met with past collaborators and attended special 3CAM symposia. These symposia on Pomacea  (a genus of apple snails) and the molecular ecology of mollusks facilitated a better understanding of research done in the last 10 years since she first started working on apple snail diversity in South America. Burks gave a talk titled “Genetic ABCs—COI to eDNA: Using Barcoding IDs to Develop Applications for Species Detections of Nonnative Apple Snails from Water Samples” that provided an overview of her most recent research direction of environmental DNA and how Burks and collaborator Dr. Matthew Barne s ’06 used diversity data from South America to address the applied issues of detecting nonnative species. Undergraduates Lauren Muskara  ’20, Shellsea Miller  ’20, Esther Nyaberi  ’21, and Kaitlin Galassini  ’21 provided data for the talk and earned positions as coauthors. Attending the meeting and subsequent travel to meet research partners in Uruguay will also push forward the remaining manuscripts from the South America project.





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth accepted the invitation from Goethe-Institut Washington, DC, to participate in strategic planning for the rollout of two major projects codeveloped with the American Association of Teachers of German and designed to strengthen education in German language and cultures in the U.S. The two initiatives, SPARK and “Our Sustainable Future,” will engage teachers and learners across institutions and aim to open doors to language learning, especially for young audiences. Members of the leadership team of educators based in Germany and the U.S. met at the Goethe-Institut, December 4–6, 2019.





  • Professor of Anthropology Melissa Johnson’s article “Creole Becoming and the Commons: Black Freedom in Belize” has been published in Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space. It is the first article published as part of a special themed section titled The Commons, Commoning, and Co-Becoming, edited by Neera Singh, Ursula Lang, and Gustavo Garcia Lopez. It is available online here. 





  • Assistant Professor of History Jethro Hernández Berrones coauthored the introductory piece for a special dossier titled “Homeopathy in Latin America and Spain: Local Developments and International Networks” with historian Patricia Palma for the journal História, Ciências, Saúde-Manguinhos. The authors came up with the idea of this collection when they saw the number of contributions on this topic at an international conference in Rio in 2017. The dossier is the first collection of articles on the topic for Latin America.





  • Assistant Professor of History Jethro Hernández Berrones published an article titled “Breaking the Boundaries of Professional Regulation: Medical Licensing, Foreign Influence, and the Consolidation of Homeopathy in Mexico” in the journal História, Ciências, Saúde-Manguinhos. Prompted by colleagues and students who attended the 2017 Borderlands Symposium, he reexamined his doctoral research considering historical actors beyond national borders and produced this analysis. Hernández Berrones argues that Mexican homeopaths’ plural approach to medicine reflected their own plural political position on professional values and regulations. Raising the concerns of the national medical community, they liberally used foreign credentials, knowledge, products, and professional associations to increase their clientele, impress government officials, and obtain support for the successful institutionalization of homeopathy in Mexico.





  • Assistant Professor of History Joseph Hower published a short review of Steven Attewell’s People Must Live by Work: Direct Job Creation in America, from FDR to Reagan in the September issue of History: Reviews of New Books.





  • Associate Professor of Environmental Studies Joshua Long  was quoted in an article published in Utility Dive  in which he discussed the role of Southwestern University and SEAK (Students for Environmental Activism and Knowledge) in Georgetown’s transition to 100% renewable energy. Read the article here.





  • Several environmental studies and feminist studies alumni, including Keara Hudler ’18, Lilly Dennis ’18, Muriel DiNella 18, Nataley Ford ’18, and Joanna Mendez ’18, along with Associate Professor of Environmental Studies Joshua Long, published an article in the Journal of Education, Citizenship, and Social Justice titled “Intersectional Sustainability and Student Activism: A Framework for Achieving Social Sustainability on University Campuses.”





  • Assistant Professor of Kinesiology Edward Merritt followed an ultraendurance cyclist across the country collecting blood and urine samples from him twice a day for the 10 days it took him to finish the 3,000-mile Race across America. This feat of scientific endurance, “Proteomic Markers of Nonfunctional Overreaching during the Race across America,” was recently published in Frontiers in Physiology. The results provide a better understanding of the changes the human body experiences during extreme physical stress.





  • Professor of Music Lois Ferrari  began her 18th consecutive appointment as music director of the Austin Civic Orchestra with two concerts this past semester: Cosmos , featuring music from the science-fiction and fantasy genres, and New York, New York , a musical tribute to the Big Apple. For the latter, composer Anthony Iannaccone was on hand to present a preconcert talk regarding his piece Waiting for Sunrise on the Sound , and previous Pearl Amster winner Ben Laude flew in from New York City to perform Gershwin’s Second Rhapsody  for piano. The orchestra also performed the music of Bernstein and Rodgers, plus a suite of music from The Godfather  by Rota.





November 2019

  • Associate Professor of French Francis Mathieu chaired a panel organized by Women in French and titled “Women’s Infidelity” at the 117th annual conference of the Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association, in San Diego, CA, in November 2019.  Women in French is a scholarly association whose goal is to promote the study of French and Francophone women authors, the study of women’s place in French and Francophone cultures or literatures, and feminist literary criticism.





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth participated in the inaugural conference to launch an innovative joint initiative by the Goethe Institut and the American Association of Teachers of German. The invited participants met on November 24, 2019, at the Goethe Institut, in Washington, DC, to develop strategies for Spark for German: Strukturiertes Programm zum Aufbau von Ressourcen und Kompetenzen für den DaF-Unterricht in den USA (a structured program to build resources and skills for German-language teaching in the U.S.).





  • Assistant Professor of Biology Kim McArthur presented her neuroscience research at two conferences during the fall 2019 semester. McArthur studies brain development and function at the cellular level using larval zebrafish. Zebrafish develop entirely outside of their mothers, and they are nearly transparent early in development. These unique characteristics allow McArthur and her students to study the fundamentals of early brain development in a living organism (with surprising similarities to humans) using noninvasive methods. This research combines microscopy, electrophysiology, and behavioral analysis to study the development of the cellular networks in the brainstem that generate innate survival behaviors, such as feeding and breathing. McArthur presented her poster, titled “Development and Early Organization of Respiratory Motor Circuits in Larval Zebrafish,” at the Texas Zebrafish Conference in Houston, TX, November 1–2, and the Zebrafish Neural Circuits and Behavior meeting at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, November 20–23. This poster included research completed by an undergraduate mentored by McArthur during her postdoctoral tenure at Cornell University.





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth  gave two presentations at the annual convention and world languages exposition of the American Council for Teaching Foreign Languages, ACTFL, and the American Association of Teacher of German, AATG, in Washington, DC, November 23–24, 2019. This global event brings together more than 8,000 language educators from all languages, levels, and assignments. Berroth presented on amplifying “ Grenzenlos Deutsch (German without Barriers) ,” her coauthored open educational resource; on teaching sustainability topics; and on using current authentic resources for teaching about rassismuskritische Bildungsarbeit  (antiracism education in Germany).





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth served as a road scholar, engaging members of the Washington, DC, Southwestern University Alumni Association on topics of international climate fiction, curricular developments, and the value of languages and cultures in liberal-arts education. Members enjoyed meeting at Washington’s Café Mozart on November 22, 2019.





