Movie Channel Entertains Students: New Films Shown Each Month

Southwestern has its very own movie channel, channel 44, dedicated to showing a varietyof different movies every month.

The movies are a mix of new releases and seasonally appropriate films.

Around Halloween, there were more horror movies on the roster, while for the rest of this year they’ll lean towards a more festive theme.

Movies run every three hours beginning at 9 a.m., with the last showing of the daystarting at midnight. In between movies the channel displays a list of the movies currently on rotation, as well as the movies coming next week. You can also find out which movies are showing, as well as their individual show times, at my.southwestern.edu under thecommunity tab.

This week’s movies are “Green Lantern”, “Apollo 13”, and “Planes,Trains, and Automobiles”. If you have a movie that you would like to see on the SU Movie Channel, you can contact Jason Chapman, assistant director of student activities. However, it is important to keep in mind that the movies are ordered two months in advance, so be ready to wait if you want to see your favorite film on the channel.

THE CHALLENGE

THE CHALLENGE, an event sponsored by Students for Environmental Activism and Knowledge (SEAK), will take place at 5:30 p.m. on the mall today.

“The purpose of the event is to raise awareness around issues related to composting andrecycling,” sophomore Joey Kyle said.

THE CHALLENGE is a tag competition in which players dress as recyclable objects andtaggers attempt to sort them into correct compostable and recyclable categories.

Prizes including gift cards and concert tickets will be awarded to the winners. SEAK will also hand out environmental literature.

Yesterday, SEAK hosted a drum circle to advertise the event in the Commons and hand out environmental fortunes.

SEAK’s ultimate purpose for this year is to get bottled water off campus and contribute to the University’s sustainability.

“In the upcoming months there will be a revamping of past compost systems and our hopes are that people will be educated enough to have a self-sustained compost system,” Kyle said.