Office of the Provost

Faculty Notables

April 2014

  • Dustin Tahmahkera, assistant professor of communication studies, has been invited by the National Endowment for the Humanities to serve as a reviewer in its Digital Humanities Implementation Grants program in Washington, D.C. Tahmahkera will review proposals for the use of innovative technologies in indigenous communities and sound studies.

  • Josh Long, assistant professor of environmental studies, presented a paper at the Association of American Geographers conference that was held in Tampa, Fla., April 8-12. His paper was titled “Smart Growth and the Neoliberal Sustainability Narrative: The Case of Austin.”

  • Alison Kafer, associate professor of feminist studies, co-edited a special issue of Disability Studies Quarterly with Michelle Jarman from the University of Wyoming. The issue, titled “Growing Disability Studies: Politics of Access, Politics of Collaboration,” features 12 essays on the future of the field from undergraduates, graduate students, faculty and independent scholars. The table of contents is available here and Jarman and Kafer’s introduction is available here.

  • Shana Bernstein, associate professor of history, was an invited participant on a “Race and the Cold War” State of the Field round table session at the Organization of American Historians conference in Atlanta April 11. The session was one of only seven State of the Field panels at the conference, which was attended by thousands of historians.

  • Helene Meyers, professor of English and McManis University Chair, gave an invited lecture titled “Reel and Novel Jews: A Feminist and Queer Renaissance” at Vassar April 3. Read more here.

  • Eric Selbin, professor of political science and University Scholar, spoke to the United States Embassies in Armenia, Azerbaijan and Ukraine about “The Power of Story and Social Change” as part of the U.S. State Department Virtual Lecture Series. 

  • Emily Northrop, associate professor of economics, presented a paper titled “Promoting Economic Growth and Climate Change in ECON 100” at a meeting of the Association for Institutionalist Thought, which met under the auspices of the Western Social Science Association Annual Conference held in Albuquerque, New Mexico, April 2-5.

  • Thomas Howe, professor of art history, was the lead presenter at a lecture titled “The Rebirth of a Roman Luxury Resort: Recent Archaeological Discoveries at The Seaside Villas at Stabia”that was held at the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia April 8. The lecture was held in conjunction with the institute’s exhibit titled “One Day in Pompeii,” which runs through April 27. Read more here.

  • Mary Visser, professor of art and holder of the Herman Brown Chair, has work in the exhibition “Momentum: Women/Art/Technology,” which will be on display at Arizona State University’s Night Gallery April 4-27. The exhibit features the work of 20 contemporary women artists and is being held in conjunction with Momentum: Women/Art/Technology, a global community of women who embrace technology as their mode of expression.

  • Bob Snyder, professor of political science, presented two papers, “The Arab Uprising and the Persistence of Monarchy” and “Ideology and International Conflict” at the International Studies Association’s annual conference in Toronto last week. He also participated on a roundtable that discussed the book Lessons from the Northern Ireland Peace Process, in which he has a chapter.

  • Laura Senio Blair, associate professor of Spanish, has earned a place in the 2014 NEH Summer Seminar on Jewish Buenos Aires, to be held in Buenos Aires between July 7-24. The seminar will focus on major texts in 20th century Jewish culture as it has played out in the context of immigration and assimilation in Buenos Aires, Argentina, the major center of Jewish culture in Latin America. Through a detailed examination of these works as literary texts that interpret the Jewish experience in Buenos Aires, the seminar will provide participants with an important grounding in this important dimension of ethnic culture in Argentina and, by implication, in other Latin American societies.

  • Brenda Sendejo, assistant professor of anthropology, had an essay titled “Methodologies of the Spirit: Reclaiming Guadalupe and Discovering Tonantzin Within and Beyond the Walls of Academia” published by the University of Arizona Press this month in the anthology, Fleshing the Spirit: Spirituality in Chicana/Latina/Indigeous Women’s Lives.

  • Eric Selbin, professor of political science & University Scholar, participated in a roundtable at the International Studies Association titled “Resistance as a Strategy for Peace and Justice?” He also co-chaired the annual Editorial Board meeting of the book series he co-edits for Rowman & Littlefield, New Millennium Books in International Relations.