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth participated in the inaugural meeting of the Task Force on Diversity and Inclusion convened by the president of the American Association of Teachers of German, in Washington, DC, on November 21, 2019. The task force aims to sustain professional-development programming and materials development to increase and support diversity, inclusion, and social justice across institutions and stakeholders involved in German education.





  • Associate Professor of English Michael Saenger  published a blog post in the Times of Israel  titled “Are Jews Welcome at the University of Toronto?” The post was marked as a featured post by the Times of Israel  and can be read here .





  • Associate Professor of Art History Allison Miller delivered two invited lectures titled “Terracotta Warriors after the First Emperor: Re-Evaluating the Qin Legacy in the Han” on November 6 and 7 at Valparaiso University, in Valparaiso, IN, and at DePaul University, in Chicago, IL. These talks were sponsored by the Valparaiso and Chicago chapters of the Archaeological Institute of America (AIA). Miller is a 2019–2020 AIA program lecturer.





  • Director of the Debby Ellis Writing Center Jennifer Marciniak successfully defended her dissertation “Brokering Words and Work: Complexities of Literacy Sponsorship in the Oilfields of South Texas” on Friday, November 15. Her Ph.D. is in rhetoric and composition from the University of Louisville.





  • Mellon Teaching Fellow of Feminist Studies Sequoia Maner  published several pieces of writing in The Langston Hughes Review  (vol. 25, no. 2). Alongside a review of the anthology The BreakBeat Poets vol. 2: Black Girl Magic , she published two poems of her own. “The Substantia Nigra” is an ode to Muhammad Ali in the wake of the Ferguson uprisings, and “When Bodies of Water Exhale” reflects on the tethered nature of African Americans to bodies of water.





  • Professor of Biology Romi L. Burks continues to build her reputation as a sought-after and dynamic educator about “real” chocolate. As she does in her courses at Southwestern, Burks points out connections between chocolate and disciplines across the liberal arts and sciences in her public lectures. Expanding her speaking invitations to the international level, Burks gave an invited lecture titled “Worth Every Pound: Why to Invest in Fine Chocolate” twice at the Brighton Chocolate Festival in the U.K. over fall break. In November, she spoke to a packed audience on “Biodiversity and Cacao” on the Women in Chocolate stage of the Northwest Chocolate Festival in Seattle, WA. Northwest Chocolate boasts the largest education program about chocolate for the general public, with five stages running concurrently over the two-day festival. All of this work and fun continue to inform the classes Burks teaches about chocolate, including Chocolate-Covered London, the  study-abroad course she’ll be leading for SU’s London Semester in Fall 2020.





  • Part-Time Instructor of Communication Studies Katie Bradford presented a paper, ”Smartphones as an Index of Authority in Family Dinner Interactions,” at the National Communication Association Convention, in Baltimore, MD, on November 17, 2019. 





  • Val Acosta ’22 and Luis Ramirez ’21 presented a poster and slide presentation about their SCOPE 2019 research, “The Synthesis of Sulfur, Nitrogen, and Oxygen Containing Ligand–Metal Complexes,” at the Capital of Texas Undergraduate Research Conference, at the University of Texas at Austin, on November 16.





  • Director of Teaching, Learning, and Scholarship Julie Sievers coled the session “Unbiasing Faculty Hiring and Retention: What Is Faculty Development’s Role?” with Gary Hawkins (Warren Wilson College) at the annual meeting of the Professional and Organizational Development (POD) Network, in Pittsburgh, PA, on November 16, 2019.





  • Associate Professor of Music Jason Hoogerhyde’ s composition Revolve/Retract  was performed four times by Line upon Line Percussion, with choreography by the Kathy Dunn Hamrick Dance Company, November 14–16, at the Ground Floor Theatre, in Austin, TX.





  • Professor of Psychology Fay Guarraci was invited to contribute to a special issue on the neuroscience of sexual motivation in the journal Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience. She wrote a review article on her lab’s contributions to the field titled  “‘What a Girl Wants’: What Can We Learn from Animal Models of Female Sexual Motivation?” with her collaborator Russell J. Frohardt.





  • Professor of Political Science Shannon Mariotti published an article titled “Zen and the Art of Democracy: Contemplative Practice as Ordinary Political Theory” in the journal Political Theory. This piece explores resonances between the radical democratic theory of Jacques Rancière and Zen works by Shunryu Suzuki and others, showing how meditation can be understood as an aesthetic practice that cultivates modes of experience, perception, thinking, and feeling that further radical democratic projects at a basic level. The article also shows how meditative practice can supplement democratic projects today focused on abolitionism and social justice, care work and dependency work, and reclaiming experience to work against the appropriation of the “attentional commons.” This piece draws from a current book project exploring contemplative practices as modes of embodied social change that can enact and extend the ordinary practice of democracy in everyday life.





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth  presented on “ Grenzenlos Deutsch  (German without Barriers),” her collaborative Digital Humanities Advancement Grant project supported by competitive funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities, at the November 2019 German Academic Exchange Service, or Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst (DAAD), faculty-development seminar in Berlin, Germany. The seminar focused on artificial intelligence and digital media in the teaching and learning of languages and cultures. Participation was competitive and brought together 23 of the cohort of 800 select German educators actively engaged in amplifying the DAAD mission worldwide. The seminar participants came from Argentina, Chile, China, Italy, Japan, Jordan, Canada, Malaysia, Paraguay, Poland, Slovenia, Spain, Thailand, the U.K., Hungary, Australia, and the U.S. The DAAD promotes international networking, collaboration, and the exchange of expertise between Germany and other countries.





  • Professor of Education Michael Kamen  published a review of Creative Block Play: A Comprehensive Guide to Learning through Building  by Rosanne Regan Hansel in the fall 2019 issue of Play News , the newsletter of The Association for the Study of Play.





  • Maddie Straup ’18, Justin White ’18, Sarah Butterworth ’18, Delaney Dunn ’18, Kayla Tate ’19, and Alexandra Guermeur ’18 coauthored a manuscript titled “I Knew You’d Understand: How Gendered Expectations of Understanding Affect Stress” that has been accepted for publication in the interdisciplinary journal Personal Relationships.





  • Devon Fulcher ’19, Sara Boyd ’20, and Anna Krolikowski ’20 represented Southwestern University at the Association for Computing Machinery’s International Collegiate Programming Competition’s South Central USA Regional Competition between schools in Texas, Louisiana, and Oklahoma, on November 9 at the University of Texas–San Antonio. There were 60 teams of three students each trying to solve 12 problems as quickly as possible. SU’s team, the Pirates, solved four problems this year, beating 18 other teams. It has been over a decade since a team from Southwestern has solved that many problems in the competition.





  • Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts and Professor of Music Michael Cooper gave two presentations on Florence Price in Boston. The first, titled “Nevertheless, She Persisted: The Homecoming of Florence B. Price,” given on November 1, 2019, was a full lecture–recital given at the New England Conservatory of Music, Price’s alma mater, and featured posthumous premieres of five of Price’s compositions for solo piano, performed by acclaimed pianist Lara Downes. The second, titled “Florence Price and the Poetics of African-American Musical Identity,” was a paper given at the national meeting of the American Musicological Society on November 2, 2019, in a session titled “Negotiating Class and Ethnicity in the United States, 1920–1950.” Both presentations centered on Cooper’s excavation and research of more than 300 unpublished compositions by a composer who is currently experiencing the most powerful sustained musical renaissance since the mid-20th century’s rediscovery of Gustav Mahler.





  • Professor of Education Michael Kamen presented a workshop for elementary- and middle-school teachers at Granger Independent School District titled “Developing Children’s Mathematical Thinking.”





  • Professor of Education Michael Kamen  published the chapter “Pedagogical Models of Play for Innovative Teaching” in The Encyclopedia of Educational Innovation  (eds. Michael A. Peters and Richard Heraud; Springer Nature Singapore, 2019).





  • Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin ’s book Revolution, Rebellion, Resistance: The Power of Story  has been published in Turkey as Devrim, Isyan, Direnis: Hikayenin Gücü   by the publisher Abis Yayincilik. This edition joins previously published translations in Arabic, German, and Spanish along with an Indian-only English language edition.





  • Dean of Enrollment Services Christine Bowman presented at the annual convention of the National Association of College Admission Counseling in Louisville, KY.  She, along with a team of high-school and college counselors, presented “Beyond Financial Aid: Addressing Full Support for Low-Income, First-Generation Students.”





  • Selections from Associate Professor of Music Jason Hoogerhyde ’s Don Juan Project  were performed at the Butler University School of Music, in Indianapolis, IN, on November 3.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Computer Science Pedro Diaz GomezHazel Hedrick ’20, Joe Roybal ’21, Matt Sanford ’20, Kirby Steckel ’21, and Thomas Zschiesche ’22 participated in the cybersecurity workshop and competition at the 9th Texas Security Awareness Week, November 1–2, organized by the University of Texas at Dallas. Two teams competed in the competition, with Sanford and Hedrick winning first place and Steckel and Roybal winning third place. The students credit their preparation for doing so well in the competition. Congratulations to our students for their teamwork, professionalism, dedication, and effort in getting this exciting result!





October 2019

  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth participated in a faculty seminar at the German Studies Association Conference in Portland, OR, in October 2019. The seminar was held over three days and brought together an interdisciplinary group of academics workshopping their contributions to the seminar theme of (De)Constructing Identities through Mobilities. Participants shared their research papers with the group of 17 scholars during the summer, provided peer review for two articles, responded to this peer review during their presentations at the seminar, and engaged in further discussions. An edited volume of peer-reviewed contributions is emerging. Berroth’s research paper is titled “Marica Bodrožić: Ecopoetics of Resilience in Transnational Identity Narratives.”





  • Associate Professor of Sociology Reggie Byron presented a paper titled “Neighborhood Context, Race, and Newspaper Coverage of Home-Invasion Crime” at the Policy Studies Organization’s 2019 International Criminology Conference in Washington, DC, on October 31.





  • Assistant Professor of Art Ron Geibel  currently has a two-person exhibition titled N with Dutch artist Jan ten Have at the Bogert Gallery in Knokke, Belgium. Geibel created the porcelain-tile installation featured in the show during a three-month artist residency at the European Ceramic Workcentre in The Netherlands during the summer of 2019. There, his research focused on place and how that affects the queer lived experience. He was one of 10 artists to receive a 2019 Lighton International Artists Exchange Grant to support hiscross-cultural research examining queer identity.  is on view October 26–November 24.





  • Assistant Director of the Residential Experience Diana Lee facilitated two workshops at the annual Texas Association of Colleges and University Student Personnel Administrators (TACUSPA) conference in San Marcos, TX. The workshops were titled “The Art of Storytelling through Your Résumé and Cover Letter” and “Practice What You Preach: Résumé Review.” Lee serves as the professional-development coordinator for TACUSPA.





  • Marissa Shipp  ’19 and Professor of Art Mary Visser  will be presenting their artworks as part of the Sunderland Pavilion of the Wrong exhibition. The title is based on the constant phrase heard by those who use the Internet, “I have the wrong router.” The Wrong Biennale  opens November 1, 2019, and features artworks by more than 2,000 artists selected by 180 curators in over 100 locations around the world and on the Internet. You can view Visser’s work here and Shipp’s animation here .





  • Professor of Spanish Katy Ross presented her paper titled “Baby Space: Narrating Infertility in Spain” at the Strong Foundations: 100 Years of Hispanism in Kansas and Beyond symposium at the University of Kansas.





  • Part-Time Instructor of Applied Music Katherine Altobello ’99 was the guest mezzo-soprano for High Holy services at Congregation Beth Israel in Austin, TX, under the direction of Dr. Jeffery Jones-Ragona and Dr. Maimy Fong.





  • Associate Professor of Communication Studies Valerie Renegar published “Evil Is Part of the Territory: Inventing the Stepmother in Self-Help Books” with coauthor Kirsti Cole in the most recent issue of Women’s Studies in Communication. In the article, Renegar and Cole examine best-selling self-help books aimed at stepmothers to determine how stepmothers are being defined and how their expectations are shaped and managed by the rhetoric of such books.





  • Professor of Mathematics Fumiko Futamura was the inaugural speaker at the newly formed Women in Science and Engineering (WISE) Club at Anderson High School in Austin, TX. She shared her experiences and reflections on getting her Ph.D. in mathematics as a Japanese woman and spoke about her research in math and art.





  • Professor of Mathematics Fumiko Futamura , along with coauthors Annalisa Crannell of Franklin and Marshall College and Marc Frantz of Indiana University, published an article “An (Isometric) Perspective on Homographies” in the Journal for Geometry and Graphics  (vol. 23, no. 1, pp. 65–83).





  • Marissa Shipp ’19 and Professor of Art Mary Visser will be presenting their artworks for the Sunderland Pavilion of the “Wrong” exhibition. The title is based upon the constant phrase heard by those who use the internet. “I Have the Wrong Router.” The “Wrong Biennale” opens November 1, 2019, featuring artworks by over 2,000 artists selected by 180 curators in over 100 locations around the world and on the internet.  Visser’s work her e. View Shipp’s animation here.  





  • Assistant Professor of Art Ron Geibel currently has a two-person exhibition titled “N” with Dutch artist Jan ten Have at Bogert Gallery in Knokke, Belgium. His porcelain tile installation featured in the show was created during a three-month artist residency at the European Ceramic Workcentre in The Netherlands during the summer of 2019. There, his research focused on place and how that affects the queer lived experience. He was one of 10 artists to receive a 2019 Lighton International Artists Exchange Grant to support my cross-cultural research examining queer identity.  “N” is on view October 26–November 24.





  • Assistant Director of the Residential Experience Diana Lee facilitated two workshops at the annual Texas Association of Colleges and University Student Personnel Administrators conference in San Marcos, TX. The workshops were titled “The Art of Story Telling Through your Resume and Cover Letter” and “Practice what you Preach: Resume Review.” Lee serves as the Professional Development Coordinator for TACUSPA. 





