Academics

Notable Faculty & Student Achievements

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October 2019

  • Professor of Music and Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts Michael Cooper  published three source-critical editions of music by Florence Price with G. Schirmer, Inc./AMP, the single largest publisher of classical sheet music globally. The editions are Price’s setting of Georgia Douglas Johnson’s poem “The Heart of a Woman,” the Fantasie No. 1 in G Minor  for violin and piano, and the Cotton Dance  for piano solo. These editions are nos. 2–4 in Cooper’s series of 64 editions of previously unpublished music by Price with Schirmer. 





  • Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow of Feminist Studies Sequoia Maner was a guest visitor to Dr. Emily Rutter’s African American Literature & Culture course at Ball State University in Muncie, IN, on October 14. She discussed her scholarship regarding Beyoncé’s Lemonadeand Tupac Shakur and also performed poetry.





  • Professor of Music Kiyoshi Tamagawa’s book Echoes from the East: The Javanese Gamelan and Its Influence on the Music of Claude Debussy will be released in December 2019 by Lexington Books. In it, he recounts Debussy’s 1889 encounter with the gamelan, the traditional musical ensemble of what is now Indonesia, at the Paris Exposition Universelle and traces its echoes through his entire compositional career. The book adds a commentary on the modern-day issue of cultural appropriation and a survey of Debussy’s contemporaries and successors who have also attempted to merge the sounds of the gamelan with their own distinctive musical styles.





  • Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow of Feminist Studies Sequoia Maner  gave a lecture and guided a series of workshops titled Langston Hughes: Writer for All Ages  for Humanities Texas and their 2019 program The Harlem Renaissance on October 9. Alongside Drs. Jennifer Wilks, Samantha Pinto, and Phil Barrish, Sequoia guided a class of over 50 secondary teachers from across Texas in the poetry & (after)life of Langston Hughes so that they might incorporate new strategies and skills into their classrooms. She emphasized the blues mode and vernacular traditions, Hughes’s landmark essay “The Negro Artist and Racial Mountain” as the manifesto of the Harlem Renaissance, and the dream series of Hughes’s poetic canon.





September 2019

  • Professor of English Eileen Cleere served on a panel of judges awarding the Richard Stein Prize to the best article published in nineteenth-century studies in 2018. The Stein Prize is awarded annually by the Interdisciplinary Nineteenth-Century Studies Association, an international organization.





  • Computational mathematics and psychology major Daniela Beckelhymer ’20 and computer science major Sara Boyd ’20 recently attended the ACM Richard Tapia Celebration of Diversity in Computing in San Diego, CA. Each received full scholarships, from IBM and Two Sigma respectively, to support their attendance in recognition of their accomplishments in computer science. Along with meeting Dr. Richard Tapia, they got to interact with numerous undergraduate and graduate students, faculty, researchers, and professionals in computing from all backgrounds and ethnicities, exploring career and graduate-school opportunities.





  • Novel English Majors, a course taught by Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers, was featured in the National Humanities Alliance blog post “Humanities Education and Career Preparation: Not Either/Or but Both/And.”  You can read it here.





  • Under the direction of Professor of Music Lois Ferrari,the Austin Civic Orchestra (ACO) has won second place for the nationally adjudicated American Prize in community orchestra performance of American music (Ernst Bacon Memorial Award). Ferrari and the ACO submitted a performance recording of a piece by local composer Dan Welcher, as well as the music of William Grant Still and Lee Actor. The ACO also garnered overall praise from the American Prize staff for the orchestra’s 2017–2018 season, titled Made in America, which featured music exclusively by American composers.





  • Professor of Chemistry Emily Niemeyer, Mei Earling ’16, and Triston Beadle ’18 published an article in the September 2019 issue of the journal Plant Foods for Human Nutrition.The article, titled “Açai Berry (Euterpe oleracea) Dietary Supplements: Variations in Anthocyanin and Flavonoid Concentrations, Phenolic Contents, and Antioxidant Properties,” was based on Earling and Beadle’s chemistry capstone projects. The research was completed with support from the Robert A. Welch Foundation and Southwestern’s Dishman endowment and Faculty–Student Projects fund. You can read it here.





  • Professor of Religion Elaine Craddock published the essay “Kālī Dances into the Cremation Grounds of the Tamil Land” in the Routledge anthology Regional Communities of Devotion in South Asia: Insiders, Outsiders, and Interlopers, edited by Gil Ben-Herut, Jon Keune, and Anne E. Monius.





  • In the wake of every election, Tufts University’s Institute for Democracy and Higher Education produces reports detailing overall college student turnout rates and campus-specific turnout for hundreds of college campuses. The 2018 reports came out September 19. Below are some highlights from Southwestern’s report:

      • The 2018 voting rate on SU’s campus was 51.7%! That surpasses both the 30% goal Assistant Professor of Political Science Emily Sydnor encouraged the student organizers to set and the 50% goal they wanted to work toward.
      • Southwestern showed a 33% increase from the voting rate at SU in 2014 and held steady at the rate SU voted in the 2016 presidential election (50% in 2016). As you might imagine, this is unusual for a midterm election.
      • SU’s rate was substantially higher than those of other institutions across the U.S.: 12.6% higher than the average across all institutions. SU’s was also higher than the national rate, which was 49.3%.
      • While turnout was up across the country in 2018, Southwestern’s impressive increase in voting rates was in part the result of concerted get-out-the-vote efforts by Sydnor, Senior Director of Integrative and Community-Engaged Learning Sarah Brackman, Teresa Cropper ’20, Laura Rativa ’20, Camille Martin ’19, Caroline Haywood ’18 and the Office of Community-Engaged Learning. 




  • This week, Columbia University Press released Disrespectful Democracy: The Psychology of Political Incivility , the first book by Assistant Professor of Political Science Emily Sydnor.The book demonstrates that incivility shapes people’s attitudes and emotional reactions to politics, but it does so differently based on how they as individuals respond to conflict and confrontation. Using data collected both at the University of Virginia and at Southwestern, the book shows that for some people, incivility can lead them to share more specific policy opinions and feel more positively about politics. 





  • Professor of Spanish Katy Ross wrote a chapter titled “Isabel: Mito, Madre y Mujer: Exploration of the Cultural Role of Isabel” in Mito e Historia en la Televisión y el Cine Español, edited by Christine Blackshaw Naberhaus and published by Albatros Hispanófila, 2019. The chapter examines the representation of Queen Isabel of Spain, from the conflicting embodiments of Isabel as mother to her depiction as queen in the television series Isabel.





  • Professor of Psychology Fay Guarraci  served as senior panelist and advisory board member during a four-day workshop for BRAINS (Broadening the Representation of Academic Investigators in NeuroScience) in Seattle, WA. BRAINS is a National Institutes of Health–sponsored program for professional development and community building among underrepresented postdoctoral fellows and new faculty in the neurosciences.





  • Professor of Music Lois Ferrari was awarded second place for the 2019 nationally adjudicated American Prize in community orchestra conducting. Ferrari’s work with the Austin Civic Orchestra (ACO) was also honored in the community orchestra performance category, with the ACO winning third place.





  • Associate Professor of Communication Studies Valerie Renegar presented her research on the discourse surrounding stepmothers at the Rhetoric Society of Europe’s Rhetoric in Society 7 conference in Ghent, Belgium in September. Her paper, “Old Stereotypes, Worn Metaphors, Outdated Fairy Tales: Stepmother Self-Help Books as (Useless) Equipment for (Barely) Living,” was coauthored with Kirsti Cole from Minnesota State University–Mankato. This is the pair’s third professional achievement in the area of mothering rhetoric.





  • Professor of English Eileen Cleere ’s review of Barbara Leckie’s Open Houses: Poverty, the Novel, and the Architectural Idea in Nineteenth-Century Britain  has just been published in the academic journal Nineteenth-Century Literature . You can read the review here .





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth earned the 2019 Outstanding German Educator Award. With this prestigious national award, the American Association of Teachers of German (AATG) recognizes one postsecondary educator annually for excellence in teaching, innovation, extraordinary talent, and exceptional leadership in the German teaching profession. Berroth will be honored during the AATG Awards Presentation at the American Council on Teaching Foreign Languages Convention and World Languages Expo in Washington, DC, in November 2019. A nominee’s dossier documents five or more years of demonstrated excellence in German education; active membership in the local AATG chapter; creative leadership in German language education; impact in local, state, or national arenas; and continued growth as a German educator. Current and former students and colleagues nationwide collaborated on submitting letters in support of Berroth’s nomination.





  • Associate Professor of Computer Science Barbara Anthony presented a paper titled ““Maximizing the Number of Rides Served for Dial-a-Ride” at ATMOS 2019, the Symposium on Algorithmic Approaches for Transportation Modeling, Optimization, and Systems, in Munich, Germany, as part of ALGO 2019, the major European event for researchers, students, and practitioners of algorithms. The paper, which will be published in the Dagstuhl Open Access Series in Informatics, has as coauthors Sara Boyd ’20; Christine Chung from Connecticut College and her students Ricky Birnbaum, Patrick Davis, and Jigar Dhimar; Ananya Christman from Middlebury College; and David Yuen.





  • Associate Professor of Environmental Studies Joshua Long, along with his co author Jennifer L. Rice of the University of Georgia, presented the opening keynote address at the New Climate Urbanism International Workshop at the Urban Institute, University of Sheffield, United Kingdom. The lecture, titled “Climate Urbanism and the Implications for Climate Apartheid,” was based on their 2019 article in the journal Urban Studies, “From Sustainable Urbanism to Climate Urbanism,” which was the inspiration for the workshop as well as a new research agenda beginning this year at the Urban Institute. 





  • Part-Time Instructor of Applied Music Adrienne Inglis ’s composition Wren , for mixed chorus and flute, will enjoy its world premiere performance by Inversion Ensemble on September 28, 2019 at 7:00 p.m. at the Wesleyan at Estrella in Georgetown and September 29, 2019, at 3:00 p.m. at Redeemer Presbyterian Church in Austin, Texas. Inversion Ensemble will also perform Wren  at its Sarofim Music Series concert on October 22, and the Southwestern University Chorale will perform it during their fall concert on November 2. Commissioned by Inversion Ensemble, Wren  sets Robert Macfarlane’s acrostic poem of the same name for mixed chorus and flute. With quick harmonic changes, syncopations, and melodic gestures, the composition captures a sense of the charming poem as well as the actual Eurasian wren ( Troglodytes troglodytes ) found year-round throughout the U.K. Macfarlane’s poem “Wren” comes from his 2017 illustrated poetry book, The Lost Words , which conjures pictures of the wild things and untamed spaces that get shortchanged in modern urban life.





  • Part-Time Instructor of Applied Music  Adrienne Inglis ’s composition  Metamorphosis,  for solo flute, solo harp, and string orchestra, will enjoy its world premiere performance by Chaski and the Balcones Community Orchestra on September 22, 2019, at 4:00 p.m. at the Lakeway Activity Center in Lakeway, TX. Commissioned by the Balcones Community Orchestra,  Metamorphosis  honors the life and work of pioneering entomologist, naturalist, and artist Maria Sibylla Merian (1647–1717). Merian carefully documented in illustrated detail the life cycle of so many insects; accordingly,  Metamorphosis  musically follows a butterfly from egg and larva to pupa and adult.





  • Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry Maha Zewail-Foote recently published an article on using computer simulations to teach chemical kinetics in the journal Trends in Chemistry. Southwestern graduate Jace Venters ’13 is a coauthor on this paper. 





  • Professor of Mathematics Fumiko Futamura, along with her colleagues Annalisa Crannell of Franklin & Marshall College and Marc Frantz of Indiana University, published a paper titled “Factoring a Homography to Analyze Projective Distortion” in the September 2019 issue of the Journal of Mathematical Imaging and Vision.





  • Assistant Professor of Communication Studies Lamiyah Bahrainwala published an article titled “Blind Submission” in the journal Communication, Culture & Critique. Bahrainwala noticed that Muslim men were posting YouTube videos of themselves blindfolded, standing on street corners, and asking for hugs from passersby to prove that they are “not terrorists.” What fresh nonsense is this? Bahrainwala wondered, and wrote about the intersections of terrorism and disability.





  • Professor of Art History and Scientific Director of the Restoring Ancient Stabiae (RAS) Foundation Thomas Noble Howe gave a presentation to faculty and administrators at Lyon College, in Batesville, AR, titled “The Synchronous International Classroom: New Directions for Cost Control of Liberal Arts Study-Abroad Programs.” Howe is working with several U.S. small colleges and consortia to establish a U.S.-accredited two-semester study-abroad center at the Vesuvian Institute of the RAS Foundation.





  • Programmer and Analyst George Godward developed a more streamlined package tracking system for the campus Post Office. The system was implemented this summer, and it has made a significant impact on the workflow in processing packages for the SU community.  





  • Assistant Professor of Computer Science Jacob Schrum attended the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Conference on Games in London, U.K., to present the paper “Desirable Behaviors for Companion Bots in First-Person Shooters,” coauthored with Adina Friedman ’19. Friedman started this research as part of her 2018 SCOPE experience. The full paper has been published in the conference proceedings.





  • Professor of Psychology Traci Giuliano  recently completed work guest editing a special issue in the journal Frontiers in Psychology  on the topic “Engaging Undergraduates in Publishable Research: Best Practices.” The editorial, which contains links to all 43 articles, can be found here . A faculty-development lunchtime discussion on the topic of publishing with undergraduates will be held on Friday, October 4 from 12:30 p.m.–1:30 p.m.





  • Assistant Professor of Political Science Emily Sydnorpresented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association (APSA) and at the APSA Political Communication Preconference, which were held in Washington, DC, August 27–September 1. Her pre-conference paper, “Confronting Politics: The Role of Conflict Orientation in Shaping Political Debate,” was coauthored by Emily Tesmer ’20 and Breely Peterson ’21. The conference paper, “Stressing Incivility: Physiological Arousal and Incivility,” reported findings from a joint project with Tesmer and Associate Professor of Psychology Erin Crockett. Both papers would not be possible without great research assistance from Ashton Eggers ’21, Madison Flores ’20, Emma Lopez ’21, Camille Martin ’19, and Olivia Montreuil ’20.





August 2019

  • Assistant Professor of Mathematics John Ross published an article titled “On the Existence of a Closed, Embedded, Rotational Lambda-Hypersurface” in the Journal of Geometry.





  • Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers  published a review of the new documentary Fiddler: A Miracle of Miracles in the Jewish Women’s Archive  blog. Read it here.





  • Part-Time Assistant Professor of Theatre Joey Banks ’07 and Technical Director in Theatre Justin Smith ’04 will be producing and performing in the Haymaker Players’ production of Tail End Charlie, August 23–September 8, at Trinity Street Playhouse in Austin.





  • This summer, Professor of Art History Thomas Noble Howe coordinated his 12th field season at the ancient Roman site of Stabiae near Pompeii, Italy, with teams from the State Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg; the Technische Universität München (the Technical University of Munich, excavation and conservation); the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee (LiDAR); and the Warsaw Academy of Fine Arts (conservation). Howe also worked with the Cornell University garden excavation at the House of Regina Carolina in Pompeii, establishing recording techniques that he developed in Rome and Stabiae using a single total station surveying instrument to record all find spots and to do a “wireframe” high-precision surveyed drawing of the architecture.





  • Associate Professor of English Michael Saenger  published a blog post for the Times  of Israel, titled “Bibi Loves BDS.” Read it here .





  • Associate Professor of English Michael Saenger was invited to be an academic visitor by the chair of the faculty of English at Cambridge University, December 2019–January 2020. Saenger will be conducting research on temporality in relation to Shakespeare’s life in print.





  • Associate Professor of Computer Science Barbara Anthony was the recipient of a $5,000 grant from the National Science Foundation–supported Center for Parallel and Distributed Computing Curriculum Development and Educational Resources. The Center helps faculty incorporate parallel and distributed computing into courses for students in their first two years of undergraduate study. As part of the grant, she spent a week with faculty members from around the country at the University of Maryland, College Park, receiving training on parallel and distributed computing content and educational evaluation methodology.





  • The Department of Mathematics and Computer Science was active at MathFest, a national meeting of the Mathematical Association of America (MAA), held this year in Cincinnati, OH, July 31–August 3, 2019.

    • Professor of Mathematics Alison Marr and Daniela Beckelhymer ’20 led an activity titled “Domino Antimagic Squares” in the MAA Workshop Create and Recreate: A Celebration of Women in Recreational Mathematics.
    • Marr copresented “Beyond Leaky Pipes: Fostering Pathways and Persistence in the Mathematical Sciences” with Joel Kilty and Alex M. McAllister, of Centre College, and Ranthony A.C. Edmonds, of Ohio State University, in the session “Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in Mathematics,” which they also coorganized.
    • Beckelhymer participated in the Mentoring Workshop for Women.
    • Professor of Mathematics Fumiko Futamura organized and led a minicourse, “Visualizing Projective Geometry through Photographs and Perspective Drawings,” with her collaborator Annalisa Crannell, of Franklin & Marshall College. This was the sixth offering of the highly successful national expert class, sponsored by the MAA special-interest group on Mathematics and the Arts.
    • Associate Professor of Mathematics Therese Shelton presented “DE and Social Justice: A Cholera Model with Bacterial Reservoir,” coauthored by Emma Kathryn Groves ’18 and Associate Professor of Education Sherry Adrian, in the session “Showcase of Modeling to Motivate Differential Equations,” coorganized with Patrice Tiffany and Rosemary Farley, of Manhattan College, Riverside, NY.  Shelton and Tiffany are among the coprincipal investigators on a grant from the National Science Foundation that sponsored the session.
    • Shelton participated in the full-day meeting of the national governing body, the MAA Congress, as the new representative from the Texas Section of the MAA. Shelton was elected as recorder for the MAA Congress (2020–2022), and she participated in the MAA Section Officers Meeting.
    • Shelton coorganized the general contributed poster session with Steven McKay, of Brigham Young University, Provo, UT, as members of the national MAA Committee on Contributed Paper Sessions.