  • Michael Saenger, associate professor of English, has been invited to deliver the first keynote address at an international Shakespeare conference hosted by the Institute of Modern Languages Research at the University of London. The conference, titled “Adapting, Performing & Reviewing Shakespearean Comedy in a European Context,” will draw attendees from across Europe and beyond. His talk will concern the role of language and genre in mediating Shakespeare in the modern world.

  • Valerie Renegar, associate professor of communication studies, was one of the spotlight scholars at Texas State University’s 26th Annual Communication Week March 24-28. Renegar gave a talk on March 24 titled “Rhetoric and Social Criticism: Imagining the Future.”

  • Alison Kafer, associate professor of feminist studies, is giving a talk at Ohio State University April 3. The talk, titled “Un/Safe Disclosures,” offers a disability studies reading of safe space, “trigger warnings,” and trauma. While at OSU, she will lead a workshop on incorporating disability and disability studies into course syllabi and developing accessible pedagogy. 

  • Eileen Cleere, professor of English, chaired two panels and delivered a paper at the Interdisciplinary Nineteenth-Century Studies Conference in Houston March 27-30. Her talk, “Resuscitating Ruskin: Race Culture as Aesthetic Culture at the fin de siècle,” was drawn from the final chapter of her forthcoming book, The Sanitary Arts: Aesthetic Culture and the Victorian Cleanliness Campaigns. Cleere also served on the Program Committee for the conference.

  • Erika Berroth, associate professor of German, was invited to write the introduction to Gernot Blume’s new volume of poetry, Redewendungen, Gedichte aus den Jahren 2012/13. Blume,a contemporary German poet, ethnomusicologist, composer, singer, musician, multicultural improviser and multi-instrumentalist has gained international recognition for his complex body of work. Germanists are particularly delighted with his Dichterlieder compositions that breathe new life into German classics like Friedrich Hölderlin, Heinrich Heine, Rainer Maria Rilke, Hermann Hesse and Hildegard von Bingen. The volume is scheduled for publication in fall 2014.

March 2014

  • Melissa Johnson, associate professor of anthropology, has had her article titled “Creolized Conservation: A Belizean Creole Community Encounters a Wildlife Sanctuary” accepted for publication in Anthropological Quarterly. It will appear in an issue in late 2014 or early 2015.

  • A paper written by Romi Burks, professor of biology, and seven others who have been involved with the SMArT program was published in Science Education and Civic Engagement: An International Journal. The paper is titled “Staying SMArT: Introduction, Reflection, and Assessment of an Inquiry-based Afterschool Science Program for Elementary School Students.” Other authors of the paper were Anna Frankel, Meredith Liebl, Megan Lowther, Amanda Mohammed, Erica Navaira, Kate Roberts and former staff member Suzy Pukys. The paper is available here.

  • Shana Bernstein, associate professor of history, presented a paper on March 15 at the American Society of Environmental History conference in San Francisco. The paper is titled “The Garbage Ladies of the Settlements: Environmental Health in Progressive-Era Chicago.” 

  • Eric Selbin, University Scholar and professor of political science, was one of three scholars interviewed by the Iranian journal Andisheh Pouya (Dynamic Thought) for their March year-end review. The article is titled “Protest, it’s my business: To which direction are social movements rising from the new middle class going?” 

  • Alison Kafer, associate professor of feminist studies, delivered the inaugural Longmore Lecture at San Francisco State University March 11. Kafer’s talk, “Crip Relations: Critical Disability Studies Now,” marked the opening of the Paul K. Longmore Papers at the SFSU library and was sponsored by the Longmore Institute for Disability Studies. While in the Bay Area, she also gave a reading from her book, Feminist, Queer, Crip at the University of California-Berkeley. On March 13, Kafer delivered the keynote address at the University of Redlands’ undergraduate women’s and gender studies conference. Her talk, “Future Coalitions,” was based on findings from her book.  

  • Alisa Gaunder, professor of political science, participated in a Feb. 25 webinar titled “Connected Classrooms: Bringing Students Together Through Small Group Videoconferencing” that was organized by the Associated Colleges of the South. The webinar and a written summary of it can be found here.

  • Erin Crockett, assistant professor of psychology, co-authored a paper that was published in a recent issue of the journal Infancy. The paper is titled “Maternal Disrupted Communication during Face-to-face Interaction at Four Months: Relation to Maternal and Infant Cortisol Among At-Risk Families.

