Stepping with Pride


By Areli Gutierrez

Boots and heels will stomp the floor at 8 pm on October 19 in the Bishops Lounge, where Friday Night Live will present the second-ever Southwestern Step and Stroll exhibition. The event is meant to showcase the choreography and performance of various organizations.

“This is a way of building bridges across campuses and cultures,” senior Kadidiatou Magassa said. “We will cross racial barriers and lines of different groups to show people that the event is about more than just race.”

Co-sponsoring the event are Kappa Delta Chi, the Diversity Enrichment Committee (DEC), and the University Programming Council. Magassa is organizing the event as a DEC representative from Ebony, along with Lizette Villarreal. These groups also sponsored the very first SU Step and Stroll exhibition last year.

“Last year’s competition only had two groups,” Magassa said. “This year, there are two main parts to the event: first, outside sororities and fraternities that have competed in Stepping contests before will be invited to show SU groups how it’s done. Then, we will hold a competition solely for SU Greek groups that have been working with step and stroll advisors to create something unique to those groups.”

Stepping originated with largely African-American fraternities and sororities but has expanded beyond racial groups and is now a hallmark among organizations as a way to bond and show off their pride.

“The Stepping and Strolling exhibition is a way to show that anyone can take something that is usually associated with one group and make it their own to show their organization’s values and what it means to be a part of that group,” Magassa said.

The exhibition, titled “Steppin’ to the Beat” will follow the “Deconstructing the Inner You” conference held earlier in the day, which will examine issues like race, ethnicity and inclusion with a community forum and workshops.

“The event will be a part of the diversity conference throughout the day,” Magassa said. “The theme lies in how campuses handle diversity, and how to embrace it. Lizette and I did a lot of this because it’s a way for us to address these issues and take traditional Stepping and Strolling to make it diverse in a safe way. We are opening it up to [all] fraternities and sororities, and to groups of all races and religions and both genders, to handle issues and deconstruct them by analyzing our backgrounds and encouraging dialogue between one another in a positive way.”

Various different Greek organizations from both on campus and from outside universities will present at the step show, including Omega Delta Phi, Delta Epsilon Psi, and Alpha Kappa Alpha.

“Dancing and throwing up my letters is one of my favorite things to do when showing off my KDChi pride,” senior Jessica Enyioha said.

There is also a competitive portion of the show, limited to only SU Greek life. This will include Alpha Delta Pi, Zeta Tau Alpha, Kappa Delta Chi, Delta Delta Delta, and the fraternity Pi Kappa Alpha.
There will be five judges: one from each of the outside fraternities and sororities, and one student judge. These organizations will compete for cash prizes for 1st, 2nd, and 3rd place to win $200, $150, and $100 respectively.

Declining Military Health: Americans Unfit to Serve

By Carly Banner
A recent study from Mission: Readiness found that 25% of Americans are too overweight to join the military. The United States is one of the few countries that face this problem.

When a quarter of a nation’s otherwise eligible citizens cannot reach a healthy enough weight to serve their country, it becomes clear that obesity is systemic threat in the United States.
If Americans are not healthy enough to join the army, they are not healthy enough to be Olympic stars or bankers or middle school teachers. Every job in America is important, and needs to be filled with energetic, capable people. For that to happen, the general conversation about food and healthy choices needs to change.

The military suggests putting healthier choices in school vending machines and cafeterias. While this would certainly help by influencing children early on, it is far from a perfect solution. Children do not eat all of their meals at school, and they grow into adults that must make their own nutrition decisions.
In order for children to grow into fit adults capable of serving their country, unhealthy food must be treated as a dangerous substance. Just as the increased coverage of the harmful health effects of cigarettes has gradually made them less socially acceptable, fatty foods need to enter the American psyche as “bad for you” at a young age in order to prevent obesity in children.