  • Professor of Art and Art History Thomas Noble Howe  and Uri Dromi (director of the Mishkenot Sha’ananim Center in Jerusalem, former spokesman of the Rabin and Perez governments, and director of the Jerusalem Press Club) published the proceedings from an international conference they organized in Jerusalem in November 2008. The publication, The Roman Villa in the Mediterranean Basin  (Cambridge Press, 2018) is being reviewed by Elaine Gazda (University of Michigan) in the Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians in September 2019 (vol. 78, no. 3, pp. 347–349). JSAH is the major international scholarly venue for architectural history, and the review characterizes Howe and Dromi’s volume as “monumental.” Howe contributed a lead chapter and invited the contributors.





  • Assistant Professor of Business Debika Sihi coauthored an article titled “The Marketing Organization’s Journey to Become Data Driven” in the Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing. The article explores the experiences of managers implementing data analytics into the processes of the marketing function. It also uncovers the challenges and identifiable stages of implementation.





  • Part-Time Instructor of Applied Music Adrienne Inglis’s composition “The Song of the Harp Seal” will enjoy its world premiere performance by Inversion Ensemble Coda August 10–11, 2019, in Georgetown and Austin, TX. Composed especially for Inversion Ensemble Coda, “The Song of the Harp Seal” sets to music Gillean McDougall’s poem of the same title and was commissioned by the composer for this project. For treble chorus and harp, this work tells the story of a mother harp seal and her pup forced south of their usual arctic range by the climate crisis. The pup ingests plastic pollution which contributes to her death near the shores of the Isle of Skye. Scottish legend mixes with modern tragedy as mermaids beckon in Gaelic to the harp pup and summon the audience to remember the harp seal. Inversion Ensemble’s project “Aether: Earth—Conservation/Nature” features guest conductor Cina Crisara and Chaski harpist Shana Norton.





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth presented her research paper “Felicitas Hoppe’s Pigafetta: Pluri-Worlds and Vibrant Matter” on the ecological interconnectedness of the Pacific at the 22nd General Congress of the International Comparative Literature Association, ACLA. Title Literature of the World and the Future of Comparative Literature, the conference was held July 29–August 2, 2019, at the University of Macau, Macau SAR, China. Berroth’s presentation contributed to subtheme 4: The Multiple Histories of Comparative Literature; Pacific Insularity: Imaginary Geography of Insular Spaces in the Pacific. Postcolonial critiques of colonial master narratives and approaches to alternative constructions of insularity beyond the dominant Western traditions were essential tasks of speakers contributing to this section.





  • An excerpt of Associate Professor of Music Jason Hoogerhyde ’s opera The Color of Dissonance  was included in the 10th edition of Nancy Rogers and Robert Ottman’s Music for Sight Singing  (Pearson, 2019).





  • Director of the Debby Ellis Writing Center Jennifer Marciniak was awarded the South Central Writing Center Association (SCWCA) Micro-Regional Grant for the state of Texas to host the Fall 2019 Directors’ Day Out on September 14 at Southwestern University. The event is a full-day workshop and networking seminar for 15 writing-center directors from Central and South Central Texas academic institutions. The workshop will focus on how regional directors can work together to train and educate writing consultants by using cross-institutional frameworks, such as field trips, mini-conferences, and video-chat sessions.





  • Southwestern faculty and students attended the American Sociological Association’s (ASA) Annual Meeting, August 10–13. 

    • Associate Professor of Sociology Reggie Byron gave a presentation titled “Workplace Discrimination and the Racialized Character of Organizations.” He also sat on an ASA panel of the Task Force on First-Generation and Working-Class Persons in Sociology for the second year in a row.
    • Professor of Sociology Maria Lowe and Madeline Carrola ’19 gave a presentation titled “Racialized Surveillance of Parks and Pools in a Liberal, Predominantly White Neighborhood.” 
    • Four sociology majors participated in the 2019 ASA’s Honors Program and presented their papers. Madeline Carrola ’19 and Molly McConnell ’20 presented their capstone and research-methods papers, which were the basis of their admission to the program. Samantha Pentecost 19 and Veronica Ciotti ’19 presented their capstone papers and were admitted by virtue of their second- and third-place wins in the annual Alpha Kappa Delta International Honor Society of Sociology undergraduate paper competition.
    • In addition, Savannah Scott  ’19 received the ASA Section on Racial and Ethnic Minorities 2019 Joe Feagin Distinguished Undergraduate Student Paper Award for her capstone project, “Medically Policing Black Female Bodies: Black Women’s Experiences with Birth Control in Austin, Texas.”




July 2019

  • D’Andre Adams ’21, Daniela Beckelhymer ’20, and Professor of Mathematics Alison Marr had their paper “Choose Your Own Adventure: An Analysis of Interactive Gamebooks Using Graph Theory” published in the July edition of the Journal of Humanistic Mathematics. This research was conducted as part of SCOPE 2017. The article is available here.





  • Julia O’Bryan  ’19 received an Award of Excellence in the prestigious VSA Emerging Young Artists Program for her work “Beautiful Brokenness,” part of her Southwestern capstone exhibition. VSA Emerging Young Artists is a program of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, in Washington, D.C., that recognizes and showcases the work of emerging young artists with disabilities. O’Bryan’s work, along with that of 15 other award recipients, will travel in a 1–2 year national exhibition.





  • Assistant Professor of Psychology Carin Perilloux, with her collaborator Dr. Jaime Cloud from Western Oregon University, published an article titled “Mate-by-Numbers: Budget, Mating Context, and Sex Predict Preferences for Facial and Bodily Traits” in the journal Evolutionary Psychological Science.





  • Assistant Professor of Psychology Carin Perilloux, together with psychology alumnus Justin White ’18, published a review of Gil Rosenthal’s book Mate Choice: The Evolution of Sexual Decision Making from Microbes to Humansin the journal Evolutionary Studies in Imaginative Culture.





  • Associate Professor of English Michael Saenger published a review of Malcolm Smuts (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of The Age of Shakespeare, Oxford University Press. The review appeared in Notes and Queries, also published by Oxford University Press.





  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Therese Shelton was interviewed for a post of the Mathematical Association of America Blog for work under a grant from the National Science Foundation, NSF Award no. 1724796 under IUSE: EHR 15-585 for 2018–2021. The coprincipal investigators in the grant are Brian Winkel, director of SIMIODE (Systemic Initiative for Modeling Investigations and Opportunities with Differential Equations); R. Corban Harwood, George Fox University in Newberg, OR; Audrey Malagon, Virginia Wesleyan University, Virginia Beach, VA; and Patrice Tiffany, Manhattan College, Riverdale, NY. Rosemary Farley from Manhattan College has also been integral to this work. In the second year of the grant, Shelton coorganized and coled a faculty-development workshop, held at George Fox University, July 22–27. Twenty-seven participants from across the U.S. became MINDE (Model Instructors in Differential Equations) Fellows to enhance their teaching of undergraduate differential equations in a modeling-first approach. The workshop was sponsored by SIMIODE , a nonprofit 501(c)3 organization, and Manhattan College.





  • Assistant Professor of Political Science Emily Sydnor  was interviewed by KXAN and the Williamson County Sun   about a new Texas law that prevents mobile polling locations during early voting. She discussed the effects of polling locations on voter turnout, particularly among college students.





  • Supported by a Sam Taylor Fellowship, Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth conducted an interview with Christian Stocker, representative of the SILVIVA foundation, and visited the Sihlwald nature education center in Zürich, Switzerland. The interview and site visit will inform units on nature education and sustainability to be published for the NEH sponsored digital humanities project, our co-authored open access curriculum Grenzenlos Deutsch.





  • Professor of Political Science and Dean of the Faculty Alisa Gaunder  argued against the resolution: “Japan needs a two-party system” in an article published in the Center for Strategic and International Studies newsletter Debating Japan . Debating Japan  is “a platform for scholars around the world to address pressing issues in Japan’s policy debate and U.S.–Japan relations.” Each author is asked to take a particular position on a policy issue. This issue of the newsletter focuses on the party system in the wake of the recent upper house parliamentary election on July 21, 2019.





  • Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin and journalist, editor, and singer Helen Cordes published “Singing Resistance, Rebellion, and Revolution into Being: Collective Political Action and Song,” the lead chapter in the anthology Sonic Politics: Music and the Narration of the Social in the Americas from the 1960s to the Present, edited by Olaf Kaltmeier and Wilfried Raussert and published by Routledge. The publication is accompanied by a webpage and a YouTube channel with playlists created for the individual chapters, providing the opportunity to listen to the songs under discussion while reading the essays, thus making the topic acoustically more “tangible.”





  • Part-Time Assistant Professor of Music Hai Zheng Olefsky was invited to give a cello master class and perform a solo and chamber music in concert with violin virtuoso Elizabeth Pitcairn at Luzerne Chamber Music Festival’s Legacy Concert on July 21, 2019. Luzerne Music Center (LMC) aims to provide world-class music instruction for passionate young people in a summer-camp environment regardless of their financial circumstances. Musicians ages nine to 18 come from all over the world to train at LMC’s campus, which is located in the foothills of New York City’s Adirondack Park.





  • Assistant Professor of Communication Studies Lamiyah Bahrainwala published an article titled “Nike Unveils Muslim Women Athletes” in the journal Feminist Media Studies, which she coauthored with Erin O’Connor from the University of Texas at Austin. This paper grew from their reaction to Nike’s ad for its Pro Hijab, which you can watch here.





  • Associate Professor of English Michael Saenger and Associate Professor of Theatre Sergio Costola organized and led a seminar titled “Polychronic Translation of Shakespeare” at the 2019 European Shakespeare Research Association Conference, held at the Università degli Studi Roma Tre, in Rome, Italy, July 9–12. Kayla Ingram ’20 attended the conference, and, following an independent study with Dr. Saenger on Shakespeare and Translation, designed graphic support for the seminar.





  • Associate Professor of Theatre Kerry Bechtel  has been acting as the associate costume designer alongside Costume Designer Jonathan Knipscher  ’03 at Central City Opera, in Central City, CO. The production of Benjamin Britten’s Billy Budd  is making its Colorado regional premiere. The opera follows the original Herman Melville novella about a young sailor on a British warship in the late 18th century; it features a cast of nearly 60 men and boys as well as realistic period costumes ranging from Royal Navy uniforms to sailors and civilians.





  • Professor of Theatre John OreSam Buehler ’20, and Sage Clay ’22 completed a faculty–student project that created the Heather McGaughey Sustainability kiosk, a public information touchscreen display located in the Jones Theater lobby. Please visit their work to find out more about environmental studies, fine arts, and Heather McGaughey’04.





  • Professor of Art Mary Visser and Charles Morris ’15 had their 3-D sculptural work selected by the European Symposium on Additive Manufacturing (3-D Printing) to be presented at their Paris conference in June at the Ecole CentraleSupélec.





  • Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers was an invited participant in KUT’s “Views and Brews” podcast on the past, present, and future of the humanities. Other panelists were Dennis Ahlburg, former president of Trinity University; Amelia Pace-Borah, academic director of Austin’s Free Minds program; and Paul Woodruff, former dean of undergraduate studies at the University of Texas. Meyers talked about her nationally recognized course Novel English Majors, the role of public scholarship in rejuvenating the humanities, and the need for continuity and change as we revise the curriculum. According to her, “a complex world and complex problems require complex and visionary thinking, and that’s what the humanities offers.” The podcast is available through NPR.





  • Associate Professor of Computer Science Barbara Anthony was a participant in the WeTeach_CS Summit 2019, a three-day event that educates, empowers, and inspires K–12 computer science teachers, advocates, administrators, professional-development providers, university instructors, and policy makers to advance the goal of computer science for all in Texas and beyond.





  • Assistant Professor of Economics Katherine Grooms and coauthors were awarded a prestigious National Institutes of Health (NIH) two-year grant for their work “Drinking Water and Infant Health: Evidence from Contaminant Levels in California.” Dr. Grooms presented their research at the annual meeting of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, in Incline Village, NV.





June 2019

  • In June, recent graduate Will Price ’19 and Assistant Professor of Computer Science Jacob Schrum attended the Congress on Evolutionary Computation in Wellington, New Zealand. 

      • Price presented research on his coauthored paper with Schrum, “Neuroevolution of Multimodal Ms. Pac-ManControllers under Partially Observable Conditions,” based on his SCOPE 2018 research, which resulted in a first-place entry in the Ms. Pac-Man vs. Ghost Team Competition.
      • Schrum presented a paper coauthored with SCOPE 2018 student Bryan Hollingsworth ’20 titled “Infinite Art Gallery: A Game World of Interactively Evolved Artwork.”




  • Director of Teaching, Learning, and Scholarship Julie Sievers and Director of Advising and Retention Jennifer Leach led the session “Expanding Inclusive Teaching: Approaches and Collaborations That Extend Our Reach” with Jennifer Jefferson and Joi Torres (both of St. Edward’s University) at the Big 12 Conference on Teaching and Learning, hosted by the University of Texas at Austin in June 2019.





  • Assistant Professor of Theatre Sergio Costola presented a paper titled “Lucrezia Borgia’s Use of Court Spectacle as Diplomacy during the Years of War (1509–1513)” and chaired the session “Confronted Case Studies of Kings and Queens in History, Art, and Psychology” at the Kings and Queens 8 conference, Resilio Ergo Regno: Resilience, Continuity, and Recovery at Royal Courts, held at the Università degli Studi di Catania, June 24–27. 





  • Assistant Professor of History Jessica Hower presented a paper titled “From Benign Mascot to Enemy of All Mankind, and Back Again: The Problem and Promise of Pirates in Pedagogy” and led the plenary roundtable on teaching piracy studies at the Problem of Piracy: An Interdisciplinary Conference on Plunder at Sea across the World from the Ancient to the Modern, at the University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, June 24–26, 2019. The conference was sponsored by the Royal Historical Society, the Society for Nautical Research, and the University of Strathclyde.





  • Assistant Director of Student Activities Oliver Agger-Shelton attended the 12th Annual Hazing Prevention.org Institute for Hazing Prevention at Drexel University, June 19–21. The conference discussed a variety of hazing-prevention topics such as policy development, distribution, education, and enforcement as well as soliciting and handling reports. He looks forward to integrating additional hazing prevention tools and strategies here at Southwestern.





  • Dean of the Faculty and Professor of Political Science Alisa Gaunder was the program cochair for the Deans’ Program at the Annapolis Group Annual Meeting, June 17–19, 2019. The Annapolis Group of Liberal Arts Colleges comprises approximately 130 leading national liberal-arts colleges. The Annapolis Group provides a forum for member institutions to “share best practices, seek higher levels of excellence, and advance the cause of liberal arts education on a national scale.” In addition to serving as program cochair, Gaunder also served as a panel participant in the session on Curricular Innovations.





  • Assistant Director of Admission Rebecca Rother served as faculty for the Texas Association of College Admission Counseling (TACAC)’s Admission and College Counseling Institute, June 15–18. She taught new admission hires in college and high school how to better serve students in the college admission process.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of History Joseph Hower published “Public Sector Unions in the United States” in the Oxford Encyclopedia of American Urban History (ed. Timothy Gilfoyle; Oxford University Press, 2019, pp. 271–285). The essay is a (slightly) modified version of a piece that was originally included in the digital Oxford Research Encyclopedia of American History  and was selected for traditional print publication based in part on heavy online traffic.





  • Associate Professor of Computer Science Barbara Anthony was participated in the 2019 Synthetic Biology: Engineering, Evolution & Design (SEED) workshops at Syracuse University, training faculty to use SEED labs to demonstrate cybersecurity exploits and countermeasures. She can be seen in the local video coverage here.





  • Assistant Professor of History Jethro Hernandez Berrones was invited to present his work in the Seminar on Otherness at the Center of Interdisciplinary Research in the Sciences and the Humanities of the National Autonomous University of Mexico. He presented the paper “Mystic of Medicine, Modern Curandero, and ‘Improvised Doctor’: Francisco I. Madero and the Practice of Homeopathy in Rural Mexico at the Turn of the 20th Century” on June 14, 2019. Hernandez Berrones discussed with undergraduate and graduate students the fluid limits among religious medical beliefs, indigenous healing rituals, and academic medicine as well as the geographic, social, economic, and cultural elements that shape and disrupt these boundaries in Mexico.





  • Assistant Dean for Student Multicultural Affairs Terri Johnson attended the 11th annual Summer Institute (SI) for Faculty at the University of Notre Dame’s Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies June 10–14. The SI is a weeklong training for academics, administrators, and researchers on how to build or strengthen peace studies programs at their colleges or universities. The SI brought together 59 faculty and staff from 29 colleges, universities, and peacebuilding organizations hailing from 12 different countries. Johnson was excited to be selected for the institute and looks forward to building peace and justice coalitions at Southwestern. Read more about Johnson’s experience.





  • Professor of Anthropology Melissa Johnson  gave two invited talks on her book Becoming Creole: Nature and Race in Belize . The first was given to a group of graduate students from the University of South Florida and members of the community of Placencia, at the Placencia Community Center in Belize on June 12; the second was given to one of the communities that the book is about, Crooked Tree Village, at the Crooked Tree Museum and Cultural Center on June 22. The American Association of Geographers Review of Books  shared the first review of the book, available here .





  • Ellie Crowley ’19, Todd Coachman ’20, and Andrea Hern ’20 are three of only 70 students who were selected from around the country for the Marketing EDGE Collegiate Summit, held in New York City, June 9–11. They met with leadership from companies including Plated, Facebook, NBC Universal, Ernst & Young, and more. Assistant Professor of Business Debika Sihi also attended.





  • Daniela Beckelhymer ’20 was selected to participate in The Institute for Mathematics and Its Applications/Math Alliance Workshop on Career Paths in the Mathematical Sciences June 6–8, 2019, at the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis–Saint Paul, MN.  Professor of Mathematics Alison Marr nominated Beckelhymer for the program.





  • Technical Assistant and Exhibitions Coordinator Seth Daulton  is exhibiting his work in “Art of the South 2019,” which is presented by Number Magazine  at Memphis College of Art, Memphis, TN. The exhibition features work produced in the last two years by artists residing in Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Missouri, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, South Carolina, Virginia, the District of Columbia, or West Virginia. The exhibition is curated by Bethany Springer and is on view June 7–July 14, 2019.