  • Michael Bray, associate professor of philosophy, had an article titled “El Estado Somos Todos, El Pueblo Soy Yo? − On Chavismo and the Necessity of the Leader,” published in the new issue of Theory & Event.

  • Erika Berroth, associate professor of German, is the recipient of the 2014 Coalition of Women in German (WIG) Faculty Research Award. The award recognizes and supports projects that address a significant topic with demonstrated relevance to German Studies informed by a feminist perspective. Preference is given to projects that engage the intersections of gender with other categories such as sexuality, class, race, ethnicity, religion and citizenship. Berroth is working on a book about the contemporary German author Marica Bodrožić, winner of the European Union Prize for Literature in 2013. Hester Baer, president of WIG, notes the relevance of Berroth’s research project to feminist work in the context of transnational aesthetics, representations of economic transformations in East-Central Europe, and environmental implications in the literature of migration.

  • Valerie Renegar, associate professor of communication studies, co-authored a piece titled “‘When God Give you AIDS…Make Lemon-AIDS’: Ironic Persona and Perspective by Incongruity in Sarah Silverman’s Jesus is Magic’” that was published in the January/February issue of the Western Journal of Communication.

  • Traci Giuliano, professor of psychology, and three of her students are presenting a paper titled “Three’s a Crowd…Or is it? Examining Public Perceptions of Polyamorous Relationships” at the 2014 meeting of the Eastern Psychological Association in Boston March 13-16. The current and former students who worked with Giuliano on the paper are Kevin Hutzler, Jordan Herselman and Sarah M. Johnson.

February 2014

  • Eric Selbin, University Scholar and professor of political science, was on the Steering Committee for the 2014 Lozano Long Conference titled “Archiving the Central American Revolutions” that was held Feb. 19-21 at the Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies (LLILAS) at The University of Texas at Austin. The conference brought together scholars, activists, filmmakers, photographers and graduate students interested in Central America’s “revolutionary decades” (1970 through 1990). Selbin also moderated the conference’s closing panel on “Human Rights and Revolution in El Salvador.”

  • Valerie Renegar, associate professor of communication studies, presented a co-authored paper at the Western States Communication Association’s annual convention in Anaheim, Calif., Feb. 14-18. The paper, titled “Transferring Visual Ideographs of Abuse: A Critical Examination of Representations of Domestic Violence,” was named the Top Paper of the conference by the Organization for Research on Women and Communication. Senior communication studies major Danielle Ezzell presented a paper titled “New Masculinity, New Girl” at the Western States Undergraduate Research Conference that was held in conjunction with the convention. The paper was based on research conducted for her Communication Studies capstone project.

  • President Edward Burger is participating in a “polylogue” on digital dementia that will be held at the Texas A&M University Health Science Center College of Medicine in Round Rock on Wednesday, March 5 at 6:30 p.m. Other participants in the event include Dr. Manfred Spitzer, who is giving a March 6 talk at Southwestern on the same topic. Read more here.

  • Kerry Bechtel, professor of theatre, designed the costumes for Unity Theatre’s production of “Almost Maine,” which runs through March 2.

  • Dustin Tahmahkera, assistant professor of communication studies, has been contracted to be the educational curriculum writer for the forthcoming PBS documentary “LaDonna Harris: Indian 101,” which will directed by Julianna Brannum. The documentary will focus on the life and work of Comanche elder and activist LaDonna Harris.

  • Alison Kafer, associate professor of feminist studies, Skyped with graduate students in Rosemarie Garland-Thomson’s seminar in feminist disability studies at Emory University Feb. 19. Students in the seminar read her book Feminist, Queer, Crip as one of their course texts. 2011 graduates Siobhan Cooke and Jordan Johnson are among the students in the class. On Feb. 26, the LGBTQ/Sexualities Research Cluster at UT-Austin will host a reading and discussion of Kafer’s book with her. 