Implementing other changes, such as banning fast food companies from advertising geared specifically towards children and emphasizing proper nutrition and frequent exercise, would go a long way to prevent the 25% of Americans too fat to serve from becoming overweight in the first place.

By first recognizing this alarming trend in military fitness, Americans can work towards fixing the issue. A solution would necessitate a society-wide shift in the attitude toward food and exercise.

Obesity exists, on television, in the military, and at the store down the street. There is no sense in trying to hide it away or shame individuals who suffer from it. But before America can defend itself from outside threats, it has to make a greater effort to defend itself from the widespread acceptance of unhealthy food.

Guest Column: Embracing the Classics.Exploring the Future.

There is a discouraging trend afoot – that of declining interest in classical music. Many professional orchestras are facing musicians’ union disputes, financial troubles, declining audiences, and some have even folded entirely. It is not within the scope of my ability to proffer a comprehensive theory as to why this is happening (as Frank Zappa observed: “writing about music is like dancing about architecture”), but I would like to provide some discussion about what the Austin Civic Orchestra (ACO) is trying to do to help alter this troubling course.

One of the most important responsibilities conductors shoulder is to support, commission and publicly present new music. Music of our time. Much of the music that we consider to be “classic” was once new; it spoke directly to the people of the time and reflected the issues of that time. To this end, we’re moving in a different direction this season to try and draw some new and younger fans to our concerts. “Embracing the Classics. Exploring the Future” is the orchestra’s new motto.

On September 29th, we presented the Texas premiere of David Amram’s “Symphonic Variations on a Song by Woody Guthrie.” Guthrie, of course, wrote the folk song, “This Land is Your Land,” and we celebrate his 100th birthday anniversary in 2012. Amram, a composer, conductor, and author, is known in classical, jazz, and folk circles and for his collaborations with Jack Kerouac (together they helped form the Beat movement), Leonard Bernstein (Bernstein chose him to serve as the first composer-in-residence with the NY Philharmonic), Charlie Mingus, Oscar Peterson, Willie Nelson… the list could go on for gigabytes.

Amram’s tribute to Guthrie sets the famous melody in ten different styles, all of which reflect America’s rich and diverse musical heritage: blues, gospel, swing, Native American, Latino, Mexican, middle eastern, klezmer, a hoe-down, and even a nod to the Salvation Army Band. We were very honored to have Amram present for the premiere and also to have his input during the dress rehearsal. This man is a living part of American history and at 82 he shows no signs of slowing down!

The experience of working with a living composer is always very exciting because the collaborative effort is extremely rewarding for all parties involved. The excitement of “giving birth” to a new work of art, especially in the presence of the creative force behind it, is truly unique to this environment and I am always privileged to serve as the midwife.

The most important outcome for this concert and for all programs in which we’ve been able to feature new music, is that we were able to bring in some new and younger audience members and to blur the boundaries between musical genres. There was an almost giddy sense of excitement in the air after the performance, something promising and immediately passionate, something one cannot get from an iPod or YouTube.

