Occuppy Wall Street: Occupy Movement Battles Injustice or Protestors’ Anger Misdirected

Injustice

What began on Sept. 17, when the anti-consumerist organization AdBusters called for the occupation of Wall Street, has expanded to a global movement with similar protests advocating everything from holding corrupt speculators accountable for the gamble of investment banking to advocating more environmental protection, to placing limits on lobbyists’ monetary influence on representatives, and to equal opportunities for women.

For most people, the Occupy Wall Street movement appears to have sprung seemingly from nowhere, with sudden widespread protests against the corporate influence in American politics and the level with which Wall Street bankers can gamble with depositors’ money, and to a larger extent, with the entire economy.

Although police thought the protestors would quickly leave, that has not been the case, and there have been many conflicts between protesters and police wishing to at least temporarily clear them out of public areas.

However, despite all of the excitement surrounding the sudden emergence of these protesters and the polarizing reactions to them, there still remains a great deal of confusion both in commentators’ remarks about them and within the movement itself as to what goals the movement is working towards. This is because, one month after it caught the country by surprise, the Occupy Wall Street protest is still entirely leaderless despite being on the threshold of becoming what many commentators refer to as a political force similar in magnitude to the Tea Party of 2009.

It would seem that if there is any common thread to the erratic protests, it would be that protesters are upset that the divisive political rhetoric in this country has aligned people against each other, and that people who are upset with the political system in this country should begin to speak for themselves instead of having politicians speak for them.

It has also allowed people of differing political ideologies, such as socialists and libertarians, to begin discussing possible solutions to the corruption in American politics and economics instead of only apathetically accepting the corruption.
Public figures have found that it is both convenient and undemanding to apply divisive labels against each other. Politicians have tapped into this broad anger to ensure re-election, which keeps people attacking each other instead of addressing any of the issues at hand.

Ever since the general de-regulation of the financial market in the 1980’s and especially with the repeal of the Glass-Steagall Act in 1999, Wall Street investment firms began to gamble with depositors’ money that was formerly held in commercial banks. Many economists attribute this to be the cause of the severity of the financial downturns since 2007.

It is necessary to open up respectful discussion in this country in order to fashion a better future. People have a right to stand up for what they believe in, and, if it means bringing attention to a corrupt oligarchy in which the wealthiest Americans are protected by corporate greed and lobbyists who ensure that the political barricade is held up by money, then by all means, people must fight and continue to fight against oppression.

From this simple cause, to eliminate the influence of money in politics, an entirely new country can be born.

Anger
The Occupy Wall Street protest that originally began in New York City to little media attention has quickly ballooned into a media spectacle with protests across the globe, fueled largely in part by such online networking sites as Twitter and Facebook. Some have even compared this protest against the economy to recent revolutions, such as the one in Egypt.

Capturing the attention of people nationwide, Occupy Wall Street has been hailed as the movement of the decade. But despite all of the hype, it has not accomplished anything.

Business owners are the foundation of America. The feared one percent is simply a misunderstood parent; a martyr for the common good that must suffer so that the 99 percent can vent their misunderstood anxiety.

The banks and traders making their living on Wall Street not only create wealth for themselves, but they also provide an opportunity for wealth for many middle-class families. In the panic caused by the collapse of the financial market, these families have forgotten where the banks got the money in the first place: the public.

There were not any Occupy Wall Street movements when college tuition was being paid by these sleazy economic tactics, and it is only after it has failed that people are upset. These protestors have only themselves to blame.

In addition to misplacing blame, this movement also misplaces its purpose. The Occupy Wall Street protests have no goals. They have nothing that they are trying to accomplish. It seems that all they want to do is get attention.

Pictures and videos of stories from behind the lines tell tales not of change, but of unruly behavior and public displays of aggression against police cars.
Many people wonder where this movement started. It appears to be a great story: a grass roots American movement to demand corporate responsibility; a liberal response to the conservative Tea Party that will save America.