  • Alisa Gaunder, professor of political science, had a comparative book review of The Evolution of Japan’s Party System: Politics and Policy in an Era of Institutional Change edited by Leonard J. Schoppa (Toronto University Press, 2011) and Welfare Through Work: Conservative Ideas, Partisan Dynamics, and Social Protection in Japan by Mari Miura  (Cornell University Press, 2012) published in the December 2013 issue of Perspectives on Politics. Gaunder and Sarah Wiliarty, associated professor of government at Wesleyan University, are putting on a Feb. 25 webinar to discuss their successful collaboration on a course called “Germany and Japan: Losers of World War II?” The webinar is sponsored by the Associated Colleges of the South as part of its ongoing initiative to help faculty members develop “blended learning” courses that combine the best of classroom and online experiences. The course included a co-authored syllabus and lectures, paired with a series of class discussions and activities supported via Google Hangouts.

  • Lois Ferrari, professor of music, conducted the Austin Civic Orchestra in a sold-out performance of “The Planets” in the Alma Thomas Theater Feb. 1. Mark Bottorf, associate professor of physics, gave a pre-concert lecture on the planets in our solar system. Dana Zenobi, part-time assistant professor of applied music, and Nicholas Simpson, part-time instructor of applied music, sang operatic arias with the orchestra. Ferrari also supports an ongoing collaboration with music majors Mattie Kotzur and Lai Na Wang, who are both members of the ACO.

  • Erika Berroth, associate professor of German, presented a poster titled “Global Players: Leadership – Football – Intercultural Perspectives” at the 15th Annual Texas Foreign Language Education Conference held Feb. 14-15 at The University of Texas at Austin. The poster outlined the process and components of an upcoming summer experience in Germany that integrates athletic competition with intercultural learning. The conference topic, “Shaping the Future of Foreign/Second Language Education to Cross Cultural Boundaries: Integrating Theory and Practice,” provided opportunities for engaging discussions of the innovative collaboration between the football and German programs at Southwestern. At the conference, Berroth also contributed to discussions on addressing foreign language anxiety, best practices on using technologies in second language culture learning, and  teaching writing for international students.

  • Willis Weigand, associate professor and director of general chemistry labs, was profiled by the American Chemical Society as part of its series on “Chemists in the Real World.” Read the profile here.

  • Eric Selbin, professor of political science and University Scholar, moderated a panel on “Pedagogy of Revolution” that was part of a conference on “Illustrating Anarchy and Revolution: Mexican Legacies of Global Change” sponsored by the Center for Mexican American Studies at The University of Texas at Austin. Students Carly Dennis, Annie Emswiler and Kevin Lentz attended parts of the conference.

  • Alison Kafer, associate professor of feminist studies, gave a talk at UC San Diego Feb 5 titled “Un/Safe Disclosures: On Trauma, Tragedy, and Other Taboos.” The talk was sponsored by the English and Communication Studies departments as well as the LGBT Center. While at UCSD, she also met with Michael Davidson’s graduate seminar in cultural studies, which was reading her book Feminist, Queer, Crip (Indiana University Press, 2013) as one of their course texts. 

  • Traci Giuliano, professor of psychology, recently presented a poster titled “Strategies for writing effectively in a first-year seminar” at the National Institute for the Teaching of Psychology in Tampa, Fla.

  • Eric Selbin, professor of political science and University Scholar, gave a talk at Austin Community College’s Eastview Campus Feb. 5 titled “Spaces and Places of (Im)Possibility and Desire: Transversal Revolutionary Imaginaries” as part of the school’s series on revolution.

  • Barbara Owens, professor emeritus of computer science, has been invited to speak at the ACM Women’s Day program that is being held as part of the ACM India conference Feb. 13-15. The Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) is the world’s largest educational and scientific computing society for the computer science/IT community. ACM India was started in 2010 to increase the focus on the country. 

  • Shannon Mariotti, associate professor of political science, has an article in the edited volume A Political Companion to Herman Melville, which was recently published by the University Press of Kentucky. Her essay is titled “Melville and the Cadaverous Triumphs of Transcendentalism” and examines how Thoreau and Emerson influenced Melville’s writings, including his enigmatic short story “Bartleby, the Scrivener.”

January 2014

  • Michael Cooper, professor of music and holder of the Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts, published the first source-critical edition of Mendelssohn’s setting of Psalm 42 (Kassel: Bärenreiter, 2014). The Psalm is one of Mendelssohn’s most popular choral works, but Cooper’s is the first edition to attribute the English translation (which was prepared by the composer and a close friend) and to draw on the latest editorial techniques and findings of performance-practice research. The edition includes both the full choral/orchestral score and Mendelssohn’s own version for chorus with piano accompaniment. 

