Academics

Notable Faculty & Student Achievements

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December 2020

  • Associate Professor of Art History Allison Miller ’s book Kingly Splendor: Court Art and Materiality in Han China  was published by Columbia University Press.





  • Associate Professor of Environmental Studies Joshua Long  coauthored a paper with former SU students Keara Hudler  ’18, Nataley Ford  ’18, Lilly Dennis  ’18, Joanna Mendez  ’18, and Muriel DiNella  ’18 that was recently nominated for the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE) Campus Research Award. That paper, titled “ Intersectional Sustainability and Student Activism ,” appeared earlier this year in the journal Education, Citizenship, and Social Justice. 





  • Associate Professor of Environmental Studies Joshua Long published an article titled ““Climate Urbanism: Crisis, Capitalism, and Intervention” with Jennifer L. Rice (Department of Geography, University of Georgia). This article appears in the latest issue of Urban Geography.





  • Assistant Professor of Political Science Emily Sydnor has shared her expertise in American political behavior through a wide range of outlets in the past few weeks, including a pre-election interview with KUT and postelection discussions with Bloomberg News and the Georgetown edition of Community Impact. She was also a contributor to U.S. Election Analysis 2020, a report capturing the immediate thoughts, reflections, and early insights on the 2020 presidential election by more than 115 leading U.S. and international academics. In her entry, Sydnor discussed the narratives of civility and incivility throughout the presidential campaign and argued that Biden’s call for a return to civility may gloss over real systemic and nationwide concerns. Sydnor also published a post on the American Political Science Association’s RAISE the Vote site, a blog dedicated to amplifying and increasing students’ civic engagement and voting. The post outlined Southwestern’s university-wide collaboration around voter education and turnout, as well as our on-campus polling place, as an example for other schools who are also interested in increasing their student engagement.





  • Associate Professor of English Michael Saenger  published a featured post on the Times of Israel  website titled “Texas Saves Progressivism.” See the article here .





November 2020

  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth contributed to the joined virtual conference of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) and the American Association of Teachers of German (AATG) November 2022, 2020. Berroth offered a session for German educators on developing connections in German instruction to topics in sustainable development with a focus on climate-science information and disinformation literacy. Berroth participated in annual meetings as a member of AATG’s regional and national leadership teams and committees.





  • Director of Study Abroad and International Student Services Monya Lemery and Assistant Director of Study Abroad and International Student Services Meaghan Bellande attended the Virtual International Student Exchange Program (ISEP) Coordinator Workshop, November 1719, 2020. Southwestern’s membership in ISEP, an international exchange network, allows SU students to study abroad at 295 institutions in 55 countries worldwide and SU to receive international exchange students from these institutions, enriching the cultural diversity of our classrooms.





  • Part-Time Assistant Professor of Classics Jeffrey Easton  has had an article accepted for publication in an upcoming issue of the classics peer-reviewed journal Historia: Zeitschrift für Alte Geschichte.  The article, titled “Mostly Work and Some Play: The Roman Municipal Familia Publica  as a ‘Professional Association,’” examines how groups of freed Roman slaves formed their own private associations as a response to their lack of access to the existing associative framework in their towns. This phenomenon is observed among the freedmen and freedwomen of many towns throughout Italy. Through these local organizations, members staged social activities and banquets, forged social and economic networks, managed funerary arrangements, and found a venue for meaningful interaction with their wider communities.





  • Part-Time Instructor of Applied Music Adrienne Inglis virtually rehearsed two of her recent compositions, “La Ciudad Sumergida” (The Submerged City; 2020) and  “Oure Light in Oure Night” (2020), which were both composed for remote online choir performance, with North Central College’s Concert Choir and Women’s Chorale. Commissioned by Ramona M. Wis and the North Central College Women’s Chorale of NapervilleIllinois, “La Ciudad Sumergida” for four-part treble chorus with nature soundtrack captures the mood of a river, a city, the cloudy sky, and the poet’s own profound melancholy. The text is an excerpt of “Río de La Plata en lluvia” (1938) by Alfonsina Storni. The sound of rain creates the ambiance of a misty day on the river and the sensation of cathartic crying from great sadness and pain. The city’s reflection on the river’s surface gives the illusion that the city is submerged in the water, and the reflection of the clouds hovering low over Río de La Plata looks like gray heliotrope flowers. The apocalyptic images of a submerged city and of tears overflowing from the chalice-sky eerily foreshadow rising sea levels due to anthropogenic global warming.





  • Associate Professor of Psychology Erin Crockett published an article with colleagues in the Netherlands titled “Does Attachment Style Moderate the Effect of Computer-Mediated versus Face-to-Face Conflict Discussions?” The article was published in the journal Personal Relationships.  For more information, click here .





  • Professor of Education Michael Kamen  coauthored a chapter in the textbook Affective Movements, Methods, and Pedagogies  (Routledge, ebook 2020, print 2021) along with Alys Mendus (first author) of the University of Hull, U.K. ; New York City–based playwright Adaire Kamen’ and SU alumni Sarah Buchanan  ’20, Abigail Luna  ’20, Abigail Earle Downs  19, and Kelli McLaughlin  18. The chapter—titled “They Call Teachers by Their First Names!”—is an ethnodrama of preservice teachers visiting innovative schools. 





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth delivered a workshop for German educators, invited by the Goethe-Institut in Washington, DC, in collaboration with Goethe-Institut Mexico. The workshop on integrating authentic resources into education for sustainable development was part of the virtual conference Unsere Nachhaltige Zukunft  (Our Sustainable Future), November 13 15, 2020. Using resources available at www.klimafakten.de, Berroth introduced an international audience to models for integrating principles of climate-science communication into teaching German language and culture.





  • Preservation Georgetown held its first virtual Home Tour on November 14, chaired by Rachel Hancock ’14 and the current Preservation Georgetown board president Austin Painchaud ’13, who is the internship and employment developer at SU’s Center for Career & Professional Development. This event highlighted three historic homes in Georgetown’s Old Town district, including the San Gabriel House Bed & Breakfast on University Avenue and another home once occupied by former SU physics professor and president Robert Hyer (1860–1929). Learn more about the Home Tour and watch the video here.





  • Professor of Music Michael Cooper published the first-ever edition of what is arguably the most important of many collaborations between Florence B. Price and Langston Hughes: “Monologue for the Working Class” (New York: G. Schirmer). Hughes wrote this poem in October 1941 or earlier to boost the morale of the “poor and unemployed” in the face of the apathy of the rich in Depression-era America, and in that guise, the poem inspired Price to write an extraordinary song, which was recently given its world premiere (in Cooper’s edition) in a music video produced by the Antwerp-based #SongsofComfort team, featuring bass-baritone Justin Hopkins and pianist Jeanne-Minette Cilliers. After the bombing of Pearl Harbor and the U.S.’s entry into World War II in December 1941, Hughes recast the poem as a morale booster in wartime, replacing the words “show ’em what the working class can do” with “show ’em what free men can really do” and making other similar changes. Hughes never published the “working-class” version of his poem, and Price never published her setting thereof—but now both are out. Because the full story is much richer than space permitted in the Schirmer edition, Cooper also blogged about it here to help brave and sleep-deprived readers learn more about the poem and music while also nodding off for a good night’s rest. 





  • At the 2020 Virtual Lt Brain Trust Conference, Assistant Professor of Kinesiology Jennifer Stokes presented “Using Lt to Create an Interactive, Data-Driven Endocrinology Activity.” The Lt Brain Trust is an annual international conference for science educators who are selected to showcase new and innovative educational practices that use Lt, an online learning platform for anatomy content, physiological recording, and data analysis.





  • Professor of Music Michael Cooper gave a virtual masterclass for the University of Memphis titled “Paying the Price: Race and Gender, Imperatives and Opportunities for the Great White Spaces of Classical Music in the Year 2020.” The presentation integrated Cooper’s work in reviving the previously unheard music of Florence B. Price into larger issues of antiracist and inclusive pedagogies in the “last water fountain” of Western classical music, as developed in his current course on Freedom, Movement, and Migration in Music.





  • Assistant Professor of Mathematics Noelle Sawyer co-organized Black in Math Week, November 8 13, a social-media event to promote visibility and community among Black mathematicians. In one of the events for the week, Sawyer cohosted an episode of the podcast Relatively Prime  about Black math educators. Black in Math Week is a part of a series of ‘Black in X’ weeks, which began with Black Birders Week to normalize Black people as a part of science communities after someone called 911 to report a Black birdwatcher in Central Park. You can find the Twitter account here and the podcast episode here .





  • Associate Professor of Business Debika Sihi presented a coauthored project titled “The Use of Social Media and Social Interaction in Crowdsourcing in the FFE (fuzzy front end) of NPD” at the Society of Marketing Advances Annual Conference November 4–7, 2020. This project examines the impact of online versus offline mechanisms of crowdsourcing on idea generation during the new product development process.





  • Associate Professor of Sociology Reggie Byron published a review of the book Should Schools be Colorblind? by Laurie Cooper Stoll in the sociology journal Social Forces.  The review can be found here .





  • Associate Professor of Sociology Reggie Byron published a peer-reviewed teaching exercise titled “Teaching Criminology during a Pandemic” in the American Sociological Association’s Teaching Resources and Innovations Library for Sociology (TRAILS). The resource can be found here.





  • Director of Study Abroad and International Student Services Monya Lemery and Assistant Director of Study Abroad and International Student Services Meaghan Bellande presented “Roundtable: How Can We Market Education Abroad in a Virtual World?” at the 2020 NAFSA Region III Virtual Conference. The theme of the conference was Vision 20/20: Seize the Present; Shape the Future. The conference was held over several days in September and October.





October 2020

  • Associate Professor of Business Debika Sihi presented and chaired a panel titled “Calm during Crisis: Creating Classroom Environments that Foster Learning and Collaboration” at the Marketing Management Association Conference October 28–30, 2020. She and two colleagues (from a private and public university) led a discussion on different initiatives to support and engage students during a challenging academic year.





  • Professor of Music Michael Cooper gave a virtual lecture titled “The Music of Florence B. Price” for the Music for Life  series of the New Horizons Band’s Toronto chapter. Although the title of the talk was as bland as old corrugated cardboard, the presentation itself focused on the issues and opportunities that Cooper’s ongoing series of editions of Price’s music pose for the current Price renaissance in a musical world hungry for new and socially relevant ideas and sounds in the world of music history. 





  • Professor of Music Lois Ferrari conducted and presided over the Austin Civic Orchestra’s (ACO’s) second virtual concert on October 24. This concert program was designed to provide the orchestra’s musicians with a safe environment in which to rehearse and perform during the current pandemic. ACO members were assigned to small chamber groups or chose to form their own groups, all with social distancing and aerosol management at the forefront of consideration. The members rehearsed for four weeks and then recorded their performances at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center in Austin. The streamed event drew a large appreciative virtual audience on both the ACO Facebook page and YouTube channel. Ferrari and the ACO plan to continue this practice through the spring semester.





  • Associate Professor of English Michael Saenger presented “Interlinguistic Shakespeare in East Asia” at the virtual 49th Southwest Conference on Asian Studies, October 23, 2020.





  • Associate Professor of Business Hazel Nguyen and economics graduate Diana Trevino ’20 presented their research titled “They’ve Figured It out! Gender Differences in Executive Language Styles through Shareholders’ Letters” at the virtual Financial Management Association Annual Meeting on October 23. The presentation was based on work conducted as part of SCOPE 2019. In their project, Nguyen and Trevino  ask whether there are differences in language and communication styles used by female versus male CEOs and how these language differences represent differences in leadership styles. They find that there are significant differences in thematic tones between female and male CEOs. Female CEOs’ languages are more comprehensible and emphasize transformational changes, optimism, mutual understanding, and rapport more than those of male CEOs while also being more resolute and authoritative.





  • Professor of Chemistry Emily Niemeyer published an article titled “Instituting a Group Component to a Final Exam” in Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry. The article is a contribution to the “ABCs of Education and Professional Development in Analytical Science” portion of the journal and was coauthored with Tom Wenzel from Bates College. The peer-reviewed pedagogical article provides an overview of considerations for adding a collaborative group element to final exams in upper-level analytical chemistry courses. The work stemmed from Niemeyer and Wenzel’s ongoing collaboration as facilitators at regional and national active-learning workshops for analytical chemistry faculty.