The truth is far less romantic. Occupy Wall Street was started by Canadian Political Action Committee Adbusters., whose tactics of lobbying, public manipulation, and dirty election money are the same practices that the movement is protesting against.
The protests have accomplished nothing, and they will continue to accomplish nothing as long as they protest to people who have no control.

A few bankers cannot be held responsible for the problems of the entire economy. The actions of a few bankers cannot derail the entire economy. If these protestors want reform, then that reform must come from the government, not the tycoons.

Superhero Movies Swooping In Influx of Superhero Movies to Create a Profit or for Fans’ Benefit

Superhero movies based on comic-book superstars have become some of the most popular movies on the market, as well as with products and games that are marketed out as well. They have been gaining more and more financial success over recent years, and have also been released in much greater numbers as more and more filmmakers seek to profit from the massively growing fan-base.

Although some fans complain about critics’ disdain for superhero movies, more superhero movies receive positive reviews than ones that receive negative reviews. However, some critics are also beginning to identify films such as “The Dark Knight” and “Iron Man” as the peak of the golden age in superhero cinema of the past decade, and expect somewhat of a decline in interest.

However, this summer alone, the box office successes were dominated by movies like “Thor” and “Captain America” with each movie gaining millions of dollars in publicity and merchandising. Many fans are excited for these products, although it is sometimes unclear whether it is hype for the heroes themselves or for “The Avengers” film Marvel has scheduled for next summer.

Marvel needed to release these movies in order to introduce major players in “The Avengers” plot so that fans will be familiar with them before next summer.
Rival comic company DC is also cashing in on the superhero fan base. While not receiving a great response this summer to “Green Lantern,” they are preparing for greater success next summer with the planned release of “The Dark Knight Rises” the long awaited conclusion to Christopher Nolan’s trilogy.

In 2012 the box office will be filled with superhero movies. The most highly anticipated are “The Avengers,” “The Dark Knight Rises,” a third “Iron Man” movie and a new reboot by Marvel of the “Spiderman” franchise.

Superhero movies are definitely popular in today’s growing economic climate.

“I think superheroes can give people hope that there is still good out there in the world even though in reality they don’t exist.” one student said. “I think superheroes represent a lot out in the world today and I don’t see them going away anytime soon.”

Exhibit Fuses Art and Technology

The art exhibition Full Circle celebrates the intertwining of art and technology using rapid prototyping and its evolution from 2003 to the present.

“Full Circle started for me in the 1990s when I started working with a computer,” artist and professor Mary Visser said. “I was doing the Brown Symposium and they had one of the first Macs here [at the university]… and they had a wonderful graphic of a Japanese woman on it, and I thought, ‘You can do that with a pixel?’ I was hooked.”

Visser wasn’t the only artist intrigued by the artistic possibilities of computers and the Internet. She soon found DAAP, a community of sculptors, artists, and architects who created in an online world supplied by the 3D virtual reality platform Active Worlds.

“First we were just sharing files across the internet because we didn’t have a way to build any of them,” Visser said.

This all changed in the early 2000s with the invention of a new technology called rapid prototyping.

Basically, a rapid prototyping machine uses a digital line drawing made up of 900,000 tiny triangles as a template for creating a tangible version of a digitally created sculpture. The machine rolls a fine layer of some sort of powdered resin over a surface, and wherever the triangles make a point on the line drawing, the computer tells lasers to fuse that resin. This is called selective laser centering and it allows for extremely detailed work that’s impossible to achieve using mediums like wax or clay.

 

“[Rapid prototyping] offers the sculptor a different way of thinking. You’re not limited by gravity and you’re not limited by reality… You can have imagination, you don’t have to be real,” Visser said.

Full Circle celebrates this new way of creating and the artists who pioneered it. The exhibit is on display in the Fine Arts Gallery until November 9.