  • Shellsea Miller ’20 and Lauren Muskara ’20 presented their research on environmental DNA (eDNA), “A Snail out of Water: Hitting the Target on Primer Optimization for Apple Snails,” as a poster presentation at the annual meeting of the Society of Freshwater Science in Salt Lake City, UT. Their work uses a molecular ecology application to detect the presence of nonnative apple snails. The research started with SCOPE 2018 and continued through the 2018–2019 academic year, during which both Miller and Muskara completed a number of novel experiments using the quantitative polymerase chain reaction thermocycler in the Keck Molecular Biology Center. This work represents part of the ongoing collaboration between Professor of Biology Romi Burks and SU alumnus Dr. Matthew Barnes ’06 of Texas Tech University.





  • Associate Professor of History Melissa Byrnes published an article, “Diplomacy at the End of Empire: Evolving French Perspectives on Portuguese Colonialism in the 1950s and 1960s,” in Cold War History.





  • Internship and Employment Developer Craig Gildenis participating in the Glass Leadership Institute Young Leaders program with the Anti-Defamation League (ADL) in Austin from September to June. The program consists of monthly trainings and discussions as well as a conference and lobbying in Washington, DC, in June.





  • Associate Professor of Sociology Reggie Byron gave a presentation titled “The Uneven Effects of Legal Representation on Employment Discrimination Charge Outcomes” on June 1 at the Annual Meetings of the Law and Society Association in Washington, DC.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of History Joseph Hower presented a paper titled “The Union of the Future: The Politics of the Presidency in a Public Sector Union, 1958–1964” at the annual meeting of the Labor and Working Class History Association Conference, held May 30–June 1 at Duke University in Durham, NC.





  • Assistant Professor of Business Debika Sihi was invited to discuss the findings from her recent paper examining the use of virtual- and augmented-reality tools in the real-estate industry at the annual Austin Home Buyer Fair on June 1, 2019.





  • Part-Time Instructor of Applied Music Adrienne Inglis’s composition “The Rage and Reconciliation of King Lear” will enjoy its world première performance by Inversion Ensemble June 1–2, 2019, in Austin, TX. Commissioned by Jonathan Riemer in memory of his father, Rev. Dr. Milton H. Riemer, the work for mixed chorus, bassoon, and piano weaves passages from Shakespeare’s King Lear with the signature phrases of Rev. Dr. Riemer. Rev. Dr. Riemer’s words bring insight and reflection to the poignant narrative of a parent–child relationship and mental illness. Inversion Ensemble’s project “Heroes/Monsters: Songs of Legends and Beasts” features bassoonist Nathan Koch and pianist Austin Haller.





May 2019

  • Assistant Professor of Psychology Carin Perilloux presented two posters with SU students at the 31st annual Human Behavior & Evolution Society conference on May 31, 2019:





  • Assistant Professor of Kinesiology Ed Merritt and Erin Hobbs ’19 presented their coauthored work “Making a Case for Using Simple, Non-Technical Language and Analogies When Using Technology to Teach Physiologic Concepts” at the PanAm Physiologic Society meeting, in Havana, Cuba, on May 29.





  • Professor of English David Gaines  attended and participated in the World of Bob Dylan Symposium in Tulsa, OK. The conference, hosted by the Tulsa University Institute for Bob Dylan Studies and the Bob Dylan Archive, was the largest international gathering of Dylan scholars and fans to date. More than 500 people registered for the four days devoted to the Nobel laureate’s work and life. On June 1, Gaines chaired a roundtable on teaching Dylan in various curricular contexts. On June 2, he presented “‘Why Dylan?’ in 157 Words/19 Lines/3 Stanzas,” a paper about the poem he contributed to Visiting Bob: Poems Inspired by the Life and Word of Bob Dylan  (New Rivers Press, 2018). On May 29, he and Norma Aguirre Gaines  ‘08 attended a reception with area alumni. They also heard a lot of music in the evenings.





  • Assistant Professor of History Jethro Hernandez Berrones was invited to the Permanent Seminar on the History of Medicine and Public Health in Latin America at the School of Medicine of the National Autonomous University of Mexico. He presented the paper “Proletarian or Bourgeois? The Dilemma of the Mexican Medical Profession after the Revolution of 1910” on May 28, 2019. In the paper, Hernandez Berrones describes the tensions among different groups of physicians between their professional liberty and their limitations in the context of the postrevolutionary government´s efforts to provide health to all Mexicans.





  • Professor of Political Science Shannon Mariotti was invited to join the editorial board of American Political Thought: A Journal of Ideas, Institutions, and Culture, published by the University of Chicago Press.





  • Associate Professor of Chinese Carl Robertson presented a paper at the Association of Welsh Writers of English Annual Conference, at Gregynog Hall, Tregynon, Wales, titled “States of Mind: The Lyric Voice and the Poetry of Leslie Norris,” including the inaugural reading of a poem dedicated to Norris, “True Lark.”





  • Part-Time Instructor of Applied Music Adrienne Inglis’s work “Innocent Blood” was nominated by the Austin Critics Table for Best Original Composition/Score for 2018–19. Her work was part of the Inversion Ensemble’s concert I, Too, Sing America: Songs of Our Shared History, which was also nominated for Best Concert/Opera Performance.





  • Professor of English David Gaines  attended and participated in the Duluth Dylan Fest, the annual celebration of Nobel Laureate Bob Dylan’s birthday in his hometowns of Duluth and Hibbing, MN. On May 22, Gaines read “Egyptian Rings and Spanish Boots,” his poem in Visiting Bob: Poems Inspired by the Life and Word of Bob Dylan  (New Rivers Press, 2018), at Zeitgeist Teatro Zuccone with the editors of the volume, who also read their work. He did likewise on May 23 at Zenith Bookstore in Duluth. On May 25, he delivered “From the North Country to Stockholm and Back: A Tale of Two Journeys,” the invited keynote John Bushey Memorial Lecture. He also heard a lot of music in the evenings.





  • Associate Professor of Anthropology Brenda Sendejo collaborated with University of Texas at Austin’s Center for Mexican American Studies on the “Chicana Movidas: New Narratives of Activism and Feminism in the Movement Era” panel presentation at the Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center in Austin. Sendejo was among the contributors to the anthology who presented at that event, made possible by a recent grant from the Summerlee Foundation to the Latina History Project (LHP), which Sendejo directs. Sendejo was also invited to present on her research at the University of Texas–Rio Grande Valley campuses in Brownsville and McAllen and at the The Esperanza Peace and Justice Center in San Antonio, which was cosponsored by Trinity University and the University of Texas–San Antonio. The recent Summerlee grant will allow Sendejo to continue the work of the LHP, documenting Chicana/Latina activism and feminism in Texas since the movement era and incorporating this research into the development and implementation of  inclusive pedagogies and methodologies. Forthcoming activities include a collaboration between Sendejo’s classes and those of Dr. Norma Cantú at Trinity University and research with SU students on the history of Chicana feminism and activism in San Antonio and Central Texas since the 1960s.





  • Professor of Mathematics Kendall Richards  recently published an article titled “A Note on Inequalities for the Ratio of Zero-Balanced Hypergeometric Functions” in the Proceedings of the American Mathematical Society  (series B, vol. 6, May 2019).





  • Professor of Music Lois Ferrari conducted the Austin Civic Orchestra (ACO) on May 18, 2019, in its annual Paint to Music Spring Concert, which features artwork created by Austin ISD students in response to hearing and studying an iconic piece of classical music. This year’s selection was Pictures at an Exhibitionby Modest Moussorgsky (orchestrated by Maurice Ravel). Also featured on the program was “Festive Overture” by Dmitri Shostakovich, the “Sleeping Beauty Waltz” by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (conducted by Gus Sterneman ’06), and the “Concerto for Horn and Orchestra in B-Flat Major, Op. 91” by Reinhold Glière (performed by ACO member Chris Simpson).





  • Associate Professor of Computer Science Barbara Anthony and Assistant Professor of Computer Science Jacob Schrum attended the Summit of the National Center for Women & Information Technology (NCWIT), in Nashville, TN, May 14–16, as part of their ongoing work with NCWIT’s Extension Services Learning Circles. In keeping with the theme of the summit, “Where Conversations Lead to Change,” they met with change leaders at other schools, participated in interactive workshops designed to help interrupt bias, and heard from plenary speakers from multiple disciplinary backgrounds on improving diversity and inclusion in computing.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Physics and Environmental Studies Rebecca Edwards helped lead a workshop held May 14–16, at St. Edward’s University, on conducting air-quality research using ozonesondes. Ozonesondes are lightweight instruments that are launched on weather balloons to measure the concentration of ozone in the atmosphere and to sample air pollutant from the ground’s surface to an altitude of 30 kilometers. SCOPE students Daniel Whitney ’21 and Jacob Fly ’21 participated in the workshop, along with several St. Edward’s students. In addition to an overview of the science of air quality, the participants learned two protocols for conditioning the instrument and then launched a balloon.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Art Ron Geibel  is one of 15 artists selected to participate in the exhibition Inspired: Contemporary Responses to a Legacy of Courage  at the Susquehanna Art Museum in Harrisburg, PA, May 10 through Aug. 18. The exhibition celebrates the 50th anniversary of the historic Stonewall uprising in New York City—a pivotal moment in LGBTQ+ history.  The Susquehanna Art Museum partnered with the LGBT Center of Central Pennsylvania and Dickinson College Archives and Special Collections to include artifacts from the History Project collection in the exhibition. The History Project documents the stories and history of LGBTQ+ life and activism in Central Pennsylvania. From there, the show travels to the Lancaster Museum of Art in Lancaster, PA, through Nov. 2019.





  • Associate Professor of Art History Allison Miller gave an invited lecture titled “Terracotta Warriors after the First Emperor: Re-Evaluating the Qin Legacy in the Han” on May 5 at the Greenburgh Public Library in Elmsford, NY. The lecture was sponsored by the Westchester Society of the Archaeological Institute of America and the New York University Alumni Club of Westchester.





  • Director of Advising and Retention Jennifer Leach has been appointed as a member of the Administrators’ Institute Advisory Board of the National Academic Advising Association (NACADA). Her appointment will run through 2021. She was invited to serve because her position at Southwestern includes both advising and retention responsibilities that are university-wide. Also, her membership will represent a type of institution that brings added diversity to the Advisory Board. Her perspective will be beneficial to evaluate and improve the Administrator’s Institute.





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth earned funding for a competitive FL-A-CH Mini Grant administered by the American Association of Teachers of German. FL-A-CH stands for Liechtenstein, Austria, and Switzerland, the countries providing funding for studying their languages and cultures at U.S. institutions. The grant enhances a student engagement project, planned for fall 2019, focused on nature education in Austria and Switzerland and emphasizing interdisciplinary connections between SU’s German and environmental studies programs.





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth received a nomination for the American Association of Teachers of German (AATG) Outstanding German Educator Award. The award recognizes excellence in teaching and outstanding contributions to the German teaching profession. A nominee’s dossier documents five or more years of demonstrated excellence in German education; active membership in the local AATG chapter; creative leadership in German language education; impact in local, state, or national arenas; and continued growth as a German educator. Nella Spurlin, serving on AATG Executive Council and representing the membership of South Texas Chapter of AATG, is coordinating the nomination. Berroth currently serves as chapter president.





  • Associate Professor of Music Jason Hoogerhyde  has published a review of Prefab Sprout’s recording “I Trawl The Megahertz” in the College Music Symposium  (spring 2019, vol. 59, no.1).





  • Director of Teaching, Learning, and Scholarship Julie Sievers participated as an invited panelist in the May 9 webinar “Research on Annotation in English and Composition,” hosted by the Hypothesis Project. In it, she discussed research from her article “Writing between the Lines: Teaching Digital Reading with Social Annotation in an Introductory Literature Course,” forthcoming in the journal Pedagogy: Critical Approaches to Teaching Literature, Language, Composition, and Culture.





  • Head Softball Coach Angela Froboese received the honor of SCAC Coach of the Year for the fifth time. She is tied for second all time in softball league history in Coach of the Year honors, and her 136 conference wins represent the most by any coach since softball became a conference sport prior to 1999. Southwestern softball currently is ranked in the top 25 in the nation.





  • Computer science major Adina Friedman ’19 and Assistant Professor of Computer Science Jacob Schrum have had a peer-reviewed publication accepted to the IEEE Conference on Games, to take place in London, U.K., August 20–23. The publication, “Desirable Behaviors for Companion Bots in First-Person Shooters,” describes research that began as part of SCOPE in summer 2018 and was followed up in fall 2018 with a human-subject study involving 30 members of the SU community. The videos, code, and other content associated with the study are available online.





  • Associate Professor of French Francis Mathieu  has just published a book review of Herrick Chapman’s France’s Long Reconstruction: In Search of the Modern Republic in the French Review  (vol. 92, no. 4, pp.217–218).





  • Head Research and Instruction Librarian Joan Parks was an invited speaker on a panel hosted by the School of Information at the University of Texas at Austin. She spoke with graduate students about librarianship as a career and answered their questions about the profession.





  • Professor of Mathematics Alison Marr received a $6,000 Mathematical Association of America’s Tensor Program for Women and Mathematics grant that will fund the Hidden No More lecture series for the 2019–2020 academic year. This grant (and some support from the Mathematics and Computer Science Department) will bring six women from underrepresented groups with doctorates in mathematics and computer science to campus over the academic year for a lecture series in which each speaker will tell her journey to math or computer science and also share the type of research she does.





  • Part-Time Assistant Professor of History Iris Ma was invited to give a presentation titled “The Making of ‘Youth’ in Modern China: Reflections on the May Fourth Movement” for the panel commemorating the 100th anniversary of the May Fourth Movement and the 70th anniversary of the Chinese Communist Revolution on May 2, 2019. The event was jointly organized by the Institute for Historical Studies and the Center for East Asian Studies at the University of Texas at Austin.





  • Computer science major Adanna Court  ’19 was selected and funded by Facebook to attend their 2019 Data Challenge on May 3–4, in Menlo Park, CA. Ten teams of three to four participants each were tasked with determining the optimal location and type of business for San Francisco based on the data set provided. Using and Python , they were able to manipulate the data and create graphs to support the recommendations they provided, which they presented to the judges. In addition, teams made recommendations to Facebook about how to use that data set to improve one of their products. Court’s team focused on WhatsApp.





April 2019

  • Professor of Art and Art History Thomas Noble Howe  published a review of the book Autour des Machines de Vitruv, l’Ingénierie Romaine: Textes, Archéologie. et Restitution, Actes du Colloque Organizé par ERLIS à Caen  (3–4 Jin 2015; eds. Sophie Madelaine and Philippe Fleury, Presses Universitaries de Caen, 2017) for the April 2019 issue of The American Journal of Archaeology  (vol. 123, no. 2).





  • The American Chemical Society student group received an award and plaque from the American Chemical Society for 2017–2018, which read, “In recognition for your commitment and achievement, this Honorable Mention award is presented to the Southwestern University Student Chapter 2017–2018.”  Director of General Chemistry Labs Willis Weigand and Assistant Professor of Chemistry Mike Gesinski are the faculty advisors for the group. The current officers of the group are Julianna Mouat ’20, president; Ethan Iverson ’20, vice president; Rachel Brasher ’21, treasurer; Abby Musyoka ’21, secretary and historian; and Ashley Chavana ’19, social outreach.





  • Sara Boyd ’20, Devon Fulcher ’19, and Daniel Maldonado ’19 received an honorable mention for their submission in the 35th annual COMAP Mathematical Contest in Modeling, advised by Associate Professor of Computer Science Barbara Anthony. During the contest, they spent five days working on a problem that required them to elect, configure, optimally pack, geoposition, deploy and operate a set of midsize unmanned aerial vehicles that would supplement existing relief medical supply chains on Puerto Rico. Their honorable mention designation put them in the top quarter of the 14,108 teams that participated. Learn more .





  • Head of Special Collections and Archives Megan Firestone  was profiled in the spring issue of Texas State University’s Hillviews  magazine for her innovative and creative uses of history.





  • Professor of Psychology Traci Giuliano recently published a paper titled “The Writing Spiral: A Practical Tool for Teaching Undergraduates to Write Publication-Quality Manuscripts” in the journal Frontiers in Psychology.





  • Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin published an article titled “Resistance and Revolution in the Age of Authoritarian Revanchism: The Power of Revolutionary Imaginaries in the Austerity–Security State Era” in Millennium, one of the U.K.’s top international relations journals.





  • Head of Special Collections and Archives Megan Firestone was part of the panel “Producing Oral History Projects at Smaller Institutions” at the Texas Oral History Association annual conference on April 27, 2019.  The panelists talked about ideas and suggestions for practitioners facing such challenges as planning and executing, infrastructure and equipment challenges, as well as archiving and preserving oral history projects in an academic setting.  





  • Professor of Anthropology Melissa Johnson  was interviewed by Dr. Alejandra Bronfman about her new book Becoming Creole: Nature and Race in Belize  for the New Books Network’s podcast series. The interview was posted on April 26, 2019, in their Caribbean Studies section.





  • Professor of Art and Art History and Chair of Art History Thomas Noble Howe presented an invitational lecture titled “What Were the First Greek Architects: Designers, Engineers, or Polymaths?” at the conference “Firmitas/Aedificatio”: Die Materiellen, “Körperlichen” Grundlagen der (Gebauten) Architektur, 8. Architekturtheoretisches Kolloquium der Stiftung Bibliothek Werner Oechslin in Zusammenarbeit with Dr. Christiane Salge, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Einsiedeln, Switzerland, April 26, 2019. The presentation was in English, with discussion and questions in German, French, Italian, and English. The lecture expands on several recent responses to his dissertation (Harvard, 1985) to propose that monumental Greek architecture was created not by craftsmen from the nascent building professions but rather by polymath intellectuals.