  • Melissa Byrnes, assistant professor of history, published an article titled “Liberating the Land or Absorbing a Community: Managing North African Migration and the Bidonvilles in Paris’s Banlieues” in the Winter 2013 special issue of French Politics, Culture & Society, “Algerian Legacies in Metropolitan France.”

  • Bob Bednar, associate professor of communication studies, presented a public lecture titled “Remembering Strangers: Roadside Shrines and Public Memory” on Jan.  29 as part of the Community Lifestyles Lecture Series at Querencia Barton Creek in Austin.

  • Edward Kain, professor of sociology and University Scholar, is leading a Jan. 24 webinar for the American Sociological Association on “MCAT Changes as Department Opportunity.” Representatives from more than 50 sociology departments from across the country are expected to participate in the webinar.

  • Patrick Hajovsky, assistant professor of art history, is giving at talk at the University of California at Berkeley Jan. 30 on “Tremors and Remedies: Images, Intercessions and Ritual Efficacy in Colonial Cuzco.” Read more here.

  • Fay Guarraci, professor of psychology, has had an article titled ““Sexy stimulants”: The interaction between psychomotor stimulants and sexual behavior in the female brain” accepted for publication in Pharmacology, Biochemistry and Behavior. The article was co-authored by 2010 graduate Jessica Bolton, who is now pursuing graduate studies in neuroscience at Duke University.

  • Reggie Byron, assistant professor of sociology, is the lead author on a co-authored article that was recently accepted for publication at Gender & Society, the leading scholarly journal in women’s studies. The article is titled “Relational Power, Legitimation, and Pregnancy Discrimination” and should appear in a 2014 volume of the journal.

  • Bob Bednar, associate professor of communication studies, had an article titled “Killing Memory: Roadside Memorial Removals and the Necropolitics of Affect” published in the winter 2013 issue of the journal Cultural Politics. The article is available here.

  • Barbara Anthony, assistant professor of computer science, had a paper on “Online bottleneck matching” published in the January 2014 issue of the Journal of Combinatorial Optimization. The paper was co-authored with Christine Chung from Connecticut College. 

  • Michael Saenger, associate professor of English, assisted in the translation of program notes from Russian to English to accompany Igor Kazakov’s ongoing production of “Hamlet” at the Mogilev Regional Puppet Theater in Belarus. The production has been a popular success, and won praise from critics

  • Reggie Byron, assistant professor of sociology, had a teaching exercise he developed titled “Teaching Tokenism with Occupational Sex Segregation Data” published in the American Sociological Association’s Teaching Resources and Innovations Library for Sociology. The exercise can be found here. Byron also has been appointed to a three-year term on the American Sociological Association’s Honors Program Advisory Panel. Serving on this panel will allow Byron to mentor some of the most exceptional undergraduate sociology majors from across the country.

  • Shana Bernstein, associate professor of history, chaired a panel on “Catholics, Racial Justice, and Reassessing Religion in the Long Civil Rights Movement,” at the American Historical Association conference in Washington, D.C., in early January.

  • In December, Tuba-Euphonium Press published an arrangement of “Salve Maria” created by Delaine Leonard, part-time instructor of applied music, and Eileen Meyer Russell, associate professor of music. The arrangement of Saverio Mercadante’s composition is set for harp and low brass (trombone or euphonium).  Fedson and Meyer Russell first performed the arrangement in recital at Southwestern, and the arrangement is recorded on their 2011 CD, Unique Conversations.

  • Lois Ferrari, professor of music, conducted the Austin Civic Orchestra in a Nov. 9 concert that featured a work by American composer Anthony Iannaccone called “Dancing on Vesuvius.” Iannaccone attended the concert and gave a pre-concert talk with Ferrari. Southwestern students Mattie Kotzur and Lena Wong are current members of the orchestra, along with Southwestern graduates Bob Brockett, Laura Gorman and Jennifer Coyle.

  • Abby Dings, associate professor of Spanish, presented two talks at the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages conference that was held in Orlando, Fla., in November. In “Learning about Spanish Oral Proficiency Evaluation: An Online Resource,” a joint presentation with colleagues from The University of Texas, the University of Iowa and Purdue University, she presented a project piloting a series of Open Badges for the Spanish Corpus Proficiency Level Training website. Her talk on “The Undergraduate Spanish Major Curriculum: Faculty, Alumni, and Student Perspectives,” which was co-presented with Tammy Jandrey Hertel of Lynchburg College, focused on the results of a nationwide survey of Spanish faculty members, current students and alumni.