  • Professor of Chemistry Emily Niemeyer and Derrica McDowell ’20 published a chapter titled “Factors Influencing the Production of Phenolic Compounds within Basil ( Ocimum basilicum L. )” in the forthcoming book Ocimum: An Overview.  Their chapter discusses the phenolic compounds found within basil and their associated health benefits, explains various strategies to increase phytochemical levels in basil, and offers conclusions about methods that can be used to maximize basil phenolic content. The book is part of the Herbs and Herbalism  series published by Nova Science Publishers. Research for the chapter was supported by the Herbert and Kate Dishman fund at Southwestern University.





  • Professor of Art Mary Visser and Charles Morris ’15 have had their digital sculptures accepted into the international Digital Sculpture Exhibition, which will be held at the Galerie Maître Albert in Paris, France, in December 2020. View their digital sculptures: Visser and Morris.





  • Professor of Anthropology Mel Johnson, Associate Professor of Education Alicia Moore , and Professor of Philosophy Phil Hopkins  were panelists for the Georgetown Public Library event “Confronting Racism: A Community Conversation.” The event offered three sessions centered around three selected texts aimed at children, young adults, and adults. Moore participated in the panel discussing New Kid by Jerry Craft, a graphic novel about the struggle to fit in with a world that doesn’t look like you. Hopkins participated in the panel discussing The Hate U Give  by Angie Thomas, which details the impact of police violence on communities of color. Johnson participated in the panel on Ibram X. Kendi’s How to Be an Antiracist,  a best-selling book on how to fight racism and inequality.





  • Professor of Computer Science Barbara Anthony  and Professor of Mathematics Alison Marr  presented their paper “Directed Zagreb Indices” at the (virtual) 18th Cologne–Twente Workshop on Graphs and Combinatorial Optimization (CTW 2020). The presentation and slides are available here . Their paper will be published in the AIRO Springer Series  CTW 2020 Proceedings  in March. 





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth gave a presentation on “Syllabus Design and Universal Design for Learning (UDL)” at the 45th Annual Women in German Conference, which was hosted virtually at Sewanee, University of the South, Tennessee, October 15–18, 2020. The presentation contributed to a pedagogy panel on “Universal Design for Learning as Feminist Practice.” Berroth serves on the Women in German Dissertation Prize Committee and was delighted to meet and mentor the candidates and the award winner, who participated from Germany. 





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth  participated in a three-day faculty seminar convened in the context of the 44th annual meeting of the German Studies Association. Via Zoom, the Beyond Umweltschutz:  Narrative and Visual Responses to Environmental Threats seminar brought together 18 environmental humanities scholars from three continents to discuss the research papers they shared with this group earlier this year. Berroth’s contribution, “From Apathy to Empathy: Approaches to Inviting Activism at the Intersections of Science and Storytelling in Werner Herzog’s Documentaries and Ilija Trojanow’s EisTau  (2011)/ The Lamentations of Zeno  (2016),” relates to texts and contexts she teaches in her first-year and advanced-entry  seminar on International Climate Fiction. 





  • Kate Davis ’20 and Hannah Hanson ’22 conducted a SCOPE project under the supervision of Professor of Psychology Fay Guarraci, which was recently published in Physiology & Behavior. This collaboration also involved Jessica Bolton ’10, who will soon begin a tenure-track position at Georgia State University. Davis, a current graduate student in the Department of Neuroscience at The University of Texas at Austin, designed the project, and together, the team found that using an animal model of poverty caused long-term deleterious effects on reproductive physiology and behavior. Neonatal poverty disrupted maternal behavior, which accelerated physiological maturation in females but delayed sexual maturation in males. However, both male and female rats displayed enhanced sexual motivation. These results have implications for precocious sexual behavior and disrupted puberty in children who are born into poverty. This research was also supported by a Sam Taylor Award. 





  • Part-Time Professor of Economics Jim Christianson was one of three Austin certified public accountants selected via a random drawing to serve on the the City of Austin Applicant Review Panel. This panel will select 60 applicants for the City of Austin Independent Citizens Redistricting  Commission, which is charged with redrawing the 10 City of Austin Council districts after the 2020 census is complete. Christianson teaches Accounting and Business Law at Southwestern. 





  • Recent alumni Maryam Ali ’20, Michael Broyle  ’20, Kate Davis  ’20, Chantal Gonzalez  ’19, Devon Lucero  ’19, and Lainey Stary  ’19 and Professor of Psychology Fay Guarraci  published a new research project investigating the long-term effects of neonatal exposure to a component of soy (genistein) on male and female reproductive physiology and behavior in the journal Behavioural Pharmacology.  Although this research was conducted in rats, it suggests that there may be some consequences of feeding neonates soy-based formula.





  • Associate Director of Admission Rebecca Rother and Associate Professor of Economics and Business Debika Sihi presented a session about business degrees in the liberal arts through the Colleges that Change Lives virtual program.





September 2020

  • Laura Hobgood,  professor of religion and holder of the Brown Chair in Religion and Environmental Studies, was the invited lecturer for Texas Christian University’s annual Blessing of the Animals (this year virtual). Her lecture was titled “We Are Animals Too” and was presented on September 30.





  • Professor of Music Michael Cooper published a source-critical edition of Florence B. Price’s previously unpublished and delightfully prankish “Scherzo” for piano solo (1928) with G. Schirmer/AMP (New York). This is the 56th edition of music by Price that Cooper has published with Schirmer in the last 52 weeks. In keeping with the prankish character of the “Scherzo,” Cooper prepared this walkthrough (“The Bee Gees Meet Florence Price”) of last year’s Price editions. A circumstantially unlikely but musically gratifying celebration of these works is finally seeing the light of day, nearly 70 years after Price’s death.





  • Professor of Music Michael Cooper published the first-ever editions of two major compositions by Margaret Bonds (1913–1972), the only female African-American composer to have a day specifically devoted to her in a major U.S. metropolis (Mayor Richard J. Daley officially proclaimed January 31 Margaret Bonds Day in Chicago in 1968). The two works are the “Montgomery Variations” for large orchestra and the “Credo” for soprano and baritone soloists with chorus and orchestra. The “Montgomery Variations,” a set of seven programmatic variations on the spiritual “I Want Jesus to Walk with Me,” is a series of musical snapshots of the civil-rights movement in Montgomery, Alabama, from the Montgomery Bus Boycotts through the aftermath of the 16th Street Baptist Church bombing. The “Credo” is a 23-minute cantata whose text is the iconic civil-rights prose poem “Credo” (1904, rev. 1920–1921) of W. E. B. Du Bois. Both works are musical masterpieces and are frequently mentioned, but they have remained unpublished and therefore unperformed. Cooper’s editions, based on archival sources, are published by Hildegard Publishing Company in association with Theodore Presser Co.





  • Part-Time Instructor of Applied Music Katherine Altobello 99 was the guest mezzo-soprano in Congregation Beth Israel’s virtual High Holy Day services, September 1828. Altobello was honored to make music alongside conductor Jeffrey Jones-Ragona, collaborative pianist Maimy Fong, and Cantorial Soloist Sarah Beth Avner. 





  • Professor of Music Lois Ferrari  conducted and presided over the Austin Civic Orchestra’s (ACO’s) first virtual concert on September 26. This concert program was designed to provide the orchestra’s musicians with a safe environment in which to rehearse and perform during the current pandemic. ACO members were assigned to small chamber groups or chose to form their own groups, all with social distancing and aerosol management at the forefront of consideration. The members rehearsed for four weeks and then recorded their performances at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center in Austin. The streamed event drew a large appreciative virtual audience on both the ACO Facebook page and YouTube channel. Ferrari and the ACO plan to continue this practice through the spring semester.





  • Professor of Music Michael Cooper hosted a virtual session titled “New Understandings” at the Southwest Chapter meeting of the American Musicological Society on September 26. The session featured papers on the symphonies of Julie Giroux, Florence B. Price, and William Grant Still.





  • For the first time, members of Professor of Psychology Fay Guarraci’s  team of researchers, the Guarraci Lab, had two articles accepted for publication as companion papers in the journal Pharmacology, Biochemistry, and Behavior.  These two papers reflect a collaboration between the Guarraci Lab and Sarah Meerts from Carleton College and her student. The SU coauthors include current psychology major Shannon Odell  ’20; recent psychology graduates Kate Davis  ’20, Wes Clemmons  ’20, and Beth Henneman  ’20; Maryam Ali  ’19 (biology); as well as alumnae Chantal Gonzalez  ’19 (psychology) and Devon Lucero  ’19 (animal behavior). The first article is titled “I. Antidepressants and Sexual Behavior: Weekly Ketamine Injections Increases Sexual Behavior Initially in Female and Male Rats.” This work was supported by multiple SCOPE awards and a Sam Taylor Award. The second article is titled “II: Antidepressants and Sexual Behavior: Acute Fluoxetine, but not Ketamine, Disrupts Paced Mating Behavior in Sexually Experienced Female Rats.”





  • Professor of Music Michael Cooper published the world-premiere edition of Florence B. Price’s concert waltz for piano “Rowing” with G. Schirmer/Associated Music Publishers (New York). This is Cooper’s 56th world-premiere edition of music by Price published by Schirmer in the last 12 months. Cooper’s mercilessly stultifying forewords to those 56 editions guarantee sleep-deprived readers a combined minimum of 448 hours of blissful slumber, and Price’s music offers radiant genius on every page. What’s not to love about it all?





  • Professor of Mathematics Kendall Richards  and Jordan Smith  ’20 coauthored the article “A Concavity Property of Generalized Complete Elliptic Integrals,” which has been accepted for publication in the journal Integral Transforms and Special Functions.  This collaboration began in an independent study last spring and continued into the summer. This fall, Smith began his graduate studies in mathematics at Baylor University.





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth  published an article commemorating the work of the late Ursula Mahlendorf, an advocate for justice, feminist scholar, and pioneer in connecting psychoanalysis with the study of literary representations, childhood trauma, and creativity. The article appears in Glossen,  a peer-reviewed, bilingual, German–American scholarly journal on literature, art, and culture in German-speaking countries after 1945.





  • Professor Emeritus of English David Gaines had his article “I Climbed Up Friday Mountain and Down Barsana Hill” published in the Wall Street Journal. Read it here.





  • Professor of Spanish Katy Ross and Lizzeth Cepeda Lozano ’20 had their article “Un Viaje Fantástico: La Adopción China en El Alfabeto de los Pájaros de Nuria Barrios” accepted for publication in the Journal ConSecuencias. The article started as a summer faculty–student research project and continued as a semester-long independent study that culminated in this publication. Ross and Lozano examine the adoption of Chinese babies by Spanish families, as depicted in the novel El Alfabeto de los Pájaros  by Nuria Barrios.





  • Assistant Professor of Political Science Emily Sydnor and political science majors Maureen Rendon ’21 and Sarah Bowen ’22 presented “Uncivil Boundaries: Contesting the Civility of Protestors and Movements on Instagram” at the American Political Science Association (APSA) Political Communication Preconference on September 8. The presentation was based on work conducted as part of SCOPE 2020. At the APSA annual meeting, Sydnor also participated in a roundtable on teaching civic engagement and received the Craig L. Brians Award for Undergraduate Research and Mentoring from the APSA Political Science Education section.





  • Garey Chair and Professor of Mathematics Alison Marr has been named the codirector of the Enhancing Diversity in Graduate Education (EDGE) Summer Program. EDGE was founded in 1998 and is a program for women about to enter Ph.D. programs in mathematics; it has now supported more than 100 women in earning their Ph.D.s. Marr is a proud member of EDGE 2002 and will codirect the program with fellow EDGE 2002 member Raegan Higgins, from Texas Tech University. Learn more here.