Students Utilize Extra Funding Source

There are several funds and grants that students can obtain to help fund creative projects, activities, events, trips, and other academic endeavors. Some of these include Community Chest, Emergency Funding, King Creativity Fund, and the McMichael Student Experience Enrichment Fund.

“Our sense is that the school’s willingness to monetarily assist motivated and eager groups such as ours shows the SU commitment to creativity and independent thinking,” Coach and Paideia professor Don Gregory said.

The McMichael fund is quickly approaching its application deadline. On November 11, applications are due for projects that meet the requirements of enrichment and diversity.

The McMichael fund is available for both co-curricular and extra-curricular opportunities that encourage students to be leaders, push towards a betterment of society, and enrich the lives of the SU community as a whole.

“A wide, ever-changing, variety of student projects are funded each year including travel to conferences and/or competitions for student organizations and the hosting of an on-campus events that enhance SU’s student life,” student life advisor Derek Timourian said.

The program is supported through a gift from alumna Sue Mood McMichael in honor of her husband, William A. McMichael. Each student awarded a grant is normally eligible for up to $800 for funding for direct expenses only or up to $2,400 for a group of 3 or more for the same experience.

“If one group is showing a passion to host a tremendous event, then the reward ought to go to the individuals willing to go beyond mere learning,” Gregory said.

In 2010-2011, 15 proposals were submitted for three different deadlines. Thirteen of those 15 proposals were approved and awarded funds that totaled $15,000.

Two projects were approved after the first deadline for the present semester. Those projects included two students attending the Collegiate Leadership Network Challenge in San Antonio, which was coordinated by the National Hispanic Institute, and a delegation of 8 students representing SU’s Model UN Club at the Model Organization of American States Conference hosted by St. Mary’s University in San Antonio.

“The McMichael Grant enabled our team to attend our first conference in 2009 and has been instrumental in continuing to fund our regional competition experiences as we are a two year old organization,” Model UN president Kate Hayden said.
With the help and support of the McMichael grants and other SU funding, the Model UN team has come back from competitions with four “outstanding delegate” awards and have become more integrated in the regional Model UN circuit.

One current project anticipating the deadline is Gregory’s Paideia cohort that is titled “Coping with Social Responsibility.” As seniors this year, they are looking to fund a symposium of speakers with the intention of presenting to the SU community a culmination of their studies from the past two and a half years on human trafficking.

“We are inviting to experts in the field of human trafficking and its origins to present to the overall SU community what we have studied and researched,” Gregory said.

“Our group has embraced the task of writing and submitting proposals. The energy is high, and the focus is on putting together an outstanding event for the school and local community.”

To those who meet the requirements of the grant, the money is a wonderful resource. However, there are many other projects and endeavors happening around the community that can benefit from funds that seem to be unaware they are available.

“It was in conversations with people across campus I respect very much that the resources available became a reality,” Gregory said. “We learned of the King Creativity, the D.E.C., Community Chest, among others. None of my coaching responsibilities or teaching duties has taken me into the school sponsored fund-raising. This is my first go with the McMichael.”

While the first deadline for applications is November 11, future applications will again be accepted for deadlines later this year.

Civil Rights Curbed for National Security

President Obama’s declaration of an end of the war in Iraq marks a significant new step in relations between the United States and Iraq. It is not the withdrawal in and of itself which will be deemed a success in the long run, but how the two nations proceed forward during Iraq’s newfound autonomy.

Opponents claim that withdrawal from Iraq opens an opportunity for Iran to impose itself on the affairs of Iraq, and that Iraq could fall into civil war without U.S. troop presence.

However, this decision was ultimately made with the cooperation between the U.S. and Iraq. Iraqis had been calling for U.S. withdrawal for a long time, including Iraqi members of parliament that are firmly anti-Iranian. An open and independent Iraqi government in the end was supportive of U.S. withdrawal.

Although Iran has influence in the country, the U.S. does as well. Iraq is increasingly shutting down Iranian militia groups near the Iranian border and has claimed that any attack on U.S. troops would be considered an attack on Iraq as well.

