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In Focus: 1/28/2011

A weekly newsletter published by the Communications Office

Top News

SOCIOLOGY PROFESSOR TRACES THE ORIGINS OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT

When people think of the civil rights movement, they usually think of individuals such as Rosa Parks or Martin Luther King, Jr.  

But this individualistic framing is not necessarily accurate, according to Southwestern University Sociology Professor Maria Lowe.  

“There were people who were ensconsed in networks that had been talking about integration for a long time beforehand,” Lowe says.  

Studying some of these networks that operated “under the national radar screen” has been the focus of Lowe’s research for the past 12 years. To date, Lowe has published four papers based on her research and has a file drawer full of materials for future papers.

Read more here.

Events

FLUTE PROFESSOR TO GIVE RECITAL JAN. 31

Flute professor Adrienne Inglis will give a faculty recital on Monday, Jan. 31, at 7 p.m. in the Caldwell-Carvey Foyer. She will be accompanied by pianist Kiyoshi Tamagawa and harpist Shana Norton.

The program will include “Sonatine” by Pierre Sancan, “Crazy Cat Lady” by B. Allen Schulz, Suite by Gaspar Sanz, and “Concierto para un gentilhombre” by Joaquín Rodrigo.

The concert is free and open to the public. For more information, call 512-863-1379.

INTERDISCIPLINARY ARTIST AND ACTIVIST TO SPEAK AT SOUTHWESTERN FEB. 1

Miranda Loud, a filmmaker and musician who uses the performing arts to encourage environmental stewardship, will give a public presentation and screening of several short films at Southwestern University on Tuesday, Feb. 1. Her presentation, titled “Saving Elephants - Saving Ourselves: The Power of the Arts to Affect Social Change,” will begin at 6 p.m. in room 110 of the F.W. Olin Building and will be followed by a question-and-answer session.

Loud has been passionate about reconnecting audiences with nature since 2005. In 2006 she founded the non-profit organization NatureStage, which combines multimedia with live performance as new way to reach audiences and motivate them to action.

Read more here.

EARLY MUSIC GROUP TO GIVE CONCERT AT SOUTHWESTERN FEB. 3

The Texas Early Music Project will give a concert at Southwestern on Thursday, Feb. 3, at 7 p.m. in the Lois Perkins Chapel.

The concert will include folk music from the heart of Europe, Baroque music influenced by folk music by Georg Philipp Telemann, and some pieces from the Texas folk tradition. The music will be performed on original instruments.

The concert is free and open to the public. For more information, call 512-863-1504 or visit the TEMP website at http://www.early-music.org.

AUTHORS TO SPEAK AT SOUTHWESTERN FEB. 5 FOR EVENT CELEBRATING J. FRANK DOBIE

Two noted authors will speak at Southwestern on Saturday, Feb. 5, as part of a celebration honoring one of the university’s most famous graduates – J. Frank Dobie.

The 2010-2011 academic year marks the 100th anniversary of J. Frank Dobie’s graduation from Southwestern. Southwestern will honor Dobie Feb. 5 by presenting lectures by Steven L. Davis, author of the 2009 book, J. Frank Dobie: A Liberated Mind, and Austin writer Sarah Bird. The lecture by Davis will begin at 9:30 a.m. in the atrium of Mood Hall and will be followed by a book signing. Bird’s lecture will begin at 11 a.m.

The events are being held as part of the university’s 2011 Charter Day celebration. Charter Day refers to the day that Southwestern University was granted its charter from the Texas Legislature on Feb. 6, 1875.

Read more here.  

AUSTIN CIVIC ORCHESTRA TO PERFORM AT SOUTHWESTERN FEB. 5  

The Austin Civic Orchestra will give its Winter Concert at Southwestern on Saturday, Feb. 5 at 7:30 p.m. in the Alma Thomas Theater. The program will include Sarasate’s “Carmen Fantaisie,” Wagner’s “Siegfried Idyll” and Sibelius’ Symphony No. 1 in E minor.

Tickets are $12 for adults, $10 for students and seniors, and $5 for children under 12. Admission is free for Southwestern students, faculty and staff.  For more information or to purchase tickets, visit www.austincivicorchestra.org.  

Notables

Oscar Aviles, Ursula James and Juan Juarez have been accepted into Teach for America. Aviles and Juarez will train at Rice University this summer then will teach in San Antonio for two years. Aviles will teach elementary school and Juarez will teach middle school. James will train at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles and then teach elementary school in Las Vegas.

Shannon Mariotti, assistant professor of political science, was invited to contribute the article on Henry David Thoreau for The Encyclopedia of Political Thought, a series forthcoming from Wiley-Blackwell in 2012. 

Sandi Nenga, assistant professor of sociology, and 2008 sociology graduate Lauren (Cox) Apgar had their coauthored article, “The Age of Love:  Dating and the Developmental Discourse in a Middle School Summer Camp,” accepted for publication in the next volume of Sociological Studies of Children and Youth.

Political Science Professor and University Scholar Eric Selbin’s book Revolution, Rebellion, Resistance: The Power of Story has been published in Germany as Gerücht und Revolution: Von der Macht des Weitererzählens by Wissenschaftlichen Buchgesellschaft.

Southwestern University’s Upward Bound Program was recently recognized for outstanding volunteerism by the Capital Area Food Bank of Texas. Fifteen students in the program volunteered at the food bank on MLK Day and helped process a combination of 4,490 pounds of food equaling 3,592 meals.