Dr. Lois Ferrari
Professor of Music
Music Director, Austin Civic Orchestra

http://www.austincivicorchestra.org

Voter ID: Reasonable Request vs. Discriminatory Law


Reasonable
By Jeffrey McKenzie
Pennsylvania and many other states have implemented or are attempting to implement voter ID laws. However, opponents are now complaining that such requests for identification are discriminatory, racist, or on par with a poll tax.
The overwhelming majority of potential voters have government-issued identification. Many of the simplest transactions involve an ID card, such as boarding an airplane. In addition, states that are passing these measures are creating ways for people without a driver’s license to obtain a free ID. Therefore, this legislation bears no resemblance to a poll tax, which is a flat fee charged to every voter.
Any interaction with government bureaucracy is a hassle, but getting an ID is no more demanding than registering to vote in the first place. Election officials have a right to ask that people prove their identity, place of residence, or citizenship in order to prevent those who are be ineligible from being able to vote. Further, the majority of people without identification are not registered to vote, and if they are, they are unlikely to turn out.
A main point of opposition is the claim there is virtually no cheating in elections. However, voter fraud would be impossible to measure because many unregistered voters could vote and not get caught. The controversy surrounding Florida’s counting of votes in the 2000 election suggests that even slight amounts of voter fraud are powerful enough to influence the outcome of an election.
Pennsylvania Governor Tom Corbett stated that a number of election precincts in Philadelphia that are reliably Democratic have produced results showing that more than 100 percent of registered voters cast ballots certain years in districts where turnout is low. It seems likely, even inevitable, that such examples of voter fraud are being repeated in cities across the country.
In 2008, the Supreme Court upheld an Indiana law requiring voter ID, with the majority opinion given by Justice John Paul Stevens: “Not only is the risk of voter fraud real but . . . it could affect the outcome of a close election.”
The honesty of the electoral process should not be made a partisan issue. States can do a better job promoting voter registration or the process by which non-drivers get an ID, but equating this measure with a poll tax or Jim Crow laws in false and disrespectful to civil rights. All citizens deserve the right to vote, and it is therefore constitutional that they be able to prove their citizenship with a government-issued ID.


Discriminatory
By Joana Moreno
As of September 24, Voter ID laws are now effective throughout twenty-three states in America. These laws vary from state to state but have one general requirement: photo identification in order to cast a vote.

For most Americans this new requirement can be fulfilled by simply using a driver’s license or state identification card, yet it can be problematic for the population of Americans without a photo ID.

According to the Voting Rights Institute, 11% of Americans lack proper identification. Many Americans in that group are minorities and working poor, two groups known to traditionally vote Democratic. By making it almost impossible for them to vote in the upcoming elections, these laws discriminate against various highly democratic minority populations within the United States.

Voter ID laws do offer the option of a free election identification certificate, yet this option only pays lip service toward making the laws fair to all Americans. Obtaining an election certificate requires travelling to a Department of Public Safety and a certified copy of your birth certificate.

Both of these seem simple, but they may not be to those adversely affected by the law. Those in rural areas would have to travel an extensive number of miles to a D.P.S, and the working-poor would be forced to pay up to twenty-two dollars for a certified copy of their birth certificate.

Proponents of the law claim that these measures are not meant to discriminate, but instead secure the election process in order to prevent electoral fraud. To reinforce their claim they also mention that requiring a photo ID is reasonable because it is required to fly or participate in other trivial activities.

Despite these statements, government officials are not blind to this form of discrimination. Attorney General Eric Holder referred to voter ID laws as modern Jim Crow-era poll taxes. In August, a federal court turned down Texas’ version of a voter ID law, Senate Bill 14, stating that it would cause “strict, unforgiving burdens on the poor.” This bill blatantly violated the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

The Advancement Project, a multi-racial civil rights organization, refers to these attempts as “voter suppression policies” and even predicts that the voter ID laws in place to date could prevent 10 million Latinos from voting. A current poll from CNN Politics reports that 68% of registered Latino voters would support Barack Obama over Mitt Romney in the upcoming election. Preventing those 10 million Latino voters would be a significant boon for the Republican Party.

Every type of voter identification laws that has been presented in federal court this year has been in some way modified in order to prevent discriminatory effects. Yet, these weakened voter ID laws remain a threat. Penda D. Hair, co-director of Advancement Project, worries that Pennsylvania voters may become confused because election workers may still ask for photo identification even though it is now not required in ordered to vote.

The very people promoting these discriminatory laws are those in elected positions who we have entrusted to speak on our behalf. Elections are approaching; it’s time to elect worthy representatives who are against discrimination and against voter ID laws.

Vandalism

By Kylie Chesser

Following acts of vandalism in and around the Herman Brown Residence Hall, emails were sent out throughout the week concerning the crime alert and those affected by the acts. Chief Deborah Brown and the campus police are actively working to find those responsible.

