Art & Art History

Art History: Notables

Spring 2017

  • Thomas Howe, Professor of Art and Art History and Coordinator General of the Restoring Ancient Stabiae Foundation, has been accepted to present a paper “Bold Imitator: The Arrival of the Greek Monumental ‘Orders,’ the Autodidact Polymath Architect and the Apollonion of Syracuse” at the conference Fonte Aretusa  Πηγὴ Ἀρέθουσα, Third Interdisciplinary Symposium on the Heritage of Western Greece, with special emphasis on: Μίμησις – Μimēsis:  imitation, emulation, representation, reenactment, at the Sicily Center for International Education, Syracuse, Sicily, May 25-28, 2017.

  • On Friday, April 21, 2017, Thomas Howe, Professor of Art and Art History, and Chair of Art History, and Coordinator General of the Restoring Ancient Stabiae Foundation, has been invited to give a lecture “Strolling with Power: New Light on Movement and Viewing in the Elite Villas of Stabiae” at the conference: “Gasparow Readings: Literature and Politics in Classical Antiquity” organized jointly by Russian State University for the Humanities (RSUH) and by Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration (RANEPA), April 19-22, 2017 at the RANEPA premises in the south-west of Moscow. The lecture will be in English with Russian translation. 

  • Thomas Noble Howe, Professor of Art and Art History, and Coordinator General of the Restoring Ancient Stabiae Foundation, was invited to lecture on recent work on the Roman Villas of Stabiae, Italy, at the École Française d’Athènes on Monday Feb. 20, at 19:00. The lecture summarized the fieldwork since 2007, which has involved coordinating some thirty five institutions from over a dozen countries in work of major excavation, garden study, conservation and architectural recording. The lecture was part of the Kyklos series sponsored in part by the Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Institut für Klassische Archäologie - Winckelmann-Institut and Deutsches Archäologisches Institut, Athen. 

  • Assistant Professor of Art History Allison Miller gave an invited lecture titled “Beyond the Five Colors: Reconsidering Purple and Its Sources in Ancient China” at Columbia University in New York on Feb. 17. The lecture was part of the Early China Seminar Lecture Series, sponsored by the Tang Center for Early China, the Department for East Asian Languages and Cultures, and The Columbia University Seminars.

  • Thomas Howe, Professor of Art and Art History, and Chair of Art History and Coordinator General of the Restoring Ancient Stabiae Foundation, published an article “Stabiae: A Draught Sustainability Master Plan after the Model of Aerospace,” which was first presented at the conference XXXIII Giornata dell’Ambiente: Resilienza delle città d’arte ai terremoti/Enhancing the Resilience of Historic Sites to Earthquakes, Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei Roma, 3-4 Novembre, 2015, published in Atti dei Convegni, 306 (Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei, Roma, 2017) 205-222. The Lincei (“Lynxes”) is the oldest and possibly most prestigious scientific academy in Europe; Gallileo was a co-founder in 1602.

  • Thomas Howe gave a lecture to the Georgetown Women’s Club on recent work on the Stabiae project of Roma Villas near Pompeii Wed. Feb. 8, 1:30-2:45 in the Georgetown Public Library, Hewett Room. 

  • Thomas Noble Howe, Professor of Art and Art History, just published a commemorative review, “The Recovery of Metaphor and Precedent in Architecture,” of architect Robert Venturi’s Complexity and Contradiction in Architecture on the occasion of the fiftieth anniversary of its publication in 1966. [Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians, (75 no. 4, 2016) 493-494.] Howe was one of six authors invited nationally to consider the legacy of this book, which is arguably the most influential work on architectural theory in the second half of the twentieth century, and the opening shot of Post-Modernism generally. Howe’s review in part refers to his own experience with the hostile reception to historical reference during his experience at the Harvard Graduate School of Design in the early 1970’s when Venturi’s design was one of the few approaches moving in a different direction. Howe’s own program in Architectural Studies, introduced at Southwestern in 1985, was the first design program in the U.S. to include a studio in historical design as a regular part of the curriculum and continues to do so.

Fall 2016

  • Prof. Thomas Howe was invited to present the lecture: “Further Thoughts on the Arrival of the Greek Monumental Orders and the Autodidact Polymath Architekton” at the Conference: Ex Ionia Scientia; ‘Knowledge’ in Archaic Greece, Athens, National and Kapodistrian University, Dec. 11- 14, 2016. 