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Physics and Environmental Studies Rebecca Edwards attended the Teaching Computational Thinking Skills with MATLAB Workshop at the Science Education Resource Center, Carleton College October 20–22.  Edwards served as a workshop facilitator and peer reviewer in addition to delivering a presentation titled “Adding a MATLAB Component to an Engineering Dynamics Course ” based on her experience integrating a computational component into the Engineering Dynamics course at Southwestern.  





  • Professor of Spanish Katy Ross presented her paper titled “Baby Space: Narrating Infertility in Spain” at the Centennial Symposium: 100 years of Hispanism in Kansas and Beyond at the University of Kansas.





  • Part-time Instructor of Applied Music Katherine Altobello ’99 was the guest mezzo-soprano for High Holy services at Congregation Beth Israel in Austin, TX under the direction of Dr. Jeffery Jones-Ragona and Dr. Maimy Fong. 





  • Associate Professor in Communication Studies Valerie Renegar published “Evil is Part of the Territory: Inventing the Stepmother in Self Help Books”  with coauthor Kirsti Cole in the most recent issue of Women’s Studies in Communication. The article looks at best selling self-help books aimed at stepmothers to determine how stepmothers are being defined and how their expectations are shaped and managed by the rhetoric of the books. 





  • Professor of Music and Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts Michael Cooper  published three source-critical editions of music by Florence Price with G. Schirmer, Inc./AMP, the single largest publisher of classical sheet music globally. The editions are Price’s setting of Georgia Douglas Johnson’s poem “The Heart of a Woman,” the Fantasie No. 1 in G Minor  for violin and piano, and the Cotton Dance  for piano solo. These editions are nos. 2–4 in Cooper’s series of 64 editions of previously unpublished music by Price with Schirmer. 





  • Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow of Feminist Studies Sequoia Maner was a guest visitor to Dr. Emily Rutter’s African American Literature & Culture course at Ball State University in Muncie, IN, on October 14. She discussed her scholarship regarding Beyoncé’s Lemonadeand Tupac Shakur and also performed poetry.





  • Professor of Music Kiyoshi Tamagawa’s book Echoes from the East: The Javanese Gamelan and Its Influence on the Music of Claude Debussy will be released in December 2019 by Lexington Books. In it, he recounts Debussy’s 1889 encounter with the gamelan, the traditional musical ensemble of what is now Indonesia, at the Paris Exposition Universelle and traces its echoes through his entire compositional career. The book adds a commentary on the modern-day issue of cultural appropriation and a survey of Debussy’s contemporaries and successors who have also attempted to merge the sounds of the gamelan with their own distinctive musical styles.





  • Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow of Feminist Studies Sequoia Maner  gave a lecture and guided a series of workshops titled Langston Hughes: Writer for All Ages  for Humanities Texas and their 2019 program The Harlem Renaissance on October 9. Alongside Drs. Jennifer Wilks, Samantha Pinto, and Phil Barrish, Sequoia guided a class of over 50 secondary teachers from across Texas in the poetry & (after)life of Langston Hughes so that they might incorporate new strategies and skills into their classrooms. She emphasized the blues mode and vernacular traditions, Hughes’s landmark essay “The Negro Artist and Racial Mountain” as the manifesto of the Harlem Renaissance, and the dream series of Hughes’s poetic canon.





  • Associate Professor of Chinese Carl Robertson  presented a paper exploring cultural comparison, titled “Lyric Voice in the Poetry of Tao Yuanming and Leslie Norris,” at the recent SouthWest Conference of Asian Studies (SWCAS), held in Austin, TX, October 19, 2019,  This paper builds on another paper Robertson presented at the conference of the Association of Welsh Writers of English (AWWE) held at Tregynog, Wales, U.K., in May 2019, titled “Personal States of Mind: The Lyric Voice of Leslie Norris,” which included a  reading of the original poem “True Lark.” Robertson was also elected as an assistant editor of the SWCAS Journal  during proceedings in Austin.





  • Professor of Anthropology Melissa Johnson gave a talk based on her book Becoming Creole: Nature and Race in Belize at the University of Kentucky (UK) on September 26, 2019. The talk was part of the UK’s Year of Equity series of events and was sponsored by the UK College of Arts and Sciences, Latin American and Caribbean Studies Program, and Anthropology Department.





  • Professor Mary Visser’s artwork will be exhibited at the eighth Web Cast, or Café des Arts of Sciences and Techniques, on November 15, 2019, at the Galerie Maître Albert, created in 2013 by Jean Demetrau, founder of the Le Monde en Tique, a professional bookstore and publishing house. Located in the heart of Paris’s Latin Quarter, the gallery hosts events such as contemporary-art exhibitions, book readings, live music performances, and international webcasts.

    Web Cast is organized by Ars Mathematica (AM), an international nonprofit association based in Paris, France. AM promotes the interconnection of art, science, and technology more generally and research in the artistic fields of 3-D and computer sculpture more specifically. The association organizes workshops, symposia, and exhibitions—the first and foremost being the World Digital Sculpture Biennale, launched in 1993, which took the name of Intersculpt in 1995. In 2015, Ars Mathematica supported the Brown Symposium, What Things May Come: 3-D Printing in the Fine Arts and Sciences, held at Southwestern University.

    Visser, who is the vice president of AM, and Christian Lavigne, the president of AM, are currently preparing a book on the history of cybersculpture.





  • Professor of Music and Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts Michael Cooper published the world-premiere edition of Florence B. Price’s String Quartet No. 2in A Minor (1935) with G. Schirmer/Music Sales Classical. The firm acquired the exclusive worldwide rights to Price’s complete catalog in 2018. This edition is the first in a series of 64 source-critical editions of Price’s previously unpublished compositions to be released in Cooper’s editions over the next two years. Readers may preview the score, complete with impossibly turgid foreword, here. 





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Music Beth Everett recently presented a lecture titled “We Belong Together: Choral and Operatic Styles in Rossini’s Petite Messe Solennelle” at the first TEXOMA Regional Conference of the National Opera Association, held at Southern Methodist University, in Dallas. In addition, Everett served on the conference planning committee.





  • Professor of Political Science and Dean of the Faculty Alisa Gaunder published a book review of The Abe Administration and the Rise of the Prime Ministerial Executive by Aurelia George Mulgan in the latest issue of Monumenta Nipponica 74 (1): 157–160.





  • Daniela Beckelhymer ’20 was selected by the American Statistical Association to present “Tingle Therapy: An Analysis of ASMR Users’ Subjective Relief” at StatFest at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston on September 21, 2019. Beckelhymer received a scholarship for travel and lodging. In addition to presenting, Beckelhymer was able to network with undergraduates, graduate students, and faculty in statistics, as well as interview with recruiters from numerous Ph.D. programs around the country. 





  • Professor of Mathematics Kendall Richards and coauthors Elyssa Sliheet ’19 and Roger Barnard had the article titled “On Sharp Bounds for Ratios of K-Balanced Hypergeometric Functions” accepted for publication in the Proceedings of the American Mathematical Society (https://doi.org/10.1090/proc/14751 ; the hard-copy publication will appear in 2020).