  • Associate Professor of Business Debika Sihi  was interviewed, along with the vice president of brand at E.l.f. Cosmetics and faculty from the University of Virginia and Carnegie Mellon, for an article in Retail Dive  on what the future of TikTok means for retail. Read the article here .





  • Professor of Music Kiyoshi Tamagawa’s transcription for trombone of the Viola Concerto in G Major  by the Baroque composer George Philipp Telemann has been accepted for publication by Cimarron Music Press, a leading publisher of music for wind and brass instruments. Telemann’s work is a staple of the viola repertory, and this version will expand the available performance literature for advanced student brass players. In reworking the solo part for a very different type of instrument, Tamagawa collaborated with low brass performers and pedagogues Eileen Meyer, former SU faculty; Steven Wolfinbarger, Western Michigan University (WMU), and WMU student Adam Collela.





  • Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts and Professor of Music Michael Cooper  has been named to the leadership team of a four-day festival of Black classical music to be jointly sponsored by Howard University and the award-winning PostClassical Ensemble. Taking place in Washington, DC, in November 2021 and devoted to the “rediscovery and renewal of Black concert traditions,” the festival is part of the PostClassical Ensemble’s American Roots  series and will include concerts, discussions, film screenings, and other events. It will also yield a world-premiere album (in Oldspeak: CD) of three pieces by Florence B. Price and William Dawson on the Naxos label.





  • Assistant Professor of Political Science Emily Sydnor is the recipient of one of the American Political Science Association’s prestigious Centennial Center Special Projects Fund grants. The Special Projects Fund is an initiative that provides grants of up to $25,000 to support member-led collaborative projects aimed at advancing the discipline of political science. Sydnor is one of the principal investigators on the taskforce project “The Components, Processes, and Implications of Conducting Civically Engaged Research in Political Science,” which you can learn more about here.





  • Assistant Professor of Communication Studies Lamiyah Bahrainwala (LB) published the article “Shithole Rhetorics” in the Journal of International and Intercultural Communication. LB has been preoccupied with potties, and it turns out that toileting discourse suffuses anti-immigrant, antidisability, antiqueer and anti-Muslim rhetorics. She apologizes for the profanity in the title, but it is a direct quote.





  • Part-Time Assistant Professor of Classics Jeffrey Easton has been invited to give a virtual talk to the Canadian Institute for Mediterranean Studies in Toronto in October on the economic migration patterns of subelite families under the Roman Empire.





  • Part-Time Assistant Professor of Classics Jeffrey Easton has recently had two articles accepted for publication. The first article, titled “The Elusive Libertina Nobilitas: A Case Study of Roman Municipal Freedmen in the Augustales,” will appear in the upcoming fall issue of the peer-reviewed journal Phoenix. Easton pushes back against some long-held assumptions about the process of social and economic mobility among the families of Roman ex-slaves by reassessing their participation in one of the most prestigious and profitable associations in Roman towns. 

    His second upcoming publication, “Servi Empticiiand Manumission in the Roman Municipal Familia Publica,” will appear in conference transactions published in the Brill Studies in Greek and Roman Epigraphyseries. Easton analyzes a rare inscription mentioning the sale of a Roman slave to understand more about the demographic impact of manumission as well as the experience of individual slaves and freed slaves in the Roman world.





  • Professor of Religion and Elizabeth Root Paden Chair in Religion and Environmental Studies Laura Hobgood has had an article accepted for Bloomsbury Religion in North America, a multimedia, peer-reviewed project. Hobgood researched and wrote “Animals and Religion” during her Southwestern-granted sabbatical in the fall of 2019.





  • Professor of Political Science Shannon Mariotti is cochairing a new group within the Western Political Science Association (WPSA): the Virtual Community on Embodied Social Change and Healing Justice. The WPSA’s Virtual Communities have two goals: (1) To keep scholarly connections strong and increase access—through small conferences, book groups, panels for works in progress, and mentoring and solidarity—during a time when traditional conferences are being revised and reimagined out of both necessity and choice. (2) To focus on areas of study that have tended to be marginalized in mainstream political science, such as planetary justice, critical disability studies, critical whiteness studies, decolonizing political science, and inclusive teaching and pedagogy. You can read more about all the Virtual Communities here, and you can read about the Embodied Social Change and Healing Justice Virtual Community here





August 2020

  • Associate Professor of Chinese Carl Robertson, with the assistance of Coordinator of Alumni and Parent Relations Serena Bettis, presented a personal introduction to Chinese culture and literature to alumni, incoming and current students, and others on August 26. Titled “The Strange Case of the Teacher Whose Life Has Become a Series of Chinese Poems: My Adventures Living in and Teaching about China,” the virtual event addressed from a personal perspective ways of seeing and participating in the environmental and social worlds as practiced by Chinese poets. 





  • Professor of English and Joanne Powers Austin Term Chair Eileen Cleere has had an article accepted for publication in Victorian Literature and Culture.Initial research for the essay, “Rape in Public: Overlooking Child Sexual Assault in Charlotte Mary Yonge’s 1856 The Daisy Chain,” was conducted in 2019 by Cleere’s summer research assistant, Morgan Mosby ’20, a position funded by the Powers Austin endowment. The final article was inspired by the #MeToo movement and is situated methodologically within the developing academic field of new rape studies.





  • Part-Time Instructor of Applied Music Adrienne Inglis’s composition “Newt” enjoys its world première YouTube performance, with Southwestern Part-Time Assistant Professor of Applied Music Jessica Gilliam-Valls on double bass, on August 21, 2020. C4 will also present the first public performance of Inglis’s compositional setting of text by Julian of Norwich, “Oure Light in Oure Night,” for voices with a nature soundtrack of nighttime Hill Country birds and insects on its the remote livestream, titled Night/Light,on August 27, 2020. Inversion Ensemble will present “El Mar,” Inglis’s setting of poetry by Alfonsina Storni for mixed chorus and piano, as part of its Aether: Waterconcert on August 29, 2020. In July, Inversion Ensemble presented all 38 seconds of her composition “Heels,” with soprano Adrienne Pedrotti Bingamon, as part of its Quarantunes project.





  • Associate Professor of Communication Studies Bob Bednar  has had his book Road Scars: Place, Automobility, and Road Trauma  published by Rowman & Littlefield in their Place, Memory, Affect  series. The book, which argues that roadside car crash shrines visually, materially, and spatially demonstrate an unresolved cultural trauma embedded within American car culture, is based on nearly two decades of fieldwork in the Southwestern U.S. and features 172 original color photographs.





  • Associate Professor of Chinese Carl Robertson, in conjunction with several colleagues, hosted and presented a virtual workshop through ACS, titled “Technologies, Pedagogies, and Best Practices for Teaching Chinese Online,” on July 8. As part of the intended outcomes and at the request of several junior faculty in attendance, Robertson followed up by initiating an intercampus network, tentatively called INCPENS (Intercampus Chinese Pedagogy Network for Small Programs). Robertson organized and hosted two of three planned virtual meetings, on July 27 and August 17, respectively, including collecting and posting shared resources. The response of the participants so far indicates that some form of this network will continue for the foreseeable future.  





  • Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers reviewed R. L. Maizes’s Other People’s Petsfor the Washington Independent Review of Books. Read her review here.





  • Avery Beam ’19 had her paper “Women’s Representation in the Post-Soviet Space: Latvia and Lithuania” accepted for publication in Reinvention: An International Journal of Undergraduate Research. The paper is based on Beam’s final research paper for Dean of the Faculty and Professor of Political Science Alisa Gaunder’s Women and Politics in Europe and Asia course. It examines the role electoral systems play in affecting the greater representation of women in post-Soviet democracies. Beam is currently a research assistant at the Congressional Research Service in Washington, D.C.





  • Associate Director of Admission Rebecca Rother presented as part of the Virtual Application Bootcamp at PfIugerville Independent School District, St. Michael’s Catholic Academy, Cedar Ridge High School, and Leander Independent School District during the past several weeks. These events were an opportunity for students, college counselors, and admission professionals to engage in dialogue about the college admission process and to receive feedback on the students’ essays and résumés.





  • Head of Special Collections and Archives Megan Firestone was interviewed about Georgetown photographer N. M. Wilcox and the Wilcox Photograph Collection held in SU Special Collections and Archives for The Root Story,a show on the Hipp Radio Network in Georgetown. The show broadcasts every Saturday, and past episodes are available on the Hipp Radio Network’s Facebook page.





  • Garey Chair and Professor of Chemistry Maha Zewail-Foote  published an article in the Journal of Chemical Education  on transitioning her biochemistry lab class to a remote format. She described the assignments she created that maintained the research learning objectives of the course and enhanced research skills as well as the community outreach project, Making a Difference, that she developed for the class.





  • Assistant Professor of English Rebecca Evans published a review of N. K. Jemisin’s newest novel in the Los Angeles Review of Books. Read it here.





  • Part-Time Instructor of Applied Music Katherine Altobello ’99 performed a live and sold-out solo vocal concert for the Austin Artists Project and Austin Chamber Ensemble’s Lawn Concert Series on June 6. The concert, which was televised and broadcast on August 8, included American musical theatre and cabaret songs from the early 1930s to the present.  





  • Professor of Sociology Sandi Nenga presented her paper “Processes of Cultural Capital in a College Readiness Program Aimed at Latinx, First-Generation Students” at the 2020 American Sociological Association meetings on August 8 (held online).





  • Megan Piel  ’20 participated in the American Sociological Association’s 2020 Undergraduate Honors Program (held online) on August 8. She presented her paper “Religion, Gender, and Attitudes towards the LGBTQ+ Community,” which was originally written for the Research Methods class in sociology.





  • Professor of Philosophy Phil Hopkins was a panelist for “Trauma and Policing: An Abusive Relationship,” part four of the Austin Justice Coalition conversation series Imagining a World without Police,on August 5. 





  • Associate Professor of Business Debika Sihi taught a class on August 4, 2020, titled Marketing for Start-Ups during COVID-19 for 25 entrepreneurs. She offered guidance on developing and adapting marketing strategies in the current economic environment. On August 7, 2020, Sihi was an invited speaker at the virtual Summer Stukent Digital Summit, where she conducted a session titled “Cookies, Clicks, and Credit Cards: Teaching Students How Their Data Is Used and Protected.” The session covered how to structure multiple class lessons on data use and privacy. Specific topics included the consumer privacy paradox and the current regulatory environment (e.g., the General Data Protection Regulation and the California Consumer Privacy Act).





  • During spring and summer 2020, Professor of Biology Romi Burks  was selected as a member of a Faculty Mentoring Network (Make TRUBLE) within the Quantitative Undergraduate Biology Education and Synthesis (QUBES) consortium. QUBES represents a community of math and biology educators who share resources and methods for preparing students to use quantitative approaches to tackle real, complex biological problems. The FMN group Make TRUBLE, or Make Teaching with to Undergraduates Be Less Excruciating, helped Burks contribute to an ongoing emphasis in the natural sciences at Southwestern to increase quantitative literacy and to use the open-source language and software with students. As part of teaching Methods in Ecology and Evolution and Ecology, her lesson, which focuses on an element of statistical analysis, can be found online .





July 2020

  • Eric Oden  ’16 and coauthors Sanaz Aliari Kardehdeh, Bruce Golden, and Eric Oden received the Trevor Evans Award of the Mathematical Association of America for their article “ Experimental Graph Theory, ” which is accessible to undergraduates and was published during the preceding year in the journal Math Horizons  (2019). Oden majored in mathematics and physics at Southwestern and is currently in the Ph.D. program in applied mathematics at the University of Maryland, College Park.





  • Associate Professor of Art History Allison Miller discussed her forthcoming book, Kingly Splendor: Court Art and Materiality in Han China, on a panel titled “The Problem of Objects and Material Culture” at the (virtual) conference, Envisioning East Asian Art History: 20 Books in 2020, hosted by the Society for the Promotion of International English-Language Scholarship on East Asian Art History on July 31. A recording of the conference and other information about the featured books can be found here.





  • Assistant Professor of Political Science Emily Sydnor and three coprincipal investigators received a $25,000 grant from the American Political Science Association Special Projects Fund to advance the public impact of political science research. The grant will fund a series of workshops on civically engaged research, building a cohort of faculty whose research is designed collaboratively with community partners to produce mutually beneficial results and more closely align the academic field of political science with the practice of politics and governance.