  • Prof. Thomas Howe published an invitational book chapter: “The Arrival of the Greek Monumental Orders and the Auto-didact Polymath Architect,” Festschrift for Manolis Korres, on the occasion of the retirement of the Parthenon Restoration architect, eds. B.K. Labrinoudakes, A. Ohnnesorg, A Simandonin-Bournia, K. Zampas, (Athens, Melissa Publishing House, 2016) 629-636.

  • Prof. Thomas Howe was invited to present a lecture on recent work at the site of Stabiae, “La Villa di Arianna a Stabia: nuove conoscenze”, with other contributions on work at Stabiae by Paolo Gardelli, Alexander Butyagin and Carmela Ariano, introductions by the Director the Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Napoli and the Superintendant of Pompei. Presented as part of the conference series Incontri con Archeologia, at the Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Napoli, in collaboration with the Soprintendenza Pompei, University of Maryland, Cornell University, Museo Statale Ermitage e Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, München, giovedì, 27. Ottobre, 2016, ore 16:00.

  • Prof. Thomas Howe was invited to present a lecture: “A Most Fragile Art Object: Interpreting and Presenting the Strolling Garden of the Villa Arianna, Stabia” at the conference Актуальные проблемы теории и истории искусства, 7th international research conference “Actual Problems of Theory and History of Art,” Saint Petersburg State University, Lomonosov Moscow State University and State Hermitage Museum, Saint Petersburg, Russia, October 11–15, 2016.

Spring 2016

  • Allison Miller, Assistant Professor of Art History, presented the paper, “Synthetic Purple in Early Han Royal Court Painting,” on a panel entitled, “Colors in East Asian Civilizations: Concept, Materiality, and Art,” at the Association for Asian Studies Annual Conference in Seattle, Washington on April 2, 2016.

  • Allison Miller, Assistant Professor of Art History, published the article, “Jade, Imperial Identity, and Sumptuary Reform in Jia Yi’s Xin Shu” in Dao: a Journal of Comparative Philosophy. 

  • Patrick Hajovsky, Associate Professor of Art History, presented “Moteuczoma’s Sculptures: Absence and Presence in Tenochtitlan” at the Association of Latin American Art Fourth Triennial Conference in San Francisco on March 19th.

  • Profs. Howe and Haskell and Instructor Sounny-Slitine participated in a seminar/workshop on adapting GIS technology for teaching and research August 8 and 9, at Trinity University, San Antonio. The workshop was funded by a joint grant from the Associated Colleges of the South. 

  • Prof. Howe revised a new draught of the Master Plan for the Stabiae site in August, 2016, summarizing work done on the site since 2001 by the RAS Foundation of which he is scientific director and the Soprintendenza Pompei, and outlining priority projects for the next ten years. 

  • Prof. Thomas Howe conducted the tenth field season of the Restoring Ancient Stabiae Foundation on the site of the Roman villas of Stabiae in June and July of 2016. Howe coordinated four field teams, two teams of conservators from the State Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg Russia, and the Warsaw Academy of Fine Arts, a field team of experts on ancient Roman gardens from Cornell University who experimented with innovative ways of getting pollen from ancient plaster, and a field team and field school from the University of Maryland doing digital recording of architecture for archaeology. Three SU students (Chris Hernandez, Sophia Anthony and Brenda Sanchez) participated in the architectural field team with partial support from the SU competitive faculty development fund. 

  • Prof. Thomas Howe presented a peer-reviewed/invited paper: “Strolling with Power: New Studies on Movement and Viewing from the Elite Roman Villas of Stabiae,” at the conference: Fonte Aretusa: Second Interdisciplinary Symposium on the Hellenic Heritage of Southern Italy with a special emphasis on “Politics and Performance in Western Greece”, Syracuse, Sicily, May 30-June 2, 2016. A version of the lecture was also  presented by invitation at the Hong Kong Club, Hong Kong, Sept. 3, 2016, and was presented at the Art History Working Papers/“Representations” lecture, in FAC 235 on the SU campus, 12:30, Sept 21, 2016. 

  • Prof. Thomas Howe published an article which was first given as an invitational conference lecture: “Creating a New Image of Antiquity in the 21st Century: The Archaeological Park at Stabiae near Pompeii,” Conference: Actual Problems of Theory and History of Art, State Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg University, Lomonosov Moscow State University,  St. Petersburg, Russia, at the State Hermitage Museum, October-1st November, 2014. Published in the Acts of the conference, co-authored with dott. Paolo Gardelli, Feb. 2016, 150-159.