September 2019

  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth serves as president of the South Texas chapter of the American Association of Teachers of German (AATG). The South Texas chapter hosted the annual meeting of the three Texas AATG chapters in Temple, TX, in September 2019. The chapter received AATG funding for a workshop on developing escape-room scenarios with German-culture themes.  Berroth coorganized the conference and presented two papers, one on best practices in connecting German and environmental studies, the other on her collaboration on Grenzenlos Deutsch, an open-access curriculum for beginning German.





  • Professor of English Eileen Cleere served on a panel of judges awarding the Richard Stein Prize to the best article published in nineteenth-century studies in 2018. The Stein Prize is awarded annually by the Interdisciplinary Nineteenth-Century Studies Association, an international organization.





  • Computational mathematics and psychology major Daniela Beckelhymer ’20 and computer science major Sara Boyd ’20 recently attended the ACM Richard Tapia Celebration of Diversity in Computing in San Diego, CA. Each received full scholarships, from IBM and Two Sigma respectively, to support their attendance in recognition of their accomplishments in computer science. Along with meeting Dr. Richard Tapia, they got to interact with numerous undergraduate and graduate students, faculty, researchers, and professionals in computing from all backgrounds and ethnicities, exploring career and graduate-school opportunities.





  • Novel English Majors, a course taught by Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers, was featured in the National Humanities Alliance blog post “Humanities Education and Career Preparation: Not Either/Or but Both/And.”  You can read it here.





  • Under the direction of Professor of Music Lois Ferrari,the Austin Civic Orchestra (ACO) has won second place for the nationally adjudicated American Prize in community orchestra performance of American music (Ernst Bacon Memorial Award). Ferrari and the ACO submitted a performance recording of a piece by local composer Dan Welcher, as well as the music of William Grant Still and Lee Actor. The ACO also garnered overall praise from the American Prize staff for the orchestra’s 2017–2018 season, titled Made in America, which featured music exclusively by American composers.





  • Professor of Chemistry Emily Niemeyer, Mei Earling ’16, and Triston Beadle ’18 published an article in the September 2019 issue of the journal Plant Foods for Human Nutrition.The article, titled “Açai Berry (Euterpe oleracea) Dietary Supplements: Variations in Anthocyanin and Flavonoid Concentrations, Phenolic Contents, and Antioxidant Properties,” was based on Earling and Beadle’s chemistry capstone projects. The research was completed with support from the Robert A. Welch Foundation and Southwestern’s Dishman endowment and Faculty–Student Projects fund. You can read it here.





  • Professor of Religion Elaine Craddock published the essay “Kālī Dances into the Cremation Grounds of the Tamil Land” in the Routledge anthology Regional Communities of Devotion in South Asia: Insiders, Outsiders, and Interlopers, edited by Gil Ben-Herut, Jon Keune, and Anne E. Monius.





  • In the wake of every election, Tufts University’s Institute for Democracy and Higher Education produces reports detailing overall college student turnout rates and campus-specific turnout for hundreds of college campuses. The 2018 reports came out September 19. Below are some highlights from Southwestern’s report:

      • The 2018 voting rate on SU’s campus was 51.7%! That surpasses both the 30% goal Assistant Professor of Political Science Emily Sydnor encouraged the student organizers to set and the 50% goal they wanted to work toward.
      • Southwestern showed a 33% increase from the voting rate at SU in 2014 and held steady at the rate SU voted in the 2016 presidential election (50% in 2016). As you might imagine, this is unusual for a midterm election.
      • SU’s rate was substantially higher than those of other institutions across the U.S.: 12.6% higher than the average across all institutions. SU’s was also higher than the national rate, which was 49.3%.
      • While turnout was up across the country in 2018, Southwestern’s impressive increase in voting rates was in part the result of concerted get-out-the-vote efforts by Sydnor, Senior Director of Integrative and Community-Engaged Learning Sarah Brackman, Teresa Cropper ’20, Laura Rativa ’20, Camille Martin ’19, Caroline Haywood ’18 and the Office of Community-Engaged Learning. 




  • This week, Columbia University Press released Disrespectful Democracy: The Psychology of Political Incivility , the first book by Assistant Professor of Political Science Emily Sydnor.The book demonstrates that incivility shapes people’s attitudes and emotional reactions to politics, but it does so differently based on how they as individuals respond to conflict and confrontation. Using data collected both at the University of Virginia and at Southwestern, the book shows that for some people, incivility can lead them to share more specific policy opinions and feel more positively about politics. 





  • Professor of Spanish Katy Ross wrote a chapter titled “Isabel: Mito, Madre y Mujer: Exploration of the Cultural Role of Isabel” in Mito e Historia en la Televisión y el Cine Español, edited by Christine Blackshaw Naberhaus and published by Albatros Hispanófila, 2019. The chapter examines the representation of Queen Isabel of Spain, from the conflicting embodiments of Isabel as mother to her depiction as queen in the television series Isabel.





  • Professor of Psychology Fay Guarraci  served as senior panelist and advisory board member during a four-day workshop for BRAINS (Broadening the Representation of Academic Investigators in NeuroScience) in Seattle, WA. BRAINS is a National Institutes of Health–sponsored program for professional development and community building among underrepresented postdoctoral fellows and new faculty in the neurosciences.





  • Professor of Music Lois Ferrari was awarded second place for the 2019 nationally adjudicated American Prize in community orchestra conducting. Ferrari’s work with the Austin Civic Orchestra (ACO) was also honored in the community orchestra performance category, with the ACO winning third place.





  • Associate Professor of Communication Studies Valerie Renegar presented her research on the discourse surrounding stepmothers at the Rhetoric Society of Europe’s Rhetoric in Society 7 conference in Ghent, Belgium in September. Her paper, “Old Stereotypes, Worn Metaphors, Outdated Fairy Tales: Stepmother Self-Help Books as (Useless) Equipment for (Barely) Living,” was coauthored with Kirsti Cole from Minnesota State University–Mankato. This is the pair’s third professional achievement in the area of mothering rhetoric.





  • Professor of English Eileen Cleere ’s review of Barbara Leckie’s Open Houses: Poverty, the Novel, and the Architectural Idea in Nineteenth-Century Britain  has just been published in the academic journal Nineteenth-Century Literature . You can read the review here .





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth earned the 2019 Outstanding German Educator Award. With this prestigious national award, the American Association of Teachers of German (AATG) recognizes one postsecondary educator annually for excellence in teaching, innovation, extraordinary talent, and exceptional leadership in the German teaching profession. Berroth will be honored during the AATG Awards Presentation at the American Council on Teaching Foreign Languages Convention and World Languages Expo in Washington, DC, in November 2019. A nominee’s dossier documents five or more years of demonstrated excellence in German education; active membership in the local AATG chapter; creative leadership in German language education; impact in local, state, or national arenas; and continued growth as a German educator. Current and former students and colleagues nationwide collaborated on submitting letters in support of Berroth’s nomination.