Brown stated that over the past two weeks three to four crude drawings have appeared on the doors of residents and the laundry room in Herman Brown.

“The graffiti consisted of drawings of offensive nature, mostly swastikas in sharpie and things like that,” Brown said. “It seems to be the work of students rather than locals.”

Vice President of Student Life Jerry Brody also addressed the community on the matter.

“Like everyone else, I am very upset and saddened that this occurred,” Brody said. “We need your help. This community needs your help. If you know anything, please share this information.”

According to Brody, no actual threats were made to any group in the community.

“The graffiti is clearly frightening, incredibly intimidating and hurtful,” Brody said. “But I’m not anticipating anything beyond what we’ve seen, and there is no evidence that it could be reaching a [violent] level. We are committed to protecting your booty!”

Brown emphasized the importance of communicating information about these events to appropriate authorities.

“Somebody knows who this is,” Brown said. “SUPD would like that information. If students don’t want to come forward to us, they can call Crime Stoppers at 1-800-253-7867. Their report will be totally anonymous, and if it leads to an arrest, they could receive up to $2,000. If they come to SUPD, we also try to keep anonymity.”

Director of Counseling Services Dr. Judy Sonnenberg organized a discussion on Monday in the Connie Ballroom for concerned students and faculty. Chief Brown made a statement, and attendees had the opportunity to ask questions about the crimes.

A recurring subject at the forum was the handling of the matter and how information was communicated to students in particular.

“My students have no idea what’s going on,” Assistant Professor of Philosophy Omar Rivera said. “They don’t know the content of what’s happened. There has to be a way of raising awareness of what happened, but also not scaring students. I think the sensation of my students is that they’re afraid, but don’t know of what, because they have heard a hundred different rumors.”

Dr. Alicia Moore, Associate Professor of Education, expressed concern about the role of faculty in communicating with and consoling their students.

“Even though we are trying not to scare students, faculty and staff need to know the loop of what’s going on, because we can’t support our students or break up fears if we don’t,” Moore said.

Sonnenburg explained that university officials were still attempting to determine an appropriate approach for distributing information about the vandalism in a timely manner. While several email notices were sent out, students were unsure about the circumstances of the crime.

“I apologize for not including specific details about the graffiti in the first email that I sent out,” Sonnenberg said. “I’ll take some responsibility for the confusion that arose.”

Senior Lizette Villarreal also had concerns about the communications.

“People come to us as leaders,” Villarreal said. “My [Panhellenic] sisters come to me and want answers about what’s going on and I don’t know what to tell them. Things were not entirely clear.”

Brown explained that the abusive language of the vandalism made it difficult to articulate correspondences that were both informative and inoffensive.

“We wanted the community to know that there are offensive things being written, but it’s a fine line we had to balance,” Brown said. “I’m still not sure if the community wants to hear [that type of language]. We were trying to get the information out, but not to sensationalize, which is unfortunately what happened anyway.”

Following Brody’s and Sonnenberg’s emails, President Schrum sent out a statement regarding the crime.

“I am both outraged and saddened by these acts. Not only are they painful for the targeted groups or individuals, but they also erode the fabric of our community,” Schrum said. “During times like this it is important that we reaffirm our commitment to be a welcoming and inclusive University.”

Senior Kadi Magassa expressed frustration at the community’s perceived lack of interest and action on this issue.

“What people are doing is actually offensive,” Magassa said. “We need to be here together discussing this event. We have to figure out a way to get everyone together.”

Sophomore DeAndre’ Woods-Walker also urged students, staff, and administrators to actively contend the negativity of the vandalism.

“We have to take action and take responsibility because this is our home. I’m miles and miles from home, but this school is also my home, and I should take responsibility as well.”

Aside from concerns about official communication, the current focus is on finding the perpetrator(s). Brown made it clear that SUPD’s goal is to protect community members’ interests and reassure them.