  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Therese Shelton, with coauthor Brian Winkel, professor emeritus of the U. S. Military Academy at West Point, developed a peer-reviewed classroom module, published by SIMIODE. The module implements mathematical modeling in differential equations. “3-034-S-CarSuspensions” is the student version, and “3-034-T-CarSuspensions”  is the teacher version. This work was supported by National Science Foundation grant #1940532.





  • Associate Professor of History Melissa Byrnes took part in the virtual joint 66th Society for French Historical Studies Conference and 22nd George Rudé Seminar in French History and Civilisation, which sadly did not take place as planned in Auckland, New Zealand. She gave a paper on student protests and state violence, “Anti-Salazarism and Transnational Solidarity: Franco-Portuguese Student Activism in the 1960s.” She also moderated a roundtable on Teaching French History in a Global Frame.





  • Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts and Professor of Music Michael Cooper has collaborated with an international team to produce a series of music videos titled Songs of Comfort (#SongsofComfort). The series will feature world-premiere recordings of Cooper’s editions of 10 songs and five piano works by Florence B. Price and Margaret Bonds. The videos are being created by U.S. bass-baritone Justin Hopkins, South African–born pianist Jeanne-Minette Cilliers, and multifaceted U.S. tenor Andrew Richards (here serving as videographer and producer). The first video in the series, Price’s setting of the iconic feminist poem “The Heart of a Woman” by Georgia Douglas Johnson, is available on YouTube here. Cooper and Cilliers blogged about the venture here.





  • Cargill Endowed Chair and Associate Professor of Education Alicia Moore and Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts and Professor of Music Michael Cooper collaborated with pianist Lara Downes to produce a crowdsourced recitation of the Civil Rights “Credo” of W. E. B. Du Bois for the podcast We Need Gentle Truths for Now, hosted by Alexandra Juhasz. Seven SU faculty and staff (Part-Time Instructor of Applied Music Adrienne Inglis, Associate Professor of Music Jason Hoogerhyde, Professor of Music Kiyoshi Tamagawa, Professor of Music Lois Ferrari, Sarofim School of Fine Arts Coordinator Olivia Wise, Assistant Dean for Student Multicultural Affairs Terri Johnson, and Associate Professor of Communication Studies Valerie Renegar), three current students (Alexis Lemus ’22, Grace Sexton ’22, and Shelby Avants ’21), and six alumnae (Erin McHugh ’09, Isabel Tweraser ’19, Julia Fowler ’15, Katiebeth Brandt ’19, Kinley Johnson ’17, and Sara Watson ’13) participated in the recitation, along with 25 other participants Black and white, ages 5 to 81, from the Americas and Europe, representing four native languages. The podcast is available here. The recitation is also available as a YouTube video titled “Testimony: A #BlackLivesMatter Manifesto after the Credo of W.E.B. Du Bois,” here.





  • Margarett Root Brown Chair in Music and Professor of Music Michael Cooper  published 12 world-premiere source-critical editions of music by Florence B. Price (1887–1953) with G. Schirmer/AMP, the single largest publisher of sheet music worldwide. Price is currently experiencing the most widespread sustained revival of public and scholarly interest since the mid-20th century’s revival of interest in the music of Gustav Mahler. Cooper’s editions—all accompanied by his usual soporific forewords—include works for piano solo and voice with piano. The works for voice with piano are Two Traditional Negro Spirituals  (“I Am Bound for the Kingdom” and “I’m Workin’ on My Buildin’”) as they were sung to Price by the granddaughter of a former slave as she heard them from her grandmother. The works for piano solo include the following: Barcarolle Child Asleep , Etude in C , His Dream , On a Summer’s Eve , Scenes in Tin Can Alley , Song without Words in A Major , Ten Negro Spirituals for the Piano , Three Miniature Portraits of Uncle Ned , and Thumbnail Sketches of a Day in the Life of a Washerwoman .





  • Associate Professor of Spanish Carlos de Oro published the article “Cine de Guerra, Drama, Comedia y Thriller: Representaciones del Trauma, La Violencia, y la Insuficiencia Estatal en el Cine Colombiano” in the peer-reviewed journal Hispanófila.





  • Head of Special Collections and Archives Megan Firestone was interviewed about Charles Belford and the Belford Collection held in SU Special Collections and Archives for a new radio show on the HIPP radio network in Georgetown. The radio show, called The Root Story, broadcasts every Saturday, and past episodes are available on the HIPP radio network Facebook page. 





  • Head of Special Collections and Archives Megan Firestone, Special Collections and Archives Assistant Haley Bryce, and Southwestern Special Collections and Archives were mentioned in two webinars conducted by the City of Georgetown as part of Preservation Month. You can watch the webinars online now.





  • Five Southwestern students, Tanmai Korapala ’21, Melanie Lim ’21, Cassidy Mayfield ’20, Thuymi Phung ’23, and Blake Stilwell ’22, completed the Marketing EDGE Summer Series, in which they participated in interactive sessions with the director of graduate development at Equifax, the vice president of marketing for the Brooklyn Nets, the CEO of FishUSA, Inc., and university students around the country.





  • Professor of Philosophy Phil Hopkins was a panelist in a two-part Zoom town hall meeting on policing and Arab, Muslim, and Middle Eastern communities. The event was hosted by Interconnecting Arabs, Muslims, and Middle Easterners (I-AMM) on July 18 and 25.  





  • Part-Time Instructor of Applied Music Katherine Altobello ’99 is a 2020 Project Live Notes grant recipient and was honored to perform a virtual solo vocal concert on July 16. Project Live Notes (PLN) is a nonprofit musical organization meant to reach individuals in dire situations. PLN provides musical gifts to people who are alone; in a hospital, nursing home, or hospice care; or dealing with other extenuating circumstances, such as fragile mental, emotional, or physical health.





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth  published the coauthored article “ Grenzenlos Deutsch : Co-Creating Open Educational Resources through Feminist Collaboration” in Feminist German Studies , published by the University of Nebraska Press. The publication of Feminist German Studies  volume 36, no. 1 marks the first special issue in the history of this journal, on the topic “Collaboration in the Humanities.” Members of the authoring collective are currently refining and expanding the scope of the OER Grenzenlos Deutsch, which supports the teaching and learning of German in hybrid or remote settings around the globe.





  • Meili Criezis  ’17 published a peer-reviewed article as part of the CTC Sentinel  special June issue on coronavirus and counterterrorism: “Pandemic Narratives: Pro-Islamic State Media and the Coronavirus.” Criezis also published “Islamic State Telegram Stickers: Purposes, Themes, and Narratives” for the Global Network on Extremism and Technology at King’s College London.





  • Professor of Philosophy Phil Hopkins  is the invited guest on the podcast The Partially Examined Life  for a two-part episode (#248) on policing. He discusses Maurice Merleau-Ponty’s Phenomenology of Perception  and Linda Alcoff and Alia Al-Saji’s developments of his theory of perception and prescriptions for disrupting racialized perceptions to try to understand persistent police violence against people of color and in general. He will also be a panelist on July 15 during a webinar for the National Association of Social Workers on policing practices, particularly during the coronavirus pandemic. 





  • Associate Professor of English Michael Saenger, in his capacity as chair of the section for faculty in the humanities at Academic Engagement Network, cochaired an electronic conference with Ayal Feinberg, assistant professor of political science at Texas A&M University–Commerce and senior fellow at the Centre for Analysis of the Radical Right. The panel, “Scholarly Perspectives on Jews and Social and Ideological Space across the Academy,” took place on June 24, 2020. The speakers included Simon Bronner, dean of the College of General Studies and distinguished professor of social sciences and business at the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee; Albert Cheng, assistant professor at the Department of Education Reform in the College of Education and Health Professions at the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville; André Villeneuve, Catholic biblical scholar and assistant professor in the Honors College at Azusa Pacific University; and Ken Stern, director of the Bard Center for the Study of Hate at Bard College.





  • Professor of Mathematics Alison Marr coauthored a paper with colleagues from India, Slovakia, and Indonesia that is now online as part of the Journal of Discrete Mathematical Sciences and Cryptography. The article, “Note on In-Antimagicness and Out-Antimagicness of Digraphs,” was written at the 2014 International Workshop on Graph Labeling in India.





  • Professor of Spanish Katy Ross  participated in Maternidad, Reproducción Social y Cuidados en la É poca Neoliberal: Descolonizando el Imaginario Patriarcal,  a virtual conference hosted by the Asociación Internacional de Literatura y Cine Españoles Siglo XXI (ALCES XXI) July 13–16. She presented the paper “Maternofobia: El Miedo a la Maternidad Patriarcal,” in which Ross analyzes the book Maternofobia  by Diana López Varela. The conference was scheduled to be held in Oviedo, Spain.





June 2020

  • Conner Joyce ’19  had his paper, “A Path-Dependent Explanation of Divergent Nuclear Trajectories,” accepted for publication in the Pi Sigma Alpha Undergraduate Journal of Politics. The paper is based on Joyce’s honors thesis in political science in 2019. It examines why some countries attempt to acquire nuclear weapons and others do not. Joyce is currently in a master’s program at the LBJ School at the University of Texas. 





  • Technical Assistant and Exhibitions Coordinator Seth Daulton  is currently exhibiting seven mixed-media monoprints in the lobby of Georgetown City Hall. The exhibition, titled Seth Daulton: Sites (Revisited) , features some of Daulton’s works from his Site  series and follows his successful exhibit last fall at Houston’s Dillon Kyle Architects. The exhibition at City Hall is on view June 1–July 31, with a closing reception to be announced. Georgetown City Hall is currently open to the public Monday–Friday 8:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.; however, please wear a mask and practice social distancing while in the space. More information and images of the exhibition can be found below:





  • Professor of Philosophy Michael Bray’s article “The Virus Infects Politics: Six Theses on Social Reproduction, Biopolitical Economies, and the Legitimacy of States,” appeared online in two parts in the new journal Spectre. Read it here: Part 1, Part 2.





  • Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin helped organize and served as a “mentor” for the International Studies Association’s (ISA’s) Second Emerging Global South Scholar Workshop. The workshop brought together 20 Global South scholars from Argentina, Brazil, China, Colombia, India, Jamaica, Kazakhstan, Lebanon, Mexico, Nigeria, Pakistan, Portugal, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Uganda, and the U.S. (selected from more than 250 applicants) with seven “mentors” from Egypt, India, Mexico, South Africa, the U.S, and the U.K. During the workshop, Selbin specifically cochaired a session on publishing strategies for peer-reviewed journals. Originally scheduled for Ifrane, Morocco, the workshop was funded by the ISA’s Committee on the Status of Engagement with the Global South, who, along with the Global South Caucus of the ISA, sponsored the event.





  • Associate Professor of English Michael Saenger  published a blog post for the Times of Israel  titled “Why Black Lives Matter for Jews.” Read it here .





  • Professor of Political Science Shannon Mariotti  worked with several friends to organize a Racial Justice March in solidarity and partnership with Black Lives Matter in the community of Alamo Heights. The march took place Saturday, June 6, and more than 500 people turned out to protest against White Silence and support Black Lives Matter. One goal was to begin a community conversation about white privilege as it relates to racial injustice and police violence. Media outlets covered the march and interviewed Mariotti; you can read the Texas Public Radio article here , as well as an article by the San Antonio Express News  here .





  • Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts and Professor of Music Michael Cooper  published a chapter titled “‘Inner Necessity’: Fabulation, Frame, and Musical Memory in Mendelssohn’s Lobgesang ” in Rethinking Mendelssohn  (ed. Benedict Taylor; Oxford University Press, 2020, pp. 60–90). The chapter complements Cooper’s recently published source-critical edition of the Lobgesang , proposing that the composition is not a thinly veiled knock-off of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony , as is generally argued, but rather an audacious experiment in the construction of a frame narrative in choral–orchestral music. Cooper’s prose is admittedly stultifying, but the diagrams and music examples in this chapter are enough to impress music dweebs on an intergalactic scale.