  • Assistant Professor of Political Science Emily Sydnor presented her paper, “Uncivil Boundaries: The Effects of Online Civility Contests on Perceptions of Protest,” at a workshop on race, gender, and toxicity online at The University of Texas’ Moody School of Communication on April 25–26, 2019. The workshop was sponsored by the Social Science Research Council’s Program on Media and Democracy.





  • Professor of Psychology Traci Giuliano recently published a paper titled  “Guiding Undergraduates Through the Process of First Authorship” in the journal Frontiers in Psychology.





  • Professor of Psychology Traci Giuliano, together with psychology alumni Sarah Butterworth ’18, Justin White ’18, Lizette Cantu ’17, and Kyle Fraser ’17, published the article “Sender Gender Influences Emoji Interpretation in Text Messages” in the journal Frontiers in Psychology.





  • Economics majors Abbie Boatwright ’19, Stan Kannegieter ’19, and Diana Trevino ’20 presented their research at the Economics Scholars Undergraduate Research Conference at the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.  Boatwright, under the direction of Professor of Economics Dirk Early and Dr. Paul Brenner, associate director of high-performance computing at the University of Notre Dame, presented her research on the link between intellectual-property protections and patenting, “Global Innovation and Intellectual-Property Rights.” Kannegieter presented his work on the effectiveness of solar incentives in solar adoption, “The Effect of Financial Incentive Policies on Residential Solar Panel Installation,” and Trevino presented her paper on discrimination in jury selection, “Discrimination in Peremptory Challenges.” Assistant Professor of Economics Katie Grooms supervised the projects produced by Kannegieter and Trevino.  Grooms was also the keynote speaker at the conference and presented her work “Water Pollution in the United States: Regulatory Enforcement, Firm Compliance, and Human Health.”





  • Assistant Professor of Communication Studies Lamiyah Bahrainwala was an invited speaker on a panel hosted by the Communication Studies Graduate Council at the University of Texas at Austin. She addressed anxieties about academic precarity, the job market, and transitioning to faculty status.





  • Avery Beam  ’19 presented her honors thesis in political science, “Ideology in Russia’s Clash with the West,” at the Midwestern Political Science Association’s annual conference, in Chicago, IL,  April 7.





  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Therese Shelton has been elected as representative of the Texas Section of the Congress of the Mathematical Association of America. This three-year national leadership position will begin in July 2019.





  • A paper coauthored by Associate Professor of Mathematics Therese Shelton, Associate Professor of Education Sherry Adrian, and Emma Kathryn Groves ’17, titled “A Model of the Transmission of Cholera in a Population with Contaminated Water,” which was accepted for publication in November 2018, has been published in the CODEE Journal, vol. 12.  The article was downloaded across 15 countries in its first 25 days of online availability.





  • Associate Professor of History Melissa Byrnes served as discussant on a panel on “The Empire beyond the Ivory Tower: Non-Academics and the Legacies of Colonial History in Contemporary France” at the Society for French Historical Studies Annual Conference, in Indianapolis, IN. She also spoke at a round-table discussion on “Using Digital Tools to Do Public History.”





  • Lauren Gillespie  ’19 has been awarded a prestigious National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship that will finance three years’ worth of graduate school attendance. Gillespie will be using the funds to seek a Ph.D. in computer science at Stanford University.





  • Professor of Political Science Shannon Mariotti presented a paper, “Everyday Democracy and Meditative Practices: Tactics to Resist the Appropriation of the Attentional Commons,” at the Western Political Science Association conference on April 20, 2019. She also served as chair on a panel titled “Spatial and Social Imaginaries: Buddhism in Context” and a discussant on a panel titled “Buddhism, Feminism, and the Body Politic.” This was all part of a miniconference she coorganized titled “The Politics of the Mindful Revolution.” Thirty interdisciplinary academics met over the course of two days to attend eight panels that explored political problems and possibilities arising from the mainstreaming of meditation and mindfulness that is known as “Buddhist modernism.”   





  • Senior Director of Integrative and Community-Engaged Learning Director Sarah Brackmann gave an invited keynote at the University of Houston–Downtown’s High-Impact Practices Showcase on April 18. In her address, “Service-Learning as a High-Impact Practice: An Unusually Effective Way to Promote Student and Community Engagement,” Brackmann discussed the teaching and learning strategies that distinguish these practices, drawing on her experiences as a participant, administrator, and researcher.





  • Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin has been named an associate faculty member at the Observatorio de la Relación Binacional México–EE.UU. (Observatory of the Binational Relationship Mexico–USA) of the Faculty of Political and Social Sciences at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM). Read the full story here .





  • Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow of Sociology Luis Romero and  Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow of Feminist Studies Sequoia Maner were invited to be featured speakers at the University of Texas at Austin. Sponsored by the College of Liberal Arts under a grant provided by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, Romero and Maner presented “Professional-Life Experiences and Postgrad Transitions” to underrepresented graduate students of color. They discussed a variety of aspects concerning the management of career and personal development in graduate school, including pedagogical approaches to studying race, gender, and class in the classroom; navigating microaggressions from students, colleagues, and administration; and juggling home and work lives. Romero and Maner also talked about how to prepare for the job market as an emerging scholar, how to maximize  professional conference opportunities, and how to position oneself for tenure-track positions.





  • Head of Special Collections and Archives Megan Firestone presented an all-day workshop, “Archiving for the Non-Archivist,” at the Texas Library Association annual conference on April 15, 2019. The 20 attendees were introduced to the basics of archiving, outreach, and developing digital projects for their institutions. She also chaired the Archives, Genealogy, and Local History Roundtable.





  • Part-Time Assistant Professor of Voice Julia Taylor  performed the role of Mimi in the all-female production of Puccini’s La Boheme (La Femme Boheme)  with Local Opera Local Artists (LOLA) at the Women’s Music, Diversity, and Leadership Conference at San Diego State University.





  • Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers published “Public Scholar, Beware” in Inside Higher Ed.





  • Professor of English David Gaines  reviewed T. C. Boyle’s Outside Looking In  in the April 12th edition of T he Austin Chronicle .





  • Associate Professor of Environmental Studies Joshua Long coorganized and chaired three sessions at the American Association of Geographers conference in April. While there, Long also served on a panel and presented the introductory paper “Theorizing the Just City in the Era of Climate Change.”





  • Sociology majors Samantha Pentecost ’19 and Veronica Ciotti ’19 were awarded Best Paper awards for their capstone projects by Alpha Kappa Delta, sociology’s national honors society. Pentecost’s paper, “Gendering the Boy Scouts: Examining Hegemonic Masculinity at a Coed Backpacking Camp,” was selected as the second-place winner, and Ciotti’s paper, “The Classroom Is Sacred: Academic Masculinity as a Response to the Campus Carry Law in Texas,” was selected as the third-place winner. Both capstone papers were written under the direction of Professor of Sociology Maria Lowe.





  • Sociology majors Zac White ’20 and Hannah Bills ’20 were selected as two of the eight students participating in the 2019 Summer Research Experience for Undergraduates Program focusing on research in race, ethnicity, and the demography of U.S. families at the University of Texas at Austin’s Population Research Center. White and Bills were assisted by Professor of Sociology Maria Lowe and Associate Professor of Sociology Reggie Byron.





  • Sociology majors Madeline Carrola ’19 and Molly McConnell ’20 were accepted into the 2019 American Sociological Association’s Honors Program. Carrola was admitted based on her capstone paper, “Performing the Handmaid’s Tale: The Use of Dystopian Literature at Political Protests,” which was written under the direction of Professor of Sociology Maria Lowe. McConnell was admitted based on her research methods paper, “Skin Tone, Colorism, and Colorblind Racism in the Age of Trump,” which was written under the direction of Associate Professor of Sociology Reggie Byron.





  • Assistant Professor of Business Debika Sihi was invited to join the editorial review board of Marketing Education Review. The journal is focused on innovative and rigorous research to advance marketing education.





  • German and education major Melina Boutris ’21 presented her research paper on inclusion in special-education classes in Germany at the Undergraduate Research Conference in German Studies at Lafayette College, in Easton, PA, on April 13, 2019.  Her presentation, titled “Inklusion von Schülern mit Lernbehinderung im Deutschen Schulsystem: Meine Erfahrungen als Special Education Student in den USA und als Praktikantin in Einer Integrativen Klasse 4 Einer Deutschen Grundschule,” earned an honorable mention, and she was invited to submit the paper for publication on the conference website. Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth mentored the project.





  • Assistant Professor of History Jessica Hower  attended the British Scholar Society’s annual Britain and the World conference in Kansas City, MO, April, 11–14, 2019. She served as chair on two panels, “Rethinking ‘Centers’ and ‘Peripheries’ in the Early Modern World” and “Commercial and Imperial Relationships in the Early Modern British World,” and took part in the editorial board meeting.





  • Part-Time Assistant Professor of Music and Concert Cellist Hai Zheng Olefsky has been invited to be an adjudicator for strings and to give two cello master classes April 11–12 at the 2019 Independent Schools Association of the Southwest (ISAS) Arts Festival in Austin, TX. This Festival has grown to be the nation’s premiere annual regional arts festival among independent schools. The festival is a collaborative enterprise with more than 40 participating schools. For more than 50 years, the ISAS Fine Arts Festival has been a celebration of the visual and performing arts, bringing together thousands of students who will share their talents and be inspired for their futures.





  • Professor of Sociology Maria Lowe, Mellon Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow Luis Romero,and seven sociology majors attended the annual meeting of the Southern Sociological Society in Atlanta, GA, April 10–13.

    • Lowe and Madeline Carrola ’19 presented “Outsiders Within: The Effects of Online and in-Person Surveillance on Residents of Color in a Predominantly White Neighborhood.” This research is funded by a Southwestern  Faculty–Student Project Award and a Sam Taylor Award.
    • Romero presented “‘Paying the ‘Detention Bill’: The Economics and Hidden Costs of Immigrant Detention for Families.”
    • Carrola also presented “The Handmaid’s Tale and Performance Activism.”
    • Veronica Ciotti  ’19 presented “‘The Classroom is Sacred:’ The Perceived Effects of Campus Carry among Texas Male Faculty Members.”
    • Carmen Hernandez  ’19 presented “How a Piece of Paper Defines One’s Experience in the U.S.: The Experiences of Documented Siblings of DACA Recipients.”
    • Samantha Pentecost  ’19 presented “Girls in the Boy Scouts: Exploring Dilemmas of Gender-Integrated Spaces and Hybrid Masculinity at a Coed Backpacking Camp.”
    • Brielle Read  ’20 presented “Letting the Teachers Speak: Teachers’ Perspectives on the Special Education Identification Process in Public Texas Elementary Schools.”
    • Savannah Scott  ’19 presented “Medically Policing Black Female Bodies: Black Women’s Experiences with Birth Control.”
    • Marta Zuzeviciute  ’19 presented “‘Why Can’t I Be Both?’: Experiences of Having an Arabic Ethnic Identity in French Society.”




  • Professor of Psychology Traci Giuliano, together with psychology alumni Sarah Butterworth ’18, Justin White ’18, Lizette Cantu ’17, and Kyle Fraser ’17, published the article “Sender Gender Influences Emoji Interpretation in Text Messages” in the journal Frontiers in Psychology.





  • Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry Maha Zewail-Foote was invited to give a research seminar at New England Biolabs, Inc., a recognized world leader in developing innovative products for the life-science industry, including genomic research.





  • Professor of Sociology Sandi Nenga delivered two presentations at the Pacific Sociological Association meetings in Oakland, CA. The first was “Doctor Who in the Gender Classroom” and was part of a panel titled  “What is this Lady Doctor Doing in MY TARDIS? Gender and the Regeneration of Doctor Who.” The second presentation was titled “Ten Respeto and Being Respectful: Shifting Meanings of Respect in a College Readiness Program for First-Generation Latinx Students.”





  • Associate Director of Admission Jamar Keaton recently presented at the annual conference of the Texas Association for College Admission Counseling in Dallas, TX. In addition to his presentation “What’s the Point of It All,” he led the organization’s annual raffle effort producing donations totaling approximately $5,500. This total represents one of the largest amounts in raffle history and an increase in the organization’s scholarship fund balance by approximately 10%.





  • Assistant Professor of History Jethro Hernandez Berrones was awarded a prestigious 2019 Summer Stipend by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). NEH grants are highly competitive. Applicants go through a three-step review process that involves specialists, NEH staff, and the National Council of the Humanities. This year, the NEH offered grants to 11% of approximately 1,000 applications. Hernandez Berrones will use the grant to continue working on the manuscript of his book project, A Revolution in Small Doses: Homeopathy, the Profession, and the State in Mexico 1910–1943.





  • Senior Director of Integrative and Community-Engaged Learning Sarah Brackmann presented at the sixth annual Leadership Education and Progress Texas Conference. Her session, titled “Paideia: Integrating Learning through High-Impact Practices,” highlighted the three iterations of Southwestern’s Paideia program and the lessons learned in terms of access, assessing impact, and implementing reflection





  • Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin served as one of the mentors to the 20 young Global South Scholars selected from several hundred globally to participate in the daylong International Studies Association’s First Emerging Global South Scholar Workshop sponsored by the International Studies Association’s (ISA’s) Committee on the Status of Engagement with the Global South (CSEGS) and the Global South Caucus (GSCIS). Among the activities, Selbin led a session on teaching experiences and challenges. Selbin also facilitated a panel at the ISA conference on publication strategies at an Intergenerational Café sponsored by the recently inaugurated Committee on the Status of the Global South with support from the ISA Global South Taskforce and the Global South Caucus. Finally, Selbin cochaired the final meeting of the 2014–2019 editorial team of International Studies Perspectives, one of the ISA’s journals.





  • Emma Cooper ’20 and Markell Henderson ’19 participated as panelists in a financial seminar titled GLAD (Greeks -and others- Learning to Avoid Debt). Professor of Economics and Chair of the Department of Economics and Business Dirk Early and Assistant Professor of Business Hazel Nguyenalso participated as panelists and provided sage advice to student participants seeking knowledge about avoiding debt before and after graduation. The GLAD event was supervised by Associate Professor of Education Alicia Moore and was cohosted by the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.; the Kappa Sigma fraternity; and EMPIRE.





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth was invited to give a presentation titled “Transnationale Erinnerungskulturen und Identitäten” about her research on transnational memory cultures in Germany and France surrounding the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I for a faculty development seminar sponsored by the German Academic Exchange Service, DAAD, and “Landeskundliches Seminar für Ortslektorinnen und Ortslektoren Weltweit. Europäer? Deutscher? Saarländer? - Identitätsfragen in Grenzregionen,” April 7–12, 2019, in Saarbrücken, Germany. From a worldwide network of 800 professionals serving as mentors and advocates for the mission of DAAD, Berroth was one of 20 faculty members invited to participate in the seminar and one of 11 participants also invited to present. Berroth was the only representative from the U.S., networking with colleagues from Colombia, Italy, Great Britain, France, Spain, Brazil, Oman, China, Korea, Argentina, Israel, and Finland on researching and teaching European identities and futures.





  • Conner Joyce  ’19 presented his honors thesis in political science, “A Path-Dependent Explanation of Divergent Nuclear Trajectories,” at the Midwestern Political Science Association’s annual conference in Chicago, IL, April 7.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Education Suzanne García-Mateus presented a paper titled “Developing Critical Awareness: A Teacher’s Role in Engaging Students to Dialogue about Social Inequities” at the Establishing Sociopolitical Consciousness as the Fourth Goal of Dual-Language Education symposium at the 2019 AERA Annual Meeting in Toronto, Canada, April 5–9, 2019.





  • Four students in the Spanish program presented papers at the XXVII Latin American Studies Symposium held at Rollins College, in Winter Park, FL, on April 5.

    • Alex Bell  ’20 presented “Poetas Principales del Modernismo Hispanoamericano en Canción de Otoño en Primavera y la Pregunta.”
    • Dominique Rosario  ’20 presented “Muerte y Nacionalismo en Dos Patrias, por José Martí.”
    • Valentina Olivieri-Puentes  ’19 presented “¿Y las Madres que opinan?”
    • Violeta Bueno  ’19 presented “Un Cambio de Vestuario: Un Análisis de El Delantal Blanco.”

    Their papers were produced in Associate Professor of Spanish Angeles Rodriguez Cadena’s class Introduction to Literary Studies in Fall 2018.





  • Southwestern had strong representation at the Consortium for Computing Sciences in Colleges South Central Conference at the University of Texas at Dallas on April 5. Students presented the following posters:

    • “Voluntunity: Building a Volunteer Opportunity Website with Django” by TaylorAxtell ’19, SaraBoyd ’20, LaurenGillespie ’19, Danielle Orbach ’19, and Colin Scruggs ’19, part of their computer-science capstone work with Associate Professor of Computer Science Barbara Anthony.
    • “Creating a User-Friendly System to Facilitate Tracking and Entry of Internship Hours” by Adina Friedman ’19, William Price ’19, Elyssa Sliheet ’19, Isabel Tweraser ’19, and Jacob Yager ’20, also part of the computer-science capstone.
    • “Verification of Welfare Transactions on the Blockchain” by Adanna Court ’19, Devon Fulcher ‘19, Bobby Garza ‘19, Alexander Hoffman ‘20, and Daniel Maldonado ‘19, also part of the computer-science capstone.
    • “Project Pen and Paper: Operations Research for Prospective Students” by Katie Dyo ‘19, Devon Fulcher ‘19, Alexander Hoffman ‘20, Daniel Maldonado ‘19, and Greg O’Brien ‘19, work that originated in the Operations Research course in Fall 2018 taught by Anthony.
    • “Desirable Behaviors for Companion Bots in First-Person Shooters” by Adina Friedman ‘19, based on her SCOPE 2018 summer research with Assistant Professor of Computer Science Jacob Schrum.
    • “Evolving Custom Convolutional Neural Network Architectures in SZ-Tetris” by Devon Fulcher ‘19, also based on SCOPE 2018 research with Schrum. This poster won fourth place in the undergraduate poster competition.
    • “Infinite  Art Gallery: A  Game World of Interactively  Evolved Artwork” by Bryan Hollingsworth ‘20, also based on SCOPE 2018 research with Schrum. This poster won third place in the undergraduate poster competition.