They have further become one of the world’s largest purchasers of U.S. military equipment. This indicates a partnership between the two countries which does not necessitate U.S. troops occupying the country.

Iraqis never believed that U.S. troops in Iraq would deter Iran. Keeping a residual force may have actually had the opposite effect of promoting increased recruitment to Iranian extremist groups.

The overall security of the country has also improved dramatically, with attacks decreasing more and more as responsibility is increasingly given instead to the Iraqi military and police forces for its protection.

The basis of many extremist groups to attack U.S. and Iraqi troops has become less and less relevant as U.S. troops have left Iraqi cities over the years and now are preparing to leave entirely. Forcing Iraqis to let foreign troops stay would have had long-term repercussions in the encouragement of extremist groups and the worsening of relations between the two countries.

Although insurgents will continue rebelling and the government still needs to stabilize the political system, these problems would continue regardless of U.S. troop presence. Active relations outside of occupation are necessary for Iraq to handle these long-term problems.

The Strategic Framework Agreement (SFA), passed in 2008 under President George W. Bush, sets the basis for international relations with Iraq, tying the countries together through both trade and security. The SFA provides initiatives for counterterrorism and defense.

The withdrawal will therefore strengthen ties with the Iraqi military and will not terminate cooperation between the two countries. The withdrawal instead is a step towards assimilating Iraq into the global market.

Moving forward, the end of the Iraq war should be seen as a beginning to strengthened relations. Many Iraqis know nothing of Americans outside of the context of the war. Seeing the war come to an end, they will be able to focus instead on strengthening relations rather than disseminating divisive sentiments with regards to the occupation.

This is an honorable end to the war which can increase cooperation going into the future.

Students Anticipate “Inheritance” Release

Curtesy Google Images.

The final and long-awaited installment in Christopher Paolini’s “Inheritance” series will be released November 8,
after years in hiatus following the 2008 release of “Brisingr”, the third book. As students and other fans of all ages line up at Barnes & Noble stores both in Austin and across the world, midnight release parties are expected to be in full swing before the first copy is sold.

“I really look forward to the book release,” first-year student Jon Sigurdsson said. “It’s been a long time coming. I started the series when I was about fourteen and the last book has been over three years in the making.”

Paolini has announced that the fourth novel, named “Inheritance” after the series features a new, male green dragon with an unknown rider and various deaths. He has also teased readers with spoilers like “a one-sided game of knucklebones, an evil assassin, bags of flour, a water-born battering ram, streets lined with lead and a knife in the back.” The book will also feature the alchemist, Angela, who will play a more prominent role than in previous stories.

“There is a lot more to Angela than meets the eye,” Paolini said. “If you like her, you’re in for a treat with Book Four. Angela gets several crowning moments of awesomeness therein.”

Readers will also finally meet Galbatorix, along with multiple new characters.

“I’m excited for both fresh characters and reappearing familiar ones. Considering the gap between the books, anyone is going to seem fresh at this point either way,” first year Hallie Harrison said. “The long time it’s taken to release the fourth book could just be attributed to writers block, or perhaps he wanted to build suspense. Who knows?”

Paolini began writing at age 15 and self-published the first book years later.

Students Address Council

This week, a group of concerned students lead by junior Colin Berr gave presentations to the campus community and to the Georgetown City Council concerning the lack of public transportation in Georgetown. Berr was motivated to form the organization “S.U. Students for Public Transit” following a year spent in Germany.

“After a great study abroad experience in Germany, my eyes were really opened to the possibilities of public transit and what it can do for a community,” Berr said to the city council.

Berr and fellow speakers Grayson Edwards and Brandee Knight were joined at the council meeting by fellow members of S.U. Students for Public Transit, other students and Georgetown citizens.

The presenters outlined the ways in which public transportation would benefit the city.  Berr asserted that the economic benefits.