  • Associate Professor of Computer Science Barbara Anthony presented a paper titled ““Maximizing the Number of Rides Served for Dial-a-Ride” at ATMOS 2019, the Symposium on Algorithmic Approaches for Transportation Modeling, Optimization, and Systems, in Munich, Germany, as part of ALGO 2019, the major European event for researchers, students, and practitioners of algorithms. The paper, which will be published in the Dagstuhl Open Access Series in Informatics, has as coauthors Sara Boyd ’20; Christine Chung from Connecticut College and her students Ricky Birnbaum, Patrick Davis, and Jigar Dhimar; Ananya Christman from Middlebury College; and David Yuen.





  • Associate Professor of Environmental Studies Joshua Long, along with his co author Jennifer L. Rice of the University of Georgia, presented the opening keynote address at the New Climate Urbanism International Workshop at the Urban Institute, University of Sheffield, United Kingdom. The lecture, titled “Climate Urbanism and the Implications for Climate Apartheid,” was based on their 2019 article in the journal Urban Studies, “From Sustainable Urbanism to Climate Urbanism,” which was the inspiration for the workshop as well as a new research agenda beginning this year at the Urban Institute. 





  • Part-Time Instructor of Applied Music Adrienne Inglis ’s composition Wren , for mixed chorus and flute, will enjoy its world premiere performance by Inversion Ensemble on September 28, 2019 at 7:00 p.m. at the Wesleyan at Estrella in Georgetown and September 29, 2019, at 3:00 p.m. at Redeemer Presbyterian Church in Austin, Texas. Inversion Ensemble will also perform Wren  at its Sarofim Music Series concert on October 22, and the Southwestern University Chorale will perform it during their fall concert on November 2. Commissioned by Inversion Ensemble, Wren  sets Robert Macfarlane’s acrostic poem of the same name for mixed chorus and flute. With quick harmonic changes, syncopations, and melodic gestures, the composition captures a sense of the charming poem as well as the actual Eurasian wren ( Troglodytes troglodytes ) found year-round throughout the U.K. Macfarlane’s poem “Wren” comes from his 2017 illustrated poetry book, The Lost Words , which conjures pictures of the wild things and untamed spaces that get shortchanged in modern urban life.





  • Part-Time Instructor of Applied Music  Adrienne Inglis ’s composition  Metamorphosis,  for solo flute, solo harp, and string orchestra, will enjoy its world premiere performance by Chaski and the Balcones Community Orchestra on September 22, 2019, at 4:00 p.m. at the Lakeway Activity Center in Lakeway, TX. Commissioned by the Balcones Community Orchestra,  Metamorphosis  honors the life and work of pioneering entomologist, naturalist, and artist Maria Sibylla Merian (1647–1717). Merian carefully documented in illustrated detail the life cycle of so many insects; accordingly,  Metamorphosis  musically follows a butterfly from egg and larva to pupa and adult.





  • Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry Maha Zewail-Foote recently published an article on using computer simulations to teach chemical kinetics in the journal Trends in Chemistry. Southwestern graduate Jace Venters ’13 is a coauthor on this paper. 





  • Assistant Professor of Communication Studies Lamiyah Bahrainwala published an article titled “Blind Submission” in the journal Communication, Culture & Critique. Bahrainwala noticed that Muslim men were posting YouTube videos of themselves blindfolded, standing on street corners, and asking for hugs from passersby to prove that they are “not terrorists.” What fresh nonsense is this? Bahrainwala wondered, and wrote about the intersections of terrorism and disability.





  • Professor of Art History and Scientific Director of the Restoring Ancient Stabiae (RAS) Foundation Thomas Noble Howe gave a presentation to faculty and administrators at Lyon College, in Batesville, AR, titled “The Synchronous International Classroom: New Directions for Cost Control of Liberal Arts Study-Abroad Programs.” Howe is working with several U.S. small colleges and consortia to establish a U.S.-accredited two-semester study-abroad center at the Vesuvian Institute of the RAS Foundation.





  • Programmer and Analyst George Godward developed a more streamlined package tracking system for the campus Post Office. The system was implemented this summer, and it has made a significant impact on the workflow in processing packages for the SU community.  





  • Assistant Professor of Computer Science Jacob Schrum attended the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Conference on Games in London, U.K., to present the paper “Desirable Behaviors for Companion Bots in First-Person Shooters,” coauthored with Adina Friedman ’19. Friedman started this research as part of her 2018 SCOPE experience. The full paper has been published in the conference proceedings.





  • Professor of Psychology Traci Giuliano  recently completed work guest editing a special issue in the journal Frontiers in Psychology  on the topic “Engaging Undergraduates in Publishable Research: Best Practices.” The editorial, which contains links to all 43 articles, can be found here . A faculty-development lunchtime discussion on the topic of publishing with undergraduates will be held on Friday, October 4 from 12:30 p.m.–1:30 p.m.





  • Assistant Professor of Political Science Emily Sydnorpresented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association (APSA) and at the APSA Political Communication Preconference, which were held in Washington, DC, August 27–September 1. Her pre-conference paper, “Confronting Politics: The Role of Conflict Orientation in Shaping Political Debate,” was coauthored by Emily Tesmer ’20 and Breely Peterson ’21. The conference paper, “Stressing Incivility: Physiological Arousal and Incivility,” reported findings from a joint project with Tesmer and Associate Professor of Psychology Erin Crockett. Both papers would not be possible without great research assistance from Ashton Eggers ’21, Madison Flores ’20, Emma Lopez ’21, Camille Martin ’19, and Olivia Montreuil ’20.





August 2019

  • Assistant Professor of Mathematics John Ross published an article titled “On the Existence of a Closed, Embedded, Rotational Lambda-Hypersurface” in the Journal of Geometry.





  • Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers  published a review of the new documentary Fiddler: A Miracle of Miracles in the Jewish Women’s Archive  blog. Read it here.





  • Part-Time Assistant Professor of Theatre Joey Banks ’07 and Technical Director in Theatre Justin Smith ’04 will be producing and performing in the Haymaker Players’ production of Tail End Charlie, August 23–September 8, at Trinity Street Playhouse in Austin.





  • This summer, Professor of Art History Thomas Noble Howe coordinated his 12th field season at the ancient Roman site of Stabiae near Pompeii, Italy, with teams from the State Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg; the Technische Universität München (the Technical University of Munich, excavation and conservation); the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee (LiDAR); and the Warsaw Academy of Fine Arts (conservation). Howe also worked with the Cornell University garden excavation at the House of Regina Carolina in Pompeii, establishing recording techniques that he developed in Rome and Stabiae using a single total station surveying instrument to record all find spots and to do a “wireframe” high-precision surveyed drawing of the architecture.





  • Associate Professor of English Michael Saenger  published a blog post for the Times  of Israel, titled “Bibi Loves BDS.” Read it here .





  • Associate Professor of English Michael Saenger was invited to be an academic visitor by the chair of the faculty of English at Cambridge University, December 2019–January 2020. Saenger will be conducting research on temporality in relation to Shakespeare’s life in print.





  • Associate Professor of Computer Science Barbara Anthony was the recipient of a $5,000 grant from the National Science Foundation–supported Center for Parallel and Distributed Computing Curriculum Development and Educational Resources. The Center helps faculty incorporate parallel and distributed computing into courses for students in their first two years of undergraduate study. As part of the grant, she spent a week with faculty members from around the country at the University of Maryland, College Park, receiving training on parallel and distributed computing content and educational evaluation methodology.