    Students Boyd, Court, Friedman, Fulcher, Garza, Hoffman, Hollingsworth, and Orbach, as well as Schrum, attended the conference.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Art Ron Geibel had two sculptures selected for Clay Houston’s Biennial exhibition titled “Future Artifacts,” on view at Central Visual Arts Gallery at Houston Community College.  “Future Artifacts” features contemporary ceramic works by artists from Arizona, Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas. The exhibition runs March 4–April 6.





  • Professor of Anthropology Melissa Johnson  presented an overview of her book Becoming Creole: Nature and Race in Belize  at the Second Belize National Research Conference in Belmopan, Belize, on April 3.





  • Professor of Theatre John Ore was selected to serve as adjudicator for the Region 3 Area 1 AAAAA one-act play contest at the Jerry Fay Wilhelm Center for the Performing Arts on April 3, 2019.  Among performances that day were scenes from A Storm in the BarnMuch Ado about Nothing, and The Man Who Came to Dinner.





  • Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts and Professor of Music Michael Cooper gave a guest lecture titled “The Silence of Florence Price” at Trinity University on April 2. The talk featured recordings by award-winning pianists Lara Downes and Petronel Malan of five still-unpublished piano compositions by Florence Price (1887–1953). Cooper called for a more intersectional and sustained exploration of the composer’s life and works. Those interested may find the narcolepsy-inducing abstract here.





  • Martin Guillermo Lopez’18 earned an internationally competitive fellowship from the Congress-Bundestag Youth Exchange for Young Professionals (CBYX). CBYX annually supports 75 U.S. and 75 German awardees. CBYX was created by the U.S. Congress and German Bundestag as a public diplomacy program to promote understanding between the people of the U.S. and Germany. The year of academic, cultural, and professional exchange consists of three phases: two months of intensive German language training, one semester of classes in one’s academic or career field at a university, and a three-month internship in one’s career field. Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth served as adviser and mentor throughout the application and interview process.





  • Mellon Teaching Fellow Sequoia Maner presented original poetry and research at The Society for the Study of Multi-Ethnic Literature of the United States (MELUS), which was organized around the topic of “Underground Histories.” As coeditor of the forthcoming volume Revisiting the Elegy in the Black Lives Matter Era, to be published by Routledge in October 2019, Maner previewed work that concerns the use of autopsy reports as material for poetic engagement, including her poem “Upon Reading the Autopsy of Sandra Bland,” a finalist for the Gwendolyn Brooks Poetry Prize.





  • Associate Professor of English Michael Saenger delivered a paper titled “Partial Paternity in Terence and Jonson” at the Renaissance Society of America annual meeting in Toronto, Canada. In addition, he chaired a panel on “Performances of Gender in Shakespearean England” at the same meeting.





  • Assistant Director of Admission Rebecca Rother was selected to serve as a faculty member for the Admission and College Counseling Institute (ACCI) program through the Texas Association of College Admissions Counselors (TACAC). This event, held in July, helps new admission and college counseling colleagues build the skills needed to perform their daily jobs.





  • Professor of Biology Romi Burks coauthored a paper in the “Academic Practice in Ecology and Evolution” section of the open-access journal Ecology and Evolution. This collaborative peer-reviewed publication, titled “Students as Ecologists: Strategies for Successful Mentorship of Undergraduate Researchers,” developed from a special session at the 2018 Ecological Society of America meeting, where Burks gave a five-minute InspireTalk-style presentation on how to continue to work and publish with undergraduates after graduation.





  • Associate Professor of Environmental Studies Joshua Long is the 2019 recipient of the Helen Ruth Aspaas SAGE Innovator Award in Geography. He will be receiving it in person while attending the American Association of Geographers annual conference in Washington, D.C., in early April.





March 2019

  • Associate Professor of History Melissa Byrnes  published a review of Paul Silverstein’s Postcolonial France: Race, Islam, and the Future of the Republic  in H-France Review  Vol. 19 (March 2019), No. 43.





  • Professor of Religion Elaine Craddock delivered a talk, “Tamil Thirunangais: Performing Divine Identities,” for the South Asian Religions Colloquium at Harvard University on March 28, 2019.





  • Southwestern University had a strong showing at the 2019 Texas Section Meeting of the Mathematical Association of America (MAA), held March 28–30 at Tarleton State University, in Stephenville, TX.

    • Katie Dyo ’20 presented “Women’s Golf: An NCAA Comparison Using Mathematical Modeling,” preliminary results from her signature work with Associate Professor of Mathematics Therese Shelton. Dyo is a mathematics major and data-science minor, and she is a member of the SU Women’s Golf Team.
    • Claire Harding ’19 and Madison Godleski ’19 presented “Rocket Projections,” supervised by Associate Professor of Physics Mark Bottorff. Harding is a physics major, and Godleski is a physics major with a mathematics minor.
    • Daniela Beckelhymer ’20, Charlie Ellison ’20, Hannah Freeman ’20, and Gerardo Gonzalez also attended the meeting.
    • President and Professor of Mathematics Edward Burger gave the invited address, “Making up Your Own Mind through Practices of (Mathematical) Effective Thinking.”
    • Professor of Mathematics Alison Marr co-led and participated in the Mathematics Learning by Inquiry organizational meetings, held in conjunction with the Texas MAA meeting.
    • Assistant Professor of Mathematics John Ross attended the professional-development program of Texas New Experiences in Teaching (NExT), held in conjunction with the Texas MAA meeting. Ross also supported the student attendees.
    • Professor of Mathematics Kendall Richards and Visiting Assistant Professor of Mathematics John Osborne participated in the Texas MAA meeting.

    Student lodging, registration, and meals were provided by the Fleming Student Travel Fund and the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science. Southwestern students accounted for five of the 57 presentations, along with 20 other colleges and universities.





  • Professor of Music Lois Ferrari conducted the Austin Civic Orchestra (ACO) on March 26, 2019, in its annual Texas Rising Stars (TRS) concert. The TRS performance is presented in collaboration with the Butler School of Music (BSOM) at the University of Texas at Austin and highlights winners of the BSOM string concerto competition. Also featured was the Amster String Quartet, an ensemble of high-school musicians nominated by their teachers and then auditioned by the ACO for the honor of being coached by a noted local music teacher (this year’s teacher was Dick Frazier at Anderson High School). Every year, a different ensemble is assembled and coached on a rotating basis (woodwind, brass, strings, percussion, etc.). The ACO was also honored to present the U.S. premiere of Roydon Tse’s Sinfonia Concertante, which won the ACO’s biannual composition contest.





  • Assistant Professor of Political Science Emily Sydnor’s 2018 article “Platforms for Incivility: Examining Perceptions Across Different Media Formats” was reprinted as a chapter in the book Studying Politics Across Media.The book, which was published by Routledge, contains research that was originally included in a special issue of the journal Political Communication.





  • Professor of Education Michael Kamen and Sarah Buchanan ’20 and Abigail Luna ‘20 presented their collaborative research “Block Play and a Pedagogic Model for Playful STEM Learning” at the International Consortium for Research in Science and Mathematics Education conference in San Jose, Costa Rica.





  • Reconsidering Southern Labor History: Race, Class, and Power  (University of Florida Press, 2018) has won the 2019 Best Book Award from the United Association of Labor Education. Visiting Assistant Professor of History Joseph Hower  contributed a chapter titled “‘A Threshold Moment’: Public-Sector Organizing and Civil Rights Unionism in the Postwar South.”





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Psychology Becca Northwas interviewed about her recent book on the podcast “Something You Should Know.” The episode aired on March 24.





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth presented a research paper titled “Plants and Heimat: Representations of Eco-Identities in the Work of Marica Bodrožić” at the 50th annual conference of the Northeast Modern Languages Association, March 21–24, in Washington, DC.  Her paper contributed to a panel series on concepts of memory, understandings of home, and nostalgia for the former Yugoslavia. Berroth’s argument for including critical plant studies in the discourse on place-based identity formations connected to the conference theme “Transnational Spaces: Intersections of Cultures, Languages, and Peoples,” which called attention to the important role of the humanities in the discourse on migrations.





  • Professor of English Eileen Cleere  delivered a paper at the Interdisciplinary Nineteenth-Century Studies Association (INCS) in Dallas, March 21–24. Her presentation, “Future Perfect: Jane Eyre and the Traumatic Mode in Walley-Beckett’s Anne with an E,” was part of a panel on psychological and mathematical models of development in old and new media.





  • Associate Professor of Art History Allison Miller presented the paper “Sculpting an All-Inclusive Empire: The Hybrid Style of Han Dynasty Luxury Bronzes” at the Association for Asian Studies Annual Meeting in Denver, CO, March 24. Her paper was presented as part of a panel titled “Empire Rediscovered: The Concept of Empire in Late Pre-Imperial and Early Imperial Archaeological and Transmitted Sources.”





  • Associate Professor of French Francis Mathieu presented a paper titled “Seduction or Harassment? The Case of Lafayette’s Princess de Cleves” at the 50th Northeast Modern Language Association in Washington, DC, on March 23. His paper was presented as part of a panel titled “Confronting Sexual Assault in French and Francophone Literature.”





  • Professor of Anthropology Melissa Johnson  gave an invited talk titled “Becoming Creole: Nature and Race in Belize” at the University of Texas at San Antonio, on Friday, March 22.





  • Professor of Spanish Katy Ross presented a paper titled “Narrating Crossings: Mother/Daughter, Morocco/Spain” at the 50th Northeast Modern Language Association in Washington, DC, on March 21. Her paper was part of a panel she organized called “Transnational Spain: Porous Borders and New Nationalist Tendencies.”





  • Assistant Professor of Mathematics John Ross was invited to speak at Trinity University’s mathematics seminar on March 19, 2019. His talk, “Isoperimetry and Geometric Optimization,” discussed recent research as well as general strategies for solving geometric optimization problems using the calculus of variations.





  • Technical Assistant and Exhibitions Coordinator Seth Daulton exhibited his artwork in the Southern Graphics Council International (SGCI) Member’s Traveling Exhibition during the SGCI conference in Dallas, TX. His work will travel with this exhibition for two years across the country to various venues. Daulton’s work was also accepted and is currently on view in the 37th Bradley International Print and Drawing Exhibition at the Bradley University Gallery in Peoria, IL.





  • Assistant Professor of Computer Science Jacob Schrum has had two peer-reviewed publications accepted to appear in the 2019 Congress on Evolutionary Computation, each with student coauthors. Will Price ’19 is the primary author on “Neuroevolution of Multimodal Ms. Pac-Man Controllers Under Partially Observable Conditions,” which describes his first place entry in the international Ms. Pac-Man vs. Ghost Team Competition in 2018. Bryan Hollingsworth ’20 is the primary author on “Infinite Art Gallery: A Game World of Interactively Evolved Artwork,” which describes a game that was part of a human-subject study at Southwestern last fall.





  • Head Men’s Basketball Coach Janson Hightower was voted the SCAC Men’s Basketball Coach of the Year. In his fifth season at the helm of the Southwestern program, Hightower led the Pirates to an 11-5 conference mark—which ties the program high for conference wins in a single season in the SCAC era—and a share of the league’s regular season title, the first for the program since 2004–05. Among head coaches with five or more years’ experience in the SCAC, Hightower’s .597 in-conference winning percentage is the sixth best in league history. A former SCAC student-athlete at Hendrix College, Hightower is just the second person to both play in the league and win SCAC Men’s Basketball Coach of the Year (COTY). The COTY honor is Hightower’s first, and he is just the second Southwestern men’s coach to earn the recognition.





  • Technical Assistant and Exhibitions Coordinator Seth Daulton served as a visiting artist at Louisiana Tech (Ruston, LA) in the School of Design on March 18. Daulton conducted lithography printing demonstrations and shared his artwork with individual students and with a lithography class. He also presented an artist lecture in the evening to School of Design students and faculty, and the general public.





  • Associate Professor of Theatre Sergio Costola presented a paper on Lucrezia Borgia (1480–1519) at the 2019 Renaissance Society of America annual meeting in Toronto, Canada, March 16–19. His paper was presented as part of a session titled “Women at Home in the Courts of Renaissance Italy.”





  • Associate Professor of History Melissa Byrnes chaired a panel on “Survival in the French Empire: Health, ‘Heathens,’ and Heritage” at the 20th & 21st Century French & Francophone Studies International Colloquium in Oklahoma City, OK, March 14.





  • Director of the Debby Ellis Writing Center Jennifer Marciniak presented her original research “But My Clipboard Says You Are Doing It Wrong’: Memes, Performance-Rhetoric, and Academic Resistance in Online Oil and Gas Worker Communities” at the Conference on College Composition and Communication (CCCC) in Pittsburgh, PA, March 14–16. She also chaired the professional and technical writing panel “Situating Performance: From Local to Global” that explored how subject position, workplace communication, and globalization inform discursive practices.





  • Visiting Professor of Environmental Engineering Rebecca Edwards  was invited to visit the office of the state climatologist John Nielsen-Gammon at Texas A&M University on March 12 to discuss her research on the climatology of extreme precipitation in Texas over the past 100 years. The invitation was extended following a presentation of her work at the American Meteorological Society Annual Meeting in Phoenix, AZ, in January.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Education Suzanne Garcia-Mateus presented a paper titled “One White Student’s Journey Through Six Years of Elementary Schooling: Uncovering Whiteness and Privilege in Two-Way Bilingual Education” which was part of a panel titled “Translanguaging in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL):  Perspectives and Possibilities” at the TESOL International Convention in Atlanta, GA, March 12–15, 2019.





  • Associate Professor of Environmental Studies Joshua Long and senior capstone students had their 2013 coauthored paper, “Toward an Informative and Applied Methodology for Price Comparison Studies of Farmers’ Markets and Competing Retailers at the Local Scale,” republished by The Journal of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Community Development as a policy brief calling for renewed research on the topic.





  • Southwestern University had a strong showing at the 2019 Western States Communication Association Conference in Seattle, WA, at the end of February. Sarah Beard ’19 presented “The Rhetorical Strategies of Humor in John Oliver’s Last Week Tonight,” her signature work from Associate Professor of Communication Studies Valerie Renegar’s fall capstone class.  Assistant Professor of Communication Studies Lamiyah Bahrainwala presented a paper titled “Shitholes: Infrastructure and Anatomy” as part of the environmental communication division, and Renegar responded to a panel titled “Gender and Health in the Workplace” on behalf of the Organization for Women and Communication.





  • Associate Professor of Chinese Carl Robertson published a translation of the short story “Tharlo” by the Tibetan writer Pema Tseden in a collection of Tseden’s work titled Enticement  (Duke UP, 2018), edited by former part-time faculty Patricia Schiaffini. This book has been adopted to promote understanding of Tibetan culture by the independent organization Machik, which is hosting discussions in 24 cities worldwide.





  • Associate Professor of Environmental Studies Joshua Long published an article titled “Contradictions in the Climate-Friendly City: New Perspectives on Eco‐Gentrification and Housing Justice” in the International Journal of Urban and Regional Research. This article was coauthored with researchers Jennifer L. Rice (University of Georgia), Daniel Aldana Cohen (University of Pennsylvania), and Jason Jurjevich (Portland State University).





  • Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers reviewed Deborah Lipstadt’s Antisemitism: Here and Now for the Washington Independent Review of Books. Read the review here.





  • Assistant Professor of Political Science Emily Sydnor published the chapter “Signaling Incivility: The Role of Speaker, Substance, and Tone” in the edited volume A Crisis of Civility? Political Discourse and Its Discontents. The book was developed with the support of the National Institute for Civil Discourse at the University of Arizona and published by Routledge.





  • Associate Professor of Spanish Abby Dings and Visiting Assistant Professor of Education Suzanne García-Mateus presented about their ongoing research project titled “Language Ideologies in a University Classroom: Pre-Service Teachers’ Perceptions of Latinx Students as Language Learners.” The panel about dual-language education took place at the 6th National Symposium on Spanish as a Heritage Language (NSSHL) hosted by University of Texas–Rio Grande Valley, in McAllen, TX.





  • Music Literature major Katiebeth Brandt ’19 prepared a critical edition and arranged for the posthumous premiere of Florence B. Price’s choral composition titled “Bluebell.” Based on a text by Mary Rolofson Gamble, the work was performed on March 3 at the University of Texas at San Antonio. Brandt prepared her edition under the supervision of  Professor of Music and Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts Michael Cooper. The autograph was obtained from the University of Arkansas Special Collections Library and has a professional recording and video made from the premiere. This piece was written by a woman, with a woman poet, edited by a woman, with a treble section of eight women voices, conducted by a woman with a woman accompanist.





  • Part-Time Instructor of Applied Music Adrienne Inglis’s composition “Asleep in a Blanket Spun of Energy” enjoyed its world premiere performance by Inversion Ensemble on March 2 and 3, 2019, in Austin, TX. Honoring Inglis’s Ojibwe ancestors, the work for mixed chorus and Trevor Shaw’s electronic track evokes the vivid imagery of Margaret Noodin’s poem “We Are Returning Always.” The piece sets all of the English text and a few key words of the Anishinaabemowin text from the bilingual poem, which beautifully captures a glimpse into the natural and celestial wonders of the Ojibwe world. The music reflects a taste of the syncopated embellished singing, pentatonic melodies, and steady drumbeat characteristic of Ojibwe music. The electronic track provides both a compelling rhythmic foundation and fantastical sonic representations of the moon, nebulae, supernovae, the aurora borealis, and the forests of the Ojibwe lands.





  • Professor of Biology and holder of the Lillian Nelson Pratt Chair Ben Pierce presented a talk at the Texas Academy of Science, March 1–2, titled “Body Condition in Natural Populations of the Georgetown Salamander (Eurycea naufragia).”





  • Eight members of Professor of Biology Romi Burks’s molecular ecology lab attended the Texas Academy of Science meeting at Howard Payne University, March 1–2.