“Whoever [the criminal] is needs to be warned that this is not a community that allows this stuff, and we will do what it takes to make sure our members feel safe in their belief systems and practices, whatever they may be,” Brown said.

The graffiti could mean a criminal mischief or vandalism charge for those responsible. Depending on the cost of cleaning it up, the crime may be a misdemeanor or could ultimately lead to jail time.

“It is in direct contrast of Southwestern’s core values,” Brown said. “I and Dean Jaime Woody and Vice President Brody, all the way to President Schrum, are appalled at the blatant disrespect of Southwestern’s core values and the value of others’ rights, privileges and beliefs.”

Students with questions, concerns or any information that will help to apprehend the individual(s) responsible for these recent acts of vandalism can contact the SU Police at 512-863-1944.

SU Merits Awards

By Joana Moreno

The past summer has brought not just one, but three awards to Southwestern from various college critics. The university received recognition from Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About Colleges, followed by Forbes and, more recently, U.S News and World Report.

Though different, all three recognized and acclaimed the university community. Christine Bowman, Director of Admissions, experienced the effects of the recognition in her department.

“Each [acclaim], I think, has a different meaning,” Bowman said. “Each one is viewed in different ways [by potential students] and we in Admissions are excited about each one of them and worked with them in different ways.”

Colleges That Change Lives (CTCL), originally published in 1996, was re-published this past summer. It recognizes Southwestern as a school with qualities that allow for student prosperity, such as: low student-to-faculty ratios, faculty dedication, and out-of-classroom learning opportunities, to name a few. Loren Pope from CTCL personally reviewed the school’s merit.

“Southwestern is one of the few jewels of the Southwest whose mission is to prepare a new generation to contribute to a changing society, and to prosper in their jobs, whatever and wherever in the world they may be,” Pope said.

Later in the semester came the recognition from Forbes which placed Southwestern as one of the top 100 undergraduate schools in the country as well as the #2 school in Texas. The criteria for this consisted of student engagement, alumni success and four-year graduation rate.

“Forbes looked at qualities we feel are important because its review was student-centered and student outcome orientated,” Bowman said.

Finally, US News & World Report featured a piece on Southwestern in ‘Texas College Road Trip,’ a subsection of the magazine which features colleges throughout the state.
“It is gratifying to see Southwestern receive such recognition. I know from my own usage of such surveys that they can really bring positive student interest to the university,” junior Brooke Chatterton said. “I’m proud to attend such a highly ranked school.”

Women’s Soccer Wins First Home Game

By Hanna Kim
The women’s soccer team is hitting the road this weekend to play Austin College on Friday and Centenary College, conference newcomers, on Sunday.

The ladies won their first home game against Howard Payne University last Tuesday with a final score of 1-0. First-year Ashley Moulder scored the team’s winning goal in the first few minutes of the second half.

“Our team gained a lot of momentum this weekend and now know the kind of effort and and intensity needed to go forth and show what we’re capable of as a team. This win is just a start for what’s to come,” said senior captain Lyndsey Resnik.

The team played two home games last weekend losing to the University of Dallas 1-2 last Sunday and Trinity 0-5 last Saturday. Senior Captain Sarah Nonaka believes these two games helped to prepare the team for last Tuesday’s win.

“Although the results from last weekend were disappointing, I believe they played an integral part in our win tonight. It is so important to learn as much as you can from every aspect of each game, good and bad in order to improve throughout the season” Nonaka said.

Jene Baclawski, head coach of the team, also keeps a positive outlook about the remainder of the season.

“The biggest thing for the girls is just pride and not giving them anything easy,” Baclawski said.

Freshman Kirsten Mazur plays center back on the team and was looking forward to playing at home last weekend.

“Everyone is excited to have home games. A lot of people are hopefully going to be there and the energy will really help us,” Kirsten Mazur said.