Fall 2015

  • Thomas Howe was invited to present a paper Wed., Nov. 4, at the Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei (“Lynxes”) in the Villa Farnesina in Rome in the conference “Enhancing reliance of Historic Sites to Earthquakes.” His paper suggested developing an unorthodox method of global management of designing and executing geotechnical stabilization of the Stabiae site by studying the highly successful aerospace industry and the key element of the “prime contractor.” The Lincei is the oldest scientific academy in Europe and remains one of the most prestigious. Galileo spoke there in 1617. 

  • Allison Miller’s article, “Emperor Wen’s ‘Baling’ Mountain Tomb: Innovation in Political Rhetoric and Necropolis Design in Early China,” was published in Asia Major, an international journal of Chinese Studies.

  • Prof. Thomas Howe published an article that was first given as conference paper,  “Defining an Archaeological Park: The Restoring Ancient Stabiae Foundation Master Plan 2001 and Work Since 2007,”  at the 7th International Conference on contemporary problems of Architecture and Construction The fruition of the heritage: cultural value-based travel, routes and landscape. New uses and enhancement of monuments”, hosted by the Fondazione Romualdo di Bianco, “Life Beyond Tourism” Project, Florence, Italy, November 19-21, 2015. Publication: eds. S. Bertocci, P. Puma, Proceedings of the 7TH International Conference on Contemporary Problems of Architecture and Construction (Editrice La Scuola di Pitagora, Napoli) 2015, pp. 701-706.

  • Prof. Thomas Howe gave an invited lecture (in Italian), “Stabiae: A Draught Sustainability Master Plan after the Model of Aerospace,” Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei, XXXIII Giornata dell’Ambiente: Resilienza delle città d’arte ai terremoti/Enhancing the Resilience of Historic Sites to Earthquakes, 3-4 novembre, 2015. Publication is in press for the acts of the conference, Sept. 2016.  The Lincei (lit. “lynx-eyed”) is one of the oldest science academies in Europe and is housed in the Villa Farnesina, Rome. Galileo was inducted there in 1611. 

Spring 2015

  • Allison R. Miller, assistant professor of art history, gave an invited lecture on January 8th at Palacký University in Olomouc, Czech Republic. The talk was entitled, “A Retreat from Naturalism: Re-thinking the Terracotta Warriors of the Han” and was financed with funds from the European Social Fund and the Czech Ministry of Education.

Fall 2014

  • Dr. Patrick Hajovsky, Associate Professor of Art History, gave a lecture at St. Edward’s University on November 21, 2014. His topic was “The Aztec Calendar Stone: Layers of Meaning Then and Now”

     

  • Prof. Thomas Howe recently delivered the manuscript of an article which he was invited to contribute to the “Festschrift” (honorary volume) to be delivered upon the retirement of the long-serving restoration architect of the Parthenon in Athens Greece, Monolis Korres, who will be retiring in June 2016. In this article Howe returns to the original topic of his dissertation on the mysterious genius behind the sudden creation of Greek architecture c. 600 B.C. (The Invention of the Doric Order, Harvard Univ. diss. 1985). In the article he builds on recent scholarly work which argues that the first Greek philosophers (e.g. Thales and Anixamander of Miletus, c. 580-550 B.C.) were influenced by the architects of the bold, huge new temples such as the Heraion of Samos (pictured). From this Howe makes the bold argument the first real architects did not rise from the building professions, but were imposed on it from a class of men just like the first philosophers: self-taught “gentlemen” polymaths, who traveled to Egypt and were experienced in politics, war, applied geometry and work-crew management. This was the beginning of the first true “liberal arts” training (called “paideia”) for creative professionals. 

     

     

  • Prof. Thomas Howe on AIA national lecture tour for third year, lectured in Eugene, Portland, and Seattle. On Oct. 23 and 24 Prof. Howe gave lectures to the Archaeological Institute of America National Lecture Tour to the AIA Societies of Eugene and Portland Oregon. He again presented the results of recent excavations and studies on his site of the large Roman villas of Stabiae near Pompeii. 

     

  • Kimberly Smith gave a talk entitled “Maria Marc’s Letters” at the conference “Crossing Borders: Marianne Werefkin and the Cosmopolitan Women Artists in Her Circle.” This international conference took place on September 11-12, 2014 at the Paula Modersohn-Becker Museum in Bremen, Germany, and was held in cooperation with Jacobs University, Bremen. Maria Marc is little known even in German art history, and even less so in Anglo-American scholarship. Smith’s talk addressed Maria Marc’s writing, from letters to provenance notes, as a generative act that should be considered crucial to our understanding of Blaue Reiter Expressionism. For more information on the conference and its accompanying exhibition, see the museum’s website.