“According to statistics from the American Public Transit Association, or APTA, individuals in the city who switch to public transportation from automobile use can save about $819 monthly. That adds up to about $10,000 a year,” Berr said.

In addition to the economic benefits, Berr, Edwards, and Knight spoke of the ways in which public transportation can save lives, dispelled myths surrounding public transportation, and explained why they believed that Georgetown needs public transit.

The presentation to the campus and city council represents the first step in attempting to bring public transit to Georgetown. Going forward, organizers will need to cultivate continued public support and convince the council that an investment in public transportation is money well-spent.

 

Wizard World hosts Austin Comic Con: Convention Returns for Second Year, Showcases Art, Pop Culture

Austin Comic Con, hosted by Wizard World, returns to the Austin Convention Center for the second year in a row November 11 to November 13.

The name ‘Comic Con’ is often associated with San Diego Comic-Con International, the most well-known of the comic book conventions, but the Wizard World made its fair bid for popularity with Wizard World Chicago, second only to San Diego in sheer attendance numbers.

This convergence of pop culture and population brings in people from all over and showcases a variety of well-known guests, fun events, celebrity panels and booths selling comics, graphic novels, anime, merchandise, and other collectible items.

Bringing fans of all ages and interests into one convention center, the Austin Comic Con features writers, artists, actors, games, contests and photo-ops.

“Two of my best friends went to Austin Comic Con last year and they’ve gotten me really intereseted in going,” said sophomore Ashley Scott. “They had a lot of fun and I can’t wait to go with them this year! It’s going to be great!”

This year, the convention brings guests such as Hayden Pantettiere, Adam Baldwin, Kevin Sorbo, four members of the cast of “Buffy: The Vampire Slayer” and many more well-known people, including Academy Award Winner Louis Gossett Jr.

Comic creators Marv Wolfman, Bill Sienkiewicz, Kevin Maguire, and others will be in attendance to meet fans, sign autographs and create sketches. Phil Ortiz, five-time Emmy winning animator, will also be on hand to “Simpsonize” people. There will also be a reunion between four of the children who starred in the original “Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory” for the movie’s 40th anniversary.

The Dealer’s Room contains many booths and tables where toys, apparel and other kinds of merchandise can be bought with either cash or credit, depending on the vendor.

The Artist Alley features different artists that have come to sell their artwork or commissions of your requested character, game or movie.

The convention encourages people to come in costume.

Information about purchasing tickets and the convention in general can be found on the Comic Con website, http://www.wizardworldcomiccon.com/home-tx.html.

SU Splash! Offers Students Opportunity to Share Passions

SU Splash! allows students to share their passions with participants from local high schools by teaching interactive classes on whatever interesting subject they can come up with. Splash! is a day-long program that aims to change perspectives, builds relationships, and lets everyone involved try something new.

“Is there something you just geek-out about? You learn everything about it and it’s just something you love. This is the opportunity to share it with people,” Splash! administrator Elizabeth Grenadier said.

The topics don’t necessarily have to be academic or even applicable to a job. Other programs have included classes like “How Pokémon Changed the World,” “Ukulele,” and “Lucid Dreaming.”

Sophomore Jacob Brown taught a class last year called “Making Sense: The Poetry of Nonsense” about a non-AP approach to analyzing and appreciating poetry.

“It was exciting putting it together,” Brown said. “It was the first time I had ever written or drafted a course plan. That was definitely a good experience for me. In general it was a really satisfying thing, having put together a class, having it run and having students be interested in the things you’re interested in.”

Splash! programs exist at universities all over the nation, including MIT, Yale and University of Chicago, but it was only last year that sophomore Kavita Singh got together with Grenadier and Brown to bring a similar program to Southwestern.

“Last year we had no budget, as in we had no money. [Singh] actually brought up the idea of having a Splash! at the end of January. We had a program by April, so that’s four months to establish relationships with high schools, to recruit teachers from [Southwestern], and to organize how we were even going to have this day,” said Grenadier.