The women’s soccer team currently holds a record of 2-8 overall and 0-2 in conference. Despite losses, Nonaka expresses hope for future conference games.

“Hopefully with this non-conference win going into the second week of conference, we have begun to establish faith in the future and the continued success of our team for the remainder of the season,” Nonaka said.

Endangered Species Faces Opposition

By Alec Bergerson

The Georgetown Salamander, a local amphibian only found in this area, is currently in the process of being listed as an endangered species. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services (FWS) is now in the public hearing phase of this process and facing opposition from local residents and developers.

Dr. Joshua Long, an assistant professor of environmental studies at the university, has attended some of the public proceedings that address this conflict.

“There is a significant degree of legal protection afforded to species and their habitat under the Endangered Species Act (ESA),” Long said. “Once a candidate species is listed as endangered, the FWS undergoes a process of determining which activities may jeopardize the survival of the species.”

Local projects and construction may conflict with the policies of the ESA.

“This might mean that certain actions associated with development projects could cause harm to the species.This concerns many officials in Williamson County, because the county is one of the fastest growing in the state, and there may be certain restrictions that would ostensibly delay development projects seen as major priorities for the county,” Long said.

The potential endangered listing of the salamander may not necessarily hinder locals, because there are ways the ESA can assist them.

“It is extremely important to note that, as the ESA has evolved over the years, several programs have emerged that afford protection to landowners and developers. In some cases, this can include economic incentives to encourage conservation,” Long said.

If the FWS lists the salamander as endangered, there may be more environmental regulations that could be beneficial to the area. Local residents and officials, however, have expressed concern about the increased governmental regulation under the ESA.

“It’s true that the listing of the salamander and any designation of critical habitat might mean more environmental regulations and bureaucracy, and that’s something that concerns Williamson County residents,” Long said. “But some of those same restrictions and regulations that slow the development process could potentially facilitate a ‘greener’ and more sustainable style of development in Williamson County.”

New Student Organizations: Students Establish Four Groups


By Joana Moreno

The university’s fall semester begins with a new record in student initiatives. Unlike previous years in which SU founded only one or two new groups, this year four new student organizations have established themselves and are looking for members.

Tau Sigma is a national honor society designed specifically for transfer students. The group focuses on recognizing and promoting the academic excellence and involvement of transfer students. The organization was co-founded by junior David Boutte, a transfer student himself.

“This is a quote about how lovely and wonderful the transfer students are and how much we would love to add them to our society,” Boutte said.

For those students passionate about economics, the Southwestern University Economics Club focuses on U.S. economics and what one can do with an economics degree after college. Sessions often include professor support and long-term thinking.

“It’s an excellent outlet to discuss economics concepts,” junior economics and business double major Brooke Chatterton said.

Trouvères is all about poetry. They focus on exploring poetry in multiple aspects, from writing it to discussing it, all while appreciating it. The organization has already hosted a poetry writing workshop and plans to sponsor spoken word artist Anis Mojgani and a poetry reading/open mike event later in the semester.

“I joined the club in order to motivate myself to write more outside of classes,” junior Jacob Brown said. “There’s no better way to get involved in writing for pleasure than to immerse yourself in a community that does the same. My ambition for the club is that it will someday produce works of visual poetry that students, faculty and visitors of the campus can enjoy.”

FACE AIDS is an awareness and fundraising group that focuses on global health equity, specifically dealing with HIV/AIDS. Leaders from the group began to promote their organization last spring and are enthusiastic about actively working for this cause in the new academic year.

“[FACE AIDS] functions to empower the youth to get up and make a lasting, positive difference in their world,” junior biology major Michelle Moses said.

The increase and variety of organizations speaks well of Southwestern’s student-driven atmosphere.
“One of the best things about Southwestern is that, if there’s not an organization that fits your needs, we’re willing to start new ones,” Assistant Director of Student Activities Jason Chapman said.

