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In Focus: 1/30/2014

A weekly newsletter published by the Communications Office

Georgetown 101

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Representatives from Georgetown’s business, civic, educational and nonprofit sectors came to Southwestern Jan. 23 for a forum on “Georgetown 101” that was sponsored by the Office of Civic Engagement. Participants included (l-r) District 6 City Council Member Rachel Jonrowe; Karen Sheldon, president of the Georgetown Chamber of Commerce; Dr. Tamarah Duperval-Brownlee, chief medical officer for the Lone Star Circle of Care; Leslie Janca, executive director of The Georgetown Project; and Joe Dan Lee, superintendent of the Georgetown Independent School District.

Top News

MAY TERM COURSES WILL GIVE STUDENTS AN OPPORTUNITY TO STUDY ROMAN ART AND LITERATURE IN ITALY

Art history professor Thomas Howe has been teaching Southwestern students about Greek and Roman art for years, but students taking his class on Hellenistic and Roman Republican Art this May will have a very different experience.

That’s because Howe will be teaching the class in Italy as part of a new partnership he has set up with the Vesuvian Institute of the Restoring Ancient Stabiae Foundation.

The institute’s facility in Stabiae on the Bay of Naples has classrooms, dorm rooms and dining facilities and is located near some of the most famous sites in the ancient world.

Howe’s class is one of two that will be offered in Stabiae over the May Term. Classics professors Hal and Pam Haskell will be teaching a class on Classical Literature in Context, which covers approximately the same time period as Howe’s art history class (second century B.C. through A.D. 100).

Howe said offering the courses in Italy will enable students to take advantage of the great museums and archaeological sites in the area. For example, he said many of the pieces of Roman art he talks about in his class are located at the National Archaeological Museum in Naples.

Read more here.

EDUCATION MAJORS HELP AN AUSTIN-BASED PROGRAM INTEREST GIRLS IN MATH AND SCIENCE

At 3:15 p.m., the hallways of Pickett Elementary School in Georgetown are almost empty. Most students have already boarded their buses or are waiting for their parents to pick them up.

But the science lab is anything but quiet. Shouts of “Girlstart! Girlstart! Girlstart!” can be heard from the main office. Those shouting are 25 4th and 5th grade girls, and one Southwestern University student, Lorin Froetschel.

Froetschel is an education major at Southwestern, and, as of last spring, a member of the STEM CREW (Creative, Resourceful, Empowered Women) for the Austin-based nonprofit Girlstart. STEM CREW members help Girlatart teach weekly free workshops at elementary schools across Texas. Froetschel was hired by GirlStart after fellow Southwestern education major Nancy Juarez recommended the program to her.

The relationship between pre-service teachers and Girlstart is mutually beneficial − college students gain teaching experience, and girls gain both a mentor and a role model.

Read more here.

Events

ART EXHIBIT OPENS FEB. 6

An exhibit titled “Reconceived Bodies (in Three Parts)” by Patricia Olynyk, director of the Graduate School of Art at Washington University in St. Louis, will open in the Fine Arts Gallery Feb. 6 and run through March 6. An opening reception for the exhibit will be held from 4:30-6 p.m. Feb. 6. The exhibit, which has been curated by Victoria Star Varner, professor of art at Southwestern, is being held in conjunction with Southwestern’s 36th annual Brown Symposium, which will be held Feb. 6-7.

Read more here.

2014 BROWN SYMPOSIUM WILL EXPLORE THE FUTURE OF HEALTH CARE IN THE UNITED STATES

Southwestern’s 36th annual Brown Symposium will be held Feb. 6-7 and is titled “Healing: The Art & Science of Medicine.”