  • Part-Time Instructor of Communication Studies Katie Bradford has completed a Ph.D. in Communication Studies at The University of Texas at Austin. Her dissertation, “Moving between the Conversation ‘at Hand’ and the ‘Handheld’ Conversation: Participation in Family Dinners with Smartphones,” investigates how people incorporate technology into their face-to-face interactions. Her research responds to contemporary concerns about smartphones and their impact on communication—and is novel because it is based on an analysis of video-recorded natural conversational data, not just surveys or observations.





  • Assistant Professor of Communication Studies Lamiyah Bahrainwala (LB)  published the article “Precarity, Citizenship, and the ‘Traditional’ Student” in the journal Communication Education  some time this spring, when she had already stopped using a calendar. She is grateful to the Southwestern students who educated her about what their precarities look like. If you feel at all inclined to read it, LB suggests waiting until you are in a good place emotionally.





  • Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers published “Surviving the Pandemic: Suggestions for Liberal-Arts Colleges” in Inside Higher Ed.





  • Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts and Professor of Music Michael Cooper  published twelve source-critical world-premiere editions of compositions by Florence B. Price (1887–1953), the first African-American woman to have her music performed by a major U.S. orchestra and the subject of the most powerful and sustained musical revival since the mid-20th-century rediscovery of Gustav Mahler. The works are the song “Don’t You Tell Me No,” which Price composed for use on the so-called Stroll in Chicago’s Black Belt in the 1930s; the spiritual “Nobody Knows the Trouble I’ve Seen” arranged for solo piano; the three-movement programmatic suites Snapshots  and Village Scenes  and the five-movement Preludes  for solo piano; and “Impromptu No. 1,” “Song without Words in G Major,” “Tarantella,” “To a Brown Leaf,” “To a Certain Pair of Newlyweds,” “Until We Meet,” and “Waltzing on a Sunbeam.” All were published by G. Schirmer/AMP (New York), the largest publisher of sheet music globally.





May 2020

  • Emeritus Professor of Economics Emily Northrop’s op-ed about climate change and COVID-19 was featured in AL.com. It can be read here.





  • Assistant Professor of History Jethro Hernández Berrones presented virtually the paper titled ”Birthing the Children of the Revolution: Professional Midwifery in Mexico City during the 1920s and ’30s” at the Latin American Studies Association on May 14, 2020. In this paper, Hernández Berrones argues that the Escuela Libre de Obstetricia y Enfermeria was a gendered space where different medical knowledges, obstetrical practices, and political positions coincided, offering midwifery students a poorly defined and consequently open space for challenging the growing presence of male doctors in the intimacy and domesticity of women´s reproductive lives.





  • Assistant Professor of Political Science Emily Sydnor talked about her recent book, Disrespectful Democracy: The Psychology of Political Incivility, the concerns raised by calls for civility, and who the most conflict-avoidant president might have been on the podcast Politics in Question. The episode is available here.





  • Professor of Political Science Shannon Mariotti coorganized the second annual interdisciplinary Politics of the Mindful Revolution miniconference as part of the Western Political Science Association conference. She helped organize three author-meets-critics roundtables. One panel features law professor and mindfulness teacher Rhonda Magee speaking with commentators about her book The Inner Work of Racial Justice. Another panel features religious studies professor Ann Gleig speaking with commentators about her book American Dharma: Buddhism beyond Modernity. A third panel features the sociologist, yoga teacher, and poet Becky Thompson speaking with commentators about her book Teaching with Tenderness: Toward an Embodied Practice. Our panels are all open to the public and will take place on Zoom throughout the day on Thursday, May 21. You can find the full program here .





  • Professor of Music Kiyoshi Tamagawa ’s review of the audio recording Gabriel Dupont: The Complete Piano Music  by pianist Bo Ties (MSR Classics) was published in the College Music Symposium  (vol. 60, no. 1; online edition May 1, 2020), the official journal of the College Music Society.





  • Meili Criezis ’17 published the peer-reviewed article “Online Deceptions: Renegotiating Gender Boundaries on ISIS Telegram” in the University of Leiden’s online journal Perspectives on Terrorism in February. She has since taken a new position as a program associate with the Polarization and Extremism Research Lab at American University. 





  • Associate Professor of Music Jason Hoogerhyde  has published a review of pianist Matthew Odell’s recording Connections: The Music of Olivier Messiaen and his Students  (Albany Records, 2019) in the scholarly journal and affiliated digital resource repository College Music Symposium  (spring 2020, vol. 60, no. 1).





  • Professor Emeritus of English David Gaines  reviewed Baron Wormser’s novel Songs from a Voice: Being the Recollections, Stanzas, and Observations of Abe Runyan, Songwriter and Performer  (Woodhall Press, 2020) for The Midwest Review . You can read the review here .





  • Professor of Philosophy Phil Hopkins was selected to serve as an outside consultant on the training audit review panel as part of the Austin Police Department (APD) evaluation mandated by recent Austin City Council Resolution 66, which set up an investigation into bias and bigotry within the APD. 





  • Associate Professor of Spanish Carlos de Oro  published an article titled “Traveling Narratives, Neorealism, and Marginalization: Ciro Guerra’s Cinema of Denunciation and Resistance” in the peer-reviewed journal Latin American Perspectives . He also presented a paper about the same topic at the 2020 Southeastern Council of Latin American Studies conference in Austin, TX.





  • Associate Professor of Computer Science Barbara Anthon coauthored a paper with Christine Chung from Connecticut College that will appear in a June 2020 volume of Theoretical Computer Science . The article, “ Equilibria in Doodle Polls under Three Tie-Breaking Rules ,” considers price of anarchy and price of stability in approval voting scenarios such as Doodle polls.





  • Professor of Political Science and Dean of the Faculty Alisa Gaunder’s article “Conservative Women in Germany and Japan: Chancellors versus Madonnas,” coauthored with Sarah Wiliarty, appears in hard copy in the latest issue of Politics and Gender (vol. 16, pp. 99-122).





  • Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin has been appointed by International Studies Association (ISA) President Helen V. Milner and approved by the ISA Governing Council as one of the nine members of the ISA Publications Committee. The committee is responsible for overseeing the eight journals the association publishes. As a member of the Feminist Theory & Gender Studies, Global Development Studies, and Theory Sections and the Global South and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, & Allies Caucuses, as well as being affiliated with the Women’s Caucus, Selbin intends to work to further the groups’ respective agendas as well as to be a voice for small liberal-arts college faculty in the publication process.





April 2020

  • Professor of Chemistry Emily Niemeyer, Jiyoun Ahn ’17, and Andie Alford ’17 published an article titled “Variation in Phenolic Profiles and Antioxidant Properties among Medicinal and Culinary Herbs of the LamiaceaeFamily” in the most recent issue of the Journal of Food Measurement and Characterization. Ahn and Alford grew 23 common and less-well-known Lamiaceaeplants during the SCOPE summer research program and then analyzed them for their chemistry capstone research. Niemeyer completed the project by conducting mass spectral analysis of the herbs during her spring 2019 sabbatical in collaboration with colleagues at the University of Texas at Austin. The research was supported by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI), the Robert A. Welch Foundation, and the Herbert and Kate Dishman endowment.





  • Double major in German and physics Claire Harding ’20 earned a prestigious Fulbright Award. The nationally competitive Fulbright English Teaching Assistantship will take Harding to Germany, where she will integrate hands-on science learning with lessons in American cultures and the English language. The Fulbright English Teaching Assistant (ETA) Program places recent college graduates and young professionals as English teaching assistants in secondary schools or universities overseas, improving foreign students’ English language abilities and knowledge of the U.S. while increasing the U.S. student’s own language proficiency and knowledge of the host country. ETAs also pursue individual study/research plans in addition to their teaching responsibilities. Harding’s teacher and mentor, Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth, deeply appreciates Harding’s contributions to the German program as a tutor and member of the leadership team of the German Club.





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth accepted an invitation issued by Priscilla Layne, president of the American Association of Teachers of German (AATG), to speak at the AATG-sponsored roundtable at the 2021 Modern Language Association conference in Toronto, Canada. The conference theme is Persistence. The roundtable addresses networking strategies in small programs. The panelists on this roundtable come from a variety of institutions, from large public state schools to small liberal-arts colleges. Berroth looks forward to representing small language programs at Southwestern University on this panel.





  • Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts and Professor of Music Michael Cooper published five source-critical world-premiere editions of compositions by Florence B. Price (1887–1953), the first African-American woman to have her music performed by a major U.S. orchestra and the subject of the most powerful and sustained musical revival since the mid-20th century’s rediscovery of Gustav Mahler. Published by G. Schirmer / AMP (New York), the largest publisher of sheet music globally, the works are “Some o’ These Days,” “Joshua Fit de Battle of Jericho,” “Placid Lake,” “Fantasie Nègre No. 2,” and “Whim Wham.” “Fantasie Nègre No. 2” and “Some o’ These Days” are featured tracks on acclaimed pianist Lara Downes’s genre-fluid new album, Some of These Days. Both may be heard on one of Cooper’s Price playlists on Spotify here.





  • Professor of Art Mary Visser ’s 3D digital sculpture Circle of Life  is now installed in the 2020 International Digital Sculpture Exhibition in the online sculpture park maintained by the DAAP, the College of Design, Architecture, Art, and Planning at  the University of Cincinnati. This exhibition accompanies the Sixième Concours International de Sculpture Numérique sponsored by the Paris, France–based nonprofit Ars Mathematica. The 3D digitally printed artworks will be on exhibit from April 10, 2020, to the end of June. Selected entries will then be 3D color printed by international sponsor Mimaki Global, and exhibited in late June at the Galerie Maître Albert, in Paris, June 1–15, 2020, where the theme is polychrome digital sculpture. The main partner, Mimaki recently launched a new 3D color printer, the 3DUJ-553, which will be used to 3D print these juried sculptures in full color and pattern for Intersculpt 2020. The International Digital Sculpture Exhibition is online now in the 3D virtual-reality art gallery at the DAAP coordinates 32s 20w 145.  





  • Professor of English David Gaines  contributed a chapter titled “Dylan’s Literary Fans: The Economy of Prestige and Reading with One Hand Waving Free” to the conference volume New Approaches to Bob Dylan  (Southern Denmark University Press). The chapter grew out of his spring 2018 capstone course, American Nobelity, and his conference presentation in Denmark that semester.





  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Therese Shelton  has joined the editorial board for the CODEE Journal . The CODEE Journal  is a peer-reviewed, open-access publication distributed by the CODEE (Community of Ordinary Differential Equations Educators) and published by the Claremont Colleges Library. It features original materials that promote the teaching and learning of ordinary differential equations.





  • Professor of English David Gaines  published “His Back Pages” in The Bridge  (vol. 66, spring 2020), the leading journal of Bob Dylan studies in Europe. Therein, he reviewed “History of a Voice” poet Bryan Wormser’s new Dylan-inspired novel.





  • Associate Professor of Sociology Reggie Byron is reviewing more than 35 published articles (as the only invited reviewer from a liberal-arts university) for the prestigious Richard Scott Best Article Award through the Organizations, Occupations, and Work section of the American Sociological Association.





  • Associate Professor of Sociology Reggie Byron had a peer-reviewed article titled “Neighborhood Context, Race, and U.S. Newspaper Coverage of Home-Invasion Crime” accepted for publication in the Journal of Criminal Justice and Popular Culture.





  • Professor of Sociology Maria Lowe, Associate Professor of Sociology Reggie Byron, and student coauthors Holly O’Hara ’17 and Dakota Cortez ’19 had a peer-reviewed article titled “Neutralized Hegemonic Banter: The Persistence of Sexist and Racist Joking among Undergraduate Students” accepted for publication in Sociological Inquiry. This is the fourth such coauthored campus climate–related study that Lowe and Byron have published.





  • Assistant Professor of Mathematics John Ross has joined the editorial board for the MAA Reviews. This outlet publishes reviews of undergraduate and graduate texts in mathematics and is hosted by the Mathematical Association of America. Ross joins the board as an associate editor of analysis.