  • Sergio Costola, associate professor of theatre, and Michael Saenger, associate professor of English, co-authored an essay titled “Shylock’s Venice and the Grammar of the Modern City,” that was accepted in a forthcoming collection of essays, Shakespeare and the Italian Renaissance: Appropriation, Transformation, Opposition, edited by Michele Marrapodi, to be published by Ashgate in late 2014 or early 2015. Their essay suggests that Shakespeare’s Merchant of Venice shows how Jews and other foreigners − such as John Florio, a contemporary of Shakespeare − were alienated in London, as well as in Venice.    

  • Barbara Anthony, assistant professor of computer science, presented a paper at the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Global Communications Conference in Atlanta, Ga., Dec. 12. The paper, titled “Data Plan Throttling: A Simple Consumer Choice Mechanism,” was co-authored with Christine Chung, assistant professor of computer science at Connecticut College, and published in the conference proceedings and IEEE Xplore.

December 2013

  • Thomas McClendon, professor of history, attended the annual meeting of the African Studies Association Nov. 21-24 in Baltimore. He presented a paper, co-authored with Professor Pamela Scully of Emory University,  on “South African Students and the U.S. Anti-Apartheid Movement in the 1980s: Activism and Opportunity,” as part of a panel on “Apartheid Migration and Anti-Apartheid Activism in Southern Africa.” He also served as discussant for a panel on “Scholars, Photographers and Chiefs: The Uses and Constructions of Zuluness.”

  • Valerie Renegar, associate professor of communication studies, presented a co-authored paper at the National Communication Association annual conference in Washington, D.C., in November. The paper, which was titled “Unmasking the Football Fraternity: A Burkean Analysis of the Penn State Sex Crimes,” was named one of the Top Four papers by the Kenneth Burke Society division of the conference.

  • Eric Selbin, professor of political science and University Scholar, gave a talk at Bielefeld University in Germany titled “Spaces and Places of (Im)Possibility and Desire: Transversal Revolutionary Imaginaries in the 20th Century Americas” and led a faculty/graduate student workshop on his work, “Local Stories−Global Impact? The Role of Stories and Imaginaries in Revolutions since the 19th Century.”

November 2013

  • Ben Pierce, professor of biology and holder of the Lillian Nelson Pratt Chair, recently received a $25,927 grant from the Williamson County Conservation Foundation for research on the ecology of the Georgetown salamander. Over the past four years, Pierce has received a total of $104,069 for his research on the Georgetown salamander.

  • Anwar Sounny-Slitine, instructor of environmental studies and GIS lab manager, co-authored an article titled “A new longitudinal approach to assess hydrologic connectivity: Embanked floodplain inundation along the lower Mississippi River” that was published in a recent issue of the journal Hydrological Processes. The article looked at hydrologic connectivity in the lower Mississippi floodplain. Sounny-Slitine and his colleagues utilized GIS and LiDAR to create hydrological models which estimated the longitudinal channel bank profile, enabling a detailed examination of embanked floodplain hydrologic connectivity. The results of the investigation shed new light on the topic of hydrologic connectivity for an important embanked fluvial system that has previously received little attention concerning its physical floodplain processes. Read more here.

  • Eric Selbin, professor of political science and University Scholar, reviewed Hal Brands’ book, Latin America’s Cold War, for the Bulletin of Latin American Research. Read the review here.

  • Patrick Hajovsky, assistant professor of art history, gave a lecture on “Moteuczoma’s Fame in Three Dimensions: Sign, Speech and Portrait in Tenochtitlan” at UT-Austin Nov. 13. Hajovsky is giving the same lecture at Southwestern Nov. 18 at noon in the Merzbach Room. Read more here. Hajovsky is the author of an upcoming book tentatively titled Moteuczoma, On the Lips of Others: Sculpture, Ritual and Fame in Tenochtitlan that will be published by UT Press.