    • Hannah Winkler ’19 presented a talk titled “Unraveling the Mystery: Genetic Identification of Nonnative Asian Mysterysnails, Cipangopaludina chinensis and C. japonica,” coauthored by Nicole Kelly ’21 and Shannon Odell ’21, alumna Shannon Walsh ’18, and collaborator Dr. Russell Minton of Gannon University.  
    • Kelly and Odell also presented the poster “Highway to Shell: Troubleshooting Methods of Genetic Detection and Identification in two invasive species, Cipangopaludina chinensis and C. japonica,” coauthored by the same research team. Kelly and Odell’s work highlighted their results from their participation in the 2018 SCOPE Program.
    • Lauren Muskara ’20 presented a talk titled “A Snail out of Water: Apple Snail Detection along Oyster Creek (Missouri City/Sugarland, TX),” coauthored with Shellsea Miller ’20 and collaborator and SU alumnus Dr. Matthew Barnes ’06 from Texas Tech University.  
    • Miller also participated in the Freshwater Science poster session with work titled “Bullseye! Hitting the Target on Primer Optimization,” which illustrated the process of arriving at species-specific targets for environmental DNA.
    • Madison Granier  ’19 also attended the meeting and worked with Dr. Barnes on data analysis for her capstone manuscript.  
    • Esther Nyaberi  ’21 and Kaitlin Galassini  ’21 (future 2019 SCOPErs with Dr. Burks) also attended and discussed eDNA with Dr. Barnes.  




February 2019

  • Associate Professor of Computer Science Barbara Anthony Christine Harbour  ‘16, and Jordan King  ‘15 published an article in the February 2019 issue of Journal of Combinatorial Mathematics and Combinatorial Computing  titled “Greedy Is Good: An Empirical Evaluation of Three Algorithms for Online Bottleneck Matching.” This paper is a culmination of work that was begun in 2014–15 with support from the Collaborative Research Experience for Undergraduates program of CRA-W, the Computing Research Association’s Committee on the Status of Women in Computing Research.





  • Associate Professor of Computer Science Barbara Anthony and Associate Professor Emeritus of Computer Science Barbara Owens attended the 50th SIGCSE, the ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education, in Minneapolis, MN, Feb. 27–March 2, 2019. Anthony was a discussion leader for a birds-of-a-feather session on “Modernizing the Mathematics Taught in Computer Science,” an associate program chair, and the chair of a session on physical computing. Owens presented “The SIGCSE Story: Getting the Scoop,” about the ACM History Committee, as well as the Computing Educators Oral History Project.





  • Assistant Professor of Kinesiology Edward Merritt received the Macknight Innovative Educator Award from the American Physiological Society and will be recognized at the 2019 Experimental Biology Annual Meeting. The award also includes an institutional grant for an education-related laboratory equipment.





  • Director of the Debby Ellis Writing Center Jennifer Marciniak presented original research and hosted a roundtable titled “Cross-Institutional Tutor Training: Creating and Revising Frameworks”  at the South Central Writing Center Association Conference at the University of Mary Hardin–Baylor (UMHB), in Belton, TX, Feb. 21–22. At the conference, she also began phase two of a curated visual art project titled Art and Migration: A Collective Memory of Writing Center Conference Work, which will be completed in the coming months and presented as part of the International Writing Center Association/National Conference on Peer Tutoring in Writing conference “The Art of It All” in Columbus, OH, in October 2019. Four SU students from her Teaching and Tutoring Writing across the Curriculum class, Aydan Urias ‘22, Connor Moland ‘22, Gabrielle Cano ‘22, and Erin Flessner ‘21, also attended the conference at UMHB.





  • Danyale Kellogg ’19 and Melina Boutris ’21 will present their research at the Ninth Undergraduate Research Conference in German Studies (co-organized by Lafayette College and Moravian College), in Easton, PA. Kellogg will speak on German national security policies. Boutris will present on the inclusion of special-needs learners in the German school system, research related to her summer internship at a school in Heidelberg, Germany. Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth mentored both research projects as independent studies.





  • Assistant Professor of Psychology Carin Perilloux presented a poster with collaborators at the Evolutionary Psychology Preconference at the annual meeting of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology in Portland, OR, on Feb. 7, 2019. The poster, “Does Humility Breed Likability? Perceptions of Compliment Givers and Receivers by Status and Modesty,” presented results from her study of how we perceive others who respond modestly or boastfully to compliments, depending on the relative status of the compliment-giver.





  • Professor of Biology and Lillian Nelson Pratt Chair Ben Pierce published a paper in the Journal of Herpetology titled “Frequency and Ecology of Tail Loss in Populations of the Georgetown Salamander (Eurycea naufragia).” The paper was coauthored with former Southwestern University student Daniel Gonzalez ’17.





  • Professor of Psychology Traci Giuliano recently participated in Cultural Day at Austin’s Liberal Arts and Sciences Academy, giving three interactive classroom presentations on the psychology of sex, gender, and sexual orientation.





  • Sphinx Organization Laureate Lara Downes gave the world premieres of two major compositions by Florence Price discovered and edited by Professor of Music and Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts Michael Cooperin a major concert on Feb. 23. The concert, part of the Washington (DC) Performing Arts series, previewed Downes’s new project,  Holes in the Sky (Sony Masterworks, March 1). The album, a genre-fluid collaboration with Judy Collins, Rhiannon Giddens, and others, is devoted exclusively to music by women, performed exclusively by women. Along with other pieces, Downes performed Price’s “Fantasie Nègre no. 2,” long believed lost before Cooper recovered it, as well as her more compact “Sketches in Sepia” and “Memory Mist.” All three compositions typify Price’s creative synthesis of African-American stylistic traits with the genres and techniques of concert music.





  • Assistant Professor of Business Debika Sihi participated in an invited panel on teaching digital marketing at the American Marketing Association Winter Educators’ Conference, in Austin, TX, Feb. 22–24, 2019. In addition, her coauthored project “The Challenge of Engagement and Co-Creation” was featured in the conference poster session.





  • Professor of Psychology Traci Giuliano presented a poster titled “Guiding Undergraduates through the Process of First Authorship” at the annual meeting of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology in Portland, Feb. 7–9.





  • Assistant Professor of Communication Studies Lamiyah Bahrainwala earned a national grant to support the Muslims in Academia Symposium at Southwestern University. The symposium will take place 8:30 a.m.–4:00 p.m. on Monday, March 4, 2018.





  • A concert aria by Felix Mendelssohn, discovered by Professor of Music and Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts Michael Cooper,received its Puerto Rican premiere in performances by the International Chamber Orchestra of Puerto Rico with soprano Sara Garcia under the direction of Emilio Colón on February 8–10 in Mayagüez and San Juan. The 14-minute aria, “Infelice! / Ah, ritorna, età dell’ oro, MWV H 4” (1834), was long assumed to be a draft for a different piece written nine years later, but Cooper’s research into the manuscripts, text, and music revealed it to be an autonomous composition—resulting in the addition of a major “new” composition to the catalog of Mendelssohn’s works and the repertoire of nineteenth-century vocal music.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Art Ron Geibel was a visiting artist in the Ceramics Department at the University of North Texas on Feb. 13 and 14 as part of their 2019 Dual Visiting Artist Workshop Series. He worked alongside potter Chris Pickett, an assistant professor of art at Idaho State University. The dual visiting series pairs one potter and one sculptor for a two-day workshop that includes demonstrations, critiques, and a public artist talk.





  • Associate Professor of Art History Allison Miller gave an invited lecture at the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World, New York University, on Feb. 12, 2019. Her talk was titled “The Archaeology of Colors: Polychromy and Classical Chinese Bronze Art.”





  • Professor of Political Science and Dean of the Faculty Alisa Gaunder coauthored an article with Sarah Wiliarty titled “Conservative Women in Germany and Japan: Chancellors versus Madonnas,” which was accepted for publication in Politics and Gender. It is currently available as a featured online article and is forthcoming in hard copy.





  • Professor of Art Mary Visser’s artwork Mandala was selected—along with the work of five other artists—to represent the organization Ars Mathematica in the journal Tangente. Tangente is a French bimonthly scientific journal devoted to mathematics and its relationship to the arts.  The works were all created using 3-D printing processes from digital files created by the artists.





  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Therese Shelton coauthored a paper, “Pharmacokinetic Models for Active Learning of Differential Equations,” which was published online by the journal PRIMUS. Shelton’s coauthors are Beulah Agyemang-Barimah ’17, currently a graduate student in computational biology at Cornell University, and Theresa Laurent, of St. Louis College of Pharmacy. This peer-reviewed paper will appear in a print version of a special issue on modeling in differential-equations courses. Some of the work that led to this paper was funded by Southwestern’s grant from the W. M. Keck Foundation.





  • Professor of Art and Art History and Chair of Art History Thomas Noble Howe was invited to give a lecture on Feb. 15 at the School of Architecture and Urban Planning at the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee. Howe lectured on new interpretations of the recent excavations of the Roman villas of Stabiae near Pompeii. Howe is coordinator general of the Restoring Ancient Stabiae Foundation excavations. The University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee will provide one of the field teams for this upcoming season.





  • Associate Professor of Theatre Kerry Bechtel recently designed the costumes for Tennessee Williams’s Pulitzer Prize–winning Cat on a Hot Tin Roofat Unity Theatre, in Brenham, TX. This production marks the 10th collaboration between Bechtel and the professional theater company.





  • An interview with Associate Professor of Environmental Studies Joshua Long will be featured in the documentary Becoming Leslie,which will debut at SXSW in March 2019.





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth earned a grant to participate in a faculty development seminar sponsored by the German Academic Exchange Service, DAAD. The seminar is scheduled for April 2019 and convenes teachers of German from all over the world for a week of study, site visits, and discussions in Saarbrücken, a city located in the border region between Germany and France. The seminar topic, “Identities and Border Regions in Germany and Europe,” is part of Berroth’s ongoing research and writing project on transnational identity narratives.





  • Professor of Music and Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts Michael Cooper uncovered and edited a composition by Florence B. Price titled “Memory Mist,” which was performed on Feb. 1 by Grammy-nominated pianist and Sphinx Organization Laureate Lara Downes as part of Detroit Public Radio’s celebration of the first day of African-American history month. The piece is part of Cooper’s large-scale project exploring the hundreds of unknown compositions by Price, who, despite her sex and race, was acclaimed as the mid-20th century’s leading African-American composer of concert music. The performance will be rebroadcast by Detroit Public Radio after Feb. 23 and will be one of the featured tracks on Downes’s new genre-fluid CD Holes in the Sky, devoted exclusively to music by women composers and performers (due for release on March 1).





  • Assistant Professor of History Jessica Hower‘s chapter “‘… And Greedily Devoured Them’: The Cannibalism Discourse and the Creation of a British Atlantic World, 1536–1612” was published in the book To Feast on Us as Their Prey: Cannibalism in the Early Modern Atlantic (ed. Rachel B. Herrmann, University of Arkansas Press, 2019, pp. 97–114.)





  • Professors of Mathematics Alison Marr and Fumiko Futamura coauthored and published a paper titled “Taking Mathematics Abroad: A How-to Guide” in the journal PRIMUS. This paper fills a gap in the literature on developing and teaching mathematics abroad, with examples and advice from the authors’ experiences teaching a variety of interdisciplinary courses in the SU London semester program.





  • Professor of Psychology Traci Giuliano gave a presentation at the annual Austin AVID College Readiness Symposium held at St. Edward’s University, Feb. 2. Her talk was titled “Things I Wish My Students Knew before Coming to College: A Professor’s Guide to Success.”





January 2019

  • Professor of Religion Elaine Craddock published the article “Recalibrating (Field)work” in the peer-reviewed journal QED: A Journal in GLBTQ Worldmaking (vol. 5, no. 3, fall 2018) as part of the Queer Forum on Navigating Normativity between Field and Academe in India.





  • Computer science and chemistry double major Lauren Gillespie ’19 has been awarded an Outstanding Undergraduate Researcher award from the Computing Research Association. Only students in North American universities may compete for the award, and only four such awards were given, with other awardees coming from such prestigious universities as Columbia, Harvard, and Yale. Gillespie’s award recognizes work she has done in the field of evolutionary computation since 2016, first as a SCOPE student under Assistant Professor of Computer Science Jacob Schrum and most recently as part of a Research Experience for Undergraduates at Michigan State University under Dr. Charles Ofria. In addition to the recognition, this award will provide Gillespie with $1,500 to attend a research conference of her choice.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Music Beth Everett presented a session at the National Opera Association national conference titled “Female Conductors and Directors and Their Paths to Careers in Opera.” The conference took place on Jan. 3–5, 2019, in Salt Lake City, UT.





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth published an invited review of “Framing Islam: Faith, Fascination, and Fear in Twenty-First-Century German Culture,” a special issue of Colloquia Germanica, an international journal for German studies, in Feminist German Studies, a refereed interdisciplinary publication presenting a wide range of feminist approaches to all aspects of German literature, culture, and language, including pedagogy. The review is guest edited by Heidi Denzel de Tirado and Faye Stewart. It is available in print and online at Project Muse.





  • The Department of Mathematics and Computer Science was active at the Joint Mathematics Meetings, with national meetings of the Mathematical Association of America (MAA), the American Mathematical Society (AMS), the Association for Women in Mathematics (AWM), and more. It is the largest meeting of mathematicians in the world. The meetings were held in Baltimore, MD, Jan. 16–19, 2019.

    • Associate Professor of Mathematics Therese Shelton copresented “Building Community through Systemic Initiative for Modeling Investigations and Opportunities with Differential Equations (SIMIODE)” in the MAA Poster Session on Projects Supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) Division of Undergraduate Education. The coauthors were the coprincipal investigators of their National Science Foundation (NSF) grant: Brian Winkel, SIMIODE and emeritus professor from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point; Richard C. Harwood, Newberg University; Audrey Malagon, Virginia Wesleyan University; and Patrice Tiffany, Manhattan College. The NSF grant partly funded Shelton’s attendance.
    • Shelton participated in the meeting of the MAA Committee on Sessions of Contributed Papers.
    • Shelton served on the SIMIODE Board of Contributing Advisors and participated in a meeting of her NSF grant coprincipal investigators.
    • Professor of Mathematics Fumiko Futamura presented “Factoring Homographies to Analyze Perspective Distortions” based on a recent paper coauthored with Marc Frantz of Indiana University Bloomington and Annalisa Crannell of Franklin and Marshall College in the MAA Contributed Paper Session on Mathematics and the Arts.
    • Assistant Professor of Mathematics John Ross presented “Exploring Big Ideas in Calculus 1 through Bite-Sized IBL Lessons” in the MAA Contributed Paper Session on Inquiry-Based Learning and Teaching.
    • Visiting Assistant Professor of Mathematics John Osborn presented “Peaks and Valleys of First-Time Implementation of IBL Methods in Calculus III and Intro to Statistics Classes” in the MAA Contributed Paper Session on Inquiry-Based Learning and Teaching.
    • Mercedes Gonzalez  ’21 presented “Restrictions on Homflypt and Kauffman Polynomials Arising from Local Moves” in the AMS Special Session on Not KNerds: A Community for Knot Theory. The talk was based on a 2018 NSF REU and coauthored by Sandy Ganzell, St. Mary’s College of Maryland; Chloe Marcum, Marshall University; Nina Ryalls, University of Dallas; and Mariel Santos, St. Mary’s College of Maryland. Gonzalez  received partial funding from the REU, the Fleming Student Travel Fund, and the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science.
    • Elyssa Sliheet  ’19 presented “Mathematical Models Linking within-Host to between-Host HIV Dynamics” in the AMS Contributed Paper Session on Dynamical Systems and Ergodic Theory. The talk was based on a 2018 NSF REU. Sliheet received partial funding from the REU, the Fleming Student Travel Fund, and the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science.
    • Our students each presented in a faculty session rather than a session for undergraduate presentations.




  • Studio Art Technical Assistant Thomas Cornell had a work accepted in the show Roze Hokjes / Pink Pigeonholing, an exhibition taking place at Galerie Tuur in the Netherlands. This show features art by more than 100 international artists and runs Feb. 3 through June 2, 2019.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Psychology Becca North’s book Your Hidden Superpowers: How the Whole Truth of Failure Can Change Our Lives  as published by Severn River Publishing in December 2018.





  • Professor of Political Science and Dean of the Faculty Alisa Gaunder attended the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U) Annual Meeting in Atlanta, GA, Jan. 23–26. While there, she led three consecutive roundtable sessions for the American Conference of Academic Deans (ACAD) on “Guiding Change in the Curriculum.” She also participated on an AAC&U panel with deans from Macalester College and Denison University. Her presentation focused on curricular innovations in the humanities and interdisciplinary programs at Southwestern.





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth earned a materials grant from the German Academic Exchange Service, DAAD, and the German government. The $1,300 grant provides the German Program with a curated collection of titles in German literature published in 2018 and a collection of German graphic novels, which will enrich teaching and learning at all levels in the program.





  • History major Danyale Kellogg ’19 was selected to receive the Cooperative Education and Internship Association (CEIA) 2018 Internship Student Achievement Award. CEIA recognizes distinguished achievement and excellence by annually recognizing outstanding students who have excelled in or made significant impact in work-integrated learning. Kellogg will receive a plaque and scholarship, which will be presented to her at the Awards Banquet during the annual CEIA conference in Chicago, IL.





  • Professor of Music Lois Ferrari conducted the Austin Civic Orchestra on Dec. 2, 2018, in a concert titled Bohemian Rhapsodies. The concert featured guest violist Roger Myers and music by Czech composers Dvorak, Stamitz, Husa, and Smetana.





  • Associate Professor of Art History PatrickHajovsky published “Shifting Panoramas: Contested Visions of Cuzco’s 1650 Earthquake” in The Art Bulletin (vol. 100, no. 4, December 2018, 34–61), the premier journal in the field of art history and one that is also read widely by specialists in other disciplines. The article takes a novel approach to understanding colonial-period religious activism and modern interpretations of an icon of the city of Cuzco, Peru: a large panorama of the devastating 1650 earthquake that has been on view in the city’s cathedral since the seismic event took place. One senior colleague and expert on the painting responded in an email, “Just read your wonderful and so insightful article on the Cuzco earthquake painting in Cuzco. Congratulations. Wonderful research! You have really cracked the  puzzle surrounding the painting and put in its proper context. I learned so much. I am most grateful.”





