Southwestern

Engaging Minds, Transforming Lives

Chemistry + Biochemistry

Curriculum

Below you will find a list of our current or recent offerings. See the course catalog for descriptions and updated information.

  • 51-001 SELECTED TOPICS
    May be repeated with change in topic.
  • 51-002 SELECTED TOPICS
    May be repeated with change in topic.
  • 51-003 SELECTED TOPICS
    May be repeated with change in topic.
  • 51-004 SELECTED TOPICS
    May be repeated with change in topic.
  • 51-054 CHEMISTRY APPRECIATION (2-2)
    A presentation of historic and modern theories and concepts of the nature of matter and bonding. Current problems dealing with synthetic and natural products and their pollutants will be discussed in light of their impact on society. Individual experiments and group demonstrations will be conducted in the laboratory. (NSL)
  • 51-064 CHEMISTRY OF THE ENVIRONMENT (2-2)
    This course provides an overview of basic chemical principles and their importance in understanding the complexities of our natural environment. In particular, the course will discuss fundamental chemical concepts such as equilibrium, solubility and acid-base chemistry and their application to environmental processes. Major topics that will be covered include atmospheric and aquatic chemistry, energy production and usage, and principles of toxicology. Also Environmental Studies 49-064. (NSL)
  • 51-141 GENERAL CHEMISTRY I WITH TUTORIAL LAB
  • 51-143 PRINCIPLES OF GENERAL CHEMISTRY WITH
    This course is recommended for first-year students who have Math SAT scores below 620. Three lectures a week plus one 1-hour tutorial. To be taken concurrently with Chemistry 51-151 (NSL)
  • 51-150 GENERAL CHEMSITRY I LAB
  • 51-151 CHEMICAL METHODS AND TECHNIQUES LAB (0-3
    This laboratory course will provide students an opportunity to learn and practice common laboratory techniques through self-directed laboratory experiments. To be taken concurrently with Chemistry 51-153 or 51-143. (NSL)
  • 51-153 PRINCIPLES OF GENERAL CHEMISTRY (3-0)
    This course will introduce students to fundamental chemical principles and concepts such as atomic structure, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, periodicity, solution chemistry, properties of gases and selected topics in descriptive chemistry. This course is recommended for students who have a Math SAT score of at least 620. To be taken concurrently with Chemistry 51-151 (NSL)
  • 51-160 GENERAL CHEMISTRY II LAB
  • 51-161 CHEMICAL KINETICS AND EQUILIBIRUM LAB
    Students will conduct labs to enhance their understanding of kinetics, thermodynamics, equilibrium concepts and other topics covered in lecture. Prerequisites: Chemistry 51-143/151 or 153/151. To be taken concurrently with Chemistry 51-163. (NSL)
  • 51-163 CHEMICAL KINETICS AND EQUILIBRIUM (3-0)
    This course will introduce topics such as thermodynamics, kinetics and equilibrium. Prerequisites: Chemistry 51-143/151 or 153/151. To be taken concurrently with Chemistry 51-161. (NSL)
  • 51-214 QUANTITATIVE METHODS OF ANALYSIS (3-4)
    This course focuses on the basic principles of analytical chemistry and how these principles apply to chemical problems. Topics of discussion include the use of statistical analysis in chemistry, calibration methods, chemical equilibria and a basic introduction to instrumental analysis. Prerequisite: Chemistry 51-163/161. (Spring) (NSL)
  • 51-301 SELECTED TOPICS
    May be repeated with change in topic.
  • 51-302 SELECTED TOPICS
    May be repeated with change in topic.
  • 51-303 SELECTED TOPICS
    May be repeated with change in topic.
  • 51-304 SELECTED TOPICS
  • 51-352 CHEMISTRY LITERATURE SEMINAR
  • 51-540 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY LECTURE RECITATION
  • 51-541 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I LAB (0-4)
    Students will be introduced to techniques used to perform experiments on the macroscale as well as the microscale level. Prerequisites: Chemistry 51-163/161. To be taken concurrently with Chemistry 51-543. (NSL)
  • 51-543 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I (3-0)
    This course is a study of the nature of bonding in carbon-containing molecules and their reactivity. Beginning with fundamental principles, emphasis will be placed on making connections between theory and application. Synthetic and mechanistic approaches will be introduced that lay the groundwork for Organic Chemistry II. Spectroscopic methods for structural determination of organic molecules will be discussed. Three hours per week, plus one hour recitation. Prerequisites: Chemistry 51-163/161. To be taken concurrently with Chemistry 51-541. (NSL)
  • 51-551 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II LAB
  • 51-553 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II
    This course is the continuation of CHE51-543. The primary focus will be on the reactions of functional groups: their mechanism and their use in complex synthesis. An introduction to biologically relevant classes of organic molecules as well as modern synthetic methods in organic chemistry will also be included. Three hours per week, plus one hour recitation. Prerequisite: Chemistry 51-543/541. To be taken concurrently with Chemistry 51-551 or 561. (NSL)