Spanish Film Series Concludes Next Week

By Jennifer Fleming

The Spanish Film Festival is an international film event sponsored by Sigma Delta Pi, and Latinos Unidos. The festival will conclude Oct. 4 in Olin 105 at 8:00 p.m. with the last of five movies, Chico & Rita.

“It’s interesting to see other cultural approaches to media. These movies couldn’t be made in America,” Mckenna Cowley said. “And I’m not sure there are many American films that have as powerful an effect as Contracorriente, last week’s film, did.”

Spanish department chair Katy Ross helped organize the ongoing Spanish Film Club series, a program supported by Pragda, the Secretary of State for Culture of Spain, and Spain’s Program for Cultural Cooperation with United States’ University.

“The Festival’s purpose is to introduce students to the cultures of Spanish speaking countries,” Ross said. “The whole thing has been a group effort.”

This year, the series has spread to 43 Universities in the United States and Canada with each school choosing a particular theme. Southwestern’s team chose ‘Cinematic Sexuality/Sexualidad Cinematica’ to connect with the upcoming Brown Symposium.

“I found out about the international event and then pulled together Sigma Delta Pi and Latinos Unidos to organize a series on campus,” Ross said. “I discovered a company that does the work getting film rights and titles for us, and then we all watched the trailers and together chose five movies to show.”

Four movies were shown throughout September, but Chico & Rita will be the final showing for the year. Ross worked within the university to spread news of the events, but gives credit to the two groups for making the festival happen.
“I don’t consider myself the creator of this event,” Ross said. “Credit should go to Sigma Delta Pi and Latinos Unidos.”

Tech Titans: Apple vs. Samsung


HARMFUL
By Carly Banner

In August, a decision in the case Apple v. Samsung was reached. Apple was awarded $1.05 billion in damages through the overzealous pursuit of patent protection.

If companies like Apple continue to pursue their patent rights so vigorously, this could be the first of many cases in which a large, successful technology company is allowed to stifle progress and competition. This practice is dangerous to the American consumer and the American economy, and it shows that there is a pressing need for greater regulation on which concepts can and should be patented.

The patents Apple contended included the homescreen and app display, pinch zooming, bouncing at the end of a scrolled page, and a square shape with rounded corners. Intangible concepts like these should not be possible to patent under U.S. law.

The great American dream is to come up from nothing, work hard or be smart enough to develop a new, desirable product, and reap the monetary rewards. Apple has set a precedent of blocking the path of the entrepreneur with patents and lawsuits over technicalities that smaller companies wouldn’t be able to afford to legally battle.

But now Apple has reached a time in which greed and monopoly over the market is slowing innovation. Apple is too busy squabbling over rounded corners and patent infringement to recognize that more can be accomplished by sharing new ideas and building on them than by hoarding them away.

In 2011, iPhone sales grew 142 percent, and iPad sales grew 183 percent. Apple’s 2011 record third quarter net profit was 7.31 billion. Clearly, Apple will have an abundance of income regardless of Samsung’s success. But if there is no less expensive alternative in the market, Apple will be free to jack up prices to its heart’s content.
If roadblocks like Apple’s patenting of minute details and general ideas becomes a common practice, making a start and moving forward in the American economy will become even more difficult. And if companies like Samsung are edged out of the game, there will be no competition, no drive to make a superior product. And that would be a disservice to technology consumers.

BENEFICIAL
Jennifer Fleming
In August, a decision in the case Apple v. Samsung was reached. Apple was awarded $1.05 billion in damages through the overzealous pursuit of patent protection.

If companies like Apple continue to pursue their patent rights so vigorously, this could be the first of many cases in which a large, successful technology company is allowed to stifle progress and competition. This practice is dangerous to the American consumer and the American economy, and it shows that there is a pressing need for greater regulation on which concepts can and should be patented.

The patents Apple contended included the homescreen and app display, pinch zooming, bouncing at the end of a scrolled page, and a square shape with rounded corners. Intangible concepts like these should not be possible to patent under U.S. law.