  • Assistant Professor of Political Science Emily Sydnorpresented a project titled “Accountability or Audacity? Protest and the Boundaries of (In)Civility” at the Southern Political Science Association, in Austin, Jan. 17–19. Current political science student Camille Martin’19 also participated in the conference, presenting her honors thesis, “Surveying Neoliberal Feminism.”





  • Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies Joshua Long and Professor of Economics Emily Northrop were signatories on a letter to Governor Abbott from Texas climate scientists and other experts urging his understanding of climate science and his action to address it. As reported in the Austin American Statesman, Northrop spoke at the Jan. 8 press conference held prior to delivering the letter to the Governor’s office.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Art Ron Geibel participated in Pentaculum, a one-week artist residency at Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts in Gatlinburg, TN, Jan. 612. The invitational residency brings together nearly 50 artists working in various media, including fibers or textiles, ceramics, metals, 2D arts, wood or sculpture, and writing. The opportunity provides an intimate atmosphere for meaningful dialogue and offers space for individual artistic growth alongside the opportunity to strengthen and build meaningful relationships within the arts-and-crafts field.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Physics and Environmental Studies Rebecca Edwards attended the 99th Annual American Meteorological Society Annual Meeting in Phoenix, Jan. 69.  While there, she delivered two presentations: “Changes in Heavy and Extreme Precipitation in Texas 19002015,” a statistical analysis of heavy precipitation events in Texas over the past century, and “The Central Texas Collaborative Air Quality Monitoring Experiment,” which described a course-based research experience that involved launching weather balloons from the Southwestern campus during the spring of 2018 as part of the Energy and the Environment course. She also presented a poster titled “Influences on Air Quality in Georgetown, Texas,” a preliminary study of the data collected as part of the weather-balloon project described above





  • Assistant Professor of History Jessica Hower presented a paper titled “‘Descended of Bastard Blood’: The Creation of Monarchy, Nation, and Empire in the Early Modern British Atlantic World, ca. 1485–1510” at the Monarchy and Modernity since 1500 Conference at the University of Cambridge, Jan. 79, 2019.





  • Part-Time Instructor of Applied Music Adrienne Inglis’s composition “Innocent Blood” was part of the Inversion Ensemble’s “I, Too, Sing America” performance, which was just selected by The Austin Chronicle as one of  Robert Faires’s Top 10 Dance and Classical Joys of 2018. Faires  describes the performance as “a history lesson through choral music, speaking to struggles present and past (e.g., witch trials in Adrienne Inglis’s forceful “Innocent Blood”), with the choir’s united voices ever a symbol of e pluribus unum.”





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth’s article “Brücken zwischen Mathematik und Deutsch: MINT im Sprachsensiblen Fachunterricht“ has been published in the online open-access and print versions of IDT 2019 Brücken Gestalten:Mit Deutsch Verbinden(MenschenLebenswelten–Kulturen: Beiträge der XVI. Internationalen Tagung der Deutschlehrerinnen und Deutschlehrer,Fribourg/Freiburg, 31 July–4 Aug. 2017). IDT, the International Convention of Teachers of German, meets every fourth year and is the largest convention of German teachers worldwide. Berroth’s article was selected for publication to represent Section B3 of the convention, in which 12 scholars selected from an international pool of applicants presented on the topic of integrating STEM with the teaching and learning of German as a foreign language. Berroth’s participation was sponsored by a fellowship from the Goethe Institut, in Washington, DC.





  • Associate Professor of Sociology Reggie Byron had a peer-reviewed article titled “Bureaucracy, Discrimination, and the Racialized Character of Organizational Life” accepted for publication in Research in the Sociology of Organizations with Vincent Roscigno at The Ohio State University. The paper will appear in the forthcoming volume on Race, Organizations, and the Organizing Process.





  • Director of Retention and Advising Jennifer Leach spoke on a panel at the 35 under 35 Coaches Leadership Institute during the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA) convention in San Antonio, TX, Jan. 6. She discussed best practices in advising and retention and how coaches can collaborate with their campus partners to promote success for student-athletes.





  • Visiting Professor of Art Ron Geibel’s work from his “Lick” ice cream series, currently on display at the Houston Center for Contemporary Craft, is being published in the January 2019 issue of Ceramics Monthly magazine to highlight the 2018 CraftTexas exhibition. The biennial juried exhibition showcases the best in Texas-made contemporary craft.





  • Professor of Anthropology Melissa Johnson’s article “Gender, Race and Ecotourism Assemblages in Rural Creole Belize” has been published as part of a special section (“Gendered Environments: Ecotourism, Space and Politics in Latin America,” eds. Eveline Durr and Saskia Walther) of the Bulletin of Latin American Research in the Journal of the Society for Latin American Studies.





  • Professor of Political Science Shannon Mariotti published an article in the journal New Political Science. The piece, titled “The New Progressive Federalism: Common Benefits, State Constitutional Rights, and Democratic Political Action,” explores the history and contemporary relevance of the “common benefits clause,” an overlooked but robustly democratic provision that dates back to 1776 but is still on the books in many state constitutions. The article shows how these “common benefits clauses” can inform the broad “new progressive federalist” movement, where democratic political action is rising up from city, state, and local governments to interrupt and counteract the oligarchic tendencies of the national government under the Trump administration.





  • Associate Professor of Art History Patrick Hajovsky will present his current research at the annual Mesoamerica Meetings (formerly Maya Meetings) at the University of Texas-Austin on Saturday, Jan. 13. This year’s theme, “Mesoamerican Philosophies: Animate Matter, Metaphysics, and the Natural Environment,” includes workshops on Maya hieroglyphs and a symposium of top scholars in Aztec studies across disciplines.





  • Professor of Theatre John Ore designed the dance lighting for Georgetown Ballet’s production of The Nutcracker. Ore also mentored Matt Murphy, class of 2019, Sam Bruno, class of 2020, and Andrew Snyder, class of 2021, who served as support technicians on this holiday classic performed in Alma Thomas Theater.





December 2018

  • Ten Southwestern students participated in the 2018 William Lowell Putnam Mathematics competition—the most prestigious undergraduate mathematics competition in North America—on Dec. 1, 2018. The competition consists of a six-hour exam, and partial credit is hard to come by (students commonly score a zero or one out of 120 possible points). This year, more than 4,600 students from 568 institutions took the Putnam exam. Charles Ellison ’20 and Jacob Jimerson ’19 tied for this year’s high score of three points, with Lauren Fantz ’21, Aleksandr Nazaruk ’20, and Gerardo Gonzalez ’21 also scoring points. Hannah Freeman ’19, Mercedes Gonzalez ’19, Katherine Nguyen ’21, William Price ’19 , and Aiden Steinle ’19  also participated.





  • Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers participated in a roundtable titled “Reaching beyond the Academy” at the annual conference of the Association for Jewish Studies in Boston, MA, Dec. 16–18.





  • Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers published “7 Jewish Feminist Highlights of 2018” in Lilith Magazine’s blog.





  • Associate Professor of Environmental Studies Joshua Long published a scholarly article with Environmental Studies alumna Peri Kincaid ’18 titled “A Red City Goes Green: The Renewable Energy Partnership of Georgetown, Texas, and Southwestern University” in Sustainability: The Journal of Record. The article is about Georgetown and Southwestern’s path to 100% renewable energy.





  • Art generated by the interactive evolution system AnimationBreeder was featured on the cover of SIGEVOlution (volume 11, issue 4) , the newsletter of the Special Interest Group on Genetic and Evolutionary Computation. AnimationBreeder is a system developed by Southwestern University students Isabel Tweraser ’19 and Lauren Gillespie ’19 as part of SCOPE summer research supervised by Assistant Professor of Computer Science Jacob Schrum. Also in the newsletter is a short description of the art, as well as a reference to the publication describing this research , which was cowritten by Tweraser, Gillespie, and Schrum.





  • Assistant Professor of Business Debika Sihi was featured in an interview conducted by the U.K.-based agency Giraffe Social Media, sharing her insights about marketing and social media strategy. The interview can be found here .





  • Associate Professor of Computer Science Barbara Anthony presented a paper on the “Inefficiency of Equilibria in Doodle Polls,” coauthored with Christine Chung of Connecticut College, at the 12th Conference on Combinatorial Optimization and Applications. She also chaired a session on combinatorial optimization at the conference.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Communication Studies Lamiyah Bahrainwala facilitated a panel titled “Talking about Race with your Child” through the Parent Advisory Committee at Child’s Day Child Development Center on Dec. 5, 2017. The panel featured experts from education, social work, and policy to provide specific strategies for parents to talk about race and racism with preschool-aged children.





  • Associate Professor of English Michael Saenger posted a blog story with the Times of Israel titled “Does BDS have anything to do with Israel?”





  • Professor of Economics Dirk Early’s article on housing discrimination, “Racial Rent Differences in U.S. Housing Markets: Evidence from the Housing Voucher Program,” has been accepted for publication in the Journal of Regional Science. The article is coauthored with Edgar Olsen at the University of Virginia and Paul Carrillo at George Washington University.





  • Professor of Theatre Desiderio Roybal is the scenic designer for A Christmas Carol Classic Radiocast, produced by Penfold Theatre of Austin. The setting is the fictional KPNF radio station, where dozens of characters bring to life the Dickens masterpiece A Christmas Carol. A small company of virtuosic voice actors and live foley sound effects reminiscent of A Prairie Home Companion recreate the images and sounds of this Christmas classic.





  • Six music majors have prepared source-critical editions of unknown, unpublished, or little-known works by African American composer Florence B. Price (1887–1953) for the Music in the United States course offered by Professor of Music and Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts Michael Cooper. The editions were prepared from autographs held at the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, and include a scholarly preface, a source-critical score of the work, and a critical report. The students have gone through the entire process of preparing scholarly editions, including finding the sources, requesting reproductions and agreeing to the holding library’s terms, researching the poets and texts (where applicable), inputting the music using professional music-editing software, and assembling the final product. They hold the copyright on their editions. The students, works, and work-statuses are

    • Emily Barham ’20, Fantasy in Purple (new edition; text by Langston Hughes)
    • Katie Beth Brandt ’19, Bluebell (premiere edition; text by Mary Rolofson Gamble; recorded by the University of Texas at San Antonio choir and set for posthumous premiere in spring 2019)
    • Myles Kellerman ’20, Monologue for the Working Class (premiere edition; text by Langston Hughes)
    • Alex Slaid ’20, The Retort (new edition; text by Paul Dunbar)
    • Tabitha Thiemens ’19, God Gives Me You (new edition; text by unidentified author)
    • Ti Xin ’20, Presto (premiere edition; for piano solo)




  • Eleven Southwestern University faculty members have won Sam Taylor Fellowship grants to support their research, with award amounts ranging from $1,000 to $1,600. Sam Taylor Fellowships are selected through a competitive application process and are provided by the General Board of Higher Education and Ministry of the United Methodist Church. This year’s recipients are

    • Professor of Physics Steven Alexander, “Generating Energy from Hot Sidewalks” (awarded $1,200)
    • Assistant Professor of Communication Studies Lamiyah Bahrainwala, “The Politics of Stealth Halal: Re-Presenting the Islamic Origins of U.S. Meat Products” (awarded $1,600)
    • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth , “Nature Education in the German Classroom: Possibilities for Integration and Inclusion?” (awarded $1,400)
    • Professor of Biology Romi Burks, “Unravelling the Mystery: Genetic Differentiation of Chinese and Japanese Mysterysnails Using 16S” (awarded $1,400)
    • Assistant Professor of History Jethro Hernandez Berrones, “With Indigenist Spirit: Doctors on Spiritual Practices in Post-Revolutionary Mexico” (awarded $1,500)
    • Professor of Anthropology Melissa Johnson, “Human–Jaguar Becomings and Racial Capitalism in Belize” (awarded $1,000)
    • Associate Professor of French Francis Mathieu, “Research on Claire de Duras’s Avant-Garde Novella, Ourika” (awarded $1,400)
    • Associate Professor of French Aaron Prevots, “Gestures toward the Sacred: Guillevic, Vargaftig, Tellermann, Michel” (awarded $1,400)
    • Associate Professor of Communication Studies Valerie Renegar, “Contemporary Modes of Parenting: Disrupting the Representation of Stepmothers in Popular Culture” (awarded $1,500)
    • Associate Professor of Spanish Maria De Los Angeles Rodriguez Cadena, “Cultural Memory and Historical Fiction: Women of the Past on Television and Film by Four Contemporary Mexican Women Directors” (awarded $1,400)
    • Assistant Professor of Political Science Emily Sydnor, “Researching Attachments to American Political Institutions” (awarded $1,600)




  • Assistant Professor of Psychology Carin Perilloux was interviewed on the YouTube channel The Dissenter (Portugal) about her research on sexual-interest perception, physical attractiveness, and more. You can watch the interview here.





  • Associate Professor of French Francis Mathieu chaired a special session titled “Married Female Characters of French Women Authors” at the 2018 Pacific Ancient and Modern Languages Association annual conference, in Bellingham, WA. Until just a few decades ago, French women were expected to marry, be submissive, and not strive for much more. French women authors have reflected a range of responses to such social expectations through their married heroines by imagining alternative life choices, subverting oppressive societal norms, and disrupting paradigms. In the wake of the Me Too movement, Mathieu successfully proposed this special session to the conference organizers in order to allow fellow French literature scholars to share their recent research on this topic.





  • Meili Criezis ’17 published an article titled “Islam, Gender, and the Algerian Revolution for Independence” in Visions & Revisions: New Scholars, New Interpretations, vol. 11 (2018). Visions and Revisionsis an interdisciplinary journal for outstanding graduate and undergraduate essays, published annually by the History, Politics, Languages and Cultures Department at Edinboro University. The article was based on Criezis’s history capstone project and drew from her original archival work as part of a faculty–student research project with Associate Professor of History Melissa Byrnes in Paris during the summer of 2016.





November 2018

  • Assistant Professor of Communication Studies Lamiyah Bahrainwala facilitated a panel titled “How to Talk to Your Kids about Race”  on Nov. 28, 2018, at Russell Lee Elementary School in Austin. The panel brought together experts in child development and education, including licensed clinical social worker Katie Malinski, University of Texas Associate Professor Richard Reddick, and Head of Headwaters Middle School Roberto Germán. The panel was well attended by parents, and Bahrainwala envisions turning this into a workshop series for the future. View the transcript from the panel here.





  • Assistant Dean for Student Multicultural Affairs Terri Johnson served as a moderator for two separate panel presentations, “Struggles over Food and Water” and “Literary Approaches to Environmental Justice,” at the National Women’s Studies Association Conference in Atlanta, GA, Nov. 811.





  • President Edward Burgerand Professor of Art Victoria Star Varner presented an invited joint lecture in the Bridges Lecture Series at the University of Waterloo, Canada, on the connections between their original research in math and art on Nov. 21. The Bridges Lecture Series “aims to rediscover points of affinity among academic disciplines…and to bring them back into productive dialogue; to raise questions that are essential to scholars in Arts, Science, and Mathematics; and to provide specialists and non-specialists alike with compelling and enriching information that uncovers the possibilities and opportunities that exist on the bridge between disciplines. Our guiding goal is to coax audiences out of their intellectual comfort zones, and to transcend narrow discipline-specific avenues of academic inquiry.”





  • Artworks by 12 Southwestern students were selected by juror Mark Anderson, chair of the Art Department at Baylor University, for inclusion in the 39th annual Central Texas Art Competition at Temple College.

    • Ana Olvera , class of 2021, received an award of excellence ribbon and a cash prize for her painting.
    • The other artists were Miriam Arzoumanian, class of 2021, painting; Julia Canfield, class of 2020, painting; Ila Dannelley, class of 2022, drawing; Summer Elliott, class of 2021, painting; Lauren Muskara, class of 2020, painting; Dani Oskam, class of 2020, painting; Aiden Steinle, class of 2020, ceramics; Lauren Valentine, class of 2019, painting; Hal Webster, class of 2021, paintings (3); Aris Wells, class of 2020, ceramics; and Mattie Wesoloski, class of 2021, painting.
    • Of the 581 works submitted for the competition, 205 were selected and will be on display in the gallery of the Temple College Visual Arts Complex at 2105 South 5th St. in Temple, TX, through Dec. 3. Gallery hours are 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday–Thursday.




  • Professor of Economics Emily Northrop’s op-ed titled “Grasping Climate as a Bridge Issue Can Lead to Bipartisan Solutions” was published in the Austin American-Statesman on Nov. 24. The op-ed describes the impacts of climate change on US House District #31.





  • Professor of Theatre Desiderio Roybal was scenic designer for John Patrick Shanley’s play Doubt: A Parable, produced by City Theatre of Austin. The play was directed by Professor Emeritus Rick Roemer. Set in 1964, the play depicts a strict nun challenging the hierarchy of the Catholic Church and her faith when she accuses a popular priest of doing something inappropriate with a student in their school.





  • Associate Professor of Spanish Abby Dings presented a paper, “Teaching the Linguistic Landscape,” at the annual meeting of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages in New Orleans, LA, on Nov. 18.





  • Assistant Professor of Communication Studies Lamiyah Bahrainwala attended the 2018 National Communication Association in Salt Lake City, UT. She presented three papers that examined veiled discourses about halal meat, menstruation, and the Nike Pro Hijab.





  • Professor of Art and Art History and Coordinator General of the Restoring Ancient Stabiae Foundation Thomas Nobel Howe has been invited to give a seminar lecture titled “Les Villas Panoramique de Stabies, Découvertes et Interpretations Récentes” in the seminar series “Décor et Architecture Antiques d’Orient et d’Occident” at the École Normale Supérieure in Paris, France, Nov. 29, 2018. The session synthesizes his interpretations of his recent and ongoing excavations at Stabiae with his forthcoming chapter on Hellenistic architecture for the 21st edition of SirBanister Fletcher’s A History of Architecture (Royal Institute of British Architects). The lecture will be in French.