  • 51-561 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II LAB FOR MAJORS
  • 51-564 GENERAL BIOCHEMISTRY I FOR MAJORS
    The course focuses on the structure and functional interrelations of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids and nucleic acids in life processes. The laboratory portion of the course will provide experience in fundamental biochemical techniques. This lab is designed specifically for chemistry and biochemistry majors as well as those students interested in pursuing scientific research careers. Prerequisites: Chemistry 51-553/551 or 553/561. (NSL)
  • 51-574 GENERAL BIOCHEMISTRY I
  • 51-584 GENERAL BIOCHEMISTRY II (3-0)
    Bioenergetics and metabolism. Also Biology 50-584. Prerequisites: Chemistry 51-574 or 51-564.
  • 51-592 ADVANCED BIOCHEMISTRY LAB (0-4)
    Separation and quantification of biological molecules and their activities. Prerequisites: Chemistry 51-574. (NSL)
  • 51-604 PHARMACEUTICAL CHEMISTRY
    From neurotransmitters to antibiotics, small molecules play a key role in biological processes and human health. This course will explore the structure and function of these secondary metabolites from a chemical perspective. Emphasis will be places on industrial and bio-synthesis, mechanism of action, clinical applications, and cultural relevance of various classes of biologically relevant molecules (steroids, stimulants, analgesics, anti-virals) Prerequisites: Chemistry 51-553/551 or 553/561. (NS)
  • 51-614 ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY (3-4)
    This course discusses how microscopic properties of atoms and molecules can affect changes within the environment. The course work places emphasis on current environmental problems and concerns while the laboratory component introduces students to techniques used in environmental water, air and soil analysis. Also Environmental Studies 49-614. Prerequisites: Chemistry 51-543/541. (NSL)
  • 51-624 INTERMEDIATE INORGANIC CHEMISTRY (3-4)
    An introduction to the structure and reactivity of inorganic compounds. Descriptive chemistry of the elements including crystal structure, molecular structure, bonding, thermodynamic and redox properties, acid-base theories using periodic trends and theoretical models. Basic coordination chemistry and its biological applications will also be covered. Prerequisites: Chemistry 51-543/541. (NSL)
  • 51-634 METALS IN MEDICINE (3-4)
    Metal complexes are increasingly used as metallo-drugs and diagnostic agents. Beginning with fundamental principles, this course will explore the relevant bonding concepts applicable to metallo-drugs/diagnostic agents and their biological targets, the interactions between these metal complexes and various substances in biological systems, the basic pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of these drugs and agents including transport and cellular uptake, and the methods to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of these agents. Using case studies, the synthetic and structural aspects of specific drugs as well as their general properties and mechanism of action will be examined. The course will end with a brief introduction to and discussion of nanomedicine, an emerging area of application of nanotechnology to medicine. Prerequisite: Chemistry 51-543/541. (NSL)
  • 51-644 INSTRUMENTATION ENVIRO & BIOLOG ANALYSIS
    This course covers the basic principles and practical applications of instrumentation used to study the environment (i.e., water, air, and soil) as well as biological phenomena. Coursework places emphasis on fundamental techniques and the most recent advances in analytical instrumentation. In the laboratory, students will be engaged in a semester-long research project that will introduce them to the use of spectroscopic, chromatographic, and electrochemical instrumentation. Prerequisites: Chemistry 51-553/551 or 553/561. (NSL)
  • 51-654 ADVANCED INORGANIC CHEMISTRY (3-4)
    A further study of the structure of inorganic compounds including applications of symmetry to bonding and spectroscopy, and of synthesis and reactions of coordination, organometallic and bioinorganic complexes. The laboratory component of this course will utilize a variety of procedures for synthesis, purification and characterization of inorganic compounds to demonstrate the diversity of techniques used in the field. Some experiments will involve the use of original papers to better acquaint the student with the available literature. Prerequisite: Chemistry 51-624. (NSL)
  • 51-662 SPECIAL TOPICS IN INORGANIC CHEMISTRY
    Selected topics from bioinorganic or organometallic chemistry. Prerequisite: Chemistry 51-624. May be repeated with changed content. (NS)
  • 51-674 ADVANCED TOPICS IN ORGANIC CHEMISTRY
    This course deals with selected advanced topics in organic chemistry including modern methods of organic synthesis and the preparation of biologically interesting structures. The course will also include a laboratory module dealing with hands-on spectroscopic structure determinations of organic molecules. The course is primarily geared to students who are interested in obtaining postgraduate degrees in chemistry or biochemistry. Prerequisites: Chemistry 51-553/551 or 553/561. (Spring) (NSL)
