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In Focus: 1/14/2011

A weekly newsletter published by the Communications Office

Top News

BOOK PUBLISHED BY SOUTHWESTERN PROFESSOR DOCUMENTS HOW STUDENTS CHANGE WHEN THEY STUDY ABROAD

As a junior in college, Sarah Angulo spent a semester studying at a university in Toledo, Spain. She liked it there so much that she didn’t want to go home. Fortunately for her, the university where she was studying gave her a job for the summer so she could stay a few extra months.

In comparing notes with her college friends, Angulo found that all of them who studied abroad had the same kind of transformative experience. And a few years after graduation, her friends who didn’t study abroad wished they had.

When it came time to do research for her Ph.D. thesis, Angulo decided to combine her two loves – psychology and study abroad.

“I wanted to learn if the reports of change among students studying abroad were anecdotal or if they were the norm,” said Angulo, who has been teaching psychology at Southwestern since spring 2010.  “Everyone knows that students who study abroad have fun, but are they really changing and growing as people?”

Sure enough, her research found that change was the norm.

Read more here.

Events

SOUTHWESTERN TO HOST COMMUNITY DINNER FOR MLK DAY JAN. 17

Southwestern will host a community dinner to celebrate the life of Martin Luther King Jr. on Monday, Jan. 17, at 6 p.m. in the McCombs Ballrooms.

Featured speaker for the dinner will be Omi Osun Joni L. Jones, associate professor and director of the Warfield Center for African and African American Studies at The University of Texas at Austin. Music for the evening will be provided by Akina Adderley and Georgetown’s New Generation Voices of Praise.

The dinner is free for Southwestern students, faculty and staff. Members of the community may attend for $8 ($4 for children under 12). For reservations, call 512-863-1342 or write schiltp@southwestern.edu.  

Read more here.    

JAN. 18 LECTURE WILL FOCUS ON WOMEN IN ORCHESTRAS  

Lin Foulk, associate professor of music at Western Michigan University, will give a lecture titled “New Standards: Women in Orchestras in the 21st Century” on Tuesday, Jan. 18, at 7 p.m. in the Caldwell-Carvey Foyer.

Foulk teaches horn at Western Michigan and performs with the Western Brass Quintet and the Western Wind Quintet. She is especially interested in music with horn by female composers, and has performed and presented lectures on works by women and female performers at numerous festivals and universities across the United States. Her solo disc, “Four Elements: Works for Horn and Piano by Female Composers” was released in 2004.  

The event is free and open to the public. For more information, call 512-863-1504.  

TUBACOR TO PERFORM JAN. 19

TubaCOR, an ensemble formed to commission and perform works for horn and tuba,
will give a recital at Southwestern on Wednesday, Jan. 19, at 7 p.m. in the Alma Thomas Theater.

The group includes horn player Lin Foulk, associate professor of music at Western Michigan University, and tuba player Deanna Swoboda, assistant professor of music at Western Michigan University.

The Jan. 19 performance will include a piece by Elizabeth Raum for horn, tuba and piano titled “Color Code” that was recently commissioned and premiered by TubaCOR. Kiysoshi Tamagawa, professor of music at Southwestern, will accompany on piano.

The event is free and open to the public. For more information, call 512-863-1504.

JAN. 20 LECTURE WILL FOCUS ON THE MAN BEHIND AMERICA’S BEST-KNOWN PAINTING

Tripp Evans, professor of art history at Wheaton College, will give a lecture titled “Paint Like a Man: Gender and Disguise in the Work of Grant Wood” on Thursday, Jan. 20, at 5 p.m. in Olin 105. The lecture is part of the Sarofim School of Fine Arts Visiting Artists and Scholars Series, and is co-sponsored by American Studies, Art & Art History, Communication Studies, and Feminist Studies.

Evans is the author of the 2010 book Grant Wood: a Life. Woods is the man behind America’s best-known painting, “American Gothic.” In the book, Evans challenges the all-American persona Grant Wood so carefully cultivated, revealing instead the complex figure the public never saw.

The lecture is free and open to the public. For more information, call 512-863-1504.

Media Coverage

The Williamson County Sun ran a story about the death of former dean F. Burr Clifford and a story about the beginning of renovations to the Roy and Lillie Cullen Building.

Notables

Shana Bernstein, associate professor of history, published a book titled Bridges of Reform: Interracial Civil Rights Activism in Twentieth-Century Los Angeles (Oxford University Press, 2010).