Speakers at the symposium will  include Victoria Sweet, clinical professor of medicine at the University of California San Francisco School of Medicine and author of the bestselling book, God’s Hotel: A Doctor, a Hospital, and a Pilgrimage to the Heart of Medicine; Mauro Ferrari, president and CEO of The Methodist Hospital Research Institute in Houston and a leading authority on nanotechnology in medicine; Kevin Davies, author of The $1,000 Genome: The Revolution in DNA Sequencing and the New Era of Personalized Medicine; Anne West, a member of one of the first families to have their genomes sequenced; Peter Hotez, dean of the National School of Tropical Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine and author of the book Forgotten People, Forgotten Diseases: the Neglected Tropical Diseases and their Impact on Global Health and Development; and Jonathan Skinner, the James O. Freedman Presidential Professor of Economics at Dartmouth College and an expert on health care economics. Skinner will wrap up the symposium with a lecture on “The Future of Medicare.”

Read more here.

PERCUSSION GROUP TO GIVE FEB. 8 RECITAL

The percussion group line upon line will give a guest recital at Southwestern on Saturday, Feb. 8, at 7 p.m. in the Alma Thomas Theater. The program will include “A Man with a Gun Lives Here”by Steve Snowden,“several inflections”byBen Isaacs, and “Drumming, Part 1”and Music for Pieces of Wood”bySteve Reich.

Line upon line is an Austin-based trio that consists of Adam Bedell, Matthew Teodori and Cullen Faulk. To date, the ensemble has commissioned and premiered 10 new works for percussion with two more works scheduled to receive their first performance in early 2014.

Additional information about the group and the Feb. 8 recital is available here

OBSERVATORY TO HOST PUBLIC VIEWING NIGHT FEB. 8

The Fountainwood Observatory will host a public viewing night on Saturday, Feb. 8, from 8 to 10:30 p.m.

The viewing will begin with a waxing gibbous moon high in the southeast sky at sunset. Bright winter constellations will be seen overhead and Jupiter, in the constellation Gemini, will be well placed for viewing.

Viewing nights are free, but donations are encouraged to help maintain the observatory. The observatory is located on the northeast side of campus adjacent to the Rockwell Baseball Field (see #6 on the campus map at http://www.southwestern.edu/map). Faculty members from the Physics Department at Southwestern as well as observers from the Williamson County Astronomy Club will be on hand to guide viewing.

For weather-related updates about viewing nights, call the Fountainwood Observatory hotline at 512-863-1242.

FACULTY MEMBERS AND GUEST ARTIST TO GIVE RECITAL FEB. 10

The Sarofim School of Fine arts is sponsoring a faculty and guest jazz recital on Monday, Feb. 10, at 7 p.m. in the Alma Thomas Theater. The concert will feature David Guidi on saxophone, Norm Bergeron on percussion and Benjamin Irom on piano. The program will include four pieces by Guidi, as well as works by Ellis Marsalis, Christian McBride and Wayne Shorter. 

Guidi is on the faculty at Southwestern. Bergeron and Irom are on the faculty at Temple College in Temple.

The performance is free and open to the public. Additional information is available here.

Media Coverage

The Williamson County Sun did a preview of the Brown Symposium.

The Williamson County Sun covered the “Georgetown 101” forum that was held at Southwestern.

Notables

Bob Bednar, associate professor of communication studies, presented a public lecture titled “Remembering Strangers: Roadside Shrines and Public Memory” on Jan.  29 as part of the Community Lifestyles Lecture Series at Querencia Barton Creek in Austin.

Melissa Byrnes, assistant professor of history, published an article titled “Liberating the Land or Absorbing a Community: Managing North African Migration and the Bidonvilles in Paris’s Banlieues” in the Winter 2013 special issue of French Politics, Culture & Society, “Algerian Legacies in Metropolitan France.”

Michael Cooper, professor of music and holder of the Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts, published the first source-critical edition of Mendelssohn’s setting of Psalm 42 (Kassel: Bärenreiter, 2014). The Psalm is one of Mendelssohn’s most popular choral works, but Cooper’s is the first edition to attribute the English translation (which was prepared by the composer and a close friend) and to draw on the latest editorial techniques and findings of performance-practice research. The edition includes both the full choral/orchestral score and Mendelssohn’s own version for chorus with piano accompaniment.