  • The student chapter of the American Chemical Society (ACS) at Southwestern was selected to receive an Honorable Mention award for its activities conducted during the 2017–2018 academic year. This award recognizes the students and faculty advisors for being exemplary chemistry ambassadors through their work in service and outreach to the community. Special congratulations go to ACS President Austin Baker, class of 2019, Vice President Saarah Cantu, class of 2019, Treasurer Lauren Gillespie, class of 2019, Secretary Renee Walker ’18, and Historian Jillian Bradley ’18. Director of General Chemistry Labs Willis Weigand and Assistant Professor of Chemistry Mike Gesinski serve as the faculty advisor and coadvisor, respectively.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Education Suzanne García-Mateus presented a paper titled “A Case Study of One Latinx and Bilingual Student: (Re)envisioning Bilingualism for Immigrant Children in a Gentrifying Two-Way Immersion Bilingual Program” on a panel she organized titled “Possibilities for Resistance and Change: Constructing Identities as Learners, Educators, Transfronterizos, and Intercultural Nations in Public Education” at the 117th American Anthropological Association conference in San Jose, CA, Nov. 1418, 2018.





  • Professor of Psychology Traci Giuliano recently had two papers published in the Handbook of Sexuality-Related Measures. The “Attitudes toward Polyamory Scale” was coauthored with alums Sarah Johnson ’13, Jordan Herselman ’13, and Kevin Hutzler ’13. The “Sexual Novelty Scale” was coauthored with alums Sarah Matthews ’17, Marissa Rosa ’18, Kayleigh Thomas ’18, and Brooke Swift ’18.





  • Professor of Theatre Desiderio Roybal received a nomination for Best Scenic Design of a Drama 2018 by Broadway World-Austin. His scenic design of Florian Zeller’s Molière Award-winning play The Father questioned the truth and the nature of reality as dementia disrupts the child-parent relationship.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Art Ron Geibel has a sculpture included in the 2018 CraftTexas exhibition at Houston Center for Contemporary Craft in Houston, TX. The exhibition was curated by Jennifer Scanlan, the curatorial and exhibitions director at Oklahoma Contemporary in Oklahoma City. CraftTexas 2018 is the tenth in a series of biennial juried exhibitions showcasing the best in Texas-made contemporary craft. The show features 50 works by 36 artists and includes a wide range of sculpture, jewelry, and furniture, with a strong emphasis on cutting-edge works. The exhibition is on view through Jan. 6, 2019.





  • Assistant Professor of Kinesiology Edward Merritt gave an invited talk titled “Traumatic Injury to Skeletal Muscle and Subsequent Regeneration” at the University of Florida Myology Institute, Nov. 15, 2018.





  • Professor Emeritus of Sociology and University Scholar Edward L. Kain is the lead editor of Conducting Effective Program Reviews: A Training Manual for the ASA Department Resources Group.This manual, published in November by the American Sociology Association (ASA) in Washington, DC, is used by members of the ASA’s Department Resources Group, a national group of consultants who serve as external program reviewers across the country. Kain served as the external program reviewer for the Anthropology and Sociology Program at Governors State University in Chicago, Nov. 67, 2018.





  • Facilities Management hosted the APPA Facilities Supervisors Toolkit the week of Nov. 5. The course hosted 38 individuals from 13 universities around the country. The course covered a host of topics to help participants further hone their skills as supervisors. Five Facilities Management team members, Supervisor of Maintenance Services Tom Williams, Assistant Supervisor of Maintenance Services Brandon Quintanilla, Central Plant Mechanic and Lead James Garcia, Supervisor of Custodial Services Anita Drake, and Supervisor of Logistical Services Juan Garza, completed the course.





  • Computer science majors Bobby Garza, class of 2019, and Sabin Oza and Matt Sanford, both class of 2020, competed in the 2018 ACM ICPC South Central USA Regional Programming Contest at Baylor University. In this competition, students work together in teams of three to solve challenging programming puzzles for five hours. Though the team did not advance to the World Finals, they are proud of their performance. Associate Professor of Computer Science Barbara Anthony was the coach for the team.





  • Professor of Biology Romi Burks presented a talk titled “The future of Genetic Engineering in the Chocolate Industry” on the Pro Series Stage of the Northwest Chocolate Festival in Seattle, WA, Nov. 10. The Festival represents one of the largest gatherings of professionals involved in fine chocolate. Burks sought to translate the latest research using CRISPR-Cas9 (a gene editing tool) that sought to increase disease resistance in Theobroma cacao (the tree from which chocolate comes). The talk developed from a case study that Burks taught in her First Year Seminar “Does Chocolate Have a Dark Side?”





  • Assistant Professor of History Jethro Hernández Berrones organized and moderated a panel titled “Contending Positions: Science, Medicine, and Religion in 19th- and 20th-century Mexico” for the 2018 History of Science Society annual meeting in Seattle, WA, Nov. 14. Gathering a diverse set of panelists at different career stages, the panel was one of three at the meeting discussing the history of science and medicine in Latin America. Dr. Hernández Berrones also presented a paper titled “Medicine in Revolution: Mapping Homeopathy in the Landscape of Mexican Medical Science, 18611934.” This paper argues that Mexican homeopaths used vitalism, a natural philosophy in tension with mechanicism, to promote an approach to medicine centered on the human being. In opposition to the model proposed by the National University, the homeopaths’ approach adapted to the economic and social needs of the rural and working-class population they served.





  • Associate Professor of History Melissa Byrnes presented a paper, “Using ‘Rights’ to Enshrine Discrimination and Disadvantage: Local Policymakers and North African Migrants in the French Suburbs after 1945,” at the annual meeting of the Social Science History Association in Phoenix, AZ, Nov. 10.





  • Psychology alumnae Sarah Matthews ’17 and Marissa Rosa ’18 had an article accepted for publication in the journal Frontiers in Psychology. Their paper, “Trials, Tribulations, and Triumphs: Research and Publishing from the Undergraduate Perspective,” was based on their work in the research lab of Professor of Psychology Traci Giuliano.





  • Associate Professor of Communication Studies Bob Bednar presented a paper titled “Broken Things: The Material Temporalities of Objects Placed at Roadside Crash Shrines” at the annual meeting of the American Anthropological Association, in San Jose, CA, on Nov. 18, 2018.





  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth  presented two papers a the American Association of Teachers of German/American Council on Teaching Foreign Languages (AATG/ACTFL) conference, in New Orleans, LA, Nov. 16 –1 8. “German and the Environmental Humanities: Projects, Engagement, and Approaches” showcased the interdisciplinary connections of SU’s small German program. “Literacy through Performance: Poetry Slams, Song Contests, and Cabarets” shared best practices on planning, implementation, and assessment of project-based learning with public performances. Berroth served on the AATG Program Committee for this conference. As an appointed member, she contributed to the annual meetings of Alle lernen Deutsch–AATG’s committee for diversity and inclusion and to the special-interest group on small undergraduate German programs.





  • Professor of Anthropology Melissa Johnson presented a paper, “Becoming Creole: Racial Capitalism and Human Being Otherwise,” for the panel “In and Against Racial Capitalism” and served as a discussant for the panel “The Plantation and the Planet, Part 1” at the American Anthropological Association 118th Meeting, in San Jose, CA, Nov. 1518, 2018.





  • Associate Professor of Anthropology Brenda Sendejo presented a paper titled “Spaces of Resistance: Chicana and Chicano Activism and Feminism in Austin since the Movement Era” in a special session organized by Associate Professor of Environmental Studies Joshua Long at the Race, Ethnicity, and Place Conference, Oct. 23–26, in Austin. Sendejo also presented at the Texas Book Festival on Nov. 4 on her essay “The Space in Between: Exploring the Development of Chicana Feminist Thought in Central Texas,” which was recently published in Chicana Movidas: New Narratives of Feminism and Activism in the Movement Era (UT Press). Sendejo and fellow contributor Martha P. Cotera spoke about their essays, putting them into historical and contemporary contexts.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Economics Lila Glaser attended the University of Texas Advanced Patent Law Institute, Nov. 12.  She talked with local patent attorneys about her Southwestern course The Economics of Patent Law.





  • Professor Emeritus and Holder of the Cullen Chair in Economics from 1996 until his 2013 retirement Ken Roberts was honored as a featured author at the Texas Book Festival. His book The Cedar Choppers: Life on the Edge of Nothing explores a legendary Texas subculture that migrated from Appalachia to the Texas Hill Country and carved out a livelihood in the cedar hills, subsisting by hunting, trapping, moonshining, and, by the early 20th century, chopping cedar for fence posts and charcoal. The emergence of Austin as a major metropolitan area brought the cedar choppers and their hillbilly lifestyle into direct confrontation with the gentrified urban population east of the Balcones Fault. This clash of cultures propels this first book-length treatment of the cedar choppers, their clans, their culture, and their longing for a way of life that was rapidly disappearing. In the last few months, Roberts has also made presentations at the Bullock Texas State History Museum, the Austin History Center, and in towns across the Hill Country.





  • Visiting Assistant Professor of History  Joseph Hower  traveled to Phoenix, AZ, for the 43rd annual meeting of the Social Science History Association, Nov. 8 10. He participated in a roundtable discussion of Oscar-nominated, Emmy-winning documentary filmmaker Julia Riechert’s new work-in-progress,  The 9-to-5 Project , which explores the struggles of working women in the 1970s and 1980s. While in Phoenix, he also chaired and commented on a panel titled “Race, Inequality, and the Struggle for Workers’ Rights in Brazil, South Korea, and the United States.”





  • Assistant Professor of Mathematics John Ross participated in the professional-development program of the Texas New Experiences in Teaching (NExT) project, held at Stephen F. Austin State University, in Nacogdoches, TX, Nov. 23, 2018. Texas NExT is sponsored by the Texas section of the Mathematical Association of America.





  • Assistant Professor of Political Science Emily Sydnor was interviewed by KXAN to discuss the changing political landscape in Williamson County.





  • Dean of Enrollment Services Christine Bowman  presented twice at the Independent Educational Consultant Association conference in Los Angeles, CA. She led a preconference case study titled “How a University’s Financial Aid Committee Works: A Trek in Their Shoes” and served on a panel session titled “Generation Z Is Coming: Are We Ready.”





  • Part-Time Instructor of Applied Music Katherine Altobello was the guest mezzo-soprano soloist in Austin Chamber Ensemble’s production A Haunted Evening,featuring works by Brahms, Strauss, Verdi, Britten, Wildhorn, Schwartz, and Sondheim. Altobello performed alongside soprano June Julian, tenor Dr. Jeffrey Jones-Ragona, and pianists Dr. Stephen Burnaman and Martha Mortensen Ahern. Performances were on Oct. 19 at Huston–Tillotson University’s King Seabrook Chapel (celebrating their second season as an “all-Steinway” music school) and on Oct. 20 at the First Presbyterian Church in Austin. Performances included solos, duets, trios, and piano movements that fit the Halloween spirit.





  • Director of the Debby Ellis Writing Center Jennifer Marciniak presented original research titled  “Migratory Patterns of Cross-Institutional Tutor Training” at the National Conference on Peer Tutoring in Writing, hosted by the University of of TexasRio Grande Valley, at South Padre Island, Nov. 14. Here, she also began a curated visual art project titled “Art and Migration: A Collective Memory of Writing Center Conference Work,” which will be completed over the next year and presented as part of the International Writing Center Association/National Conference on Peer Tutoring in Writing conference The Art of It All in Columbus, OH, in October 2019.





  • Assistant Professor of Communication Studies Lamiyah Bahrainwala published the paper “Bad Archives, Bad Workers” in Flow Journal: A Critical Forum on Media and Culture. The theme of the issue was Media(ted) Archives: The Politics of Saving and Making Media Histories.





  • Professor of Music and Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts Michael Cooper  uncovered, edited, and arranged for the posthumous premiere of two unpublished songs by African-American composer and civil-rights activist Margaret A. Bonds (1913–1972). The songs are based on Edna St. Vincent Millay’s (1892–1950) sonnets “What Lips My Lips Have Kissed” and “I Know My Mind and I Have Made My Choice.” Millay’s poems, considered among the finest sonnets of the 20th century, are important for their use of feminist themes, which Bonds in turn engages in the works’ musical style. The works received their modern premiere at a recital by former Southwestwestern Instructor of Music Dana Long Zenobi at Butler University, Nov. 6, 2018.





  • Five math majors presented at the Texas Undergraduate Mathematics Conference (TUMC), held at Stephen F. Austin State University, in Nacogdoches, TX, Nov. 2 3, 2018.

    • Aiden Steinle, class of 2020, presented “Staying in Shape with Real-World Mappings.” Steinle’s work was supervised by Professor of Mathematics and Chair of Mathematics and Computer Science Fumiko Futamura.
    • Gillian Glover , class of 2019, presented “Make Money with Linear Algebra: A Model of Portfolio Analysis.” Glover’s math capstone is an extension of work supervised by Dr. Futamura.
    • Stan Kannegieter , class of 2019, presented “The Kissing Disease and Differential Equations.”
    • Will Price, class of 2019, presented “Ms. Pac-Man Eats AI for Breakfast.” Price’s math capstone is an extension of his SCOPE 2018 research under Assistant Professor of Computer Science Jacob Schrum.
    • Mercedes Gonzalez, class of 2021, presented “Restrictions on HOMFLYPT and Kauffman Polynomials Arising from Local Moves.” Gonzalez presented work from a National Science Foundation Research Experience for Undergraduates program, supervised by Dr. Sandy Ganzell from St. Mary’s College of Maryland.
    • Associate Professor of Mathematics Therese Shelton supervised the math capstone work of Glover, Kannegieter, and Price, and she moderated a session of presentations at the TUMC.  
    • Other attendees included Zariah Whyte, class of 2021, and Assistant Professor of Mathematics John Ross.
    • Student lodging, registration, and meals was provided by National Science Foundation award no. DMS-1834888 for 2018. Additional funding was provided by a Faculty–Student Project award, the Fleming Student Travel Fund, and the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science. Southwestern students accounted for five of the 57 presentations given by students representing 21 colleges and universities.




  • Associate Professor of Anthropology Brenda Sendejo presented a paper, “Towards a Mujerista Ethnographic Approach: Embodied Knowledge and Feminist Anthropology in the Borderlands,” for the panel “Critical Chicana and Latinx Ethnography: Reflections from the Field,” which she cochaired at the American Anthropological Association’s 118th Meeting, in San Jose, CA, Nov. 15–18, 2018. Sendejo also served as an invited panelist at the American Studies Association Annual Meeting in Atlanta, GA, on Nov. 8, 2018, where she presented “The Space in Between: Exploring the Development of Chicana Feminist Thought in Central Texas.”





  • Professor of Mathematics Alison Marr presented a talk titled “Envisioning a New Calculus Sequence”  in the “Innovation/Ideation” session at the Association of American Colleges & Universities’ Transforming STEM Higher Education Conference, held Nov. 810, in Atlanta, GA. This talk was based on work that has taken place over the last year as part of an ACS grant titled “Supporting Diversity and Inclusion in Mathematics and the STEM Disciplines,” which is a joint project with Joel Kilty and Alex McAllister at Centre College.





  • Part-Time Assistant Professor of Philosophy Linda Cox presented the paper “How to Begin to Begin Again: Ricoeurian Innovation and Sedimentation in William Carlos Williams’s Paterson” at the Society for Ricoeur Studies Annual Conference in Los Angeles, CA, on Nov. 3, 2018.





  • Professor of Art Victoria Star Varner’s artwork was selected for the 7e Internationale Exposition Estampes Bisannuelle Miniature (the 7th International Miniature Print Biennial Exhibition) organized by the Ottawa School of Art, Ontario, Canada. The exhibition brought together 260 works by over 100 artists from 20 countries. In addition, she and Technical Assistant and Exhibitions Coordinator Seth Daulton were invited to participate in Our Indiana: M.F.A. Selections, curated by Professor Gail Panske, University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee, and Professor Ellen Price, Miami University, Ohio, for the Mid-America Print Council’s biennial conference held at the University of Wyoming.





  • Professor of Anthropology Melissa Johnson’s book Becoming Creole: Nature and Race in Belize was published by Rutgers University Press on Nov. 1 in their Critical Caribbean Studiesseries. Use code 02AAAA17 for a 30% discount here. You can also find it on Amazon.





  • Professor of Psychology Traci Giuliano, together with psychology alums Sarah Matthews ’17, Marissa Rosa ’18, Kayleigh Thomas ’18, Brooke Swift ’18, Nicki Ahearn ’16, Aaron Garcia ’17, Skylar Smith ’16, Casey Niblett ’16, and Maddie Mills ’17, published an article titled “The Battle against Bedroom Boredom: Development and Validation of a Brief Measure of Sexual Novelty in Relationships” in the Canadian Journal of Human Sexuality.





  • Professor of Music and Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts Michael Cooper discovered and edited an unpublished choral work by Florence B. Price (1887–1953) that will be performed by Visiting Assistant Professor of Music Beth Everett and the Southwestern University Chorale at their concert on Nov. 3, 2018. The composition, titled “Night,” is based on a poem first published in 1930 in the NAACP journal The Crisis by Harlem Renaissance author Bessie Mayle. Price, generally acclaimed as the doyenne of African-American concert music of the mid-20th century, set Mayle’s poem to music in 1945. After her setting was premiered in Chicago, the autograph was filed among Price’s other manuscripts. Cooper discovered it during his research in the summer of 2018.





  • Assistant Professor of Kinesiology Edward Merritt attended the Education Committee meeting of the American Physiological Society and was appointed chair of the Medical Physiology Refresher Course for the 2019 Experimental Biology meeting.





  • Assistant Professor of Kinesiology Edward Merritt coauthored a publication titled “Human Neuromuscular Aging: Sex Differences Revealed at the Myocellular Level” in the journal Experimental Gerontology.





  • Assistant Professor of Political Science Emily Sydnor was interviewed by Spectrum News’s In Focus program about civility in the midterm elections.