Spring 2014

  • Kimberly Smith gave an invited lecture at Southern Methodist University’s Meadows Museum on April 10, as part of the Alessandra Comini Lecture Series organized by the Department of Art History. Her talk was entitled “Learning to See: Franz Marc and Robert Delaunay”.

  • Allison Miller, Assistant Professor of Art History, presented a paper at the conference, Empire, Ethics, and Tradition: An International Conference on the Han Dynasty, held at the University of Pittsburgh from May 23-24. Her talk was entitled, “The Disappearing Armies of the Han: Royal Terracotta Warriors and Western Han Burial Culture.” The interdisciplinary conference featured nineteen presenters from universities in the US, Canada, Switzerland, China, and Australia. Click here to find out more.

  • Prof. Thomas Howe, coordinator general of the Restoring Ancient Stabiae Foundation in Italy, delivered the book length manuscript of the publication of one of the most important ancient Roman gardens ever found, that at the Villa Arianna of Stabiae. Howe assumed personal direction of the excavation from 2007 to 2010 and study afterward, and worked with over a dozen authors and specialists to produce a model interdisciplinary study of the first garden to provide archaeological proof of the kind of “fictive thicket” garden which has long been known through the famous garden fresco of the Villa of the Empress Livia at Prima Porta outside Rome (pictured). The volume will be published as a monograph in the Quaderni of the Rivista di Studi Pompeiani, both in Italian and English. 
  • Patrick Hajovsky, Assistant Professor of Art History, spoke at University of California, Berkeley, on January 30th. His talk was “Tremors and Remedies: Images, Intercessions and Ritual Efficacy in Colonial Cuzco” and centered around the colossal votive painting of the catastrophic 1650 Cuzco earthquake.

Fall 2013

  • Patrick Hajovsky, Assistant Professor of Art History, will speak at UT Austin on November 13th as part of The Mesoamerica Center Colloquium Series. His talk will be “Moteuczoma’s Fame in Three Dimensions: Sign, Speech and Portrait in Tenochtitlan”.

  • Patrick Hajovsky, Assistant Professor of Art History, spoke at the 4th Annual South-Central Conference on Mesoamerica, November 1-3, at the University of Houston. His talk was: “Moteuczoma- Tezcatlipoca- Xiuhtecuhtli: Invisibility and Visibility in Aztec Sculpture and Ritual”.

  • Thomas Howe, Professor of Art History, will speak at CyArk 500 Challenge, October 20-22 2013, at the Tower of London. He will speak on cultural heritage, around the topic The Benefits: Beyond Documentation.

Spring 2013

  • Kim Smith, professor of art history, gave an invited lecture on May 18, 2013 at a German Expressionism Symposium held by the Department of the History of Art and Architecture at the University of Oregon, in conjunction with an exhibition of Expressionist prints. Her talk was entitled “Primitivism and Perception in the Work of Franz Marc.” The event was organized by distinguished scholar Sherwin Simmons, and honored his retirement from the profession after forty years of important contributions to the field of German art history.

     

  • Thomas Howe, Professor of Art and Art History, presented a NITLE Shared Academics seminar, “The Synchronous International Classroom: New Directions for Cost Control of Foreign Study Programs”, Tuesday July 30, 2013.

  • Thomas Howe, Professor of Art and Art History, was invited to give a lecture on the innovative master plan which he developed for the Stabiae archaeological site in 2001 and whose executio has managed since then: I Beni Archeologici come motore del turismo: approccio progettuale del parco archeologico di Stabiae, venerdi, 12 luglio 2013, Ischia, Villa Arbusto; hosted by Associazione Premio Internazionale Ischia di Architettura.

  • Allison Miller, assistant professor of art history, gave an invited lecture at the San Antonio Museum of Art on April 16th entitled, “From Splendor to Revolt: Royal Intrigue and the Terracotta Works of Early Han China.” The talk focused on Han ceramic warrior figurines and was held in conjunction with the special exhibition, “Entombed Treasures: Funerary Art of Han Dynasty China.”

  • Thomas Howe, professor of art and art history, presented a new interpretation of the site of the ancient Roman villas he has been studying in Stabiae, Italy, at an international conference titled “Public and Private in the Roman House” held in Helsinki, Finland, April 18-20, 2013. Read more here.