March 2020

  • Professor of Chemistry Emily Niemeyer and Katie McCance ’15 published an article titled “Classroom Observations to Characterize Active Learning within Introductory Undergraduate Science Courses” in the March/April issue of the Journal of College Science Teaching. The authors discuss the analysis of observation data to characterize different instructional practices in science classrooms. McCance, a doctoral student in the Department of STEM Education at North Carolina State University, and Niemeyer collaborated on the study with Timothy Weston, a research faculty member at the University of Colorado, Boulder. The research was completed with support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI).





  • Associate Professor of Computer Science Barbara Anthony had a poster accepted to the 51st ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education (SIGCSE ’20). While the March 2020 presentation in Portland, OR, was cancelled day-of because of COVID-19, the poster is now displayed in the revised virtual conference. The peer-reviewed work on “Introducing Parallelism to First-Year CS Majors” (with coauthors D. Cenk Erdil, Sacred Heart University; Olga Glebova, Georgia State University; and Robert Montante, Bloomsburg University) resulted from work begun at a weeklong training in August 2019 by the National Science Foundation–supported Center for Parallel and Distributed Computing Curriculum Development and Educational Resources.





  • Assistant Professor of Computer Science Jacob Schrum has had two peer-reviewed papers accepted to appear in the proceedings of the 2020 Genetic and Evolutionary Computation Conference. Both papers were sparked by research collaborations with coauthors that began at the 2017 Dagstuhl Seminar on AI-Driven Game Design . SU computer science major Jake Gutierrez  ’22 later contributed to this line of research as part of SCOPE 2019, and major work finalizing the projects occurred as part of the 2019 Dagstuhl Seminar on Revolutions in Computational Game AI .

    • “Interactive Evolution and Exploration within Latent Level–Design Space of Generative Adversarial Networks” was written along with Gutierrez and four other collaborators: Vanessa Volz, Jialin Liu, Simon Lucas, and Sebastian Risi. It presents a method for interactively designing video-game levels for Super Mario Bros. and The Legend of Zelda  using techniques that emulate the style of levels from the original games.
    • “CPPN2GAN: Combining Compositional Pattern–Producing Networks and GANs for Large-Scale Pattern Generation” was written with Vanessa Volz and Sebastian Risi and focuses on a way of scaling up the levels generated by our method to very large spaces. This particular approach to encoding game levels still emulates levels from Mario and Zelda but can generate content of arbitrary size that is connected in a cohesive way.




  • Computer science major Jake Gutierrez ’22 and Assistant Professor of Computer Science Jacob Schrum have had their peer-reviewed paper “Generative Adversarial Network Rooms in Generative Graph Grammar Dungeons for The Legend of Zelda” accepted for publication in the proceedings of the 2020 IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers) Congress on Evolutionary Computation, which will be part of this year’s World Congress on Computational Intelligence. This research started as part of SCOPE 2019 and continued into fall 2019 with a human-subject study, which involved members of the SU community evaluating video-game dungeons created by the artificial-intelligence methods developed for the paper.





  • Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts and Professor of Music Michael Cooper published the first fully source-critical editions of the full score and piano–vocal score Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy’s symphony-cantata Lobgesang(Song of Praise) with Bärenreiter-Verlag. Widely hailed after its 1840 premiere as the beginning of a “completely new art-form” and performed at least 26 times in the seven years between its completion and Mendelssohn’s death, the Lobgesangwas later derided by critics such as Wagner for supposedly being unbecomingly indebted to Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony. Cooper’s edition, in addition to drawing on previously never-before-cited correspondence and review and drawing on sources from six archives and libraries in four countries, shows that the work is not a unilinear sequence of movements, as the Ninthis, but rather an audacious experiment in musical time and narrativity, specifically in its transferal of the idea of the “frame story” (after the model of the Decameronor A Thousand and One Nights) into musical form. Cooper began work on this pair of editions (spanning 295 pages and 103 pages, respectively) in 2015 but seems to have survived. 





  • Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts and Professor of Music Michael Cooper  published six new source-critical editions of compositions by Florence B. Price with G. Schirmer, the single largest publisher of sheet music globally: “First Romance,” “In Sentimental Mood,” “Three Roses,” “Your Hands in Mine,” “Fantasy No. 2 for Violin and Piano,” and “Valsette Mignon.” The first four of these editions were released simultaneously by acclaimed pianist Lara Downes on her new EP From the Heart  and are available on one of Cooper’s Price playlists on Spotify here . The editions are nos. 19–24 in Cooper’s currently contracted set of 64 Price editions to be released in the near future. 





  • Mosaic Ambassadors Anna Franklin ’22 and Nalyah Johnson ’20 presented at the Leading and Learning Student Educators Forum at the University of Texas at Austin on February 22. Their presentation, “Engage, Reflect, Articulate: Mosaic at Southwestern University,” showcased techniques they utilize as student facilitators to help other students engage in dialogue and develop outside of the classroom.





  • A coauthored chapter by Professor of Education Michael Kamen and education majors Abigail Luna ’20 and Sarah Buchanan ’20, “Block Play and a Pedagogical Model for Playful STEM Learning,” has been accepted for publication in Bloom, M. B. & Quebec Fuentes, S. (Eds.), Advancing Science and Mathematics Education for a Sustainable Future. In addition, this chapter has also been posted as this month’s featured research article for discussion in the Reading Group on Playfutures. PlayFutures, initiated by the Lego Foundation, is an online global community of researchers, practitioners, parents and influencers/policymakers who strive towards expanding the opportunities for learning through play.





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth earned a materials grant from the German Academic Exchange Service, DAAD. Materials enriching the teaching and learning of German at SU include a curated collection of literary works published in 2019 and a collection of German classics adapted for beginning learners.





  • Assistant Professor of Psychology Carin Perilloux presented a poster with her collaborator Dr. Jaime Cloud (Western Oregon University) at the evolutionary psychology pre-conference at the annual meeting of the Society of Personality and Social Psychology (SPSP) in New Orleans, LA. You can download an image of the poster, “Women with Attractive Faces Want it All,” here.





  • Daniela Beckelhymer ’20 and Emily Thompson ’22 presented “Who Feels the Tingles? The Emotional Side of ASMR” at the emotion pre-conference with Assistant Professor of Psychology Carin Perilloux at the annual meeting of the Society of Personality and Social Psychology (SPSP) in New Orleans, LA. This poster is based on work completed on a 2019 SCOPE project.





  • Associate Professor of Psychology Erin Crockett presented a poster with students MacKenzie Maddox ’19, Athena Pinero ’20, and Aaron Mink ’21 titled “Is Emotional Suppression All Bad? The Consequences Associated with Suppressing Negative and Positive Emotions” at the annual meeting of the Society of Personality and Social Psychology (SPSP) in New Orleans, LA. This research was the result of a faculty-student research project in the summer of 2019.





  • Professor of Psychology Traci Giuliano presented a poster titled “A 3-Pronged Approach for Teaching Psychology Students to Understand and Avoid Plagiarism” at the teaching pre-conference of the annual meeting of the Society of Personality and Social Psychology (SPSP) in New Orleans, LA.





  • Assistant Professor of History Jethro Hernández Berrones presented a paper titled “Midwife Tomasa C. De Jumper: The Appropriation of and Contestation to Obstetrical Knowledge after the Mexican Revolution” in the panel “Health and Revolution in Twentieth-Century Latin America” at the 67th Annual Meeting of the Southeastern Council of Latin American Studies celebrated in Austin, TX, in March 4–8, 2020. In his paper, Hernández Berrones discussed how clinical histories taken by midwives in Mexico City in the 1930s demonstrate the key role midwives trained in proprietary medical schools had in helping women give birth to their children both in public spaces and in domestic settings. These highly skilled women challenged assumptions by male physicians and government authorities about their training institutions and practical skills. They were the ones in charge of giving birth to the children of the revolution.





  • Joanne Powers Austin Chair and Professor of English Eileen Cleere delivered a paper titled “Ecopsychology and the Greening of Jane Eyre” at the annual Interdisciplinary Nineteenth-Century Studies (INCS) Conference in Los Angeles, CA, March 4–8, 2020. She also participated in a pedagogy workshop called  “How to Teach Victorian Literature Online.” Cleere currently serves on the governing board of INCS as second vice president.





  • Associate Professor of English and Chair of Early Modern Studies Michael Saenger has been named chair of the section for faculty in the humanities at the Academic Engagement Network (AEN). AEN is a national organization of faculty members and staff on American university and college campuses that seeks to oppose efforts to delegitimize Israel; to support robust discussion, research, and education about Israel in the academy; to promote campus free expression and academic freedom; and to counter antisemitism when it occurs on campus.





  • Professor of English David Gaines reviewed Sam Wasson’s The Big Goodbye, a book about the making of the 1974 film Chinatown, in the February 25th Austin Chronicle. Read his review here.





  • Senior Director of Integrative & Community-Engaged Learning Sarah Brackmann presented her research on high-impact practices and Southwestern’s Paideia philosophy at the third annual HIPs in the States Conference.





February 2020

  • Danyale Kellogg  ’19, a graduate from the history department at SU and now a Master of International Affairs candidate at the Bush School of Government and Public Service of Texas A&M University, presented a paper at the 11th Annual Texas A&M History Conference, “The Challenge of Change,” in February. The paper, titled “Forgotten Intelligence from the Forgotten War: Victory Disease, American Intelligence Failures, and the US Government´s False Perception of the Chinese During the Korean War,” was based on her final capstone paper where she examined US Intelligence failures to anticipate the Chinese intervention in the Korean War in the early 1950s.





  • In the month of February, Assistant Director of Admission Rebecca Rother presented case studies for admission at several high schools, presented an essay writing workshop, was on a panel at the AISD AVID College Readiness Symposium, and presented at a gap-year fair.





  • Biology major Rebecca Chastain ’20 presented a poster coauthored with Professor of Biology Ben Pierce at the Texas Academy of Sciences meeting in Nacogdoches, TX,  February 28–29. Chastain’s poster on Texas chirping frogs won first place in the terrestrial ecology section of the meeting.





  • Professor of Political Science Shannon Mariotti published an invited article for the volume A Companion to Adorno, edited by Peter Gordon, Espen Hammer, and Max Pensky. This volume is part of the Blackwell Companions to Philosophy  series and, with 40 essays, is the largest collection of essays by Adorno specialists ever gathered in a single volume. Her piece is titled “Adorno’s Democratic Modernism in America: Leaders and Educators as Political Artists.” Bridging disciplinary divides, this essay brings the lens of artistic modernism to bear on Adorno’s writings on democracy in America to illuminate the distinctive contributions of a political theory that might only appear partial and preliminary when analyzed through the lens of conventional politics. Adorno’s understanding of “democratic enlightenment” resonates with the modernist concept of epiphany and represents a translation of artistic modernism to the political realm. She shows how Adorno’s lessons on the meaningful everyday practice of democracy speak powerfully and practically to people in the U.S. today.





  • Assistant Professor of Mathematics John Ross  and Professor of Mathematics Kendall Richards ’ book Introductory Analysis: An Inquiry Approach  was released by Taylor & Francis–CRC Press. The text is an inquiry-based exploration of the real number line, seriously examining fundamental topics in the field of real analysis. Beyond the main content, the text features an extended prologue that introduces readers to inquiry-based proof writing, as well as a suite of extended explorations into advanced special topics in the field. An early version of this text was read by SU math majors Morgan Engle  ’18 and Elyssa Sliheet  ’19, and improvements were made based on their suggestions.





  • Part-Time Assistant Professor of Anthropology Naomi Reed was interviewed by CBS News to contribute to a Web and television segment on a Texas textbook’s representations of slavery and Black people. The article reads in part, “CBS News is not the first to point out problems with The American Pageant. Dr. Naomi Reed is a sociocultural anthropologist and professor at Southwestern University in Texas. She looked at the 12th edition of the textbook in 2007 and the 15th edition in 2015, and said it consistently takes a white redemptive narrative of American history.” You can read the article here.