  • Romi Burks, professor of biology, and Therese Shelton, associate professor of mathematics, had an article titled “Count Your Eggs Before They Invade: Identifying and Quantifying Egg Clutches of Two Invasive Apple Snail Species (Pomacea)” published in the online journal PLOS ONE. Former students Allyson Plantz and Colin Kylewere co-authors on the paper. Read the article here.

  • Shana Bernstein, associate professor of history, participated as an invited reviewer at the National Endowment for the Humanities’ Collections and References Resources Grant Program in Washington, D.C.

  • Feminist, Queer, Crip, the new book by Alison Kafer, associate professor of feminist studies, will be highlighted during this weekend’s National Women’s Studies Association conference in Cincinnati. Kafer’s work will be the focus of an “Authors Meet Critics” session, which is designed to bring authors of recent cutting-edge books deemed to be important contributions to the field of women’s studies together with discussants chosen to provide a variety of viewpoints. Read more here. Earlier this week, Kafer spoke about the book with Professor Matt Richardson’s graduate seminar on queer theory at UT-Austin. 

  • Patrick Hajovsky, assistant professor of art history, presented a paper titled “Moteuczoma-Tezcatlipoca-Xiuhtecuhtli: Invisibility and Visibility in Aztec Sculpture and Ritual,” at the 4th Annual South Central Conference on Mesoamerica, which was held at the University of Houston Nov. 1-3.

  • Erika Berroth, associate professor of German, participated in the 38th annual conference of the Coalition of Women in German (WIG) in Shawnee on Delaware, Pa., Oct. 24-27. Berroth led three professional development workshops, organized and moderated a panel on “Erlkönigs Töchter: Witches and Ghosts in German Literature and Film,” and collaborated in selecting the 2013 winner of the Women in German Dissertation Prize. She was appointed to chair the Dissertation Prize Committee in the coming year. The WIG membership also voted to sponsor Berroth’s proposal to organize and moderate a panel on “Eco-Pedagogy and Feminist Praxis in Modern Languages and Literatures” at the 2014 conference of the American Council for Teaching Foreign Languages  (ACTFL) and the American Association of Teachers of German (AATG) that will be held in San Antonio next November.

  • Three Music Department faculty members were featured at the College Music Society National Conference held in Cambridge, Mass., Oct. 30-Nov. 2. Jason Hoogerhyde, associate professor of music, had his piano trio, Canopy of Night, performed by the Trio Florida on one of the CMS New Music Concerts. Kiyoshi Tamagawa, professor of music, presented a paper titled “The Sing-It-Yourself Messiah: A Particular Kind of Community Engagement,” and Eileen Meyer Russell, associate professor of music, presented a paper titled “Civic Engagement and the Applied Music Studio.” 

October 2013

  • Eric Selbin, professor of political science and University Scholar, has been named a Research Fellow at the Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies at The University of Texas at Austin.

  • Valerie Renegar, associate professor of communications studies, authored an article titled “Critical/Cultural Scholarship and the Responsibility for Building Theory: Enduring Criticism Revisited” that appeared in a recent special issue of the Western Journal of Communication.

  • Alison Marr, associate professor of mathematics, co-authored an article titled “Minimal Pancyclic Graphs” that appeared in a recent issue of the Journal of Combinatorial Mathematics and Combinatorial Computing.

  • Josh Long, assistant professor of environmental studies, co-authored an article titled “Toward Sustainable Educational Travel” that appeared in a recent issue of the Journal of Sustainable Tourism. He also co-authored an article titled “A Broad Spectrum: Sustainability in Educational Travel” that appeared in a recent issue of theJournal of Sustainability in Higher Education.

  • Michael Kamen, associate professor of education, co-authored a chapter titled “Exploring Innovative Schools with Preservice Teachers,” which appears in The Routledge International Handbook of Innovation Education. Kamen wrote the chapter with Debbie Shepherd from the Meridian School in Round Rock.

  • Michael Cooper, professor of music and holder of the Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts, published hisHistorical Dictionary of Romantic Music with The Scarecrow Press.

  • Davi Thornton, associate professor of communication studies, had an essay titled “The Rhetoric of Civil Rights Photographs: James Meredith’s March Against Fear” published in the fall 2013 issue of the journal Rhetoric & Public Affairs.

More Faculty Notables

"Faculty Notables" are published each week, during the academic year, by the Office of Communications. You can read them in the weekly publication, In Focus.