  • The Department of Mathematics and Computer Science was active at MathFest, a national meeting of the Mathematical Association of America (MAA), held this year in Cincinnati, OH, July 31–August 3, 2019.

    • Professor of Mathematics Alison Marr and Daniela Beckelhymer ’20 led an activity titled “Domino Antimagic Squares” in the MAA Workshop Create and Recreate: A Celebration of Women in Recreational Mathematics.
    • Marr copresented “Beyond Leaky Pipes: Fostering Pathways and Persistence in the Mathematical Sciences” with Joel Kilty and Alex M. McAllister, of Centre College, and Ranthony A.C. Edmonds, of Ohio State University, in the session “Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in Mathematics,” which they also coorganized.
    • Beckelhymer participated in the Mentoring Workshop for Women.
    • Professor of Mathematics Fumiko Futamura organized and led a minicourse, “Visualizing Projective Geometry through Photographs and Perspective Drawings,” with her collaborator Annalisa Crannell, of Franklin & Marshall College. This was the sixth offering of the highly successful national expert class, sponsored by the MAA special-interest group on Mathematics and the Arts.
    • Associate Professor of Mathematics Therese Shelton presented “DE and Social Justice: A Cholera Model with Bacterial Reservoir,” coauthored by Emma Kathryn Groves ’18 and Associate Professor of Education Sherry Adrian, in the session “Showcase of Modeling to Motivate Differential Equations,” coorganized with Patrice Tiffany and Rosemary Farley, of Manhattan College, Riverside, NY.  Shelton and Tiffany are among the coprincipal investigators on a grant from the National Science Foundation that sponsored the session.
    • Shelton participated in the full-day meeting of the national governing body, the MAA Congress, as the new representative from the Texas Section of the MAA. Shelton was elected as recorder for the MAA Congress (2020–2022), and she participated in the MAA Section Officers Meeting.
    • Shelton coorganized the general contributed poster session with Steven McKay, of Brigham Young University, Provo, UT, as members of the national MAA Committee on Contributed Paper Sessions.




  • Professor of Art and Art History Thomas Noble Howe  and Uri Dromi (director of the Mishkenot Sha’ananim Center in Jerusalem, former spokesman of the Rabin and Perez governments, and director of the Jerusalem Press Club) published the proceedings from an international conference they organized in Jerusalem in November 2008. The publication, The Roman Villa in the Mediterranean Basin  (Cambridge Press, 2018) is being reviewed by Elaine Gazda (University of Michigan) in the Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians in September 2019 (vol. 78, no. 3, pp. 347–349). JSAH is the major international scholarly venue for architectural history, and the review characterizes Howe and Dromi’s volume as “monumental.” Howe contributed a lead chapter and invited the contributors.





  • Assistant Professor of Business Debika Sihi coauthored an article titled “The Marketing Organization’s Journey to Become Data Driven” in the Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing. The article explores the experiences of managers implementing data analytics into the processes of the marketing function. It also uncovers the challenges and identifiable stages of implementation.





  • Part-Time Instructor of Applied Music Adrienne Inglis’s composition “The Song of the Harp Seal” will enjoy its world premiere performance by Inversion Ensemble Coda August 10–11, 2019, in Georgetown and Austin, TX. Composed especially for Inversion Ensemble Coda, “The Song of the Harp Seal” sets to music Gillean McDougall’s poem of the same title and was commissioned by the composer for this project. For treble chorus and harp, this work tells the story of a mother harp seal and her pup forced south of their usual arctic range by the climate crisis. The pup ingests plastic pollution which contributes to her death near the shores of the Isle of Skye. Scottish legend mixes with modern tragedy as mermaids beckon in Gaelic to the harp pup and summon the audience to remember the harp seal. Inversion Ensemble’s project “Aether: Earth—Conservation/Nature” features guest conductor Cina Crisara and Chaski harpist Shana Norton.





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth presented her research paper “Felicitas Hoppe’s Pigafetta: Pluri-Worlds and Vibrant Matter” on the ecological interconnectedness of the Pacific at the 22nd General Congress of the International Comparative Literature Association, ACLA. Title Literature of the World and the Future of Comparative Literature, the conference was held July 29–August 2, 2019, at the University of Macau, Macau SAR, China. Berroth’s presentation contributed to subtheme 4: The Multiple Histories of Comparative Literature; Pacific Insularity: Imaginary Geography of Insular Spaces in the Pacific. Postcolonial critiques of colonial master narratives and approaches to alternative constructions of insularity beyond the dominant Western traditions were essential tasks of speakers contributing to this section.





  • An excerpt of Associate Professor of Music Jason Hoogerhyde ’s opera The Color of Dissonance  was included in the 10th edition of Nancy Rogers and Robert Ottman’s Music for Sight Singing  (Pearson, 2019).





  • Director of the Debby Ellis Writing Center Jennifer Marciniak was awarded the South Central Writing Center Association (SCWCA) Micro-Regional Grant for the state of Texas to host the Fall 2019 Directors’ Day Out on September 14 at Southwestern University. The event is a full-day workshop and networking seminar for 15 writing-center directors from Central and South Central Texas academic institutions. The workshop will focus on how regional directors can work together to train and educate writing consultants by using cross-institutional frameworks, such as field trips, mini-conferences, and video-chat sessions.





  • Southwestern faculty and students attended the American Sociological Association’s (ASA) Annual Meeting, August 10–13. 

    • Associate Professor of Sociology Reggie Byron gave a presentation titled “Workplace Discrimination and the Racialized Character of Organizations.” He also sat on an ASA panel of the Task Force on First-Generation and Working-Class Persons in Sociology for the second year in a row.
    • Professor of Sociology Maria Lowe and Madeline Carrola ’19 gave a presentation titled “Racialized Surveillance of Parks and Pools in a Liberal, Predominantly White Neighborhood.” 
    • Four sociology majors participated in the 2019 ASA’s Honors Program and presented their papers. Madeline Carrola ’19 and Molly McConnell ’20 presented their capstone and research-methods papers, which were the basis of their admission to the program. Samantha Pentecost 19 and Veronica Ciotti ’19 presented their capstone papers and were admitted by virtue of their second- and third-place wins in the annual Alpha Kappa Delta International Honor Society of Sociology undergraduate paper competition.
    • In addition, Savannah Scott  ’19 received the ASA Section on Racial and Ethnic Minorities 2019 Joe Feagin Distinguished Undergraduate Student Paper Award for her capstone project, “Medically Policing Black Female Bodies: Black Women’s Experiences with Birth Control in Austin, Texas.”




July 2019

  • D’Andre Adams ’21, Daniela Beckelhymer ’20, and Professor of Mathematics Alison Marr had their paper “Choose Your Own Adventure: An Analysis of Interactive Gamebooks Using Graph Theory” published in the July edition of the Journal of Humanistic Mathematics. This research was conducted as part of SCOPE 2017. The article is available here.