  • Part-Time Professor of Applied Music Adrienne Inglis’s composition “Fireflies” will enjoy its world-première performance by Inversion Ensemble and Part-Time Assistant Professor of Music Matt Teodori at 7:00 p.m. on February 29, 2020, , at the Concordia University Chapel and at 3:00 p.m. on March 1, 2020, at Redeemer Presbyterian Church in Austin, Texas. Commissioned by Inversion Ensemble, “Fireflies” (2019) for mixed chorus, piano, and percussion evokes the vivid imagery of Margaret Noodin’s bilingual poem “Fireflies,” from her 2015 book Weweni: Poems in Anishinaabemowin and English.Honoring the composer’s Ojibwe ancestors, the piece sets the poem’s English text, including the Anishinaabemowin word for fireflies (Waawaatesiwag). Moments of musical and whispered aleatory capture visions of fireflies on a summer night. Colorful augmented sixth chords and lush harmonies kindle visions of love and nature amid the dreamy mixolydian modality and lilting ¾ time.





  • Head of Special Collections & Archives Megan Firestone was interviewed for and mentioned in a Williamson County Sunarticle about her presentation for the Preservation Georgetown First Friday event held at Grace Heritage Center. 





  • Assistant Professor of Art Ron Geibel ’s sculpture from his Untitled (decoy)  series was selected for the 33rd annual Materials: Hard + Soft International Contemporary Craft Competition and Exhibition at the Patterson–Appleton Arts Center in Denton, TX. The exhibition was curated by Beth McLaughlin, chief curator of exhibitions and collections at Fuller Craft Museum, in Brockton, MA. McLaughlin selected 72 works from over 1,300 submissions from 16 countries. Recognized as one of the premier craft exhibitions in the country, the Materials: Hard and Soft  exhibition celebrates the evolving field of contemporary craft and is on view through May 9, 2020.





  • Outreach and Information Literacy Librarian Theresa Zelasko moderated a panel of academic librarians at the recent Greater Austin Area Information Literacy Symposium (GAAILS). The panel, “Information Literacy and the Austin-Area Student,” featured three academic librarians from area institutions answering questions about high-school and college freshman information-literacy initiatives. GAAILS 2020 was held Friday, February 21, at Austin Community College Eastview Campus.





  • Kinesiology majors Brielle Adolph ’20, Chelsea Banawis ’20, Kendall Barton ’20, Morgan Gilpin ’20, Jazmin Howard ’20, Haley Hurt ’20, Brianna Lombardi ’20, Leilani McDaniel ’20, and Nadia Netek ’20 presented their capstone research projects at the Texas chapter of the American College of Sports Medicine Annual Meeting, February 20–21, 2020, in Waco, TX.  McDaniel was selected as a finalist in the undergraduate research competition.





  • Associate Vice President for Alumni and Parent Relations Megan Frisque was recently announced as one of four professionals to serve on PeopleGrove’s Alumni Innovation Advisory Board. PeopleGrove is an online platform that connects university prospects, students, and alumni with the connections, communities, and mentors needed to succeed. The University partners with PeopleGrove on its PirateConnect networking and mentoring platform. Other members of the Alumni Innovation Advisory Board include Susan deMuth, assistant vice president of alumni relations at Johns Hopkins University and the executive director of the Johns Hopkins Alumni Association; Jeff Minhs, executive director of alumni relations at the University of California, Irvine; and Lisa Vaccarelli, senior consultant at Plus Delta Partners, previously associate vice president of alumni and constituent engagement at Temple University.





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth gave an invited presentation at the Northeast Conference on Teaching Foreign Languages, February 13–15, in New York, NY. Her talk connected to the conference theme “Languages for All: Envisioning Language Learning Opportunities for Every Learner” and focused on increasing inclusion through networking. The presentation was sponsored by the American Association of Teachers of German.





  • Professor of Music Kiyoshi Tamagawa  participated as an invited performer in two events at the recent Texas Music Educators Association’s (TMEA’s) convention in San Antonio. On Wednesday, February 12 and Thursday, February 13, he performed Ravel’s Tzigane  with former Texas All-State Orchestra member and current Eastman School of Music student Grace Song as part of It Starts with Music , a video and performance event commemorating TMEA’s centennial. On Friday, February 14, he accompanied internationally acclaimed mezzo-soprano and Texas Tech graduate Susan Graham at the session “A Conversation with Susan Graham” and during her appearance at the Past Presidents’ dinner.





  • Associate Director of Admission Jamar Keaton was a highlighted speaker for the Cy-Fair ISD College Knowledge Night on February 10. He led panel discussions focused on test-optional application policies as well as the truths and myths surrounding liberal-arts education for more than 600 juniors and their families.





  • Technical Assistant and Exhibitions Coordinator Seth Daulton  currently has a solo show titled Seth Daulton: Sites  at Dillon Kyle Architects in Houston, TX. The exhibition features 10 new mixed-media works that focus on ideas of space, place, the built environment, and psychological geography. The show is up February 7, 2020–March 8, 2020.





  • Assistant Director of Admission Rebecca Rother presented about finding the right college fit at Cedar Ridge High School in Round Rock and at Glenn High School in Leander this past January.





  • Professor of Biology and Chair of the Pre-Med Advisory Committee Maria Cuevas was the recipient of the inaugural Advisor of the Year Award conferred by the Texas Association of Advisors for the Health Professions (TAAHP). The award was created to recognize a TAAHP member who has exhibited excellence in health professions advising over the past year. Cuevas added significant resources for students in her first two years as Southwestern’s chief faculty pre-health advisor and chair of the Pre-Med Committee, including a robust pre-health website, a physical home for pre-health students in the new science building, and an enhanced process for committee recommendation letters.





  • Professor of Music Lois Ferrari recently conducted the Austin Civic Orchestra in a performance of Mahler’s 4th Symphony. The concert was presented in the Alma Thomas Theater on February 8, 2020. Part-Time Instructor of Applied Music Katherine Altobello ’99 was the guest soloist. A preconcert talk was given by SU alumni Walter P. (Gus) Sterneman III ’07.





  • Head of Special Collections & Archives Megan Firestone presented at a Preservation Georgetown First Friday event on February 7, 2020. She gave two presentations on the role of Special Collections, collections related to Georgetown and Williamson County, and the growth of SU Special Collections’ digital collections.





  • Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts and Professor of Music Michael Cooper published seven world-première editions of works by Florence B. Price with G. Schirmer (New York): “Remembrance,” “Sketches in Sepia,” “Clouds,” “Meditation,” “Summer Moon,” “On a Quiet Lake,” and “Down a Southern Lane.” The editions are nos. 12–18 in Cooper’s series of 67 editions of Price’s music to be published with Schirmer, and their recordings are part of a series of 17 world-première recordings of Price’s music to be released by pianist Lara Downes in the spring of 2020, all timed to coincide with the publication of Cooper’s editions. Inquisitive and courageous souls will find abridged versions of the editions’ impossibly tedious forewords at Schirmer’s homepage for Price’s piano works here; those interested in hearing Price’s lyrical and deeply original music may access Downes’s recordings for free through Spotify, YouTube, or Naxos Music Library in the SU Libraries’ collection of databases, courtesy of Naxos America (Cooper’s Price–Downes playlist on Spotify is here). 





  • Professor of Psychology Fay Guarraci, Chantal Gonzalez ’19,  Devon Lucero’19, Kate Davis’20, and Sarah Meerts, an associate professor of neuroscience and psychology at Carleton College, published a longitudinal study in the journal Current Aging Science titled “Sexual Behavior Is Enhanced by Regular, Repeated Mating Behavior from Young Adulthood to Middle Age in Female Long-Evans Rats.”





January 2020

  • Every year, the General Board of Higher Education and Ministry awards Sam Taylor Fellowships to full-time faculty members at United Methodist–affiliated colleges and universities in Texas. This year, eight Southwestern University faculty members won grants up to $2,000:

    • Associate Professor of French Aaron Prevots, “Esther Tellermann: Enigma, Prayer, Identity”
    • Associate Professor of Spanish María de los Ángeles Rodriguez Cadena, “Cultural Memory and Historical Fiction: Women of the Past on Television and Film by Four Contemporary Mexican Women Directors”
    • Associate Professor of Computer Science Barbara Anthony, “The Social Welfare of Human Behavior in Doodle Polls”
    • Associate Professor of Psychology Bryan Neighbors, “Central Texas Treatment Center Aftercare Assessment”
    • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth , “Minimalism and Restraint”
    • Professor of Psychology Fay Guarraci, “Poverty: Understanding the Long-Term Effects of Poverty Using an Animal Model”
    • Assistant Professor of History Joseph Hower, “The Life and Career of Author–Activist Ralph de Toledano”
    • Associate Professor of Communication Studies Valerie Renegar, “Contemporary Modes of Parenting: Disrupting the Representation of Stepmothers in Popular Culture”

    Learn more about this prestigious grant here.





  • Professor of Art and Art History Thomas Howe  recently published two invitational drawings in the celebration of the Tribunal de Contas de Portugal (the Portuguese Court of Auditors) at the 630th anniversary of its first Regulations. The publication is titled “O Número :  A Emblemática Tapeçaria que Almada Negreiros Concebeu para o Tribunal de Contas ”  (“ The Number:  The Iconic Tapestry Designed by Almada Negreiros for the Tribunal de Contas”), published in Portuguese. The drawings are from Howe’s publication with Ingrid Rowland, Vitruvius: The Ten Books on Architecture  (Cambridge University Press, 1999)—illustrations of the supposedly innate proportions of the Vitruvian “human.” The illustrations are a variation of the famous drawing by Leonardo da Vinci but show the ideal human as half male, half female—the first ever revision of the famous image of Leonardo’s male figure, based on the actual meaning of the term humanus , which is not gender specific in Latin.  The illustrations also appeared in a Portuguese translation of Vitruvius.





  • Professor of Biology and holder of the Lillian Nelson Pratt Chair Ben Pierce authored the seventh edition of Genetics: A Conceptual Approach, which was published by Macmillan Learning. This new edition emphasizes active learning and updates the book with the latest research in genetics.





  • Associate Professor of Business Debika Sihi served as a judge for the American Marketing Association (AMA) Collegiate Case Competition in collaboration with Cotton Incorporated. The competition includes submissions from student teams from different universities across the U.S.





  • Professor of Biology Romi BurksLauren Muskara ’20, Esther Nyaberi ’21, and Kaitlin Galassini ’21 attended the Texas Conservation Symposium, January 9–10th. Each gave a presentation. All three students received financial acknowledgments of the quality of their undergraduate research talks. The research on environmental DNA started during SCOPE 2018 and 2019 and will hopefully soon contribute to submissions to peer-reviewed journals. Their talk titles included the following:

    • “Looking at and beyond the Horizon: Studying Nonnative Apple Snails in Texas and Diversity across the Globe” by Burks.
    • “Indicating Invasion with eDNA: Detecting Apple Snails along Oyster Creek” by Muskara, coauthored by Shellsea Miller ’20, Burks, and Matthew Barnes ‘’06, assistant professor of natural resources management at Texas Tech University.
    • “Old School or New School: Comparing the Efficiency of eDNA Sampling by Hand and with the ANDe™ eDNA Backpack” by Galassini, coauthored by Nyaberi, Burks, and Barnes.
    • “Effect of the Degradation of eDNA in the Presence of Microplastics” by Nyaberi, coauthored by Galassini, Burks, and Barnes.

    Professor of Biology Ben Pierce, the Williamson County Conservation Fund (WCCF), and Southwestern University cosponsored the symposium, which attracted 118 attendees and featured 25 talks. 





  • Assistant Professor of Political Science Emily Sydnor  was interviewed about her recently published book, Disrespectful Democracy: The Psychology of Political Incivility  (Columbia University Press, 2019), as part of the National Institute for Civil Discourse’s podcast series. The conversation ranged from the specific findings of the book to broader debates about the role that civility and incivility have in democracies. The interview is available here .





  • Dean of Enrollment Services Christine Bowman was one of five college admission deans from around the country invited to participate in the Casady School’s (OK) Junior Parent forum.  She presented not only on Southwestern but also the benefits of a liberal-arts education.





  • Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin published a review of the redoubtable Margaret Randall’s Exporting Revolution: Cuba’s Global Solidarity(Duke University Press, 2017) in the Canadian journal Left History: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Historical Inquiry and Debate.





  • Associate Professor of Communication Studies Bob Bednar presented a paper titled “Trauma Remains: The Material Temporalities of Objects Placed at Roadside Crash Shrines” at the Material Temporalities Workshop at the Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Diversity, in Göttingen, Germany, on January 23–24, 2020. 





  • Sociology alumna Samantha Pentecost ’19 has had her capstone paper, “Gendering the Boy Scouts: Examining Hegemonic Masculinity at a Coed Backpacking Camp,” accepted for publication in the Journal for Undergraduate Ethnography(vol. 10, no. 2). In addition, sociology alumna Madeline Carrola ’19 received the best undergraduate paper award for her capstone paper, “Performing TheHandmaid’s Tale: The Use of Dystopian Literature at Political Protests,” at the October 2019 Mid-South Sociological Association meeting. Both capstone papers were written under the direction of Professor of Sociology Maria Lowe.





  • Professor of Education Michael Kamen and Project WILD Coordinator (Texas Parks and Wildlife Department) Kiki Corry presented a preprogram workshop session titled “Project WILD Facilitator Training” at the Association for Science Teacher Education 2020 international conference in San Antonio, TX.





  • Professor of Education Michael Kamen and senior education majors Abigail Luna’20 and Sarah Buchanan’20 presented their research, “Pedagogical Model and Strategies for Playful Learning in Science,” at the Association for Science Teacher Education 2020 international conference in San Antonio, TX. 





  • Mellon Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow in the Feminist Studies Program Sequoia Maner’s coedited book, Revisiting the Elegy in the Black Lives Matter Era, was published by Routledge Press. The title is available with a 20% discount from the publisher with the code HUM20 at checkout.





  • Assistant Professor of Communication Studies Lamiyah Bahrainwala (LB) published a chapter titled “Visible Allies and Muslim Inclusion” in the book Academic Labor beyond the College Classroom: Working for Our Values(edited by Holly Hassel and Kirsti Cole). The chapter discusses the Muslims in Academia Symposium that took place at Southwestern in spring 2019.





  • Dean of Enrollment Services Christine Bowman spoke to teachers at the Round Rock ISD Gifted and Talented Summit regarding the value of a teacher recommendation.  This is the second year that she has spoken at this event.





  • The Department of Mathematics and Computer Science was active at the Joint Mathematics Meetings, with national meetings of the Mathematical Association of America (MAA), the American Mathematical Society (AMS), the Association for Women in Mathematics (AWM), and more. It is the largest meeting of mathematicians in the world. The meetings were held in Denver, CO, January 15–18, 2020.

    • Sarah Friday ’21 and Jordan Smith ’20 presented “Diagonalizing the Undiagonalizable,” research based and expanding on a 2019 SCOPE project with Professor of Mathematics Fumiko Futamura. Aaron Waclawczyk ’21 was a coauthor who helped extend the SCOPE work. The presentation was in the AMS contributed-paper session on algebra and algebraic geometry.
    • Daniela Beckelhymer ’20 presented her mathematics capstone project titled “The Costs and Rewards of Pursuing Different Postsecondary Degrees“ as part of the undergraduate poster session. Professor of Mathematics Alison Marr supervised the project.
    • Marr presented “Choose Your Own Adventure: An Analysis of Interactive Gamebooks Using Graph Theory” in the MAA contributed-paper session “Tell Me a Story: Connections between Mathematics and Performed or Print Narrative.” D’Andre Adams ’21 and Beckelhymer are coauthors.  The presentation was based on their 2017 SCOPE research and their subsequent publication.
    • Marr  coorganized the MAA contributed-paper session on re-envisioning the calculus sequence with coorganizers Robin Cruz, College of Idaho; Tom Halverson, Macalester College; Joel Kilty, Centre College; Alex M. McAllister, Centre College; and Chad Topaz, Williams College.
    • Marr  was a coauthor of the talk “Calculus: Origins, Reforms, and New Directions” with Robin Cruz, College of Idaho; Tom Halverson, Macalester College; Joel Kilty, Centre College; Alex M. McAllister, Centre College; and Chad Topaz, Williams College.
    • Marr and Assistant Professor of Mathematics John D. Ross presented the preliminary report “A Re-Envisioning of the Calculus Sequence for the Modern Student” with coauthors Joel Kilty, Centre College, and Alex M. McAllister, Centre College.
    • Ross  presented “Exploring Big Ideas in Calculus 1 through Bite-Sized IBL Lessons” in the MAA contributed-paper session on inquiry-based learning and teaching.
    • Associate Professor of Mathematics Therese Shelton copresented “Building Community through Systemic Initiative for Modeling Investigations and Opportunities with Differential Equations (SIMIODE)” in the MAA poster session on projects supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) Division of Undergraduate Education. Her coauthors were the coprincipal investigators of their NSF grant: Brian Winkel, SIMIODE and emeritus professor from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point; Richard C. Harwood, Newberg University; Audrey Malagon, Virginia Wesleyan University; and Patrice Tiffany, Manhattan College. The NSF grant partly funded Shelton’s attendance. Shelton served on the SIMIODE Board of Contributing Advisors, as well as participated in a meeting of her NSF grant coprincipal investigators.
    • Shelton  coorganized the AMS special session “Wall-to-all Modeling Activities in Differential Equations Courses.” Her coorganizers were Janet Fierson, La Salle University, and Brian Winkel, SIMIODE.
    • Shelton  participated in the meeting of the national MAA Committee on Sessions of Contributed Papers.
    • Visiting Assistant Professor of Mathematics Safia Chettih presented the preliminary report “A Combinatorial Model for an Honest ∞-Operad” in the AMS special session on computational and categorical methods in homotopy theory. Her coauthors were L. Bonatto, University of Oxford; A. Linton, University of Southampton; S. Raynor, Macquarie University; M. Roberston, University of Melbourne; and N. Wahl, University of Copenhagen.
    • Visiting Assistant Professor of Mathematics John M. Osborn also attended.




  • Associate Professor of Art History Allison Miller gave an invited lecture titled “Terracotta Warriors after the First Emperor: Re-Evaluating the Qin Legacy in the Han” on January 17, 2020, at the University of Central Florida in Orlando. The talk was the last of three talks Miller gave this academic year as a 2019–2020 Archaeological Institute of America (AIA) program lecturer.





  • Professor of Art History Thomas Noble Howe  has just published two invitational book chapters, “Hellenistic Architecture” (17,000 words) and “The Christian Roman Empire, A.D. 306–c. A.D. 500” (11,000 words), in the 21st edition of Sir Banister Fletcher’s A History of Architecture  (commissioned by the Royal Institute of British Architects and the University of London; published by, Bloomsbury Press,  pp. 284–331 and409–436). The Banister Fletcher is the oldest and arguably most prestigious repeatedly reedited history of architecture, first published in 1893. Howe has been invited to attend the presentation at the Royal Institute of British Architects and Bloomsbury Press in London on January 28. Both chapters are the only currently available one-volume histories of either period of architectural history.





  • Computer science majors Anna Krolikowski ’20, Sarah Friday ’20, and Alice Quintanilla ’20 coauthored a peer-reviewed paper with Assistant Professor of Computer Science Jacob Schrum that was accepted to the EvoMUSART: International Conference on Computational Intelligence in Music, Sound, Art, and Design. Their paper, “Quantum Zentanglement: Combining Picbreeder and Wave Function Collapse to Create Zentangles,” presents a computational approach to generating art reminiscent of Zentangles. Examples of generated art are available here.





  • Professor of Music and Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts Michael Cooper  published two editions of previously unpublished works by Florence B. Price (1887–1953) with G. Schirmer (New York). “Night” (1945) is scored for women’s chorus with piano and was given its posthumous premiere by Visiting Assistant Professor of Music Beth Everett  and the SU Chorale in November 2018. This work is based on a poem by Bessie Mayle (1898–1959) that was first published in The Crisis  in 1930; the poem celebrates the beauty and resilience of the blackness of the nighttime sky as a metaphor for the beauty and resilience of Black experience. The second edition, Fantasie Nègre No. 4 , is a milestone in the ongoing Florence Price renaissance. Its release was timed to coincide with acclaimed pianist Lara Downes’s world-première recording of the work (available on Spotify here ). The editions are nos. 10 and 11 in Cooper’s series of 67 editions of Price’s music to be published with Schirmer, and the recording is the first in a series of 17 world-première recordings of Price’s music to be released by Downes in the spring of 2020, all timed to coincide with the release of Cooper’s editions. For more information on this project, see here .





  • Professor of English and Joanne Powers Austin Term Chair Eileen Cleere has been elected second vice president of Interdisciplinary Nineteenth-Century Studies (INCS), an international organization. Her term will run 2020–2021.





  • Professor of Mathematics Fumiko Futamura  coauthored an IBL-style textbook titled Perspective and Projective Geometry   (Princeton University Press, 2019), with her colleagues Annalisa Crannell, of Franklin & Marshall College, and Marc Frantz, of Indiana University. The textbook introduces students to geometry through perspective drawing, leading students to discover ideas through hands-on activities, including drawing, analyzing Renaissance paintings and photographs, and GeoGebra constructions. The textbook also guides students to develop rigorous proofs for their conjectures and can be used as an introduction to proofs course for undergraduate math majors.





  • Assistant Professor of Biology Kim McArthur was awarded the ADInstruments Educator Scholarship to attend the CrawFly neurophysiology course at the University of the Incarnate Word, January 9–12. This course provides intensive hands-on training for undergraduate educators developing laboratory courses in neuroscience to encourage integration of high-impact research experiences into the undergraduate curriculum. McArthur plans to develop a course in neurobiology that can incorporate modules from this training course.





  • Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers published “7 Jewish Feminist Highlights of 2019” in the Lilith Blog. Read it here.





  • Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers was an invited participant on the roundtable “Building Bridges: Feminist Mentorship, Collaboration, and Coalition Building” at the annual meeting of the Association for Jewish Studies. Meyers talked about diverse forms of mentoring, including public scholarship.





  • Assistant Professor of History Jethro Hernández Berrones reflected on the relevance of homeopathy for understanding access to medicine in Mexico and Latin America in the past and in the present in an interview for the blog of the Brazilian journal História Ciências Saúde—Manguinhos. You can read the interview here.





  • Assistant Professor of History Jethro Hernández Berrones’s entry “A Recipe for the Body: Chiropractic Medicine in Mexico (Part I)” was published by The Recipes Project, a blog dedicated to food, magic, art, science, medicine, and everything related to recipes, from magical charms to veterinary remedies. The entry offers a brief analysis of a few documentary ingredients Hernández Berrones found prospecting the archival mines of unorthodox healers in postrevolutionary Mexico in his efforts to concoct a nuanced narrative of 20th-century medicine in that country. Mexican chiropractors navigated a still-undefined space where national traditions blended with domestic and foreign modernities. Their bodily recipes kept the bodies of thousands of Mexicans fit to modernize a nation, and their activism pushed for the health of the medical body politic.





  • Computer science major Sara Boyd ’20 has been selected as a finalist of the Computing Research Association’s (CRA) Outstanding Undergraduate Researcher Award for 2020. This award program recognizes undergraduate students in North American colleges and universities who show outstanding potential in an area of computing research. Boyd’s award recognizes published work she has done with Associate Professor of Computer Science Barbara Anthony, an REU at the University of Texas at Arlington, as well as project work in several computer science courses.





  • Professor of Classics Hal Haskell delivered an invited paper at Rhodes College in Memphis titled “Ancients Exploiting the Past for Propaganda,” in which he discussed how minor elite dynasties in ancient Greece in the generation following the Trojan War invented connections with their predecessors through the display of antiques. The invitation to speak in Memphis sprang from Haskell’s “Cretan Overseas Connections in Late Minoan IIIC: The Contribution of Transport Stirrup Jars,” a refereed paper delivered at the annual meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America, in Washington, DC, on January 5.