  • 51-682 ADVANCED TOPICS IN BIOCHEMISTRY (2-0)
    Selected topics from the areas of physical biochemistry, enzymology and protein chemistry, nucleic acids chemistry, cellular regulation and recombinant DNA technology will be presented and discussed. Prerequisites: Chemistry 51-574. (NS)
  • 51-714 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY: THERMODYNAMICS AND
    This course focuses on the fundamental understanding and the quantitative description of chemical and biochemical processes. The course covers thermodynamics (whether processes occur) and kinetics (how fast processes occur) and includes an integrated laboratory that combines wet lab with computational exercises. Biochemistry majors and pre-engineering students are highly encouraged to take this course in their junior year. Prerequisites: Chemistry 51-163/161, Mathematics 52-254 and Physics 53-164. (NSL)
  • 51-724 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY: QUANTUM MECHANICS
    This course focuses on applied quantum mechanics (how individual molecules behave and interact with each other and light) and statistical mechanics (how collections of molecules behave) and includes an integrated laboratory that combines wet lab with computational exercises. Physics majors interested in chemical physics, and Mathematics/Computer Science students are highly encouraged to take this course. Prerequisites: Chemistry 51-163/161, Mathematics 52-254, and Physics 53-164. (NSL)
  • 51-732 ADVANCED PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY (2-0)
    Selected topics in computational chemistry, including electronic structure methods, molecular mechanics, molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations. The course is appropriate for chemistry majors interested in graduate research and for physics majors interested in chemical physics. Prerequisite: Chemistry 51-714 or 724. (NS)
  • 51-812 CHEM LIT RESEARCH CAPSTONE
  • 51-814 SENIOR SEMINAR CAPSTONE
  • 51-901 TUTORIAL
  • 51-902 TUTORIAL
  • 51-903 TUTORIAL
  • 51-904 TUTORIAL
  • 51-912 SENIOR RESEARCH CAPSTONE
    This course is intended for students who have completed a departmentally approved independent research project. Students will be required to write a scientific article describing their research and complete a presentation and oral examination. (NS) (WA)
  • 51-922 SENIOR LITERATURE SEMINAR CAPSTONE
    This course is intended for students who have not completed at least two credits of the Methods In Laboratory Research course (51-991). This writing-intensive course will involve an in-depth analysis and critical review of current research topics. Students will be required to write scientific papers, and give oral presentations. (NS) (WA)
  • 51-951 INDEPENDENT STUDY
  • 51-952 INDEPENDENT STUDY
  • 51-953 INDEPENDENT STUDY
  • 51-954 INDEPENDENT STUDY
    May be repeated with changed content.
  • 51-961 LABORATORY RESEARCH WITH DISTINCTION
    This course is for students who have distinguished themselves in all aspects of research and have made significant progress in their laboratory work undertaken with a faculty member in the department. Students will work with a faculty member to complete their on-going research project. For seniors only. Upon approval from the department. Converted to Methods in Laboratory Research (51-991,992, 993) at the discretion of the instructor on or before the last class day. Prerequisite: Chemistry 51-991, 992, or 993.
  • 51-962 LABORATORY RESEARCH WITH DISTINCTION
    This course is for students who have distinguished themselves in all aspects of research and have made significant progress in their laboratory work undertaken with a faculty member in the department. Students will work with a faculty member to complete their on-going research project. For seniors only. Upon approval from the department. Converted to Methods in Laboratory Research (51-991,992, 993) at the discretion of the instructor on or before the last class day. Prerequisite: Chemistry 51-991, 992, or 993.
  • 51-963 LABORATORY RESEARCH WITH DISTINCTION
    This course is for students who have distinguished themselves in all aspects of research and have made significant progress in their laboratory work undertaken with a faculty member in the department. Students will work with a faculty member to complete their on-going research project. For seniors only. Upon approval from the department. Converted to Methods in Laboratory Research (51-991,992, 993) at the discretion of the instructor on or before the last class day. Prerequisite: Chemistry 51-991, 992, or 993.
  • 51-981 HONORS
    By invitation only.
  • 51-982 HONORS
    By invitation only.
  • 51-983 HONORS
    By invitation only.
  • 51-984 HONORS
    By invitation only.
  • 51-991 METHODS IN LABORATORY RESEARCH
    May be repeated with changed content.
  • 51-992 METHODS IN LABORATORY RESEARCH
    May be repeated with changed content.
  • 51-993 METHODS IN LABORATORY RESEARCH
    May be repeated with changed content.