  • Julia O’Bryan  ’19 received an Award of Excellence in the prestigious VSA Emerging Young Artists Program for her work “Beautiful Brokenness,” part of her Southwestern capstone exhibition. VSA Emerging Young Artists is a program of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, in Washington, D.C., that recognizes and showcases the work of emerging young artists with disabilities. O’Bryan’s work, along with that of 15 other award recipients, will travel in a 1–2 year national exhibition.





  • Assistant Professor of Psychology Carin Perilloux, with her collaborator Dr. Jaime Cloud from Western Oregon University, published an article titled “Mate-by-Numbers: Budget, Mating Context, and Sex Predict Preferences for Facial and Bodily Traits” in the journal Evolutionary Psychological Science.





  • Assistant Professor of Psychology Carin Perilloux, together with psychology alumnus Justin White ’18, published a review of Gil Rosenthal’s book Mate Choice: The Evolution of Sexual Decision Making from Microbes to Humansin the journal Evolutionary Studies in Imaginative Culture.





  • Associate Professor of English Michael Saenger published a review of Malcolm Smuts (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of The Age of Shakespeare, Oxford University Press. The review appeared in Notes and Queries, also published by Oxford University Press.





  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Therese Shelton was interviewed for a post of the Mathematical Association of America Blog for work under a grant from the National Science Foundation, NSF Award no. 1724796 under IUSE: EHR 15-585 for 2018–2021. The coprincipal investigators in the grant are Brian Winkel, director of SIMIODE (Systemic Initiative for Modeling Investigations and Opportunities with Differential Equations); R. Corban Harwood, George Fox University in Newberg, OR; Audrey Malagon, Virginia Wesleyan University, Virginia Beach, VA; and Patrice Tiffany, Manhattan College, Riverdale, NY. Rosemary Farley from Manhattan College has also been integral to this work. In the second year of the grant, Shelton coorganized and coled a faculty-development workshop, held at George Fox University, July 22–27. Twenty-seven participants from across the U.S. became MINDE (Model Instructors in Differential Equations) Fellows to enhance their teaching of undergraduate differential equations in a modeling-first approach. The workshop was sponsored by SIMIODE , a nonprofit 501(c)3 organization, and Manhattan College.





  • Assistant Professor of Political Science Emily Sydnor  was interviewed by KXAN and the Williamson County Sun   about a new Texas law that prevents mobile polling locations during early voting. She discussed the effects of polling locations on voter turnout, particularly among college students.





  • Supported by a Sam Taylor Fellowship, Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth conducted an interview with Christian Stocker, representative of the SILVIVA foundation, and visited the Sihlwald nature education center in Zürich, Switzerland. The interview and site visit will inform units on nature education and sustainability to be published for the NEH sponsored digital humanities project, our co-authored open access curriculum Grenzenlos Deutsch.





  • Professor of Political Science and Dean of the Faculty Alisa Gaunder  argued against the resolution: “Japan needs a two-party system” in an article published in the Center for Strategic and International Studies newsletter Debating Japan . Debating Japan  is “a platform for scholars around the world to address pressing issues in Japan’s policy debate and U.S.–Japan relations.” Each author is asked to take a particular position on a policy issue. This issue of the newsletter focuses on the party system in the wake of the recent upper house parliamentary election on July 21, 2019.





  • Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin and journalist, editor, and singer Helen Cordes published “Singing Resistance, Rebellion, and Revolution into Being: Collective Political Action and Song,” the lead chapter in the anthology Sonic Politics: Music and the Narration of the Social in the Americas from the 1960s to the Present, edited by Olaf Kaltmeier and Wilfried Raussert and published by Routledge. The publication is accompanied by a webpage and a YouTube channel with playlists created for the individual chapters, providing the opportunity to listen to the songs under discussion while reading the essays, thus making the topic acoustically more “tangible.”





  • Part-Time Assistant Professor of Music Hai Zheng Olefsky was invited to give a cello master class and perform a solo and chamber music in concert with violin virtuoso Elizabeth Pitcairn at Luzerne Chamber Music Festival’s Legacy Concert on July 21, 2019. Luzerne Music Center (LMC) aims to provide world-class music instruction for passionate young people in a summer-camp environment regardless of their financial circumstances. Musicians ages nine to 18 come from all over the world to train at LMC’s campus, which is located in the foothills of New York City’s Adirondack Park.





  • Assistant Professor of Communication Studies Lamiyah Bahrainwala published an article titled “Nike Unveils Muslim Women Athletes” in the journal Feminist Media Studies, which she coauthored with Erin O’Connor from the University of Texas at Austin. This paper grew from their reaction to Nike’s ad for its Pro Hijab, which you can watch here.





  • Associate Professor of English Michael Saenger and Associate Professor of Theatre Sergio Costola organized and led a seminar titled “Polychronic Translation of Shakespeare” at the 2019 European Shakespeare Research Association Conference, held at the Università degli Studi Roma Tre, in Rome, Italy, July 9–12. Kayla Ingram ’20 attended the conference, and, following an independent study with Dr. Saenger on Shakespeare and Translation, designed graphic support for the seminar.





  • Associate Professor of Theatre Kerry Bechtel  has been acting as the associate costume designer alongside Costume Designer Jonathan Knipscher  ’03 at Central City Opera, in Central City, CO. The production of Benjamin Britten’s Billy Budd  is making its Colorado regional premiere. The opera follows the original Herman Melville novella about a young sailor on a British warship in the late 18th century; it features a cast of nearly 60 men and boys as well as realistic period costumes ranging from Royal Navy uniforms to sailors and civilians.





  • Professor of Theatre John OreSam Buehler ’20, and Sage Clay ’22 completed a faculty–student project that created the Heather McGaughey Sustainability kiosk, a public information touchscreen display located in the Jones Theater lobby. Please visit their work to find out more about environmental studies, fine arts, and Heather McGaughey’04.





  • Professor of Art Mary Visser and Charles Morris ’15 had their 3-D sculptural work selected by the European Symposium on Additive Manufacturing (3-D Printing) to be presented at their Paris conference in June at the Ecole CentraleSupélec.





  • Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers was an invited participant in KUT’s “Views and Brews” podcast on the past, present, and future of the humanities. Other panelists were Dennis Ahlburg, former president of Trinity University; Amelia Pace-Borah, academic director of Austin’s Free Minds program; and Paul Woodruff, former dean of undergraduate studies at the University of Texas. Meyers talked about her nationally recognized course Novel English Majors, the role of public scholarship in rejuvenating the humanities, and the need for continuity and change as we revise the curriculum. According to her, “a complex world and complex problems require complex and visionary thinking, and that’s what the humanities offers.” The podcast is available through NPR.





  • Associate Professor of Computer Science Barbara Anthony was a participant in the WeTeach_CS Summit 2019, a three-day event that educates, empowers, and inspires K–12 computer science teachers, advocates, administrators, professional-development providers, university instructors, and policy makers to advance the goal of computer science for all in Texas and beyond.





  • Assistant Professor of Economics Katherine Grooms and coauthors were awarded a prestigious National Institutes of Health (NIH) two-year grant for their work “Drinking Water and Infant Health: Evidence from Contaminant Levels in California.” Dr. Grooms presented their research at the annual meeting of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, in Incline Village, NV.