  • Patrick Hajovsky, Assistant Professor of Art History, gave a talk for the Pan American Round Table of Austin on February 25th. He discussed his research on painting in Cusco and devotional imagery following its disastrous earthquake of 1650.

Fall 2012

  • Professor Thomas Howe, Professor of Art and Art History and Chair of Art History, and Coordinatore Generale of the Restoring Ancient Stabiae Foundation, was invited to serve on the editorial board of  FORMA CIVITATIS: International journal of urban and territorial morphological studies http://www.formacivitatis.com, Alessandro Camiz Ph.D., Universita di Roma, La Sapienza, editor. He was also invited to serve on the Advisory Board of the National Institute for Technology in Liberal Arts, 2013-15. Conference Paper: “The Excavations in the Garden of the Villa Arianna at Stabiae,” Invitational conference: Approaches to Ancient Roman Luxury Villas: Oplontis and Beyond,” (Organizer John Clarke), University of Texas, April 1-2, 2011.    

  • Thomas Howe, Professor of Art and Art History and Chair of Art History, and Coordinatore Generale of the Restoring Ancient Stabiae Foundation, delivered a book chapter: “The Architectural Evolution of the Villas of Stabiae, c. 80 B.C.-A.D. 79.” The paper was originally presented at the conference: Paradigm and Progeny: Roman Imperial Architecture and Its Legacy, Conference in Honor of William L. MacDonald, at The American Academy in Rome, Dec. 6-7, 2011 and is in press with the publication of the acts of the conference, eds. F.Yegül, D.Favro.

  • Thomas Howe, Professor of Art and Art History and Chair of Art History, and Coordinatore Generale of the Restoring Ancient Stabiae Foundation, contributed a chapter A Companion to Greek Architecture, ed. Margaret M. Miles, U.C. Irvine, for Wiley-Blackwell publishers. The article, “Hellenistic Architecture in Italy: Consuetudo Italica,” is general summary of architectural development in the last two centuries of the Roman Republic (c. 201-30 B.C.), when Romans entered the cosmopolitan, pan-Mediterranean culture of the Hellenistic world, and rapidly acquired and assimilated numerous features of Greek architecture.

  • Thomas Howe, Professor of Art and Art History and Chair of Art History, and Coordinatore Generale of the Restoring Ancient Stabiae Foundation, has the general article on all Vesuvian archaeology (“Pompeii, Herculaneum and the Vesuvian Area,”) to the Oxford Encyclopedia of Archaeology and the Bible, ed. Daniel Master (Wheaton Coll.). The article is a general introduction to the major Vesuvian sites based on recent scholarly work and includes sections on the controversies over history of urban development, political system, status of women and slaves, and developments in religion in the first centuries B.C. and A.D.

  • Allison Miller, assistant professor of art history, presented the paper, “Architecture in Archaeology: the Logic of Spatial Design in Elite Tombs of the Early Chinese Empire,” at the Society for East Asian Archaeology Fifth Worldwide Conference in Fukuoka, Japan in June 2012. The thumbnail is an image of the Yoshinogari site (吉野ヶ里), a Yayoi period settlement site that Dr. Miller visited with an international group of archaeologists.

  • Patrick Hajovsky, assistant professor of art history, presented a paper on October 12th at the Université de Toulouse - Le Mirail for a group of scholars of Spanish America about local memory and competing miraculous images in Cusco, Peru that were responsible for intervening in earthquakes. One was Our Lady of the Remedies, which was favored among Spanish magistrates in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. The other was Our Lord of the Earthquakes, which has since and to this day been preferred.

  • Kimberly Smith, professor of art history, gave an invited lecture at the San Diego Museum of Art on September 15, at a symposium held in conjunction with the SDMA’s “Human Beast” exhibition of Expressionist art. In her talk, “Franz Marc’s Abstractions: How To See Like An Animal”, Smith took a small piece in the exhibition by Marc entitled “Colored Flowers” as a starting point for considering the shift in style that occurs in the artist’s later work. Marc is best known for his lyrical paintings of animals, yet the little picture in the SDMA exhibition not only does not appear to represent animals, it is noticeably more abstract than much of his earlier and better known paintings. Prof. Smith proposed that Marc’s more abstract style represents a re-thinking of the possibilities of animal painting based on cognitive theories of divided perception.

  • Patrick Hajovsky, Assistant Professor of Art History, has published a chapter entitled “Without a Face: Voicing Moctezuma II’s Image at Chapultepec Park, Mexico City” in the book Seeing Across Cultures in the Early Modern World, Ashgate Press, June 2012.

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