For the first SU Splash, Singh, Grenadier and Brown only recruited from Georgetown High School. Ultimately, 20 students showed up.

For the upcoming program in February, they hope to have 100 high school students attend by recruiting from five high schools in Georgetown and Round Rock.

They have also received a King’s Creativity Grant for $1,500 in order to create a more cohesive, full-day program, rather than just offering a small collection of sporadic classes. All they need now are the people to make it run.

“This is as big a time commitment as you want it to be,” Singh said. “A class doesn’t take a terribly large amount of time to teach, but even if you just wanted to come over for 30 minutes and meet some high school students, check them in, and hand them their Splash schedules, that’s great.”

Teachers have until the end of the term to register their classes. Volunteers are welcome any time.

“If you’re unsure about teaching this year and you want to see what it’s all about, come and volunteer. You’ll get to see the day, maybe sit in on a class, and next year maybe work up the courage to put yourself out there and teach that thing that you love,” Singh said.

For more information about SU Splash! visit susplash.learningu.org, come to one of the administrator meetings held every Thursday at 5 p.m. on the second floor of Prothro or email Kavita Singh at southwesternsplash@gmail.com.

Iraq Withdraw

President Obama’s declaration of an end of the war in Iraq marks a significant new step in relations between the United States and Iraq. It is not the withdrawal in and of itself which will be deemed a success in the long run, but how the two nations proceed forward during Iraq’s newfound autonomy.

Opponents claim that withdrawal from Iraq opens an opportunity for Iran to impose itself on the affairs of Iraq, and that Iraq could fall into civil war without U.S. troop presence.

However, this decision was ultimately made with the cooperation between the U.S. and Iraq. Iraqis had been calling for U.S. withdrawal for a long time, including Iraqi members of parliament that are firmly anti-Iranian. An open and independent Iraqi government in the end was supportive of U.S. withdrawal.

Although Iran has influence in the country, the U.S. does as well. Iraq is increasingly shutting down Iranian militia groups near the Iranian border and has claimed that any attack on U.S. troops would be considered an attack on Iraq as well. They have further become one of the world’s largest purchasers of U.S. military equipment. This indicates a partnership between the two countries which does not necessitate U.S. troops occupying the country.

Iraqis never believed that U.S. troops in Iraq would deter Iran. Keeping a residual force may have actually had the opposite effect of promoting increased recruitment to Iranian extremist groups.

The overall security of the country has also improved dramatically, with attacks decreasing more and more as responsibility is increasingly given instead to the Iraqi military and police forces for its protection. The basis of many extremist groups to attack U.S. and Iraqi troops has become less and less relevant as U.S. troops have left Iraqi cities over the years and now are preparing to leave entirely. Forcing Iraqis to let foreign troops stay would have had long-term repercussions in the encouragement of extremist groups and the worsening of relations between the two countries.

Although insurgents will continue rebelling and the government still needs to stabilize the political system, these problems would continue regardless of U.S. troop presence. Active relations outside of occupation are necessary for Iraq to handle these long-term problems.

The Strategic Framework Agreement (SFA), passed in 2008 under President George W. Bush, sets the basis for international relations with Iraq, tying the countries together through both trade and security. The SFA provides initiatives for counterterrorism and defense. The withdrawal will therefore strengthen ties with the Iraqi military and will not terminate cooperation between the two countries. The withdrawal instead is a step towards assimilating Iraq into the global market.

Moving forward, the end of the Iraq war should be seen as a beginning to strengthened relations. Many Iraqis know nothing of Americans outside of the context of the war. Seeing the war come to an end, they will be able to focus instead on strengthening relations rather than disseminating divisive sentiments with regards to the occupation. This is an honorable end to the war which can increase cooperation going into the future.

Students Anticipate the Release of New Skyrim Game

Tonight at midnight, students waiting anxiously in line at Gamestops everywhere will see the first sales of what may just be the Game of the Year, as Bethesda’s Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim is finally released.