The great American dream is to come up from nothing, work hard or be smart enough to develop a new, desirable product, and reap the monetary rewards. Apple has set a precedent of blocking the path of the entrepreneur with patents and lawsuits over technicalities that smaller companies wouldn’t be able to afford to legally battle.

But now Apple has reached a time in which greed and monopoly over the market is slowing innovation. Apple is too busy squabbling over rounded corners and patent infringement to recognize that more can be accomplished by sharing new ideas and building on them than by hoarding them away.

In 2011, iPhone sales grew 142 percent, and iPad sales grew 183 percent. Apple’s 2011 record third quarter net profit was 7.31 billion. Clearly, Apple will have an abundance of income regardless of Samsung’s success. But if there is no less expensive alternative in the market, Apple will be free to jack up prices to its heart’s content.
If roadblocks like Apple’s patenting of minute details and general ideas becomes a common practice, making a start and moving forward in the American economy will become even more difficult. And if companies like Samsung are edged out of the game, there will be no competition, no drive to make a superior product. And that would be a disservice to technology consumers.

Boesak Discusses Justice, Peace: Wilson Lecture Hosts Anti-Apartheid Leader

Rev. Dr. Allan Boesak speaks at the Wilson Lecture on Oct.4. Photo by Olivia Stephenson

By Devin Corbitt

Chair of the Western Cape region of the African National Conference; President of the World Alliance of Reformed Churches; founder of the United Democratic Front; and leader of South Africa’s anti-apartheid movement: these are just a few of the many accomplishments achieved throughout the life of Rev. Dr. Allan Boesak. He currently serves as an Extraordinary Professor of Public Theology at the University of Stellenbosch and chair of the Advisory Council of the Trans-Atlantic Roundtable on Religion and Race.

Boesak was invited to speak as the feature of this year’s Wilson Lecture. He delivered the morning’s chapel address, entitled “Quietly Bringing Justice.” He was introduced by Dr. Walt Herbert, Professor Emeritus of Southwestern.

“I trust you will find Allan’s message inspiring and instructive,” Herbert said. “It is an honor to welcome him to Southwestern.”

That afternoon, Boesak gave a lecture on “‘The Glory that is not Steeped in Blood’: War and Peace in a Globalized World”. His focus revolved around the causes and solutions to war in our current society.

“The presence of war is the one enduring constant in the developing history of the human kind, it seems,” Boesak said. “E­ven as enlightened science brought us new possibilities for meaningful life such as we have never seen before, our capacity for creating death has become even more resourceful.”

Boesak rejects the notion of war being the answer to conflict, preferring instead a more peaceful approach.

“I enter this discussion as a Christian liberation theologian from the global South,” Boesak said. “The tradition I revere and try to live by is a tradition of non-violence, even in resistance. I do not believe that violence, in the long run, can offer any lasting solution.”

In keeping with his anti-apartheid views, Boesak discussed historical wars through the lens of colonialism and racism. Through this, Boesak endeavored to show that war, in its most basic form, is apt to do more harm than good.

“The exterminations of the so-called ‘lower races’ were seen as a biological, political and economic necessity. And in these wars of brutality, accountability and proportionate response, our so-called measure of strength, did not exist. From early on in modern times, colonial wars were the experimental field of extinction.”

Boesak argues that it is impossible to hide the truths of war, especially in an era so rich in technology.The only solution, in his opinion, is to end war altogether and move toward a peaceful state in which equality reigns.

“In a globalized world, it is no longer possible to fully hide the consequences of war,” Boesak said. “We must, in communities and within and among nations, continue to encourage the search for non-violent solutions to vexing problems. All you have to do is to bring justice, even quietly.”
Boesak’s visit was sponsored by the Departments of History, Political Science, and Religion; the International Studies Program; the Golabal Citizens Fund; the Slover Fund and the Wilson Lectureship.