“I’m getting it as soon as it comes out,” first-year Marion Clendenen said. “It’s been years in the making, so Bethesda has taken so long to develop Skyrim’s storyline that I have faith the game will be awesome.”

That storyline centers on civil war in the mountainous land, as its empire falls and dragons return to destroy its cities. Five of these are large, main areas, while 15 minor villages can also be explored.

“The game play and the graphics are going to be unreal,” sophomore Jake Balderama said. “But I’m most excited for the storyline and the vastness of the world that Bethesda built for the sake of the fifth installment of the Elder Scrolls.”

This installment features multiple improvements from earlier Elder Scrolls games, like Morrowind or Oblivion. Dual wielding is a new ability, where each hand can equip its own weapon. Fresh combat advantages like this are complimented by a new, simpler leveling system and journal interface.

“The game is definitely a complex of improvements from Oblivion, a game that was great in itself,” first-year Nick Kellogg said.

The graphics of the new world of Skyrim were a main focus for the Bethesda team, and their hard work shows in everything from the falling snow of the mountaintops to the multiple new options for facial structure when designing a character.

“I got to play a version of the game early on xBox Live,” Kellogg said. “The graphics are astounding. Looking up at the sky in-game is just like looking up when you’re outside.”

Despite so many changes Bethesda has made to improve the style of the series, its tried-and-true ‘open-world’ theme has not been tampered with.

Skyrim offers the familiar freedom of choice and open-ended game play that the company is famous for, as in the Fallout series and previous Elder Scrolls releases.

“Bethesda’s progress in the Fallout games speaks for their potential to keep improving, so I know the graphics of Skyrim will be even better than Oblivion’s. The snowy mountains of this new land should be much more engaging than summery Oblivion, because the harsh weather is more realistic. The map is expected to be much easier to navigate, as well.”

Any place on the map is open to exploration, any rumor available to be chased—the main quest does not hamper a player’s freedom to wander, as so many students will do when they get their hands on the anticipated game at 12:01 Friday morning.
Many students are excited for the midnight release of this highly anticipated game.

“Skyrim is going to be the Game of the Year,” Balderama said. “It encompasses over 250 hours of game play, and the fact that you can face dragons in their entirety is awesome. I’m very excited about the release.”

Theatre Department to Perform “The 1940’s Radio Hour”

November 16 through the 19, Southwestern students have the opportunity to come experience mid-century America re-created in our theatre department’s production of “The 1940’s Radio Hour”.

“If you don’t like having fun, you shouldn’t come,” junior Robert Frost said.
Frost is serving as the musical director for the production. He said that audiences are sure to enjoy the authentic look and feel of the play, which is set, as the title might imply, at a radio station in New York during the year 1942.

“Audiences will have the chance to see us re-create an era in a very accurate and realistic way,” Frost continued.

The process of putting on this play has included many accommodations to historical accuracy. Efforts to help audiences feel as if they are living during another decade include a live band which will be playing during the show.

“It’s been a blast,” Frost said, “We’re actually working with someone who played on Broadway during the 1940s and 50s, and who has worked with many shows like ours.”

The band and cast will be performing many of the musical numbers that make up the Dec. 23 holiday broadcast of the New York radio station WOV, the main focus of the plot. The story follows the station’s attempts to put together a live broadcast which will be heard by audiences at home and by the troops fighting overseas.

“This show is mainly character driven, as people see we’re putting on a radio show as soon as they walk in the door,” assistant stage manager Kristen Samuelson said.

“I think what’s really interesting about the show is the fact that it’s mainly focused on relationships between characters and not on the plot. These relationships are really interesting to watch.”

The play will be showing in the Jones Theater, beginning Wednesday, Nov. 16. Wednesday and Thursday there are showings at 7 p.m. and Friday Saturday the show starts at 8 p.m.

Saturday and Sunday there will be afternoon matinee performances at 3 p.m.

Students are entitled to one free ticket each, which can be collected at the box office in the FAB.